FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Hubert Humphrey
Hubert Horatio Humphrey, Jr.
Hubert Humphrey

In office
January 20, 1965 – January 20, 1969
President Lyndon B. Johnson
Preceded by Lyndon B. Johnson
Succeeded by Spiro Agnew

Election date
November 5, 1968
Running mate Edmund Muskie
Opponent(s) Richard Nixon (R)
George Wallace (AI)
Incumbent Lyndon B. Johnson (D)

In office
January 3, 1971 – January 13, 1978
Preceded by Eugene McCarthy
Succeeded by Muriel Humphrey
In office
January 3, 1949 – December 30, 1964
Preceded by Joseph H. Ball
Succeeded by Walter Mondale

In office
January 3, 1961 – December 30, 1964
Preceded by Mike Mansfield
Succeeded by Russell B. Long

In office
1977 – 1978
President Sen. James Eastland
Preceded by None
Succeeded by George J. Mitchell (1987)

In office
July 2, 1945 – November 30, 1948
Preceded by Marvin L. Kline
Succeeded by Eric G. Hoyer

Born May 27, 1911(1911-05-27)
Wallace, South Dakota
Died January 13, 1978 (aged 66)
Waverly, Minnesota
Political party Democratic
Spouse Muriel Buck Humphrey
Alma mater University of Minnesota, Drew College of Pharmacy and Louisiana State University
Religion Congregationalist (United Church of Christ)/United Methodist

Hubert Horatio Humphrey, Jr. (May 27, 1911January 13, 1978) was the thirty-eighth Vice President of the United States, serving under President Lyndon B. Johnson. Humphrey twice served as a United States Senator from Minnesota, and served as Democratic Majority Whip. He was a founder of the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party and Americans for Democratic Action. He also served as mayor of Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1945–1949. In 1968, Humphrey was the nominee of the Democratic Party in the United States presidential election but narrowly lost to the Republican nominee, Richard Nixon. Hubert Humphrey can refer to: A family of politicians who represent or have represented the US State of Minnesota Hubert Horatio Humphrey II (1911-1978), 38th Vice President of the United States, a prominent Minnesotan and United States politician and one of the founding members of the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer... Image File history File links Official White House portrait of Humphrey. ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... LBJ redirects here. ... LBJ redirects here. ... Spiro Theodore Agnew (November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996) was the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States serving under President Richard M. Nixon, and the fifty-fifth Governor of Maryland. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The United States presidential election of 1968 was a wrenching national experience, and included the assassination of Democratic candidate Robert F. Kennedy, the violence at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, and widespread demonstrations against the Vietnam War across American university and college campuses. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was an American Democratic politician from Maine. ... Nixon redirects here. ... GOP redirects here. ... This article is about the politician, former governor of Alabama and former presidential candidate. ... The American Independent Party is a California political party. ... LBJ redirects here. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Not to be confused with the anti-Communist senator Joseph Raymond McCarthy. ... Muriel Humphrey Muriel Buck Humphrey (February 20, 1912 – September 20, 1998) was the wife of Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, and a United States Senator. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Joseph H. Ball (November 3, 1905 - December 18, 1993) was an American politician. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... In politics, a whip is a member of a political party in a legislature whose task is to ensure that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Mike Mansfield, Congressional portrait This article describes the American politician. ... Russell Billiu Long Russell Billiu Long (November 3, 1918 – May 9, 2003) was an American politician who served in the United States Senate as a Democrat from Louisiana from 1948 until 1987. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see James Eastland (disambiguation). ... For other persons with a similar name, see George Mitchell George John Mitchell, GBE (born August 20, 1933) is a former Democratic Party politician and United States Senator from the state of Maine, and currently serves as Chairman of the global law firm DLA Piper US LLP and also as... This article is about the year 1987. ... This is a list of Mayors of Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Wallace is a town located in Codington County, South Dakota. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Waverly is a city located in Wright County, Minnesota. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Muriel Humphrey Muriel Buck Humphrey (February 20, 1912 – September 20, 1998) was the wife of Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, and a United States Senator. ... For other uses, see Alma mater (disambiguation). ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... For other uses, see LSU. Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, generally known as Louisiana State University or LSU, is a public, coeducational university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the main campus of the Louisiana State University System. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the United States denomination known as United Church of Christ. ... The United Methodist Church is the largest Methodist denomination, and the second-largest Protestant one, in the United States. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... LBJ redirects here. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... In politics, a whip is a member of a political party in a legislature whose task is to ensure that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ... The Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) is a major political party in the US state of Minnesota. ... Americans For Democratic Action (ADA) was formed in January 1947, when Eleanor Roosevelt, John Kenneth Galbraith, Reinhold Niebuhr, Hubert Humphrey and 200 other activists. ... This is a list of Mayors of Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Minneapolis redirects here. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Republican Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States two-party system, the other one being the Democratic Party. ... Nixon redirects here. ...


In a renowned speech, Humphrey told the 1948 Democratic National Convention, "The time has arrived in America for the Democratic Party to get out of the shadow of states' rights and walk forthrightly into the bright sunshine of human rights," winning support for a pro-civil-rights plank in the Party's platform. The 1948 Democratic National Convention was held in Philadelphia from July 12 to July 14, and resulted in the nomination of President Harry Truman for President and of Alben Barkley for Vice President. ...

Contents

Early years

Humphrey was born in Wallace, Codington County, South Dakota. He was the son of Hubert Humphrey, Sr. and Ragnild Kristine Sannes, who was Norwegian.[1] Humphrey spent most of his youth in the small town of Doland, South Dakota on the Dakota prairie. His father was the town pharmacist and a community leader; he served as Doland's mayor and as a town council member. In the late 1920s a severe economic downturn hit Doland; both of the town's banks closed and Humphrey's father struggled to keep his drugstore open. After his son graduated from Doland's high school, Hubert, Sr. left Doland and opened a new drugstore in the larger town of Huron, South Dakota, where he hoped to improve his fortunes. As a result of the family's financial struggles, Hubert had to leave the University of Minnesota after just one year to help his father in the new drugstore. He earned a pharmacist's license from the Drew College of Pharmacy in Denver, Colorado (completing a two-year course in just six months), and spent the years from 1930 to 1937 helping his father run the family drugstore. He was a brother of Phi Delta Chi, a professional pharmaceutical fraternity and an honorary brother of Alpha Phi Alpha, an African-American fraternity. Over time the "Humphrey Drug Company" in Huron became a profitable enterprise and the family was able to prosper again. Wallace is a town located in Codington County, South Dakota. ... Codington County is a county located in the state of South Dakota. ... Official language(s) English Demonym South Dakotan Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th in the US  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Doland is a city located in Spink County, South Dakota. ... The mortar and pestle is an international symbol of pharmacists and pharmacies. ... Huron is a city located in Beadle County, South Dakota. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... Nickname: Location of Denver in the State of Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country United States State State of Colorado City and County Denver[1] Founded 1858-11-22, as Denver City, K.T.[2] Incorporated 1861-11-07, as Denver City, C.T.[3] Consolidated... Phi Delta Chi (ΦΔΧ) The oldest Pharmacy only Fraternity, was founded on 2 November 1883 at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor by 11 men, led by Dean Albert B. Prescott. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ...


However, Hubert did not enjoy working as a pharmacist, and his dream remained to earn a doctorate in political science and become a college professor. In 1937 he returned to the University of Minnesota and earned a bachelor's degree in 1939. He also earned a master's degree from Louisiana State University in 1940, serving as an assistant instructor of political science there. One of his classmates was Russell B. Long, a future senator from Louisiana. He then became an instructor and graduate student at the University of Minnesota from 1940 to 1941 (joining the American Federation of Teachers), and was a supervisor for the Works Progress Administration (WPA). Humphrey would soon become active in Minneapolis politics, and as a result he never finished his Ph.D. The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... For other uses, see LSU. Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, generally known as Louisiana State University or LSU, is a public, coeducational university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the main campus of the Louisiana State University System. ... Russell Billiu Long Russell Billiu Long (November 3, 1918 – May 9, 2003) was an American politician who served in the United States Senate as a Democrat from Louisiana from 1948 until 1987. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The American Federation of Teachers or AFT is an American labor union founded in 1916 which represents teachers; paraprofessionals and school-related personnel; local, state and federal employees; higher education faculty and staff; and nurses and other healthcare professionals. ... WPA Graphic The Works Progress Administration (later Work Projects Administration, abbreviated WPA), was created on May 6, 1935 by Presidential order (Congress funded it annually but did not set it up). ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ...


