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Encyclopedia > Hubert H. Humphrey
Hubert H. Humphrey
Order: 38th Vice President
Term of Office: January 20, 1965
January 20, 1969
Predecessor: Lyndon Johnson
Succeeded by: Spiro Agnew
Date of Birth: May 27, 1911
Place of Birth: Wallace, South Dakota
Date of Death: January 13, 1978
Place of Death: Waverly, Minnesota
Wife: Muriel Humphrey
Profession: Pharmacist, teacher
Political Party: Democrat (DFL)
President: Lyndon Johnson

Hubert Horatio Humphrey II (May 27, 1911January 13, 1978) was the 38th Vice President of the United States, serving under President Lyndon Johnson. Humphrey twice served as a United States Senator from Minnesota, and served as Democratic Majority Whip. He was a founder of the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party. He was also elected mayor of Minneapolis, Minnesota. In 1968 Humphrey was the nominee of the United States Democratic Party in the United States presidential election, but lost to Republican Richard M. Nixon. Image File history File links Official White House portrait of Humphrey. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Spiro Theodore Agnew (November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996), born Spiros Anagnostopoulos in Towson, Maryland, was the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1973 under President Richard M. Nixon. ... May 27 is the 147th day (148th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 218 days remaining. ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... Wallace is a town located in Codington County, South Dakota. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... Waverly is a city located in Wright County, Minnesota. ... Marriage is a relationship that plays a key role in the definition of many families. ... Muriel Buck Humphrey (February 20, 1912–September 20, 1998) was the wife of Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, and a United States Senator. ... A profession is an occupation that requires extensive training and the study and mastery of specialized knowledge, and usually has a professional association, ethical code and process of certification or licensing. ... Pharmacists are health professionals who practice the art and science of pharmacy. ... A teachers room in a Japanese middle school, 2005. ... A political party is an organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) is a political party in the US state of Minnesota. ... The presidential seal was first used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... May 27 is the 147th day (148th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 218 days remaining. ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, is a heartbeat from the presidency, and in the calculation of Vice President John Nance Garner, not worth a bucket of warm piss. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) None Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 12th 225,365 km² 400 km 645 km 8. ... In politics, a whip is a member of a political party in a legislature whose task is to ensure that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ... The Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) is a political party in the US state of Minnesota. ... A mayor (from the Latin maÄ«or, meaning larger,greater) is the politician who serves as chief executive official of some types of municipalities. ... Nickname: City of Lakes Motto: En Avant Official website: http://www. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Order: 37th President Vice President: Spiro Agnew (1969–1973), Gerald R. Ford (1973–1974) Term of office: January 20, 1969 – August 9, 1974 Preceded by: Lyndon B. Johnson Succeeded by: Gerald R. Ford Date of birth: January 9, 1913 Place of birth: Yorba Linda, California Date of death: April 22...


In one of the most renowned speeches in American political history, Humphrey told the 1948 Democratic National Convention: "the time has arrived in America for the Democratic Party to get out of the shadows of states' rights and walk forthrightly into the bright sunshine of human rights," winning support for a pro-civil-rights plank in the Party's platform. The 1948 Democratic National Convention was held in Philadelphia from July 12 to July 14, and resulted in the nomination of President Harry Truman for President and of Alben Barkley for Vice President. ...

Contents


Early years

This son of Hubert Humphrey Sr. was born in Wallace, South Dakota (Codington County). He attended the public schools of Doland, South Dakota, where his family had moved. After public school, he graduated from Capitol College of Pharmacy, Denver in 1933. He then became a pharmacist with the Humphrey Drug Co. in Huron, South Dakota, from 1933 to 1937. Wallace is a town located in Codington County, South Dakota. ... Codington County is a county located in the state of South Dakota. ... Doland is a city located in Spink County, South Dakota. ... Nickname: The Mile-High City Official website: http://www. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Pharmacists are health professionals who practice the art and science of pharmacy. ... Huron is a city located in Beadle County, South Dakota. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Humphrey then returned to school, receiving a degree from the University of Minnesota in 1939. He also earned a graduate degree from Louisiana State University in 1940, serving as an assistant instructor of political science there. He then became an instructor and graduate student at the University of Minnesota from 19401941. Humphrey never finished his Ph.D., and for this reason he was not allowed to teach in the political science department when he returned to the university after losing the 1968 presidential election to Richard Nixon. He lived in Waverly, Minnesota. UMN redirects here. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College at Baton Rouge, or simply Louisiana State University (LSU) is a public, coeducational university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the main campus of the Louisiana State University System. ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... UMN redirects here. ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1941 calendar). ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...


