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Encyclopedia > Hugh Dalton
Rt. Hon. Edward Hugh John Neale Dalton
Baron Dalton

In office
27 July 1945 – 13 November 1947
Prime Minister Clement Attlee
Preceded by John Anderson
Succeeded by Stafford Cripps

Born 26 August 1887
Neath, Wales
Died 13 February 1962
Political party Labour

Edward Hugh John Neale Dalton, Baron Dalton PC , generally known as Hugh Dalton (26 August 188713 February 1962) was a British Labour Party politician, and Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1945 to 1947. He was implicated in a political scandal involving budget leaks. The Right Honourable (abbreviated Rt Hon, The Rt Hon, The Right Hon, Right Hon) is an honorific prefix that is traditionally applied to certain people in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the Anglophone Caribbean and in other Commonwealth Realms, and elsewhere. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, PC (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland from 1945 to 1951. ... John Anderson, 1st Viscount Waverley of Westdean (8 July 1882 – 4 January 1958) was a British statesman. ... Sir Richard Stafford Cripps, known as Stafford Cripps, (April 24, 1889 - April 21, 1952) was a British Labour politician and Chancellor of the Exchequer for several years following World War II. // Cripps was born in London. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Image:Neatharms. ... This article is about the country. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Labour Party is a centre-left or social democratic political party in Britain (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of British political scandals, real or alleged: 1700s South Sea Bubble (1720) 1910s Marconi scandal of insider trading by Rufus Isaacs and others (1912) 1920s Zinoviev Letter (1924) 1930s Jimmy Thomas budget leak (1936) 1940s Hugh Dalton budget leak (1947) John Belcher corruptly influenced - led to...


He was born in Neath in Wales: his father, Canon John Neale Dalton was chaplain to Queen Victoria and tutor to the future King George V of the United Kingdom. Hugh was educated at Eton College, where he was head of his house but was disappointed not to be elected to "Pop". After leaving school he went up to King's College, Cambridge, where his socialist views earned him three defeats for the Secretaryship of the Cambridge Union (the only office generally then contested) and then the London School of Economics and the Middle Temple. During World War I, he served as a lieutenant on the French and Italian Fronts; he later wrote a memoir of the war called "With British Guns in Italy". He then returned to the LSE and the University of London as a lecturer. Image:Neatharms. ... This article is about the country. ... Canon John Neale Dalton (September 24, 1839 - 1931) was a chaplain to Queen Victoria and tutor to King George V of the United Kingdom. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, Berkshire, near Windsor in England, situated north of Windsor... Full name The King’s College of Our Lady and St Nicholas in Cambridge Motto Veritas et Utilitas Truth and usefulness Named after Henry VI Previous names - Established 1441 Sister College(s) New College, Oxford Provost Prof. ... Mascot Beaver Affiliations University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Golden Triangle Website http://www. ... Part of Middle Temple c. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The University of London is a university based primarily in London. ...


Political career

Dalton stood unsuccessfully for Parliament four times: at the Cambridge by-election, 1922, in Maidstone at the 1922 general election, in Cardiff East at the 1923 general election, and the Holland with Boston by-election, 1924, before entering Parliament for Peckham at the 1924 general election. Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons The Right Honourable Michael Martin MP Lord Speaker Hélène Hayman, Baroness Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups (as of May 5, 2005 elections) Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats... The Cambridge by-election, 1922 was a by-election held on 16th March 1922 for the British House of Commons constituency of Cambridge. ... Maidstone and The Weald is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The UK general election of 1922 was held on 15th November 1922. ... Cardiff East was a parliamentary constituency in Cardiff which returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1918 until it was abolished for the 1950 general election. ... The UK general election of 1923 was held on 5th December 1923. ... The Holland with Boston by-election, 1924 was a by-election held on 31st July 1924 for the British House of Commons constituency of Holland with Boston in Lincolnshire. ... Camberwell and Peckham is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The 1924 UK general election was held on 29th October 1924. ...