Marriage and family

In 1934 Hubert began dating Muriel Buck; she was a bookkeeper and graduate of local Huron College. They were married in 1936 and remained married until Humphrey's death nearly 42 years later. They had four children: Hubert Humphrey III, Nancy, Robert, and Douglas. Through most of his years as a U.S. Senator and Vice-President his home was located in a modest middle-class housing development in Chevy Chase, Maryland, a suburb of Washington, D.C.. In the 1960s Hubert and Muriel used their savings to build a lakefront home in Waverly, Minnesota, some forty miles west of Minneapolis. “Huron College” redirects here. ... Hubert Horatio Skip Humphrey III (born 26 June 1942) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL). ... Chevy Chase is the name of both a town and an unincorporated Census-Designated Place (CDP) in Montgomery County, Maryland. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Waverly is a city located in Wright County, Minnesota. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ...


City and state politics (1942–1948)

During World War II, Humphrey tried twice to join the armed forces, but was rejected both times due to a hernia. Instead, he served in an administrative capacity in a variety of wartime government agencies; he also worked as a college instructor. In 1942 he was the state director of new production training and reemployment and chief of the Minnesota war service program. In 1943 he was the assistant director of the War Manpower Commission. From 1943-1944 Humphrey was a professor in political science at Macalester College in St. Paul and from 1944-1945 he was a news commentator for a Minneapolis radio station. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Alternate cover US 1979 and 2002 reissue cover, also known as paint spatter cover For the military meaning, see Armed forces. ... Look up hernia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Macalester College is a privately supported, coeducational liberal arts college in Saint Paul, Minnesota. ... State capitol building in Saint Paul Saint Paul is the capital and second-largest city of the state of Minnesota in the United States of America. ...


In 1943, Humphrey made his first run for elective office, for mayor of Minneapolis. Although he lost, his poorly-funded campaign still captured over 47% of the vote. In 1944, Humphrey was the one of the key players in the merger of the Democratic and Farmer-Labor parties of Minnesota to form the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL). When in 1945 Minnesota Communists attempted to seize control of the new party, Humphrey became an engaged anti-Communist and led the successful fight to oust the Communists from the DFL. This is a list of Mayors of Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Farmer-Labor Party was a political party of Minnesota. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... The Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) is a major political party in the US state of Minnesota. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... Anti-communism is opposition to communist ideology, organization, or government, on either a theoretical or practical level. ...


After the war, he again ran for mayor of Minneapolis and won the election with 61% of the vote. He served as mayor from 1945–1949. He was re-elected in 1947 by the largest margin in the city's history to that time. Humphrey gained national fame during these years by becoming one of the founders of the liberal anti-communist Americans for Democratic Action (ADA) and for reforming the Minneapolis police force. Previously, the city had been declared the antisemitism capital of the country and the small African-American population of the city encountered numerous instances of racial discrimination. Humphrey worked hard to end these examples of racism, and his tenure as mayor would be famous for his efforts to fight bigotry in all its forms. A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Americans For Democratic Action (ADA) was formed in January 1947, when Eleanor Roosevelt, John Kenneth Galbraith, Reinhold Niebuhr, Hubert Humphrey and 200 other activists. ... Antisemitism (alternatively spelled anti-semitism or anti-Semitism, also known as judeophobia) is prejudice and hostility toward Jews as a religious, racial, or ethnic group. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... For people named Bigot and other meanings, see Bigot (disambiguation). ...


The 1948 Democratic National Convention

The national Democratic Party of 1948 was split between liberals who thought the federal government should assertively guarantee civil rights for non-whites and southern conservatives who thought the states should be able to choose what civil rights their citizens would enjoy (the "states' rights" position). Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Historic Southern United States. ... Conservatism is a term used to describe political philosophies that favor tradition and gradual change, where tradition refers to religious, cultural, or nationally defined beliefs and customs. ... States rights refers to the idea, in U.S. politics and constitutional law, that U.S. states possess certain rights and political powers in relation to the federal government. ...


At the 1948 Democratic National Convention, the party platform reflected this division and contained only platitudes in favor of civil rights. Though the incumbent President Harry S Truman had already issued a detailed 10-point Civil Rights Program calling for aggressive federal action on the issue of civil rights, he gave his backing to the party establishment's platform that was a replication of the 1944 Democratic National Convention plank on civil rights. The 1948 Democratic National Convention was held in Philadelphia from July 12 to July 14, and resulted in the nomination of President Harry Truman for President and of Alben Barkley for Vice President. ... A political platform is a list of the principles which a political party supports in order to appeal to the general public for the purpose of having said partys candidates voted into office. ... For the victim of Mt. ... The 1944 Democratic National Convention was held at the Chicago Stadium in Chicago, Illinois from July 19 - July 21, 1944. ...


A diverse coalition opposed this tepid platform, including anti-communist liberals like Humphrey, Paul Douglas and John Shelley, all of whom would later become known as leading progressives in the Democratic Party. These liberals proposed adding a "minority plank" to the party platform that would commit the Democratic Party to a more aggressive opposition to racial segregation. The minority plank called for federal legislation against lynching, an end to legalized school segregation in the South, and ending job discrimination based on skin color. Also strongly backing the liberal civil rights plank were Democratic urban bosses like Ed Flynn of the Bronx, who promised the votes of northeastern delegates to Humphrey's platform, Jacob Arvey of Chicago, and David Lawrence of Pittsburgh. Although viewed as being conservatives, these urban bosses believed that Northern Democrats could gain many black votes by supporting civil rights, and that losses among anti-civil rights Southern Democrats would be relatively small. Though many scholars have suggested that labor unions were leading figures in this coalition, no significant labor leaders attended the convention, with the exception of the heads of the Congress of Industrial Organizations Political Action Committee (CIOPAC), Jack Kroll and A.F. Whitney. This article is about the economist and senator; Paul Douglas. ... John Francis Jack Shelley (September 3, 1905 – September 1, 1974) was the Mayor of San Francisco, California from 1964 to 1967, the first Democrat elected to the office in 50 years, and the first in a string of Democratic mayors that lasts to the present (as of 2005). ... Racial segregation characterised by separation of different races in daily life, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in the rental or purchase of a home. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... For other uses, see Bronx (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... David Lawrence can refer to many different People: David L. Lawrence is the former Pennsylvania governer. ... City nickname: The Steel City Location in the state of Pennsylvania Founded 1758 Mayor Tom Murphy (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 151. ...


Despite aggressive pressure by Truman's aides to avoid forcing the issue on the Convention floor, Humphrey chose to speak on behalf of the minority plank. In a renowned speech, Humphrey passionately told the Convention, "To those who say, my friends, to those who say, that we are rushing this issue of civil rights, I say to them we are 172 years too late! To those who say, this civil rights program is an infringement on states' rights, I say this: the time has arrived in America for the Democratic Party to get out of the shadow of states' rights and walk forthrightly into the bright sunshine of human rights!" Humphrey and his allies succeeded; the pro-civil-rights plank was narrowly adopted.


As a result of the Convention's vote, the Mississippi and one half of the Alabama delegation walked out of the hall. Many Southern Democrats were so enraged at this affront to their "way of life" that they formed the Dixiecrat party and nominated their own presidential candidate, Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina. The goal of the Dixiecrats was to take several Southern states away from Truman and thus cause his defeat. The Southern Democrats reasoned that after such a defeat the national Democratic Party would never again aggressively pursue a pro-civil rights agenda. However, this move actually backfired. Although the strong civil rights plank adopted at the Convention cost Truman the support of the Dixiecrats, it gained him important votes from blacks, especially in large northern cities. As a result Truman won a stunning upset victory over his Republican opponent, Thomas E. Dewey. Truman's victory demonstrated that the Democratic Party no longer needed the "Solid South" to win presidential elections, and thus weakened Southern Democrats instead of strengthening their position. Pulitzer Prize-winning historian David McCullough has written that Humphrey probably did more to get Truman elected in 1948 than anyone other than Truman himself. This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... GOP redirects here. ... Thomas Edmund Dewey (March 24, 1902 – March 16, 1971) was the Governor of New York (1943-1954) and the unsuccessful Republican candidate for the U.S. Presidency in 1944 and 1948. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... David Gaub McCullough (mÉ™-kÅ­lÉ™) (born July 7, 1933) is an American historian and bestselling author. ...