City and state politics (1942-1948)

During World War II, he became state director of war production training and reemployment and State chief of Minnesota war service program 1942; assistant director, War Manpower Commission 1943; professor in political science at Macalester College in St. Paul 1943–1944; radio news commentator 1944–1945. In 1943, he made his first run at elective office, for mayor of Minneapolis, but he lost. Combatants Allies: • Soviet Union, • UK & Commonwealth, • USA, • France/Free France, • China, • Poland, • ...and others Axis: • Germany, • Japan, • Italy, • ...and others Casualties Military dead: 18 million Civilian dead: 33 million Full list Military dead: 7 million Civilian dead: 4 million Full list World War II, also known as the Second World... This article is about the year. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) is a common year starting on Friday. ... Macalester College is a privately supported coeducational liberal arts college in Saint Paul, Minnesota. ... State capitol building in Saint Paul Saint Paul is the capital and second-largest city of the state of Minnesota in the United States of America. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) is a common year starting on Friday. ... A mayor (from the Latin maÄ«or, meaning larger,greater) is the politician who serves as chief executive official of some types of municipalities. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ...


In 1944, Humphrey was the one of the key players in the merger of the Democratic and Farmer-Labor parties of Minnesota to form the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL). When in 1945 Minnesota Communists attempted to strengthen their position in the DFL Party, Humphrey backed away from his big tent policies and became an energetic anti-Communist. 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Farmer-Labor Party was a political party of Minnesota. ... Official language(s) None Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 12th 225,365 km² 400 km 645 km 8. ... The Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) is a political party in the US state of Minnesota. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... Official language(s) None Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 12th 225,365 km² 400 km 645 km 8. ...


After the war, he ran for and became mayor of Minneapolis 1945–1948. He was re-elected in 1947 by the largest margin in the city's history, to that time. Humphrey gained national fame during these years by being among the founders of the liberal anti-communist Americans for Democratic Action (ADA) and for reforming the Minneapolis police force. Previously, the city had been declared the Anti-Semitism capital of the country and the small African-American population of the city encountered numerous instances of racism. His tenure as mayor would be famous for his efforts to fight bigotry in all its forms. A mayor (from the Latin maÄ«or, meaning larger,greater) is the politician who serves as chief executive official of some types of municipalities. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Americans For Democratic Action (ADA) was formed in January 1947, when Eleanor Roosevelt, John Kenneth Galbraith, Reinhold Niebuhr, Hubert Humphrey and 200 other activists. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, American-African) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... It has been suggested that Racism in Mass Media be merged into this article or section. ... A mayor (from the Latin maÄ«or, meaning larger,greater) is the politician who serves as chief executive official of some types of municipalities. ... A bigot is a prejudiced person who is intolerant of opinions differing from his own. ...


The Happy Warrior (1948-1964)

The Democratic Party at the national level had been accommodating racial discrimination in the South, under the rubric of "states' rights". At the 1948 Democratic National Convention, the draft platform reflected this policy, and was supported by the incumbent President Harry S. Truman and the Democratic Party leadership. Humphrey and other liberals sought to substitute a strong civil rights plank. In one of the most renowned speeches in American political history, Humphrey told the Convention: "To those who say that this civil rights program is an infringement on states' rights, I say this, that the time has arrived in America for the Democratic Party to get out of the shadows of states' rights and walk forthrightly into the bright sunshine of human rights." Humphrey and his allies succeeded; the pro-civil-rights plank was narrowly adopted. The U.S. Southern states or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... In American politics and constitutional law, states rights are guaranteed by the Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution (i. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... The 1948 Democratic National Convention was held in Philadelphia from July 12 to July 14, and resulted in the nomination of President Harry Truman for President and of Alben Barkley for Vice President. ... A political platform is a list of the principles which a political party supports in order to appeal to the general public for the purpose of having said partys candidates voted into office. ... Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was the thirty-fourth Vice President (1945) and the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953), succeeding to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... The civil rights movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to all citizens of United States. ...


