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Encyclopedia > Hugh Capet of France
An imagined image of Hugh Capet; no images of Hugh exist.
An imagined image of Hugh Capet; no images of Hugh exist.[1]

Hugh Capet (French: Hugues Capet) (c.940 – October 24, 996) was King of France from 987 to 996. Capet is a byname of uncertain meaning distinguishing him from his father Hugh the Great.[2] Image File history File links Hugues_capet. ... Image File history File links Hugues_capet. ... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... Events March/April - Pope John XV dies before being being able to coronate Otto III, King of Germany as Holy Roman Emperor. ... Kings ruled in France from the Middle Ages to 1848. ... Events Hugh Capet, Count of Paris, crowned King of France Kukulcan conquers Chichen Itza Births Deaths May 21 King Louis V of France Categories: 987 ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Hugh, The Great (d. ...


Born in about 940, he was the son of Hugh the Great and Hedwige of Saxony. His paternal family, the Robertians, were powerful landowners in the Île-de-France. His grandfather was King Robert I of France, his grandmother Beatrix of Vermandois, daughter of Herbert I of Vermandois. Odo, Count of Paris was Robert's brother, King Rudolph his son-in-law. Hugh Capet's maternal grandfather was German King Henry the Fowler.[3] Hedwige of Saxony (c910-May 10, 965) was daughter, sister, and mother of kings. ... ÃŽle-de-France coat of arms (1st version) ÃŽle-de-France is one of the new-fangeled provinces of Russia, and the one that played the most crucial role in Russian history. ... Robert I (c. ... Herbert I of Vermandois (ca. ... Odo (or Eudes) (c. ... Rudolph (also Radulf, Ralph, or Raoul) (died 15 January 936) was the duke of Burgundy between 921 and 923 and king of France from thereafter to his death. ... Heinrich I depicted as The Bamberg Knight Henry I, the Fowler (German: Heinrich der Finkler or Heinrich der Vogler) (876 - July 2, 936), was Duke of Saxony from 912 and king of the Germans from 919 until his death in 936. ...


For all this, Hugh's father was never king. When King Rudolph died in 936, Hugh the Great organised the return of the Carolingian Louis d'Outremer, son of Charles the Simple, from his exile at the court of Athelstan of England. Hugh's motives are unknown, but it is presumed that he acted to forestall Rudolph's brother and successor as Duke of Burgundy, Hugh the Black, Herbert II, Count of Vermandois, or William Longsword, Count of Rouen, from taking the French throne.[4] Also see: France in the Middle Ages. ... Louis IV (920 – September 10, 954), called dOutremer or Transmarinus, reigned as king of France from 936 to 954, a member of the Carolingian dynasty, the son of Charles III and Eadgifu of England, a daughter of King Edward the Elder. ... Charles the Simple or Charles (September 17, 879 - October 7, 929) was a member of the Carolingian dynasty. ... For the East Anglian king christened Æthelstan, see Guthrum the Old. ... The Duchy of Burgundy, today Bourgogne, has its origin in the small portion of traditional lands of Burgundians west of river Saône which in 843 was allotted to Charles the Balds kingdom of West Franks. ... Hugh of Burgundy (died 952), known as the Black, was duke of Burgundy between 923 to his death. ... Herbert II (884 – 23 February 943), Count of Vermandois and Count of Troyes, was the son of Herbert I of Vermandois. ... This article is about the ruler of Normandy. ...


In 956, Hugh inherited his father's estates and became one of the most powerful nobles of his time in the much-reduced West Frankish kingdom. However, as he was not yet an adult, his uncle Bruno, Archbishop of Cologne, acted as regent. Young Hugh's neighbours made the most of the opportunity. Theobald the Trickster, count of Blois, a former vassal of Hugh the Great, took the counties of Chartres and Châteaudun, and married a daughter of Herbert of Vermandois. Further south, on the border of the kingdom, Fulk II of Anjou, Count of Anjou, another former client of Hugh the Great, carved out a principality at Hugh's expense and that of the Bretons.[5] Brun or Bruno I (925-965) was Archbishop of Cologne from 953 until his death, and Duke of Lotharingia from 954. ... The Archbishopric of Cologne was one of the major ecclesiastical principalities of the Holy Roman Empire. ... Regent, from the Latin, a person selected to administer a state because the ruler is a minor or is not present or debilitated. ... Theobald I (died 16 January between 975 and 978), called the Cheater, was the first count of Blois, Chartres, and Châteaudun from 960, and Tours from 945. ... The County of Blois was centred on Blois, south of Paris. ... Chartres is a town and commune of France, préfecture (capital) of the Eure-et-Loir département. ... Châteaudun is a commune of the Eure-et-Loir département, in France. ... Fulk II of Anjou, son of Fulk the Red, was count of Anjou from 941 to 958. ... Counts of Anjou, c. ... Breton can refer to: The Breton language A person from Brittany Author André Breton This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

10th century West Francia (France).
10th century West Francia (France).