The Happy Warrior (1948–1964)

Minnesota elected Humphrey to the United States Senate in 1948 on the DFL ticket, and he took office on January 3, 1949. He was the first Democrat ever elected senator from the state of Minnesota since before the civil war. Humphrey's father died that year, and Humphrey stopped using the "Jr." suffix on his name. He was re-elected in 1954 and 1960. His colleagues selected him as majority whip in 1961, a position he held until he left the Senate on December 29, 1964 to assume the vice presidency. During this period, he served in the 81st, 82nd, 83rd, 84th, 85th, 86th, 87th, and a portion of the 88th Congress. Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1948 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of Democratic President Harry Truman for a full term. ... The Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) is a major political party in the US state of Minnesota. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1954 was an election for the United States Senate which was a midterm election in the first term of Dwight D. Eisenhowers presidency. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1960 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of John F. Kennedy as president. ... The U.S. Senate Majority Whip is the second ranking member of the United States Senate. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... 81st Congress (1949-1951) Congressional Profile Total Membership: 435 Representatives, 2 Delegates, 1 Resident Commissioner Party Divisions: 263 Democrats, 171 Republicans, 1 American-Labor Leadership & Officers Speaker of the House: Sam Rayburn (D- Texas) Majority Leader: John W. McCormack (D- Massachusetts) Minority Leader: Joseph W. Martin, Jr. ... // 1951-1952 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, D.C. from January 3, 1951 to October 20, 1951. ... The Eighty-third United States Congress was in session from 1953 to 1955. ... The Eighty-fourth United States Congress was in session from 1955 to 1957. ... // Dates of Sessions 1957-1958 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from January 3, 1957 to August 30, 1957. ... Senators George David Aiken (R-VT) Gordon Llewellyn Allott (R-CO) Clinton Presba Anderson (D-NM) Edward Lewis Bartlett (D-AK) James Glenn Beall (R-MD) Wallace Foster Bennett (R-UT) Alan Harvey Bible (D-NV) Henry Styles Bridges (R-NH) Styles Bridges (R-NH) Clarence Norman Brunsdale (R-ND... Sessions of the 87th Congress, (1961-1963) Categories: United States Congress by session ... Dates of Sessions January 3, 1963-January 3, 1965 Major Political Events Senator Robert C. Byrd makes a record breaking fillibuster in that it lasts 14 hours and 13 minutes. ...


Initially, Humphrey's support of civil rights led to him being ostracized by Southern Democrats, who dominated most of the Senate leadership positions and who wanted to punish Humphrey for proposing the successful civil rights platform at the 1948 Convention. However, Humphrey refused to be intimidated and stood his ground; his passion and eloquence eventually earned him the respect of even most of the Southerners. Humphrey became known for his advocacy of liberal causes (such as civil rights, arms control, a nuclear test ban, food stamps, and humanitarian foreign aid), and for his long and witty speeches. During the period of McCarthyism (1950–1954), Humphrey was accused of being "soft on Communism," despite having been one of the founders of the anti-communist liberal organization Americans for Democratic Action, having been a staunch supporter of the Truman Administration's efforts to combat the growth of the Soviet Union, and having fought Communist political activities in Minnesota and elsewhere. In 1954 Humphrey proposed to make mere membership in the Communist Party a felony — a proposal that failed. He was chairman of the Select Committee on Disarmament (84th and 85th Congresses). As Democratic whip in the Senate in 1964, Humphrey was instrumental in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of that year. Humphrey's consistently cheerful and upbeat demeanor, and his forceful advocacy of liberal causes, led him to be nicknamed "The Happy Warrior" by many of his Senate colleagues and political journalists. Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Arms control is an umbrella term for restrictions upon the development, production, stockpiling, proliferation, and usage of weapons, especially weapons of mass destruction. ... Preparation for an underground nuclear test at the Nevada Test Site in the 1980s. ... The Food Stamp Program is a federal assistance program that provides food to low income people living in the United States. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Development aid. ... This article is about the U.S. senator from Wisconsin (1947-1957). ... This article is about the form of society and political movement. ... Americans For Democratic Action (ADA) was formed in January 1947, when Eleanor Roosevelt, John Kenneth Galbraith, Reinhold Niebuhr, Hubert Humphrey and 200 other activists. ... The Communist Party of the United States of America (CPUSA) is one of several Marxist-Leninist groups in the United States. ... The United States Senate Select Committee on Disarmament was a committee organized in the U.S. Senate. ... The Eighty-fourth United States Congress was in session from 1955 to 1957. ... // Dates of Sessions 1957-1958 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from January 3, 1957 to August 30, 1957. ... In politics, a whip is a member of a political party in a legislature whose task is to ensure that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ... First page of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 The Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Pub. ...


Presidential and Vice-Presidential ambitions (1952–1964)

In the 1960 primaries, Humphrey won South Dakota and Washington, D.C.
In the 1960 primaries, Humphrey won South Dakota and Washington, D.C.

As one of the most respected members of the U.S. Senate, Humphrey ran for the Democratic presidential nomination twice before his election to the Vice Presidency in 1964. The first time was as Minnesota's "favorite son" in 1952, where he received only 26 votes on the first ballot; the second time was in 1960. In between these two presidential bids, Senator Humphrey was part of the free-for-all for the vice-presidential nomination at the 1956 Democratic National Convention, where he received 134 votes on the first ballot and 74 on the second. The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The 1956 National Convention of the U.S. Democratic Party nominated Adlai E. Stevenson of Illinois for President and Estes Kefauver for Vice President. ...


In 1960, Humphrey ran again for the Democratic presidential nomination against fellow Senator John F. Kennedy in the primaries. Their first meeting was in the Wisconsin primary, where Kennedy's well-organized and well-funded campaign defeated Humphrey's energetic but poorly-funded effort. Kennedy's attractive brothers, sisters, and wife combed the state looking for votes, at one point Humphrey memorably complained that he "felt like an independent merchant running against a chain store." Kennedy won the Wisconsin primary, but by a smaller margin than anticipated; some commentators argued that Kennedy's victory margin had come almost entirely from areas that were heavily Roman Catholic, and that Protestants actually supported Humphrey. As a result, Humphrey refused to quit the race and decided to run against Kennedy again in the West Virginia primary. Humphrey calculated that his midwestern populist roots and Protestant religion (he was a Congregationalist) would appeal to the state's disenfranchised voters more than the Ivy League and Catholic millionaire's son, Kennedy. But Kennedy led comfortably until the issue turned to religion. When asked why he was quickly losing ground in polls, one adviser explained to Kennedy, "no one knew you were a Catholic then." John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ...


Kennedy chose to engage the religion issue head-on. In radio broadcasts, he carefully repositioned the issue from one of Catholic versus Protestant to tolerance versus intolerance. Kennedy appealed to West Virginia's long-held revulsion for prejudice and placed Humphrey, who had championed tolerance his entire career, on the defensive; Kennedy attacked him with a vengeance. Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr., the son of the former President, stumped for Kennedy in West Virginia and raised the issue of Humphrey's failure to serve in the armed forces in World War II (though in fact Humphrey had tried to enlist). Humphrey, who was short on funds, could not match the well-financed Kennedy operation. Humphrey traveled around the state in a cold rented bus, while Kennedy and his staff flew around West Virginia in a large, modern, family-owned airplane. There were also accusations (both by Humphrey and numerous historians) that the Kennedys "bought" the West Virginia primary by paying bribes to county sheriffs and other local officials to give Kennedy the vote; however, these accusations have never been conclusively proven. Kennedy defeated Humphrey soundly, winning 60.8% of the vote in that state. That evening, Humphrey announced that he was no longer a candidate for the presidency. By winning the West Virginia primary, Kennedy was able to overcome the belief that Protestant voters would not elect a Catholic candidate to the Presidency and thus sewed up the Democratic nomination for President.[2] Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr. ...


Humphrey did win the South Dakota and District of Columbia primaries, which JFK did not enter. At the 1960 Democratic Convention he received 41 votes even though he was no longer an active presidential candidate.


