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Encyclopedia > Howell Cobb

Howell Cobb (September 7, 1815October 9, 1868) was an American political figure. He served as a Congressman and in the Presidential Cabinet of James Buchanan and then in the civic and military service of Civil War-era Georgia and the Confederate States of America. September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in Leap years). ... 1868 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. ... For the economist of this name, see James M. Buchanan. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... National Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Official language English de facto nationwide Various European and Native American languages regionally Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans...


Born in Jefferson County, Georgia, he was raised in Athens, Georgia and attended the University of Georgia. He was admitted to the bar in 1836 and became solicitor general of the western judicial circuit of Georgia. He was elected as Democrat to the 28th, 29th, 30th and 31st Congresses. Jefferson County is a county located in the state of Georgia. ... Downtown Athens, as seen through the University of Georgia arch Athens or Athens-Clarke County is a city located in Clarke County,Georgia, U.S., in the northeastern part of the state, just off of Georgia 316. ... The Arch, the gateway to UGAs historic North Campus. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... (Redirected from 28th Congress) Twenty-eighth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... (Redirected from 29th Congress) Twenty-ninth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... Thirtieth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... This is a list of members of the Thirty-First United States Congress. ...


He was chairman of the U.S. House Committee on Mileage during the 28th Congress, and Speaker of the United States House of Representatives during the 31st Congress. Dennis Hastert of Illinois, the current Speaker of the House (since January 6, 1999) The Speaker of the House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the United States House of Representatives. ... This is a list of members of the Thirty-First United States Congress. ...


He sided with President Andrew Jackson on the question of nullification; was an efficient supporter of President James K. Polk's administration during the Mexican-American War; and was an ardent advocate of slavery extension into the territories, but when the Compromise of 1850 had been agreed upon he became its staunch supporter as a Union Democrat, and on that issue was elected governor of Georgia by a large majority. Order: 7th President Vice President: John C. Calhoun (1829-1832) Martin Van Buren (1833-1837) Term of office: March 4, 1829 – March 3, 1837 Preceded by: John Quincy Adams Succeeded by: Martin Van Buren Date of birth: March 15, 1767 Place of birth: Waxhaws area of North Carolina Date of... This article or section should be merged with Nullification Crisis This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Order: 11th President Vice President: George M. Dallas Term of office: March 4, 1845 – March 3, 1849 Preceded by: John Tyler Succeeded by: Zachary Taylor Date of birth: November 2, 1795 Place of birth: Mecklenburg County, North Carolina Date of death: June 15, 1849 Place of death: Nashville, Tennessee First... The Mexican-American War was a war fought between the United States and Mexico between 1846 and 1848. ... A monument celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, erected in Victoria Tower Gardens, Millbank, Westminster, London Look up Slavery in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Slavery can mean one or more related conditions which involve control of a person against his or her will, enforced by... These are historic regions of the United States, meaning regions that were legal entities in the past, or which the average modern American would no longer immediately recognize as a regional description. ... Henry Clay takes the floor of the Old Senate Chamber; Millard Fillmore presides as Calhoun and Webster look on. ...


In 1851 he left the House to serve as the Governor of Georgia, holding that post until 1853. He was elected to the 34th Congress and then took the position of Secretary of the Treasury in Buchanan's Cabinet. He served for three years, resigning in December 1860. In 1860, he ceased to be a Unionist, and became a leader of the secession movement. This is a list of Governors of the state of Georgia, including governors of the British colony of Georgia. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the finance minister of the Federal Government of the United States. ... The word Unionist, simply meaning one espousing a union, has a number of connotations, depending on context: Unionists are people in Ireland, England, Scotland and Wales who were historically in favour of uniting their nations into a United Kingdom, or who in modern times wish their nations to remain part... Secession is the act of withdrawing from an organization, union, or political entity. ...


He was president of the convention of the seceded states which drafted a constitution for the Confederacy which assembled in Montgomery, Alabama, on February 24, 1861. Montgomery is the capital of the state of Alabama, and is a city located in Montgomery County. ... February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


He was appointed a brigadier general in the Confederate Army February 13, 1862, and was promoted to major general September 9, 1863. He surrendered at Macon, Georgia, April 20, 1864. From the close of the war until his death he vigorously opposed the Reconstruction Acts. A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... For other places called Macon, see Macon Macon is a city located in Bibb County, Georgia. ... Following the Civil War, the United States Congress passed four pieces of legislation known as Reconstruction Acts. ...


He died in New York City in 1868. He is buried in Athens, Georgia. City nickname: The Big Apple Location in the state of New York Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area  - Land  - Water 1,214. ...


Sources

The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ...

External links

  • New Georgia Encyclopedia: Howell Cobb (1815-1868) (http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/nge/Article.jsp?id=h-615)
  • U.S. Treasury - Biography of Secretary Howell Cobb (http://www.ustreas.gov/education/history/secretaries/hcobb.html)


Preceded by:
Robert C. Winthrop
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
December 22, 1849March 3, 1851
Succeeded by:
Linn Boyd
Preceded by:
George W. Towns
Governor of Georgia
18511853
Succeeded by:
Herschel V. Johnson
Preceded by:
James Guthrie
U.S. Secretary of the Treasury
18571860
Succeeded by:
Philip Thomas


Robert Charles Winthrop (May 12, 1809–November 16, 1894) was an American statesman who served in the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate. ... Dennis Hastert of Illinois, the current Speaker of the House (since January 6, 1999) The Speaker of the House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the United States House of Representatives. ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... Events January 23 - The flip of a coin determines whether a new city in Oregon is named after Boston, Massachusetts, or Portland, Maine, with Portland winning. ... Linn Boyd (November 22, 1800–December 17, 1859) was a prominent U.S. politician of the 1840s and 1850s, and served as Speaker of the United States House of Representatives from 1851 to 1855. ... This is a list of Governors of the state of Georgia, including governors of the British colony of Georgia. ... Events January 23 - The flip of a coin determines whether a new city in Oregon is named after Boston, Massachusetts, or Portland, Maine, with Portland winning. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Herschel Vespasian Johnson (September 18, 1812 - August 16, 1880) was an American politician. ... James Guthrie (December 5, 1792–March 3, 1869) was an American businessman and politician. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the finance minister of the Federal Government of the United States. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Philip F. Thomas For the actor, see Philip Michael Thomas. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
New Georgia Encyclopedia: Howell Cobb (1815-1868) (1040 words)
A mid-nineteenth-century politician, Howell Cobb served as congressman (1843-51; 1855-57), Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives (1849-51), governor of Georgia (1851-53), and secretary of the treasury (1857-60).
Cobb was born in Jefferson County on September 7, 1815, the eldest child of John and Sarah Cobb.
During Cobb's tenure at the Treasury Department, the financial panic of 1857 beset the nation.
New Georgia Encyclopedia: Thomas R. R. Cobb (1823-1862) (1097 words)
Thomas R. Cobb was one of antebellum Georgia's foremost legal authorities and most outspoken advocates of slavery and of secession from the Union.
Cobb attended the University of Georgia, graduated at the top of his class, and was admitted to the Georgia bar in 1842.
Cobb was a deeply religious man and a leader in the Presbyterian church in Athens.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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