As a result of the Convention's vote, several Southern and conservative Northern delegations walked out of the hall. Many Southern Democrats were so enraged that they formed the "Dixiecrat" party and nominated their own presidential candidate, Strom Thurmond. Although the strong civil rights plank adopted at the Convention cost Truman the support of the Dixiecrats, it gained him important votes from blacks, especially in Northern cities. Pulitzer Prize-winning historian David McCullough has written that Humphrey probably did more to get Truman elected in 1948 than anyone other than Truman himself. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) represented South Carolina in the United States Senate from 1954 to April 1956 and November 1956 to 1964 as a Democrat and from 1964 to 2003 as a Republican. ... Listen to this article (help) Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-04-13, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... David McCullough (mə-kŭlə) (born July 7, 1933) is an American historian and bestselling author. ...


Minnesota elected Humphrey to the United States Senate in 1948 on the DFL ticket, and he took office on January 3, 1949. Humphrey's father died that year, and Humphrey stopped using "Jr." He was reelected in 1954 and 1960. His colleagues selected him as majority whip in 1961, a position he held until he left the Senate on December 29, 1964. Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1948 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of Democratic President Harry Truman for a full term. ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1954 was an election for the United States Senate which was a midterm election in the first term of Dwight D. Eisenhowers presidency. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1960 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of John F. Kennedy as president. ... The U.S. Senate Majority Whip is the second ranking member of the United States Senate. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ...


In the Senate, Humphrey became known for his advocacy of liberal causes (such as civil rights, arms control, a nuclear test ban, food stamps, and humanitarian foreign aid), and for his long and witty speeches. In 1954 Humphrey proposed to make mere membership in the Communist Party a felony. He was chairman on the Select Committee on Disarmament (Eighty-fourth and Eighty-fifth Congresses). As Democratic whip in the Senate in 1964, Humphrey was instrumental in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of that year. Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Arms control is a broad term alluding to a range of political concepts and aims. ... Preparation for an underground nuclear test at the Nevada Test Site in the 1980s. ... The Food Stamp Program is a program that provides food to low income people living in the United States. ... Foreign aid, international aid or development assistance are situations in which one country helps another country through some form of donation. ... The Communist Party of the United States of America (CPUSA) is one of several Marxist-Leninist groups in the United States. ... The United States Senate Select Committee on Disarmament was a committee organized in the U.S. Senate. ... The Eighty-fourth United States Congress was in session from 1955 to 1957. ... The Eighty-fifth United States Congress was in session from 1957 to 1959. ... For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Presidential and Vice-Presidential ambitions (1960-1969)

One of the most respected members of the U.S. Senate, Humphrey ran for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1960, but lost to Massachusetts Senator John F. Kennedy. He was elected Vice President of the United States on the Democratic ticket with Lyndon Johnson in 1964, and served from January 20, 1965, until January 20, 1969. As Vice President, Humphrey was controversial for his complete and vocal loyalty to Johnson and the policies of the Johnson Administration, even as many of Humphrey's liberal admirers opposed Johnson with increasing fervor about the Vietnam War. Critics later learned that Johnson had informed Humphrey that he would oppose him for the presidential nomintion if Humphrey (whom Johnson knew increasingly opposed the war) broke with the Johnson administration's Vietnam policies. Even Humphrey's nickname, the Happy Warrior, was used against him. The nickname referred not to hawkishness but rather Humphrey's crusading for social programs. The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 44th 10,555 mi²; 27,360 km² 183 mi; 295 km 113 mi; 182 km 13. ... A senate is a deliberative body, often the upper house or chamber of a legislature. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK, or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, is a heartbeat from the presidency, and in the calculation of Vice President John Nance Garner, not worth a bucket of warm piss. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam) United States of America South Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand the Philippines Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) National Liberation Front (Viet Cong) Strength ~1,200,000 (1968) ~420,000 (1968) Casualties South Vietnamese dead: 1,250,000+ US dead: 58,226 US wounded...