At the 1964 Democratic National Convention, Lyndon B. Johnson kept the three likely vice presidential candidates, Connecticut Senator Thomas Dodd, fellow Minnesota Senator Eugene McCarthy, and Humphrey, as well as the rest of the nation in suspense before announcing Humphrey as his running-mate with much fanfare, praising Humphrey's qualifications for a considerable amount of time before announcing his name. The 1964 Democratic National Convention took place at the Atlantic City Convention Center in Atlantic City, New Jersey, August 24 - 27, 1964. ... LBJ redirects here. ... Thomas Joseph Dodd (May 15, 1907-May 24, 1971) was a United States Senator and Representative from Connecticut. ... Not to be confused with the anti-Communist senator Joseph Raymond McCarthy. ...


The following day Humphrey's acceptance speech overshadowed Johnson's own acceptance address:

Hubert warmed up with a long tribute to the President, then hit his stride as he began a rhythmic jabbing and chopping at Barry Goldwater. "Most Democrats and Republicans in the Senate voted for an $11.5 billion tax cut for American citizens and American business," he cried, "but not Senator Goldwater. Most Democrats and Republicans in the Senate — in fact four-fifths of the members of his own party — voted for the Civil Rights Act, but not Senator Goldwater." Time after time, he capped his indictments with the drumbeat cry: "But not Senator Goldwater!" The delegates caught the cadence and took up the chant. A quizzical smile spread across Humphrey's face, then turned to a laugh of triumph. Hubert was in fine form. He knew it. The delegates knew it. And no one could deny that Hubert Humphrey would be a formidable political antagonist in the weeks ahead.[3]

In 1964, the Johnson/Humphrey ticket won overwhelmingly, garnering 486 electoral votes out of 538. Only five Southern states and Goldwater's home state of Arizona supported the Republican ticket. Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


The Vice Presidency

Vice President Humphrey bust
Vice President Humphrey bust
Vice President Hubert Humphrey, President Lyndon Johnson, and General Creighton Abrams in a Cabinet Room meeting in March 1968
Vice President Hubert Humphrey, President Lyndon Johnson, and General Creighton Abrams in a Cabinet Room meeting in March 1968

Humphrey took office on January 20, 1965. As Vice President, Humphrey was controversial for his complete and vocal loyalty to Johnson and the policies of the Johnson Administration, even as many of Humphrey's liberal admirers opposed Johnson with increasing fervor with respect to Johnson's policies during the war in Vietnam. Many of Humphrey's liberal friends and allies over the years abandoned him because of his refusal to publicly criticize Johnson's Vietnam War policies. Humphrey's critics later learned that Johnson had threatened Humphrey — Johnson told Humphrey that if he publicly opposed his Administration's Vietnam War policy, he would destroy Humphrey's chances to become President by opposing his nomination at the next Democratic Convention. However, Humphrey's critics were vocal and persistent - even his nickname, the Happy Warrior, was used against him. The nickname referred not to his military hawkishness but rather to his crusading for social welfare and civil rights programs. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 506 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (515 × 610 pixel, file size: 51 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Hubert Humphrey bust from the Senate collection of Vice Presidents http://www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 506 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (515 × 610 pixel, file size: 51 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Hubert Humphrey bust from the Senate collection of Vice Presidents http://www. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Creighton Williams Abrams Jr. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


While he was Vice President, Hubert Humphrey was the subject of a satirical song by songwriter/musician Tom Lehrer entitled "Whatever Became of Hubert?" ("I wonder how many people here tonight remember Hubert Humphrey. He used to be a senator..."). The song addressed how some liberals and progressives felt let down by Humphrey, who had become a much more mute figure as Vice President than he had been as a senator. The song goes "Whatever became of Hubert? Has anyone heard a thing? Once he shone on his own, now he sits home alone and waits for the phone to ring. Once a fiery liberal spirit, ah, but now when he speaks he must clear it. ..." Thomas Andrew Tom Lehrer (born April 9, 1928) is an American singer-songwriter, satirist, pianist, and mathematician. ... For other uses, see Progressivism (disambiguation). ...


In Germany, Humphrey indirectly earned fame during an April 1967 visit when some hippies, armed with what looked like a bomb, planned to cause trouble at the place Humphrey was to speak. However, the "bomb" contained nothing but pudding, and the plan was foiled by the police. The would-be vandals were dubbed "assassins" and "ten little Oswalds" in some widely-read conservative German newspapers; this characterization sparked riots by left-wing student activists. The well-known left-wing journalist Ulrike Meinhof (who had not yet connected herself to terrorism) wrote in Konkret magazine: "It is thought rude to throw custard pies at politicians, but not to welcome politicians who have villages wiped out and cities bombed... napalm yes, custard, no." This "pudding assassination" thus became an early defining moment of the "68er" German student movement, many of whose leaders moved into national politics later. Hippies (singular hippie or sometimes hippy) were members of the 1960s counterculture movement who adopted a communal or nomadic lifestyle, renounced corporate nationalism and the Vietnam War, embraced aspects of Buddhism, Hinduism, and/or Native American religious culture, and were otherwise at odds with traditional middle class Western values. ... Jack Ruby murdered the assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, in a very public manner. ... Lee Harvey Oswald (October 18, 1939 – November 24, 1963) was, according to four United States government investigations, the assassin of U.S. President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963 in Dallas, Texas. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Meinhof as a young journalist. ... Terrorist redirects here. ... konkret is a monthly German magazine for politics and culture (according to its subtitle) that has existed since 1955. ... A simulated Napalm explosion during MCAS Air Show in 2003. ... The German student movement (in Germany commonly called 68er-Bewegung, movement of 1968) was a protest movement that took place during the late 1960s in Germany. ...


The 1968 Presidential election

As 1968 began, it looked as if President Johnson, despite the rapidly-increasing unpopularity of his Vietnam War policies, would easily win the Democratic nomination for a second time. Humphrey indicated to Johnson that he would like to be his running mate again. However, in the New Hampshire primary Johnson was nearly defeated by Senator Eugene McCarthy of Minnesota; McCarthy had challenged Johnson on an anti-war platform, but had not expected to become an actual contender for the Democratic nomination. A few days later, Senator Robert Kennedy of New York also entered the race on an anti-war platform. On March 31, 1968, a week before the Wisconsin primary, where the polls predicted a loss to McCarthy, President Lyndon B. Johnson stunned the nation by withdrawing from his race for a second term. The United States presidential election of 1968 was a wrenching national experience, and included the assassination of Democratic candidate Robert F. Kennedy, the violence at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, and widespread demonstrations against the Vietnam War across American university and college campuses. ... The New Hampshire primary is the first of a number of statewide political party primary elections held in the United States every four years, as part of the process of the Democratic and Republican parties choosing their candidate for the presidential elections on the subsequent November. ... Not to be confused with the anti-Communist senator Joseph Raymond McCarthy. ... Robert Kennedy Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy, also called RFK (November 20, 1925–June 6, 1968) was the younger brother of President John F. Kennedy, and was appointed by his brother as Attorney General for his administration. ... This article is about the state. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Primary. ... LBJ redirects here. ...


Following this announcement, Humphrey quickly re-evaluated his position, and announced his presidential candidacy in late April 1968. Many people saw Humphrey as Johnson's stand-in; he won major backing from the nation's labor unions and other Democratic groups that were troubled by young antiwar protestors and the social unrest around the nation. Humphrey avoided the primaries (and/or was too late to enter them) and concentrated on winning delegates in non-primary states; by June he was seen as the clear front-runner for the nomination. However, following a key victory over McCarthy in the California primary, it appeared that Kennedy could possibly challenge Humphrey for the nomination. But the nation was shocked yet again when Senator Kennedy was assassinated the night of his victory speech in California. A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