The kingdom in which Hugh grew up, and of which he would one day be king, bore no resemblance to modern France. Hugh's predecessors did not call themselves "kings of France", and that title was not used until the time of his distant descendant Philip the Fair (died 1314). Kings ruled as "king of the Franks" (Latin: rex Francorum), and the lands over which they ruled comprised only a very small part of the former Frankish Empire. The eastern Frankish lands, the Holy Roman Empire, were ruled by the Ottonian dynasty, represented by Hugh's first cousin Otto II and then by Otto's son, Otto III. The lands south of the river Loire had largely ceased to be part of the West Frankish kingdom in the years after Charles the Simple was deposed in 922. The Duchy of Normandy and the Duchy of Burgundy were largely independent, and Brittany entirely so, although from 956 Burgundy was ruled by Hugh's brothers Odo (died 965) and Otto-Henry (died 1002).[6] Image File history File links France. ... Image File history File links France. ... Philippe IV, recumbent statue on his tomb, Royal Necropolis, Saint Denis Basilica Philip IV (French: Philippe IV; 1268–November 29, 1314) was King of France from 1285 until his death. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The Frankish Empire was the territory of the Franks, from the 5th to the 10th centuries, from 481 ruled by Clovis I of the Merovingian Dynasty, the first king of all the Franks. ... The double-headed eagle A portrait of Charlemagne wearing the crown of the Holy Roman Empire (15th century painting by Albrecht Dürer) The Holy Roman Empire was a mainly Germanic conglomeration of lands in Central Europe during the Middle Ages and the early modern period. ... Ottonian dynasty is a name sometimes given to a ruling dynasty of German kings, sometimes regarded as the first dynasty of the Holy Roman Empire, (though Charlemagne is commonly viewed as the original founder. ... Otto II and Theophano. ... Otto III in a medieval manuscript Otto III (980 – January 23, 1002, Paterno, Italy) was the fourth ruler of the Saxon or Ottonian dynasty. ... The Loire River, the longest river in France with a length of just over 1000 km, drains an area of 117,000 km², more than a fifth of France. ... The Duchy of Normandy stems from the Viking invasions of France in the 8th century. ... The following is a list of the Dukes of Burgundy Richard of Autun, the Justicier (880–921) Rudolph of Burgundy (king of France from 923) (921–923) Hugh the Black (923–952) Gilbert of Chalon (952–956) Odo of Paris (956-965) Otto-Henry the Great... Brittany has an expansive coastline Flag of Brittany (Gwenn-ha-du) Historical province of Brittany région of Bretagne, see Bretagne. ... Odo of Paris (944–February 22, 965) was duke of Burgundy from 956 to his death. ... Otto-Henry of Paris ( 946– October 15, 1002), known as the Great, was duke of Burgundy from 956 to his death. ...


From 978 to 986, Hugh Capet allied himself with the German emperors Otto II and Otto III and with archbishop Adalberon of Reims to dominate the Carolingian king, Lothair. By 986, he was king in all but name. After Lothair and his son died in early 987, the archbishop of Reims convinced an assembly of nobles to elect Hugh Capet as their king. He was crowned King of France at Noyon, Picardie on July 3, 987, the first of the Capetian to rule France. Events Badìa Fiorentina, an abbey in Italy, is founded by Willa, Margravine of Tuscany. ... Events March 2 - Louis V becomes King of the Franks End of the reign of Emperor Kazan of Japan Emperor Ichijo ascends to the throne of Japan Explorer Bjarni Herjólfsson becomes the first inhabitant of the Old World to sight North America Births Deaths March 2 - Lothair, King of... Otto II and Theophano. ... Otto III in a medieval manuscript Otto III (980 – January 23, 1002, Paterno, Italy) was the fourth ruler of the Saxon or Ottonian dynasty. ... Adalberon (died 998) was the archbishop of Reims, chancellor of Kings Lothair and Louis V of France. ... Reims (English traditionally Rheims) (pronounced in French) is a city of northern France, 144 km (89 miles) east-northeast of Paris. ... Also see: France in the Middle Ages. ... Lothair (941-986), king of France, son of Louis IV and Gerberge of Saxony, succeeded his father in 954, and was at first under the guardianship of Hugh the Great, duke of the Franks, and then under that of his maternal uncle Bruno, archbishop of Cologne. ... Events March 2 - Louis V becomes King of the Franks End of the reign of Emperor Kazan of Japan Emperor Ichijo ascends to the throne of Japan Explorer Bjarni Herjólfsson becomes the first inhabitant of the Old World to sight North America Births Deaths March 2 - Lothair, King of... Events Hugh Capet, Count of Paris, crowned King of France Kukulcan conquers Chichen Itza Births Deaths May 21 King Louis V of France Categories: 987 ... The Archdiocese of Reims was founded (as a diocese) around 250 by St. ... Noyon is a small but historic French city in the Oise département, Picardie, on the Oise Canal, approximately 60 miles north of Paris. ... (Région flag) (Région logo) Location Administration Capital Amiens Regional President Claude Gewerc (PS) (since 2004) Départements Aisne Oise Somme Arrondissements 13 Cantons 129 Communes 2,292 Statistics Land area1 19,399 km² Population (Ranked 12th)  - January 1, 2005 est. ... July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... Events Hugh Capet, Count of Paris, crowned King of France Kukulcan conquers Chichen Itza Births Deaths May 21 King Louis V of France Categories: 987 ... The direct Capetian Dynasty followed the Carolingian rulers of France from 987 to 1328. ...