In Germany, Humphrey indirectly earned fame during an April 1967 visit when some Hippies, armed with what looked like a bomb, planned to cause trouble at the place Humphrey was to speak. However, the "bomb" contained nothing but pudding, and the plan was foiled by the police. The would-be vandals were dubbed "assassins" and "ten little Oswalds" in some widely-read right-leaning German newspapers; this characterization sparked riots by left-wing student activists. This "pudding assassination" thus became an early defining moment of the German part of the May 1968 movement, many of whose leaders moved into national politics later. 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hippies (singular hippie or sometimes hippy) were members of the 1960s counterculture movement who adopted a communal or nomadic lifestyle, renounced corporate nationalism and the Vietnam War, embraced aspects of Buddhism, Hinduism, and/or Native American religious culture, and were otherwise at odds with traditional middle class Western values. ... Jack Ruby murdered the assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, in a very public manner. ... This photo, showing Oswald wielding a rifle, a handgun, and the newspapers The Militant and The Worker, was one of three taken on March 31, 1963 in the backyard of his Dallas home by his wife Marina. ... May 1968 poster: Be young and shut up. ...


In 1968, the 22nd amendment did not disqualify LBJ from running for a second term, even though he succeeded into the presidency, because he had only served 14 months of Kennedy's term. However, after he announced that he would not run for a second term, Humphrey ran for President of the United States winning the United States Democratic Party nomination at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, amid riots and protests by antiwar demonstrators, some of whom favored Eugene McCarthy, George McGovern, or other protest candidates. Humphrey lost the 1968 election to Richard M. Nixon. His campaign was hurt because Humphrey had secured the Presidential nomination without winning a single primary. (In later years, changes in party rules made such an outcome virtually impossible.) During his underfunded campaign he grew on voters, who saw a kind of transparent decency as well as a mind that quickly grasped complicated issues. Starting out substantially behind Richard Nixon in polls, he had almost closed the gap by election day. 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... The Twenty-second Amendment of the United States Constitution sets a term limit for the President of the United States, providing that No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person who has held the office of President, or acted as President... The presidential seal was first used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Police and protesters at the Convention The 1968 Democratic National Convention was held in Chicago, Illinois from August 26-29, 1968, by the United States Democratic Party, for the purposes of choosing the Democratic nominee for the 1968 U.S. Presidential Election. ... Eugene Joseph Gene McCarthy (March 29, 1916 – December 10, 2005) was an American politician and a longtime member of the U.S. Congress. ... George McGovern Dr. George Stanley McGovern (born July 19, 1922) was a United States Congressman, Senator, and Democratic presidential candidate, losing the 1972 presidential election to incumbent Richard Nixon. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Order: 37th President Vice President: Spiro Agnew (1969–1973), Gerald R. Ford (1973–1974) Term of office: January 20, 1969 – August 9, 1974 Preceded by: Lyndon B. Johnson Succeeded by: Gerald R. Ford Date of birth: January 9, 1913 Place of birth: Yorba Linda, California Date of death: April 22... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ...


While he was Vice President, Hubert Humphrey was the subject of a satirical song by songwriter/musician Tom Lehrer entitled "Whatever Became of Hubert?" ("I wonder how many people here tonight remember Hubert Humphrey. He used to be a senator..."). The song addressed how some liberals and progressives felt let down by Humphrey, who had become a much more mute figure as Vice President than he had been as a senator. The song goes "Whatever became of Hubert? Has anyone heard a thing? Once he shone on his own, now he sits home alone and waits for the phone to ring. Once a fiery liberal spirit, ah, but now when he speaks he must clear it. ..." Tom Lehrer in 1960. ...


Immensely admired by associates and members of his staff, Humphrey could not break loose from the domination of Lyndon Johnson. The combination of the unpopularity of Johnson, the Chicago riots, and the discouragement of liberals and African-Americans when both Robert F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr., were assassinated during the election year caused him to lose to a candidate many thought less qualified to be president. The war Humphrey had come to oppose continued until the mid-1970s.


Later years (1969-1978)

After leaving the Vice-Presidency, Humphrey kept busy by teaching at Macalester College and the University of Minnesota, and by serving as chairman of board of consultants of the Encyclopædia Britannica Educational Corporation. Macalester College is a privately supported coeducational liberal arts college in Saint Paul, Minnesota. ... UMN redirects here. ... 1913 advertisement for the 11th edition, with the slogan When in doubt — look it up in the Encyclopædia Britannica The Encyclopædia Britannica (properly spelt with æ, the ae-ligature) was first published in 1768–1771 as The Britannica was an important early English-language general encyclopedia, and is still...


