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Encyclopedia > Hua Tuo

Names Personal names in Chinese culture follow a number of conventions different from those of personal names in Western culture. ...

Simplified Chinese: 华陀
Traditional Chinese: 華佗
Pinyin: Huà Tuó
Wade-Giles: Hua T'o
Zi: Yuanhua (元化)

Huà Tuó was a famous Chinese physician during the Eastern Han and Three Kingdoms era. He was the first person to perform surgery with the aid of anesthesia, some 1600 years before the practice was adopted by Europeans. He did this by first feeding the patient with wine mixed with a herbal concoction before carrying out the operation. It is said he looked like "a saint who had passed the gates of this life", and was "a man with the complexion of a youth and a snowy beard". The menstrual cycle is the periodic change in a womans body that occurs every month between puberty and menopause and that relates to reproduction. ... The menstrual cycle is the periodic change in a womans body that occurs every month between puberty and menopause and that relates to reproduction. ... Pinyin is a system of romanization (phonemic notation and transcription to Roman script) for Standard Mandarin, where pin means spell(ing) and yin means sound(s)). This article describes the most common variant called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: 汉语拼音; Traditional Chinese: 漢語拼音; pinyin: HànyÇ” PÄ«nyÄ«n), also known as scheme... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... A Chinese style name, sometimes also known as a courtesy name, is an extra name that could be used in place of the given name. ... Physician examining a child A physician is a person who practices medicine. ... The Han Dynasty (Traditional Chinese characters: 漢朝, Simplified Chinese characters: 汉朝, pinyin Hàncháo 202 BC - AD 220) followed the Qin Dynasty and preceded the Three Kingdoms in China. ... The Three Kingdoms in 262, on the eve of the conquest of Shu. ... A thoracic surgeon performs a mitral valve replacement at the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, November 1990. ... Cetacaine, a typical topical anesthetic Anesthesia or anaesthesia (see spelling differences), is the process of blocking the perception of pain and other sensations. ... A saint is a term to refer to someone who is a holy person. ...


One of the most respected physicians in China's history, he was also one of the first physicians to devise exercises to enhance health. He developed a series of exercises based on the movements of five animals (tiger, deer, bear, ape, and crane) known as "Frolics of The Five Animals."


He was introduced to Sūn Quán, by Dǒng Xī. Huà Tuó healed Sūn Cè's general Zhōu Tài who had suffered great injuries to rescue Quán's brother, Cè. He used drugs which healed Zhōu Tài by the end of the month and was rewarded richly. Sun Quan (Traditional Chinese: 孫權; Simplified Chinese: 孙权; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Sun Chuan) (182 - 252), son of Sun Jian, courtesy name Zhongmou (仲謀), formally Emperor Da of (Eastern) Wu was the founder of Eastern Wu, during the Three Kingdoms period, in China. ... SÅ«n Cè (175 – 200) was a military general and warlord during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms era in ancient China. ... Sun Quan (Traditional Chinese: 孫權; Simplified Chinese: 孙权; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Sun Chuan) (182 - 252), son of Sun Jian, courtesy name Zhongmou (仲謀), formally Emperor Da of (Eastern) Wu was the founder of Eastern Wu, during the Three Kingdoms period, in China. ... SÅ«n Cè (175 – 200) was a military general and warlord during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms era in ancient China. ... Many drugs are provided in tablet form. ...


Huà Tuó was later called upon to cure an chronic and excruciating pain in Cáo Cāo's head, which turned out to be a brain tumour. Huà Tuó told Cáo Cāo that to cure him, he would have to open up his skull to remove the tumour. Cáo Cāo thought Huà Tuó had the intention of killing him by opening his skull. This was due to his fear of surgeons after Ji Ping, a former royal surgeon, attempted to assinate him as part of Dong Cheng's girdle plot. Huà Tuó was jailed and ordered to death by Cáo Cāo. Legend has it that Huà Tuó gave his medicine booklet, the Qīng Náng Shū (青囊書), in which were recorded various ways to treat patients, to a prison officer before his execution; however, the wife of the prison officer burned the booklet out of fear of being implicated and only two pages of Huá Tuó's works were left. This loss to Traditional Chinese Medicine was irreplaceable. There is also a set of 34 paravertebral acupuncture points named in his honor, the "Huà Tuó Jia Ji." In some versions of Huà Tuó's death, however, it was said that he died of illness and was filled with agaony to his last moment at not being able to cure his own sickness even though he was a doctor. Cao Cao (曹操; Pinyin: Cáo Cāo) (155 – 220), whose name is also often transliterated and should be correctly pronounced as Tsao Tsao, was a regional warlord and the last Chancellor of Eastern Han Dynasty who rose to great power during the last years of the Eastern Han... A brain tumor is any mass created by an abnormal and uncontrolled growth of cells either found in the brain (neurons, glial cells, epithelial cells, myelin producing cells, etc. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Dong Cheng, was given the task to assasinate Cao Cao by the Emperor. ... Traditional Chinese medicine shop in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong. ...