With the support of Mayor Richard J. Daley, Humphrey and his running mate, Ed Muskie went on to easily win the Democratic nomination at the party convention in Chicago, Illinois. (In later years, changes to the party rules made such an outcome virtually impossible.) Unfortunately for Humphrey and his campaign, outside the convention hall there were riots and protests by thousands of antiwar demonstrators, many of whom favored Eugene McCarthy, George McGovern, or other "anti-war" candidates. These protestors - most of them young college students - were attacked and beaten on live television by Chicago police, which merely amplified the growing feelings of unrest in the general public. Humphrey's inaction during the riots, as well as public backlash from securing the presidential nomination without entering a single primary, highlighted turmoil in the Democratic party's base that proved to be too much for Humphrey to overcome in time for the general election. Humphrey was also hurt by the third-party campaign of former Alabama Governor George Wallace, a Southern Democrat whose veiled racism and militant opposition to anti-war protestors attracted millions of Northern and Midwestern blue-collar votes that would otherwise have probably gone to Humphrey. Thus, Humphrey lost the 1968 election to Richard Nixon. Richard Joseph Daley (May 15, 1902 – December 20, 1976) was the longest-serving mayor of Chicago. ... A running mate is a person running for a subordinate position on a joint ticket during an election. ... Edmund Muskie Edmund Sixtus Muskie (Edmund Marciszewski) (March 28, 1914–March 26, 1996) was a Polish-American politician from Maine. ... The 1968 National Convention of the U.S. Democratic Party was held at International Amphitheatre in Chicago, Illinois, from August 26 to August 29, 1968, for the purposes of choosing the Democratic nominee for the 1968 U.S. presidential election. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... The McGovern-Fraser Commission was a commission created at the 1968 democratic national convention due to riots outside the convention by minority groups and others who demanded better representation. ... Opposition to U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War began slowly and in small numbers in 1964 on various college campuses in the United States and had spread to the United Kingdom by May of 1965 [1]. By the end of 1968, as U.S. troop casualties mounted and the... Not to be confused with the anti-Communist senator Joseph Raymond McCarthy. ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, (born July 19, 1922) is a former United States Representative, Senator, and Democratic presidential nominee. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the politician, former governor of Alabama and former presidential candidate. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... A blue-collar worker is a working class employee who performs manual or technical labor, such as in a factory or in technical maintenance trades, in contrast to a white-collar worker, who does non-manual work generally at a desk. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Nixon redirects here. ...


Although he lost the election by less than 1% of the popular vote, (43.4% for Nixon to 42.7% for Humphrey, with 13.5% (9,901,118 votes) for George Wallace,) Humphrey only carried 13 states with 191 electoral college votes. Richard Nixon carried 32 states and 301 electoral votes, and Wallace carried 5 states in the South and 46 electoral votes (270 were needed to win). This article is about the politician, former governor of Alabama and former presidential candidate. ...


Immensely admired by associates and members of his staff, Humphrey could not break loose from the domination of Lyndon Johnson. The combination of the unpopularity of Johnson, the Chicago riots, and the discouragement of liberals and African-Americans when both Robert F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr. were assassinated during the election year were all contributing factors that caused him to lose the election to former Vice President Nixon. The war that Humphrey was saddled with in the Johnson Administration continued until the early 1970s. Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ... Martin Luther King redirects here. ...


Post-Vice Presidency (1969–1978)

Teaching and return to the Senate

Senator Hubert Humphrey with President Jimmy Carter aboard Air Force One in 1977.
Senator Hubert Humphrey with President Jimmy Carter aboard Air Force One in 1977.

After leaving the Vice-Presidency, Humphrey utilized his talents by teaching at Macalester College and the University of Minnesota, and by serving as chairman of board of consultants at the Encyclopedia Britannica Educational Corporation. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... For the current aircraft, see Boeing VC-25. ... Macalester College is a privately supported, coeducational liberal arts college in Saint Paul, Minnesota. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... 1913 advertisement for the 11th edition, with the slogan When in doubt — look it up in the Encyclopædia Britannica The Encyclopædia Britannica (properly spelled with æ, the ae-ligature) was first published in 1768–1771 as The Britannica was an important early English-language general encyclopedia and is still...


Initially he had not planned to return to political life, but an unexpected opportunity changed his mind. Eugene McCarthy, a DFL U.S. Senator from Minnesota who was up for re-election in 1970, realized that he had only a slim chance of winning even re-nomination (he had angered his party by opposing Johnson and Humphrey for the 1968 presidential nomination), and declined to run. Humphrey won the DFL nomination and the election, and returned to the U.S. Senate on January 3, 1971. He was re-elected in 1976, and remained in office until his death. In a rarity in politics Humphrey served as a Senator by holding both seats in his state (Class I and Class II). This time he served in the 92nd, 93rd, 94th, and a portion of the 95th Congress. Results -- Conservative pickups in orange, Independent pickups in yellow, Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1970 was an election for the United States Senate which was a midterm election in the term of... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... Results -- Independent holds in light yellow, Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1976 was an election for the United States Senate that coincided with Democrat Jimmy Carters election to the presidency. ... Dates The first session convened on 21 January 1971, and adjourned on 17 December 1971. ... The Ninety-third United States Congress was in session from 1973 to 1975. ... // 1975-1976 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from January 14, 1975 to December 19, 1975. ... Ninety-fifth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ...

See also: US Congressional Delegations from Minnesota

In 1972, Humphrey once again ran for the Democratic nomination for president. He was defeated by Senator George McGovern in several primaries, and was trailing in delegates at the 1972 Democratic National Convention in Miami Beach, Florida. His hopes rested on challenges to the credentials of some of the McGovern delegates. For example, the Humphrey forces argued that the winner-take-all rule for the California primary violated procedural reforms intended to produce a better reflection of the popular vote, the reason that the Illinois delegation was bounced. The effort failed, as several votes on delegate credentials went McGovern's way, guaranteeing his victory. These are tables of congressional delegations from Minnesota to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, (born July 19, 1922) is a former United States Representative, Senator, and Democratic presidential nominee. ... The 1972 Democratic National convention nominated Senator George McGovern for President and Senator Thomas Eagleton for vice president. ... Location in Miami-Dade and the state of Florida. ...


Humphrey also briefly considered mounting a campaign for the Democratic nomination from the Convention once again in 1976, when the primaries seemed likely to result in a deadlock, but ultimately decided against it. At the conclusion of the Democratic primary process that year, even with Jimmy Carter having requisite number of delegates needed to secure his nomination, many still wanted Humphrey to announce his availability for a "draft" movement. However, he did not do so, and Carter easily secured the nomination on the first round of balloting. What wasn't known to the general public was that Humphrey already knew he had terminal cancer. The 1976 Democratic National Convention in New York City nominated Jimmy Carter of Georgia for President and Walter F. Mondale of Minnesota for Vice President. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ...


Deputy President pro tempore of the Senate (1976–1978)

In 1974, along with Rep. Augustus Hawkins of California, Humphrey authored Humphrey-Hawkins Full Employment Act, the first attempt at full employment legislation. The original bill proposed to guarantee full employment to all citizens over 16 and set up a permanent system of public jobs to meet that goal. A watered-down version called the Full Employment and Balanced Growth Act passed the House and Senate in 1978. It set the goal of 4 percent unemployment and 3 percent inflation and instructed the Federal Reserve Board to try to produce those goals when making policy decisions. Augustus Freeman Hawkins (born August 31, 1907), a prominent U.S. figure in Civil Rights and Organized Labor history. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Humphrey-Hawkins Full Employment Act passed in 1978 gave the US government the goal to provide full employment. ... The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central bank of the United States. ...

Burial Plot of Vice President Humphrey. Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Burial Plot of Vice President Humphrey. Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Humphrey ran for Majority Leader after the 1976 election but lost to Robert Byrd of West Virginia. The Senate honored Humphrey by creating the post of Deputy President pro tempore of the Senate for him. On August 16, 1977, Humphrey revealed his terminal cancer to the public. On October 25, 1977, he addressed the Senate, and on November 3, 1977, Humphrey became the first person other than a member or the president to address the House of Representatives in session. President Carter honored him by giving him command of Air Force One for his final trip to Washington on October 23. One of Humphrey's speeches contained the lines "It was once said that the moral test of Government is how that Government treats those who are in the dawn of life, the children; those who are in the twilight of life, the elderly; and those who are in the shadows of life, the sick, the needy and the handicapped," which is sometimes described as the "liberals' mantra." Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 2 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo taken by author. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 2 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo taken by author. ... Lakewood Cemetery is a large private, non-sectarian cemetery located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Minneapolis redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Senate Majority and Minority Leaders (also called Senate Floor Leaders) are two... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... The ceremonial post of Deputy President pro tempore of the United States Senate was created for Hubert Humphrey, a former Vice President, in 1977 following his lost bid to become the Senate majority leader. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... For the current aircraft, see Boeing VC-25. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Death and funeral

In late 1977, Humphrey was diagnosed with terminal bladder cancer. He spent his last weeks calling old political acquaintances on a special long-distance telephone his family had given him. One call was to Richard Nixon, his former foe in the 1968 presidential election in which Humphrey invited Nixon to his upcoming funeral; Nixon accepted. Bladder cancer refers to any of several types of malignant growths of the urinary bladder. ... Nixon redirects here. ...