Initially he had not planned to return to political life, but an unexpected opportunity changed his mind. Eugene McCarthy, a DFL U.S. Senator from Minnesota who was up for re-election in 1970, realized that he had only a slim chance of winning even re-nomination (he had angered his party by opposing Johnson and Humphrey for the 1968 presidential nomination), and declined to run. Humphrey won the DFL nomination and the election, and returned to the U.S. Senate on January 3, 1971. He was re-elected in 1976, and remained in office until his death. Eugene Joseph Gene McCarthy (born March 29, 1916) was a Congressman from Minnesotas Fourth District, from 1949 to 1959, and a United States Senator from Minnesota from 1959 to 1971. ... Official language(s) None Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 12th 225,365 km² 400 km 645 km 8. ... Results -- Conservative pickups in orange, Independent pickups in yellow, Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1970 was an election for the United States Senate which was a midterm election in the term of... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... Results -- Independent holds in light yellow, Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1976 was an election for the United States Senate that coincided with Democrat Jimmy Carters election to the presidency. ...


In 1972, Humphrey once again ran for the Democratic nomination for president. He was defeated by Senator George McGovern in several primaries, and was trailing in delegates at the 1972 Democratic National Convention in Miami Beach, Florida. His hopes rested on challenges to the credentials of some of the McGovern delegates. For example, the Humphrey forces argued that the winner-take-all rule for the California primary violated procedural reforms intended to produce a better reflection of the popular vote. The effort failed, as several votes on delegate credentials went McGovern's way, guaranteeing his victory. Humphrey also briefly considered mounting a campaign for the Democratic nomination from the Convention once again in 1976, when the primaries seemed likely to result in a deadlock, but ultimately decided against it. 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1972 calendar). ... George McGovern Dr. George Stanley McGovern (born July 19, 1922) was a United States Congressman, Senator, and Democratic presidential candidate, losing the 1972 presidential election to incumbent Richard Nixon. ... The 1972 Democratic National convention nominated Senator George McGovern for President and Senator Thomas Eagleton for vice president. ... Location of Miami Beach in Miami-Dade County, Florida. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 3rd 410,000 km² 402. ... Nomination is part of the process of selecting a candidate for either election to an office, or the bestowing of an honor or award. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1976 calendar). ...


Humphrey ran for Majority Leader after the 1976 election but lost to Robert Byrd of West Virginia. The Senate honored Humphrey by creating the post of Deputy President pro tempore of the Senate for him. On August 16, 1977, Humphrey revealed that he had terminal cancer. On October 25, 1977, he addressed the Senate, and on November 3, 1977, Humphrey became the first person other than a Member or the President to address the House of Representatives in session. President Carter honored him by giving him command of Air Force One for his final trip to Washington on October 23. One of Humphrey's speeches contained the lines "It was once said that the moral test of Government is how that Government treats those who are in the dawn of life, the children; those who are in the twilight of life, the elderly; and those who are in the shadows of life, the sick, the needy and the handicapped," which is sometimes described as the "liberals' mantra." 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1976 calendar). ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Robert Byrd Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is a West Virginia Democrat serving in the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 41st 62,809 km² 210 km 385 km 0. ... The ceremonial post of Deputy President pro tempore of the United States Senate was created for Hubert Humphrey, a former Vice President, in 1977 following his lost bid to become the Senate majority leader. ... August 16 is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... For the submarine, see USS Jimmy Carter (SSN-23). ... Air Force One is the air traffic control call sign of any U.S. Air Force aircraft carrying the President of the United States (it is a common misconception that Air Force One refers to a single airplane). ...


Humphrey spent his last weeks calling old political acquaintances on a special long-distance telephone his family had given him. After his death at home in Waverly, Minnesota, he lay in state in the rotunda of both the U.S. Capitol and of the Minnesota State Capitol. His body was interred in Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Ironically, he ended up with substantially more national respect than the president who had kept him on a tight leash and the Republican opponent who had defeated him for the presidency but later resigned from office in August 1974. Waverly is a city located in Wright County, Minnesota. ... United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as home for Congress, the legislative branch of the United States federal government. ... The Minnesota State Capitol in Saint Paul The Minnesota State Capitol is located in Minnesotas capital city, Saint Paul, and houses the Minnesota Senate, Minnesota House of Representatives, the Office of the Attorney General and the Office of the Governor. ... Lakewood Cemetary is a large private, non-sectarian cemetery located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Nickname: City of Lakes Motto: En Avant Official website: http://www. ...