Hugh Capet possessed minor properties near Chartres and Anjou. Between Paris and Orléans he possessed towns and estates amounting to approximately 400 square miles (1,000 km²). His authority ended there, and if he dared travel outside his small area, he risked being captured and held for ransom or even murdered. Indeed, there was a plot in 993 masterminded by the Bishop of Laon and Odo I of Blois to deliver Hugh Capet into the custody of Otto III. The plot failed, but the fact that no one was punished illustrates how tenuous his hold on power was. Beyond his power base, in the rest of France, there were still as many codes of law as there were fiefdoms. The country operated with 150 different forms of currency and at least a dozen languages. Uniting all this into one cohesive unit was a formidable task and a constant struggle between those who wore the crown of France and its feudal lords. As such, Hugh Capet's reign was marked by numerous power struggles with the vassals on the borders of the Seine and the Loire. Beyond his realm, the investiture and then deposition of Arnulf, nephew of the duke of Lorraine, as archbishop of Reims involved the king and bishops in conflict with Pope John XV that was not yet resolved at Hugh Capet's death in 996. Chartres is a town and commune of France, préfecture (capital) of the Eure-et-Loir département. ... Anjou is a former county (c. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Orléans Cathedral, dedicated to the Holy Cross, built from 1278 to 1329; after being pillaged by Huguenots in the 1560s, the Bourbon kings restored it in the 17th century. ... Events July 4 - Saint Ulrich of Augsburg canonized Births Deaths Categories: 993 ... Laon is a city and commune of France, préfecture (capital) of the Aisne département. ... Odo I of Blois (950–995), (French: Eudes), Count of Blois and Count of Chartres, was the son of Count Theobald I of Blois and Luitgarde of Vermandois. ... The Seine (pronounced in French) is a major river of north-western France, and one of its commercial waterways. ... The Loire River (pronounced in French), the longest river in France with a length of just over 1000 km, drains an area of 117,000 km², more than a fifth of France. ... John XV, pope from 984 to 996, generally recognized as the successor of Boniface VII, the pope John who was said to have ruled for four months after John XIV, being now omitted by the best authorities. ...


While Hugh Capet's military power was limited and he had to seek military aid from Richard I of Normandy, his unanimous election as king gave him great moral authority and influence. Adémar de Chabannes records, probably apocryphally, that during an argument with the Count of Auvergne, Hugh demanded of him: "Who made you count?" The count riposted: "Who made you king?"[7] Richard I of Normandy (933 - November 20, 996) was the Duke of Normandy from 942 to 996. ... Adémar de Chabannes (989-1034) was an 11th century monk, a historian, who wrote the first annals that had been compiled in Aquitaine since Late Antiquity, as well as a musical composer and a successful literary forger. ... This is a list of the various rulers of Auvergne. ...


Hugh Capet died on October 24, 996 in Paris, and was interred in the Saint Denis Basilica. He was succeeded by his son, Robert II. October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... Events March/April - Pope John XV dies before being being able to coronate Otto III, King of Germany as Holy Roman Emperor. ... West façade of Saint Denis The Basilica of Saint Denis (French: Basilique de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis) is the famous burial site of the French monarchs, comparable to Westminster Abbey in England. ... Robert II the Pious (French: Robert II le Pieux) (March 27, 972 – July 20, 1031) was King of France from 996 to 1031. ...


