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Encyclopedia > Howard University
Howard University
Howard University seal

Motto: Veritas et Utilitas
(Latin:Truth and Service)
Established: 1867
Type: Private
Religious affiliation: Nonsectarian
Endowment: US$532 million [1]
President: H. Patrick Swygert
Staff: 3,953
Undergraduates: 7,063
Postgraduates: 3,682
Location: Flag of the United States Washington, D.C.
Campus: Urban; 258 acres (1.0 km²)
Colors: Red, White, and Blue
               
Mascot: Bison
Athletics: NCAA Division I
19 Varsity Teams
Affiliations: Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools
Website: www.howard.edu

Howard University (HU) is a private, coeducational, nonsectarian university located in Washington, D.C., United States. Howard University seal File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... H. Patrick Swygert is an American higher education executive. ... This article is about work. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Species †B. antiquus B. bison B. bonasus †B. latifrons †B. occidentalis †B. priscus Bison in winter. ... NCAA redirects here. ... The Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools is a voluntary, peer based, non-profit association dedicated to the educational excellence and improvement through peer evaluation and accreditation. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


Established on March 2, 1867 under a charter enacted by Congress and approved by President Andrew Johnson, the college was named after General Oliver O. Howard who was commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau and the college's third president. A historically black university, the college currently ranks 96th among national universities in the U.S. News & World Report's "America's Best Colleges 2008" rankings.[2] Howard University is the number-one producer of African American Ph.D.s in the United States.[3][4] is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... Oliver Otis Howard (November 8, 1830 – October 26, 1909) was a career U.S. Army officer and a Union general in the American Civil War. ... A Bureau agent stands between an armed group of Southern whites and a group of freed slaves in this 1868 picture from Harpers Weekly On March 3, 1865, Congress established the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, also known as the Freedmens Bureau, was a federal agency that... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ...

Contents

Background

Howard was established by a charter in 1867, and much of its early funding came from endowment, private benefaction, and tuition. An annual congressional appropriation administered by the Secretary of the Interior funded the school.[5] Today, it is a member school of the Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Fund[6] and is partially funded by the US Government, which gives approximately $235 million annually.[7][8] From its outset, it was nonsectarian and open to people of both sexes and all races.[9] Howard has graduate schools of law, medicine, dentistry and divinity, in addition to the undergraduate program. The current enrollment (as of 2003) is approximately 11,000, including 7,000 undergraduates. The university's football homecoming activities serve as one of the premier annual events in Washington. [10] The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Thurgood Marshall successfully argued the 1954 landmark case Brown v. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


History

Founders Library is an iconic building on the Howard University campus that has been declared a National Historic Landmark.
Founders Library is an iconic building on the Howard University campus that has been declared a National Historic Landmark.

Howard University has played an important role in American history and the Civil Rights Movement on a number of occasions. Alain Locke, Chair of the Department of Philosophy and first African American Rhodes Scholar, authored The New Negro, which helped to usher in the Harlem Renaissance.[11] Ralph Bunche, the first Nobel Peace Prize winner of African descent, served as chair of the Department of Political Science.[12] Stokely Carmichael, also known as Kwame Toure, a student in the Department of Philosophy and the Howard University School of Divinity coined the term "Black Power" and worked in Lowndes County, Alabama as a voting rights activist.[13] Historian Rayford Logan served as chair of the Department of History.[14] E. Franklin Frazier served as chair of the Department of Sociology.[15] Sterling Allen Brown served as chair of the Department of English. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 556 pixelsFull resolution (2167 × 1507 pixel, file size: 976 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 556 pixelsFull resolution (2167 × 1507 pixel, file size: 976 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Pre-Colonial America For details, see the main Pre-Colonial America article. ... Martin Luther King is perhaps most famous for his I Have a Dream speech, given in front of the Lincoln Memorial during the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom This article is about the civil rights movement following the Brown v. ... Alain LeRoy Locke (1886-1954) was born on September 13, 1886, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania He was an American educator, writer, and philosopher, and is best remembered as a leader and chief interpreter of the Harlem Renaissance. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... The New Negro: An Interpretation is a book edited by Alain Locke in 1925, about race in America. ... The Harlem Renaissance was named after the anthology The New Negro, edited by Alain Locke in 1925. ... Dr. Ralph Johnson Bunche (August 7, 1903 – December 9, 1971) was an American political scientist, diplomat who received the 1950 Nobel Peace Prize for his late 1940s mediation in Palestine. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Stokely Standiford Churchill Carmichael (June 29, 1941 – November 15, 1998), also known as Kwame Ture, was a Trinidadian-American black activist active in the 1960s American Civil Rights Movement. ... Carmichael amidst a demonstration near the United States Capitol protesting the House of Representatives action denying Rep. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... Lowndes County is the name of several counties in the United States: Lowndes County, Alabama Lowndes County, Georgia Lowndes County, Mississippi This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Voting rights refers to the right of a person to vote in an election. ... Rayford Wittingham Logan (January 7, 1897 - November 4, 1982) was an African American historian and Pan-African activist. ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... Dr. Edward Franklin Frazier (September 24, 1894 - May 17, 1962), was an American sociologist. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the scientific or systematic study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous... Sterling Allen Brown (May 1, 1901 – January 13, 1989) was an African American teacher, and writer on folklore, of poetry and of literary criticism. ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, the Philippines, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology...