Honors

In 1965 Hubert Horatio Humphrey -- Vice President of the United States -- was made an Honorary Life Member of Alpha Phi Alpha, the first intercollegiate Greek-letter fraternity established for African Americans. 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ), Fraternity (known as A-Phi-A, but also Alphas and A-PHI) is the first intercollegiate Greek letter fraternity established for African Americans when established on December 4, 1906 on the campus of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... While the terms fraternity (from the Latin word frater, meaning: brother) and sorority may be used to describe any number of social and charitable organizations, including the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, and the Shriners, in the United States and Canada fraternities and sororities are most commonly known...


He was awarded posthumously the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor on June 13, 1979 and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1980. Congressional Gold Medal presented to Navajo Code talkers in 2000 The Congressional Gold Medal of Honor is the highest award which may be bestowed by the Legislative Branch of the United States government. ... June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States, considered the equivalent of the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ...


Buildings and institutions named for Humphrey

Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport (IATA: MSP, ICAO: KMSP) is the largest and busiest airport in the five state upper Midwest region (Minnesota, Iowa, South Dakota, Wisconsin and North Dakota, the borders of the Upper Midwest are actually somewhat nebulous; if one takes the Upper Midwest to include Illinois then... The Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome, usually simply called the Metrodome, is a domed sports stadium in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... The Hubert H. Humphrey Institute ranks among the top 15 professional schools of public affairs at public universities in the country; our program concentration in nonprofit management ranks fifth in the nation. ... UMN redirects here. ... SR 520, previously known as the Cocoa-Orlando Highway is an east-west highway connecting Cocoa Beach in Brevard County and Bithlo in Orange County. ... The Indian River Lagoon is a series of lagoons and inlets making up a portion of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in the U.S. state of Florida. ... Merritt Island is: An island (strictly, part of a peninsula) in Brevard County, Florida, on Floridas Atlantic coast a town located on the island Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, also located on the island The island Merritt Island is not strictly an island at all, but part of a... Location in the state of Florida Formed 1844 Seat Titusville Area  - Total  - Water 4,032 km² (1,557 mi²) 1,395 km² (539 mi²) 34. ...

See also

These are tables of congressional delegations from Minnesota to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Hubert Horatio Skip Humphrey III is the son of former Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey II and Muriel Humphrey. ... Hubert Horatio Buck Humphrey IV is the son of former Minnesota attorney general Hubert H. Humphrey III and Nancy Lee Humphrey and the grandson of former US Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey and former Second Lady and US Senator Muriel Humphrey. ... Official language(s) None Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 12th 225,365 km² 400 km 645 km 8. ... A politician is an individual involved in politics to the extent of holding or running for public office. ... This is a list of famous people who either were born in Minnesota or spent some important time in Minnesota. ...

References

  • Berman, Edgar. Hubert: The Triumph And Tragedy Of The Humphrey I Knew. New York, N.Y. : G.P. Putnam's & Sons, 1979
  • Humphrey, Hubert H. The Education of a Public Man: My Life and Politics. Garden City, N. Y. : Doubleday, 1976.
  • Solberg, Carl. Hubert Humphrey: A Biography. New York : Norton, 1984.

External links

Preceded by:
Joseph H. Ball
United States Senator (Class 2) from Minnesota
1949 - 1964
Served alongside: Edward J. Thye, Eugene McCarthy
Succeeded by:
Walter Mondale
Preceded by:
Mike Mansfield
United States Senate Majority Whip
1961 - 1965
Succeeded by:
Russell B. Long
Preceded by:
Lyndon B. Johnson
Democratic Party Vice Presidential candidate
1964 (won)
Succeeded by:
Edmund Muskie
Preceded by:
Lyndon B. Johnson
Vice President of the United States
January 20, 1965January 20, 1969
Succeeded by:
Spiro Agnew
Preceded by:
Lyndon B. Johnson
Democratic Party Presidential candidate
1968 (lost)
Succeeded by:
George McGovern
Preceded by:
Eugene McCarthy
United States Senator (Class 1) from Minnesota
1971 - 1978
Served alongside: Walter Mondale, Wendell R. Anderson
Succeeded by:
Muriel Humphrey
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