Most historians regard the beginnings of modern France with the coronation of Hugh Capet. This is because, as Comte de Paris, he made it his power center. The monarch began a long process of exerting control of the rest of the country from there. Every succeeding monarch down to Louis Philippe, with the exception of the Bonapartes, is descended from him. Louis-Philippe of France (October 6, 1773–August 26, 1850), served as the Orleanist king of the French from 1830 to 1848. ...


Family

Hugh Capet married Adelaide, daughter of William Towhead, Count of Poitou. Their son Robert was king after Hugh died. Their two daughters were Hedwig, or Hathui, who married Reginar IV, Count of Hainaut, and Gisela, or Gisele. A number of other daughters are less reliably attested.[8] Adele or Adelaide of Aquitaine (or Adelaide of Poitiers) (c. ... William III (915 – 3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête détoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the Count of Poitou (as William I) and Duke of Aquitaine from 935 to his death. ... Among the men who have borne the title of Count of Poitiers (or Poitou, in what is now France but in the Middle Ages became part of the Aquitaine) are: Guerin (or Warin[us]) (638-677) Renaud (795-843) Bernard I (815-844) Ranulph I (835-875) Ranulph II (855... Regnier IV, Count of Mons (c. ... The virtually independent county of Hainaut emerged from chaotic conditions at the end of the 9th century as a semi-independent state, at first a vassal of the crown of Lotharingia. ...

Preceded by
Hugh the Great
Duke of the Franks
956–987
Succeeded by
became King of France
Preceded by
Louis V
King of France
987–996
Succeeded by
Robert II

Hugh, The Great (d. ... Mayor of the Palace was an early medieval title and office, also known by the Latin name, maior domus, used most notably in the Frankish kingdoms in the 7th and 8th centuries. ... King Louis V of France (ca. ... Kings ruled in France from the Middle Ages to 1848. ... Robert II the Pious (French: Robert II le Pieux) (March 27, 972 – July 20, 1031) was King of France from 996 to 1031. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Bordenove, p. 4.
  2. ^ Folk etymology connects it with cape, other suggested etymologies derive it from terms for chief, mocker or big head. See further fr:Capet (nom). His father's byname is presumed to have been retrospective, Latin: Hugo Magnus, meaning Hugh the Elder, this Hugh being Hugh the Younger, Capet being a 12th century addition; James, p. 183.
  3. ^ For a fuller explanation of the descent and relationships of Hugues, see the genealogical tables in Riché, Les Carolingiens, pp. 399 ff.
  4. ^ James, pp. 183–184; Theis, pp. 65–66.
  5. ^ Theis, pp. 69–70.
  6. ^ James, pp. xxiii, 182–183; Gauvard, pp. 163–168; Riché, pp. 285 ff.
  7. ^ Bordenove, pp. 265–266.
  8. ^ Thus Gauvard, p. 531.

Folk etymology or popular etymology is a linguistic term for a category of false etymology which has grown up in popular lore, as opposed to one which arose in scholarly usage. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ...

References

  • Bordenove, Georges, Les Rois qui ont fait la France: Hugues Capet, le Fondateur. Paris: Marabout, 1986. ISBN 2-501-01099-X
  • Gauvard, Claude, La France au Moyen Âge du Ve au XVe siècle. Paris: PUF, 1996. 2-13-054205-0
  • James, Edward, The Origins of France: From Clovis to the Capetians 500-1000. London: Macmillan, 1982. ISBN 0312588623
  • Riché, Pierre, Les Carolingiens: Une famille qui fit l'Europe. Paris: Hachette, 1983. 2-012-78551-0
  • Theis, Laurent, Histoire du Moyen Âge français: Chronologie commentée 486-1453. Paris: Perrin, 1992. 2-87027-587-0

  Results from FactBites:
 
Hugh Capet of France - Biocrawler (569 words)
From 978 to 986, Hugh Capet allied himself with the German emperors Otto II and Otto III and with archbishop Adalbero of Reims to dominate the weak Carolingian king, Lothair.
Hugh Capet married Adelaide of Aquitaine (952-1004), daughter of Duke William III of Aquitaine.
Hugh Capet died on October 24, 996 in Paris, and was interred in the Saint Denis Basilica.
Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Hugh Capet of France (384 words)
Hugh Capet (French Hugues Capet) (938 - October 24, 996) was King of France from 987 to 996.
As such, Hugh Capet's reign was marked by numerous power struggles, both with the Roman Catholic Church and the vassals on the borders of the Seine and the Loire.
King Hugh Capet died on October 24, 996 in Paris, and was interred in the Saint Denis Basilica.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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