At the 1929 general election, he was finally elected to the British House of Commons as Labour MP for Bishop Auckland in 1929 and became a junior Foreign Office minister in the second Labour Government. As with most other Labour MPs, he lost his seat in 1931, though he was re-elected in 1935. During the World War II coalition, Winston Churchill appointed him Minister of Economic Warfare from 1940 and he established the Special Operations Executive, and was later a member of the executive committee of the Political Warfare Executive. He became President of the Board of Trade in 1942; the future Labour leader Hugh Gaitskell, drafted into the Civil Service during the war, was his Principal Private Secretary. The 1929 UK general election was held on 30th May 1929, and resulted in a hung parliament. ... Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups... Bishop Auckland is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for promoting the interests of the United Kingdom abroad. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC (Can) (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. ... The Minister of Economic Warfare was a British government position which existed during the Second World War. ... The Special Operations Executive (SOE), sometimes referred to as the Baker Street Irregulars after Sherlock Holmess fictional group of spies, was a World War II organization initiated by Winston Churchill and Hugh Dalton in July 1940 as a mechanism for conducting warfare by means other than direct military engagement. ... During World War II, the Political Warfare Executive (PWE) was a British clandestine body created to produce and disseminate both white and black propaganda, with the aim of damaging enemy morale. ... The President of the Board of Trade the title of a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ... Hugh Todd Naylor Gaitskell (April 9, 1906 – January 18, 1963) was a British politician, leader of the Labour Party from 1955 until his death in 1963. ...


Although a Labour politician Dalton was a strong supporter of Churchill during the crisis of May, 1940, when Lord Halifax and other Conservative supporters of appeasement in the war cabinet urged a compromise peace. Cover of Time Magazine April 12, 1926 Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax, known as Lord Irwin from 1926 until 1934, (1881-1959) was a British Conservative politician. ... Appeasement is a policy of accepting the imposed conditions of an aggressor in lieu of armed resistance, usually at the sacrifice of principles. ... A War Cabinet is committee formed by a government in time of war. ...


After the Labour victory in the 1945 general election, Dalton had been expected to become Foreign Secretary, but instead the job was given to Ernest Bevin. Dalton became Chancellor of the Exchequer and nationalised the Bank of England in 1946. Alongside Clement Attlee, Ernest Bevin, Herbert Morrison and Stafford Cripps Dalton was initially seen as one of the "Big Five" of the Labour Government. Clement Attlee Winston Churchill The United Kingdom General Election of 1945 held on 5 July 1945 but not counted and declared until 26 July 1945 (due to the time it took to transport the votes of those serving overseas) was one of the most significant general elections of the 20th... Ernest Bevin (9 March 1881 - 14 April 1951) was a British labour leader, politician, and statesman best known for his time as Minister of Labour in the war-time coalition government, and as Foreign Secretary in the post-war Labour government. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... Headquarters Coordinates , , Governor Mervyn King Central Bank of United Kingdom Currency Pound Sterling ISO 4217 Code GBP Base borrowing rate 5. ... Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, PC (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland from 1945 to 1951. ... Ernest Bevin (9 March 1881 - 14 April 1951) was a British labour leader, politician, and statesman best known for his time as Minister of Labour in the war-time coalition government, and as Foreign Secretary in the post-war Labour government. ... Herbert Morrison For others named Herbert Morrison, see Herbert Morrison (disambiguation). ... Sir Richard Stafford Cripps, known as Stafford Cripps, (April 24, 1889 - April 21, 1952) was a British Labour politician and Chancellor of the Exchequer for several years following World War II. // Cripps was born in London. ...


During this time Britain, whose overseas investments had been sold to pay for the war (thus losing Britain their income), was suffering severe balance of payments problems to pay for the the effort of maintaining a global military presence. The American loan negotiated by John Maynard Keynes in 1946 was soon exhausted, and by 1947 rationing had to be tightened and the convertibility of the pound suspended. In the atmosphere of crisis Herbert Morrison and Stafford Cripps intrigued to replace Clement Attlee with Ernest Bevin as Prime Minister; Bevin refused to play along and Attlee bought off Cripps by giving him Morrison's responsibilities for economic planning. Ironically, of the "Big Five" it was to be Dalton who ultimately fell victim to the events of that year. John Maynard Keynes, 1st Baron Keynes, CB (pronounced cains, IPA ) (5 June 1883 – 21 April 1946) was a British economist whose ideas, called Keynesian economics, had a major impact on modern economic and political theory as well as on many governments fiscal policies. ... Herbert Morrison For others named Herbert Morrison, see Herbert Morrison (disambiguation). ... Sir Richard Stafford Cripps, known as Stafford Cripps, (April 24, 1889 - April 21, 1952) was a British Labour politician and Chancellor of the Exchequer for several years following World War II. // Cripps was born in London. ... Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, PC (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland from 1945 to 1951. ... Ernest Bevin (9 March 1881 - 14 April 1951) was a British labour leader, politician, and statesman best known for his time as Minister of Labour in the war-time coalition government, and as Foreign Secretary in the post-war Labour government. ...