Humphrey died on January 13, 1978 at his home in Waverly, Minnesota. His body lay in state in the rotunda of both the United States Capitol and the Minnesota State Capitol, and was interred in Lakewood Cemetery in Minneapolis. His wife, Muriel Humphrey, was appointed by Minnesota's governor Rudy Perpich to serve in the US Senate until a special election to fill the term was held. She did not seek election to finish her husband's term in office. Waverly is a city located in Wright County, Minnesota. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... Minnesota State Capitol at Night The Minnesota State Capitol is located in Minnesotas capital city, Saint Paul, and houses the Minnesota Senate, Minnesota House of Representatives, the Office of the Attorney General and the Office of the Governor. ... Lakewood Cemetery is a large private, non-sectarian cemetery located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... Muriel Humphrey Muriel Buck Humphrey (February 20, 1912 – September 20, 1998) was the wife of Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, and a United States Senator. ... Rudy Perpich (June 27, 1928–September 21, 1995) was an American dentist and politician. ...


Muriel Humphrey remarried Max Brown in 1979 and took the name Muriel Humphrey Brown. She died in 1998 at the age of 86 and is interred next to her first husband. Muriel Humphrey Muriel Buck Humphrey (February 20, 1912 – September 20, 1998) was the wife of Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, and a United States Senator. ...


Honors

A statue honoring Humphrey outside Minneapolis City Hall[4]

In 1965, Humphrey was made an Honorary Life Member of Alpha Phi Alpha, the first intercollegiate Greek-letter fraternity established for African American males. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2142x2654, 1361 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hubert Humphrey User:Malepheasant/articles Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2142x2654, 1361 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hubert Humphrey User:Malepheasant/articles Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Minneapolis City Hall, Franklin Bidwell Long and Frederick G. Kees, architects, finished 1906 (view from northeast) Minneapolis City Hall and Hennepin County Courthouse (also known as the Municipal Building) is the main building used by the city government of Minneapolis, Minnesota, also serving Hennepin County. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... This page contains special characters. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...


He was awarded posthumously the Congressional Gold Medal on June 13, 1979 and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1980. Congressional Gold Medal presented to Navajo Code talkers in 2000 The Congressional Gold Medal should not be confused with the Medal of Honor (commonly called the Congressional Medal of Honor), which is also awarded by Congress, but only to military members as the highest military decoration of the United States. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal, which is bestowed by an...


Buildings and institutions named for Humphrey

  • The Hubert H. Humphrey Terminal at Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport
  • The Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome domed stadium in Minneapolis and home to the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League and the Minnesota Twins of Major League Baseball
  • The Hubert H. Humphrey Job Corps Center in St. Paul, Minn.
  • The Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota and its building, the Hubert H. Humphrey Center
  • The Hubert H. Humphrey Building of the Department of Health and Human Services in Washington,D.C.
  • The Hubert H. Humphrey Bridge carrying FL S.R. 520 over the Indian River Lagoon between Cocoa and Merritt Island in Brevard County, Florida
  • The Hubert H. Humphrey Middle School in Bolingbrook, Illinois.
  • The Hubert H. Humphrey Comprehensive Health Center of the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services in Los Angeles, CA.
  • The Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship Program, which fosters an exchange of knowledge and mutual understanding throughout the world.
  • The Hubert H. Humphrey Auditorium at Doland High School[1] in Doland, South Dakota.
  • The Hubert H. Humphrey Elementary School in Albuquerque, New Mexico

Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport (IATA: MSP, ICAO: KMSP) is the largest and busiest airport in the five-state upper Midwestern region of Minnesota, Iowa, South Dakota, North Dakota, and Wisconsin. ... The Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome, often simply called The Metrodome, is a domed sports stadium in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... The Hubert H. Humphrey Institute ranks among the top 15 professional schools of public affairs at public universities in the country; our program concentration in nonprofit management ranks fifth in the nation. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... SR 520, previously known as the Cocoa-Orlando Highway is an east-west highway connecting Cocoa Beach in Brevard County and Bithlo in Orange County. ... The Indian River Lagoon is a series of lagoons and inlets making up a portion of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in the U.S. state of Florida. ... Cocoa is a city located in Brevard County, Florida. ... Merritt Island is: An island (strictly, part of a peninsula) in Brevard County, Florida, on Floridas Atlantic coast a town located on the island Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, also located on the island The island Merritt Island is not strictly an island at all, but part of a... Brevard County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida, along the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. ... Incorporated Village in 1965. ... Albuquerque redirects here. ...

Electoral history

Main article: Electoral history of Hubert Humphrey

See also

Minnesota is known for a politically active citizenry, with populism being a longstanding force among the states political parties. ... These are tables of congressional delegations from Minnesota to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Hubert Horatio Skip Humphrey III is the son of former Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey II and Muriel Humphrey. ... Hubert Horatio Buck Humphrey IV is the son of former Minnesota attorney general Hubert H. Humphrey III and Nancy Lee Humphrey and the grandson of former US Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey and former Second Lady and US Senator Muriel Humphrey. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ...

Notes

  1. ^ RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project. Ancestry.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-29.
  2. ^ Solberg, Carl (1984). Hubert Humphrey: A Biography. Borealis Books, 209. ISBN 0-87351-473-4. 
  3. ^ The Man Who Quit Kicking the Wall. Time Magazine. Time/CNN (1964-09-04). Retrieved on 2007-05-31.
  4. ^ Municipal Building Commission: City Hall and Courthouse timeline

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Berman, Edgar [2]. Hubert: The Triumph And Tragedy Of The Humphrey I Knew. New York, N.Y. : G.P. Putnam's & Sons, 1979. A physician's personal account of his friendship with Humphrey from 1957 until his death in 1978.
  • Cohen, Dan. Undefeated: The Life of Hubert H. Humphrey. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications, 1978.
  • Garrettson, Charles L. III. Hubert H. Humphrey: The Politics of Joy. New Brunswick, N.J.: Transaction Publishers, 1993.
  • Humphrey, Hubert H. The Education of a Public Man: My Life and Politics. Garden City, N. Y. : Doubleday, 1976.
  • Mann, Robert. The Walls of Jericho: Lyndon Johnson, Hubert Humphrey, Richard Russell and the Struggle for Civil Rights. New York, N.Y. : Harcourt Brace, 1996.
  • Solberg, Carl. Hubert Humphrey: A Biography. New York : Norton, 1984.
  • Taylor, Jeff. Where Did the Party Go?: William Jennings Bryan, Hubert Humphrey, and the Jeffersonian Legacy. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 2006.
  • Thurber, Timothy N. The Politics of Equality: Hubert H. Humphrey and the African American Freedom Struggle. Columbia University Press, 1999. Pp. 352.

External links

Political offices
Preceded by
Marvin Kline
Mayor of Minneapolis
1945 – 1949
Succeeded by
Eric G. Hoyer
Preceded by
Mike Mansfield
Senate Majority Whip
1961 – 1965
Succeeded by
Russell B. Long
Preceded by
Lyndon B. Johnson
Vice President of the United States
January 20, 1965 – January 20, 1969
Succeeded by
Spiro Agnew
New title Deputy President pro tempore
of the United States Senate

1977 – 1978
Succeeded by
George J. Mitchell
United States Senate
Preceded by
Joseph H. Ball
Senator from Minnesota (Class 2)
1949 – 1964
Served alongside: Edward Thye, Eugene McCarthy
Succeeded by
Walter Mondale
Preceded by
Eugene McCarthy
Senator from Minnesota (Class 1)
1971 – 1978
Served alongside: Walter Mondale, Wendell Anderson
Succeeded by
Muriel Humphrey
Party political offices
Preceded by
Lyndon B. Johnson
Democratic Party vice presidential candidate
1964
Succeeded by
Edmund Muskie
Democratic Party presidential candidate
1968
Succeeded by
George McGovern
Honorary titles
Preceded by
Lyndon B. Johnson
Persons who have lain in state or honor
in the United States Capitol rotunda