Huà Tuó's name is often being used synonymous with "miracle worker doctor" (神醫) in China. A particularly skilled doctor is often called "Hua Tuo Revived". (華佗再世)


In fiction

In the Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Huà Tuó healed Guan Yu, who had been struck with a poisoned arrow during his attack on Fancheng. Huà Tuó offered to anesthesize Guan Yu so that the operation would not hurt, but Guan Yu simply laughed and said that he was not afraid of pain. So Huà Tuó cut the flesh from Guan Yu's arm, then scraped the poison from the bone with a knife. The noise generated chilled all who were present to the bone, but through all this treatment, Guan Yu continued to play go (a board game) with Ma Liang as if uninjured and without flinching from pain. When quizzed by Ma, Guan said that he had done so to keep the morale of the army high. After Huà Tuó cured Guan Yu he was rewarded with a rich banquet. Guan Yu wanted to present him with one hundred ounces of gold, but he refused, saying that a doctor's duty was to cure his patients, and not for the purpose of profit. In actual history, however, Hua Tuo died long before Guan Yu fought in the battle of Fancheng. Romance of the Three Kingdoms (Simplified Chinese: 三国演义; Traditional Chinese: 三國演義; Pinyin: sānguó yÇŽnyì), written by Luó Guànzhōng in the 14th century, is a Chinese historical novel based upon events in the turbulent years near the end of the Han Dynasty, and the Three Kingdoms period (220-280). ... Guan Yu (關羽)(160–219) was a military general under the warlord Liu Bei during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms period in ancient China. ... The Battle of Fancheng was a battle fought between the Shu and Wei kingdoms during the Three Kingdoms period of ancient China. ... Guan Yu (關羽)(160–219) was a military general under the warlord Liu Bei during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms period in ancient China. ... Go, also known as Weiqi in Mandarin Chinese (Traditional Chinese: 圍棋; Simplified Chinese: 围棋), and Baduk in Korean (Hangul:바둑), is a strategic, deterministic two-player board game originating in ancient China, before 200 BC. The game is now popular throughout East Asia and on the Internet. ... Ma Liang (馬良; style name Jichang 季常; sometimes called Bomei 白眉 White eyebrows) was an advisor to Liu Bei, ruler of the Three Kingdoms state of Shu until his death in 222. ... Guan Yu (關羽)(160–219) was a military general under the warlord Liu Bei during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms period in ancient China. ... General Name, Symbol, Number gold, Au, 79 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 6, d Appearance metallic yellow Atomic mass 196. ...



Prominent people of the Three Kingdoms Era
Rulers Wei: Cao Cao - Cao Pi - Cao Rui
Shu: Liu Bei - Liu Shan
Wu: Sun Jian - Sun Ce - Sun Quan
Others: Dong Zhuo - Gongsun Zan - Han Fu - Liu Biao - Liu Yao - Liu Zhang - Lü Bu - Ma Teng - Meng Huo - Yuan Shao - Yuan Shu - Zhang Jiao - Zhang Lu - Emperor Xian
Advisors Wei: Guo Jia - Sima Yi - Xun You - Xun Yu
Shu: Fei Yi - Jiang Wan - Jiang Wei - Pang Tong - Zhuge Liang
Wu: Lu Su - Lu Xun - Zhou Yu
Generals Wei: Dian Wei - Xiahou Dun - Xiahou Yuan - Xu Chu - Xu Huang - Zhang He - Zhang Liao
Shu: Guan Yu - Huang Zhong - Ma Chao - Wei Yan - Zhang Fei - Zhao Yun
Wu: Huang Gai - Lü Meng - Taishi Ci - Zhou Tai
Others Diaochan - Hua Tuo - Sun Shangxiang

  Results from FactBites:
 
Five Animal Frolics (Wu Qin Xi) Qigong - Ancient Chinese Exercise System (5180 words)
"Hua Tuo (141-208 A.D.) was a contemporary of Zhang Zhongjing.
Cao Cao, ruler of the state of Wei, had Hua Tuo put to death for reasons that are unclear.
Hua T'o (110-207 A.D.) is one of the famous physicians of the Han Dynasty.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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