Dalton was under great strain, suffering psychosomatic boils. Walking into the House of Commons to give the autumn 1947 Budget speech, he made an off-the-cuff remark to a journalist, telling him of some of the tax changes in the budget, which was printed in the early edition of the evening papers before he had completed his speech, and whilst the stock market was still open. This led to his resignation for leaking a Budget secret; he was succeeded by Stafford Cripps. Dalton was further implicated in the allegations that led to the Lynskey tribunal in 1948 but was exonerated. Sir Richard Stafford Cripps, known as Stafford Cripps, (April 24, 1889 - April 21, 1952) was a British Labour politician and Chancellor of the Exchequer for several years following World War II. // Cripps was born in London. ... The Lynskey tribunal was a 1948 UK enquiry into allegations of corruption among government ministers and civil servants. ...


In 1948 he returned to the Cabinet as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, then became Minister of Town and Country Planning in 1950, renamed as Minister of Local Government and Planning in 1951. He still had the ear of the Prime Minister, and enjoyed promoting the careers of younger men, but was no longer a major political player as he had been until 1947. He left government after the 1951 General Election. The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ...


He was also president of the Ramblers' Association from 1948 to 1950 and Master of the Drapers' Company in 1958-59. He was made a life peer as Baron Dalton, of Forest and Friton in the County Palatine of Durham in 1960. The Ramblers Association is the largest organisation in the British Isles to look after the interests of walkers (or ramblers) in Britain. ... Arms of the Drapers Company The Worshipful Company of Drapers is one of the Livery Companies of the City of London; it has the formal name of The Master and Wardens and Brethren and Sisters of the Guild or Fraternity of the Blessed Mary the Virgin of the Mystery of... In the United Kingdom, Life Peers are appointed members of the Peerage whose titles may not be inherited (those whose titles are inheritable are known as hereditary peers). ... Durham (IPA: locally, in RP) is a small city and main settlement of the City of Durham district of County Durham in North East England. ...


Dalton had a daughter who died in infancy in the early 1920s, but his biographer Ben Pimlott leaves little doubt that Dalton was a repressed homosexual. As a young man he was close to the poet Rupert Brooke, who died of disease during the Gallipoli campaign. In later years he acted as a mentor to various handsome young men (most of them heterosexual) in the Labour Party, including Anthony Crosland, whom he talent-spotted at the Oxford Union in 1946 and whose selection for a winnable seat for the 1950 General Election he helped to arrange, and James Callaghan. A statue of Rupert Brooke in Rugby Rupert Chawner Brooke (August 3, 1887 – April 23, 1915) was an English poet known for his idealistic War Sonnets written during the First World War (especially The Soldier), as well as for his poetry written outside of war, especially The Old Vicarage, Grantchester... Charles Anthony Raven Crosland (29 August 1918 - 19 February 1977) was a member of the Labour Party and an important socialist theorist. ... Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ...


His papers, including his diaries, are held at the London School of Economics.


References

  • Craig, F. W. S. [1969] (1983). British parliamentary election results 1918-1949, 3rd edition, Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. ISBN 0-900178-06-X. 

Frederick Walter Scott Craig (1929 - March 23, 1989) was a British psephologist and compiler of reference books. ...

External links

Parliament of the United Kingdom (1801–present)
Preceded by
Collingwood James Hughes
Member of Parliament for Peckham
19241929
Succeeded by
John Beckett
Preceded by
Ruth Dalton
Member of Parliament for Bishop Auckland
1929–1931
Succeeded by
Aaron Charlton Curry
Preceded by
Aaron Charlton Curry
Member of Parliament for Bishop Auckland
1935–1959
Succeeded by
James Boyden
Political offices
Preceded by
Godfrey Locker-Lampson
Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs
1929–1931
Succeeded by
Anthony Eden
Preceded by
Jennie Adamson
Chair of the Labour Party
1936–1937
Succeeded by
George Dallas
Preceded by
John Llewellin
President of the Board of Trade
1942–1945
Succeeded by
Oliver Lyttelton
Preceded by
Sir John Anderson
Chancellor of the Exchequer
1945–1947
Succeeded by
Sir Stafford Cripps
Preceded by
The Lord Pakenham
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
1948–1950
Succeeded by
The Viscount Alexander of Hillsborough

  Results from FactBites:
 
Hugh Dalton - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (435 words)
Edward Hugh John Neale Dalton, Baron Dalton, generally known as Hugh Dalton (1887-1962) was a British Labour Party politician, and Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1945 to 1947.
Hugh was educated at Eton College, King's College, Cambridge, the London School of Economics and the Middle Temple.
Although a Labour politician Dalton was a strong supporter of Churchill during the crisis of May 1940, when Lord Halifax and other Conservative supporters of appeasement in the war cabinet urged a compromise peace.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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