January 14, 1978 – January 15, 1978
Succeeded by
Unknown Soldier of the Vietnam Era
(Michael Joseph Blassie)
This is a list of the candidates for the offices of President of the United States and Vice President of the United States that the U.S. Democratic Party has nominated since its founding. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... For other persons named James Buchanan, see James Buchanan (disambiguation). ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (nicknamed the Little Giant because he was short but was considered by many a giant in politics) was an American politician from the western state of Illinois, and was the Democratic Party nominee for President in 1860. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Southern Democrats are members of the U.S. Democratic Party who reside in the U.S. South. ... For the 1960s commissioner of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, see George McClellan (police commissioner). ... Governor Horatio Seymour Horatio Seymour (May 31, 1810 - February 12, 1886) was an American politician. ... Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811 – November 29, 1872) was an American editor of a leading newspaper, a founder of the Liberal Republican Party, reformer and politician. ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... Winfield Scott Hancock (February 14, 1824 – February 9, 1886) was a career U.S. Army officer and the Democratic nominee for President of the United States in 1880. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837–June 24, 1908), was the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States. ... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... Alton Brooks Parker (May 14, 1852 – May 10, 1926) was an American lawyer and judge and a U.S. presidential candidate in the 1904 elections. ... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... James Middleton Cox (March 31, 1870 – July 15, 1957) was a Governor of Ohio, U.S. Representative from Ohio and Democratic candidate for President of the United States in the election of 1920. ... John W. Davis John William Davis (April 13, 1873 — March 24, 1955) was an American politician and lawyer. ... Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... FDR redirects here. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... This is about the mid-20th-century politician and diplomat; for other American politicians so named, see Adlai Stevenson (disambiguation). ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... LBJ redirects here. ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, (born July 19, 1922) is a former United States Representative, Senator, and Democratic presidential nominee. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... This is a list of the candidates for the offices of President of the United States and Vice President of the United States that the U.S. Democratic Party has nominated since its founding. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President of the United States, serving in the administration of Martin Van Buren. ... For other persons named George Dallas, see George Dallas (disambiguation). ... William Orlando Butler (April 19, 1791 - August 6, 1880) was a U.S. political figure from Kentucky. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Herschel Vespasian Johnson (September 18, 1812 - August 16, 1880) was an American politician. ... Joseph Lane (1801-1881) was an American general during the Mexican War. ... Southern Democrats are members of the U.S. Democratic Party who reside in the U.S. South. ... George Pendleton George Hunt Pendleton (July 19, 1825 – November 24, 1889) was a Representative and a Senator from Ohio. ... Francis Preston Blair, Jr. ... Benjamin Gratz Brown (May 28, 1826 - December 13, 1885) was a Liberal Republican Senator, Governor of Missouri, and the Vice presidential candidate in the election of 1872. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885)[1] was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Indiana, a Governor of Indiana, and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States (serving with Grover Cleveland). ... William Hayden English (August 27, 1822–February 7, 1896) was an American politician. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885)[1] was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Indiana, a Governor of Indiana, and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States (serving with Grover Cleveland). ... Allen Granberry Thurman (November 13, 1813_December 12, 1895) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from Ohio. ... Adlai E. Stevenson I Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) was a Representative from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. ... Arthur Sewall (November 25, 1835 _ September 5, 1900 was a U.S. Democratic politician from Maine most notable as William Jennings Bryans first running mate in 1896. ... Adlai E. Stevenson I Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) was a Representative from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. ... Henry Gassaway Davis (16 November 1823 - March 11, 1916) was a U.S. Democratic politician from West Virginia. ... John Worth Kern (December 20, 1849 - August 17, 1917) was a U.S. Democratic politician from Indiana. ... Thomas R. Marshall Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the twenty-eighth Vice President of the United States of America under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1921. ... FDR redirects here. ... Charles Wayland Bryan (February 10, 1867 - March 4, 1945), was the younger brother of perennial U.S. Democratic presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan. ... Joseph Taylor Robinson Joseph Taylor Robinson (August 26, 1872 - July 14, 1937) was a Democratic United States Senator, Senate Majority Leader, member of the United States House of Representatives, Governor of Arkansas, and U.S. Vice Presidential candidate. ... John Nance Garner IV (November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States (1933-41). ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–46). ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Alben William Barkley (November 24, 1877 – April 30, 1956) was a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives and the United States Senate from Kentucky, and the thirty-fifth Vice President of the United States. ... credited to the United States Senate Historical Office John Jackson Sparkman (December 20, 1899 – November 16, 1985) was a United States politician from Alabama. ... The issue of Time Magazine in which Kefauvers victory in the New Hampshire primary was reported. ... LBJ redirects here. ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was an American Democratic politician from Maine. ... Thomas Eagleton and George McGovern on July 24, 1972 cover of Time magazine after his nomination for vice president on the Democratic ticket Thomas Eagleton on August 7, 1972 cover of Time Magazine after his withdrawal for vice president on the Democratic ticket. ... Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... Geraldine Anne Ferraro (born August 26, 1935) is a Democratic politician and a former member of the United States House of Representatives. ... Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a United States Senator from Connecticut. ... This article is about the American attorney and politician. ... The ceremonial post of Deputy President pro tempore of the United States Senate was created for Hubert Humphrey, a former Vice President, in 1977 following his lost bid to become the Senate majority leader. ... For other persons with a similar name, see George Mitchell George John Mitchell, GBE (born August 20, 1933) is a former Democratic Party politician and United States Senator from the state of Maine, and currently serves as Chairman of the global law firm DLA Piper US LLP and also as... The Cabinet meets in the Cabinet Room on May 16, 2001. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... LBJ redirects here. ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Download high resolution version (407x619, 70 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... David Dean Rusk (February 9, 1909 – December 20, 1994) was the United States Secretary of State from 1961 to 1969 under presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Dillons signature, as used on American currency Clarence Douglas Dillon (August 21, 1909 – January 10, 2003) son of Clarence and Ann (Douglass) Dillon, was U.S. Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to France (1953-1957) and 57th secretary of the United States Department of the Treasury (1961-1965). ... }} Henry Hammill Fowler (September 5, 1908–January 3, 2000) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Joseph Walker Barr (January 17, 1918–February 23, 1996) was an American businessman and politician. ... The United States Secretary of Defense (SECDEF) is the head of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), concerned with the armed services and military matters. ... For the figure skater, see Robert McNamara (figure skater). ... Clark McAdams Clifford (December 25, 1906 – October 10, 1998) was a highly influential American lawyer who served Presidents Truman, Kennedy, Johnson and Carter, serving as Secretary of Defense for Johnson. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ... Nicholas deBelleville Katzenbach (born January 17, 1922) was a American lawyer and United States Attorney General. ... William Ramsey Clark (born December 18, 1927) is a lawyer and activist. ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... John Austin Gronouski (October 26, 1919 - January 7, 1996) had been the Wisconsin state commissioner of taxation, and the United States Postmaster General Biography Gronouski was born in Dunbar, Wisconsin. ... You may have also meant Lawrence Francis Larry OBrien, one-time Postmaster General of the United States and commissioner of the National Basketball Association. ... William Marvin Watson (b. ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Stewart Udall Stewart Lee Udall (born January 31, 1920) was an American politician. ... The United States Secretary of Agriculture is the head of the United States Department of Agriculture concerned with land and food as well as agriculture and rural development. ... Orville Lothrop Freeman (May 9, 1918–February 20, 2003) was an American Democratic politician who served as the 29th Governor of Minnesota from January 5, 1955 to January 2, 1961 and as the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture from 1961 to 1969 under Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B... The office of the U.S. Secretary of Commerce in the mid-20th century. ... Luther Hartwell Hodges Luther Hartwell Hodges (9 March 1898 – 6 October 1974) was the Democratic governor of the state of North Carolina from 1954 to 1961 and United States Secretary of Commerce from 1961 to 1965. ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Secretaries of Commerce | 1914 births | 2000 deaths ... Alexander Buel Trowbridge Alexander Buel Trowbridge (born December 12, 1929) was the United States Secretary of Commerce from June 14, 1967 to March 1, 1968 in the administration of Lyndon Johnson. ... Cyrus Rowlett Smith Cyrus Rowlett Smith (September 9, 1899 – April 4, 1990), known throughout his life as C. R. Smith, was the CEO of American Airlines from 1934 to 1968 and from 1973 to 1974. ... Seal of the United States Department of Labor Secretary of Labor redirects here. ... The official portrait of W. Willard Wirtz hangs in the Department of Labor W. Willard Wirtz (born March 14, 1912) was a U.S. administrator. ... Anthony Joseph Celebrezze Sr. ... John W. Gardner, Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare under President Lyndon Johnson, was subsequently the founder of two influential national organizations, Common Cause and Independent Sector, as well as the author of numerous books on improving leadership in American society and other subjects. ... Wilbur J. Cohen Wilbur Joseph Cohen, generally called Wilbur J. Cohen, was a Jewish American politician born in Milwaukee in 1913. ... Seal of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development The United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development is the head of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Robert Clifton Weaver (December 29, 1907-July 17, 1997) served as the first United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (also known as HUD) from 1966 to 1968. ... Robert Coldwell Wood (September 16, 1923 – April 1, 2005) was a U.S. administrator. ... Seal of the United States Department of Transportation The United States Secretary of Transportation is the head of the United States Department of Transportation. ... Alan Stephenson Boyd (born July 20, 1922) was the first United States Secretary of Transportation, appointed by Lyndon Johnson. ... The United States presidential election of 1960 marked the end of Dwight D. Eisenhowers two terms as President. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The 1960 Democratic National Convention nominated John F. Kennedy for President and Lyndon B. Johnson for Vice President. ... Ross Robert Barnett (January 22, 1898 – November 6, 1987) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Mississippi from 1960 to 1964. ... For other persons named Pat Brown, see Pat Brown (disambiguation). ... Michael Vincent DiSalle (January 6, 1908 - September 14, 1981) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... LBJ redirects here. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Robert Baumle Meyner (July 3, 1908 - May 27, 1990) of Phillipsburg, New Jersey was the Democratic Governor of New Jersey from 1954 to 1962. ... Wayne Lyman Morse (October 20, 1900 – July 22, 1974) was a United States Senator from Oregon from 1945 to 1969. ... George Smathers George Armistead Smathers (born November 14, 1913) is an American lawyer and politician who represented Florida in the United States Senate for eighteen years, from 1951 until 1969, as a member of the Democratic Party. ... This is about the mid-20th-century politician and diplomat; for other American politicians so named, see Adlai Stevenson (disambiguation). ... William Stuart Symington William Stuart Symington (June 26, 1901–December 14, 1988) was a businessman and political figure from Missouri. ... LBJ redirects here. ... GOP redirects here. ... Mitchell who sits next to Ryan Anderson in computer class at Thunderbolt Middle School is weird. ... Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for president in the 1964 election. ... Nixon redirects here. ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ... Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. ... The United States presidential election of 1968 was a wrenching national experience, and included the assassination of Democratic candidate Robert F. Kennedy, the violence at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, and widespread demonstrations against the Vietnam War across American university and college campuses. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The 1968 National Convention of the U.S. Democratic Party was held at International Amphitheatre in Chicago, Illinois, from August 26 to August 29, 1968, for the purposes of choosing the Democratic nominee for the 1968 U.S. presidential election. ... Roger Douglas Branigin (July 26, 1902–November 19, 1975) was a Democratic governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from January 11, 1965 to January 13, 1969. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey II (May 27, 1911 – January 13, 1978) was the 38th Vice President of the United States, serving under President Lyndon Johnson. ... Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ... LBJ redirects here. ... Other notable people share this name. ... Eugene Joseph Gene McCarthy (born March 29, 1916) was a Congressman from Minnesotas Fourth District, from 1949 to 1959, and a United States Senator from Minnesota from 1959 to 1971. ... George Stanley McGovern (born July 19, 1922 in Avon, South Dakota) was a United States Congressman, Senator, and Democratic presidential candidate most noted for his opposition to the Vietnam War. ... Daniel Killian Moore (2 April 1906 - 7 September 1986) was the Democratic governor of the state of North Carolina from 1965 to 1969. ... George Smathers George Armistead Smathers (born November 14, 1913) is an American lawyer and politician who represented Florida in the United States Senate for eighteen years. ... credited to the United States Senate Historical Office Stephen Marvin Young (May 4, 1889 - December 1, 1984) was an American politician of the Democratic Party from Ohio. ... Julian Bond, 2005 Horace Julian Bond (born January 14, 1940) is an American leader of the American Civil Rights Movement. ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was an American Democratic politician from Maine. ... For other persons named Ted Kennedy, see Ted Kennedy (disambiguation). ... GOP redirects here. ... The 1968 Republican National Convention was held in Miami Beach, Miami-Dade County, Florida, August 5-8, 1968. ... Frank Carlson (January 23, 1893-May 30, 1987) was theGovernor of Kansas from 1947 to 1950 and a U.S. Senator from 1950 to 1969. ... Clifford P. Case on the cover of Time Magazine (18 October 1954) Clifford Phillip Case (16 April 1904 in Franklin Park, New Jersey – 5 March 1982 in Washington, DC) was an American lawyer political figure, serving in the U.S. House of Representatives (1945–1953) and United States Senate (1955... Hiram Fong Hiram Leong Fong (鄺友良; pinyin:Kuàng Yǒuliáng), formally Yau Leong Fong (October 15, 1906-August 18, 2004), was an American elder statesman and business tycoon industrialist from Hawaii. ... John Vliet Lindsay (November 24, 1921–December 19, 2000) was an American politician who served as a Congressman (1959-1966) and mayor of New York City (1966-1973). ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Order: 40th President Term of Office: January 20, 1981–January 20, 1989 Preceded by: Jimmy Carter Succeeded by: George H.W. Bush Date of birth: February 6, 1911 Place of birth: Tampico, Illinois Date of death: June 5, 2004 Place of death: Los Angeles, California First Lady: Nancy Reagan Political... James Allen Rhodes (September 13, 1909 - March 4, 2001) was a Republican politician from Ohio, and as of 2004 one of only three U.S. state governors to be elected to four terms in office. ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 - January 26, 1979) was a Governor of New York and the 41st Vice President of the United States of America from December 19, 1974 to January 20, 1977. ... This article is about the Governor of Arkansas (1967-1971). ... George Wilcken Romney (July 8, 1907 – July 26, 1995) was chairman of the American Motors Corporation from 1954 to 1962 and was elected three times as the Republican Governor of Michigan from 1963 to 1969. ... Harold Edward Stassen (April 13, 1907 - March 4, 2001) was the 25th Governor of Minnesota from 1939 to 1943. ... John Anthony Volpe (December 8, 1908 - November 11, 1994) was a Governor of Massachusetts and a U.S. Secretary of Transportation. ... Spiro Theodore Agnew (November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996) was the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States serving under President Richard M. Nixon, and the fifty-fifth Governor of Maryland. ... Edward William Brooke III (born October 26, 1919) is an American politician and was the first African American to be elected by popular vote to the United States Senate when he was elected as a Republican from Massachusetts in 1966, defeating his Democratic opponent, Endicott Peabody 58%-42%. Born in... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born June... John Lester Hubbard Chafee (October 22, 1922 – October 24, 1999) was an American politician. ... Daniel Jackson Evans Daniel Jackson Evans (born November 11, 1925) served three terms as governor of the state of Washington from 1965 to 1977, and represented the state in the United States Senate from 1983 to 1989. ... Robert Hutchison Finch (October 9, 1925 - October 10, 1995) was a Republican politician from Southern California. ... Mark Odom Hatfield (born July 12, 1922) is an American politician from Oregon. ... Jacob Koppel Jack Javits (May 18, 1904 – March 7, 1986) was a liberal New York politician. ... John Arthur Love (November 29, 1916, to January 21, 2002) was a United States attorney and Republican politician who served as the 36th Governor of the State of Colorado from 1963 to 1973. ... Rogers Clark Ballard Morton Rogers Clark Ballard Morton (September 19, 1914 – April 19, 1979) was a U.S. Republican political figure. ... Charles Harting Percy (born September 27, 1919) was chairman of the Bell & Howell Corporation from 1949 to 1964 and Republican United States Senator for Illinois from 1967 to 1985. ... John Goodwin Tower (September 29, 1925 – April 5, 1991) was a conservative Republican United States Senator from Houston, Texas. ... In a two-party system a third party is a party other than the two dominant ones. ... The American Independent Party is a California political party. ... This article is about the politician, former governor of Alabama and former presidential candidate. ... Curtis Emerson LeMay (November 15, 1906 - October 3, 1990) was a General in the United States Air Force. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Hubert H. Humphrey (700 words)
A delegate to the 1948 Democratic national convention, Humphrey was instrumental, through his evangelical oratory, in having the convention override the platform committee and include President Truman’s civil rights proposals in the platform.
Humphrey's convention triumph preceded his election to the Senate that year and gave him a reputation as a fire-breathing Midwestern liberal.
Humphrey carried 13 states, mostly in the East, and the District of Columbia, for 191 electoral votes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m