After being refused admission to the then-white-only University of Maryland School of Law, a young Lincoln University graduate Thurgood Marshall enrolled at Howard University School of Law instead. There he studied under Charles Hamilton Houston, a Harvard Law School graduate and leading civil rights lawyer who at the time was the dean of Howard's law school. Houston took Marshall under his wing, and the two forged a friendship that would last for the remainder of Houston's life. Howard University was the site where Marshall and his team of legal scholars from around the nation prepared to argue the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case.[16] University of Maryland, Baltimore, (also known as UMB) was founded in 1807. ... Lincoln University in Pennsylvania is a four-year university on 350 acres in southern Chester County and a Center for Graduate Studies in Philadelphia. ... For people and institutions etc. ... In the United States, a law school is an institution where students obtain a professional education in law. ... Charles Hamilton Houston (September 3, 1895–April 22, 1950) was a black lawyer, Dean of Howard University Law School and NAACP Litigation Director who helped play a role in dismantling the Jim Crow laws and helped train future Supreme Court justice Thurgood Marshall. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Holding Segregation of students in public schools violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, because separate facilities are inherently unequal. ...

Main Hall and Miner Hall in 1868. Miner Hall is located to the left.

Howard is the site of the historic Black Greek letter organization among black colleges. Although not the first black greek letter organization (see Sigma Pi Phi (the boule')), nor the first to be officially recognized by Howard University Board of Deans, Alpha Phi Alpha was the first to appear and establish itself amongst the male students of Howard University. Soon after came the other prominent black greek organizations, who hold a special bond to Howard University, as they were founded on the Howard campus. The Alpha chapters of Alpha Kappa Alpha in 1908, Delta Sigma Theta in 1913, Omega Psi Phi 1911, Phi Beta Sigma in 1914 and Zeta Phi Beta in 1920 hold this special bond.[17] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... Sigma Pi Phi is the the oldest surviving black fraternity and generally considered to be the first black fraternity. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΆΚΆ) is the first Greek-lettered sorority established and incorporated by African-American college women. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Omega Psi Phi (ΩΨΦ) is a national fraternity, and was the first black national fraternal organization to be founded at a historically black college. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ... Zeta Phi Beta (ΖΦΒ) Sorority, Inc. ...


Major improvements, additions, and changes occurred at the school in the aftermath of World War I. New buildings were built under the direction of architect Albert Cassell. [18] In 1918, all the secondary schools of the university were abolished and the whole plan of undergraduate work changed. The four-year college course was divided into two periods of two years each, the Junior College, and the Senior Schools. The semester system was abolished in 1919 and the quarter system substituted. Twenty-three new members were added to the faculty between the reorganization of 1918 and 1923. A dining hall building with class rooms for the department of home economics was built in 1921 at a cost of $301,000. A greenhouse was erected in 1919.[citation needed] Howard Hall was renovated and made a dormitory for girls; many improvements were made on campus; J. Stanley Durkee, Howard's last white president, was appointed in 1918. [19] “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Albert Irvin Cassell (1895-1969) was a prominent mid-twentieth-century African American architect in Washington, D.C., whose work shaped many academic communities in the United States. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Royal Greenhouses of Laeken. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ...


In 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson delivered a speech to the graduating class at Howard, where he outlined his plans for civil rights legislation and endorsed aggressive affirmative action to combat the effects of years of segregation of blacks from the nation's economic opportunities.[20] Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... LBJ redirects here. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Affirmative action in the United States Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity...


In 1989, Howard gained national attention when students rose up in protest against the appointment of then-Republican National Committee Chairman Lee Atwater as a new member of the university's Board of Trustees. Student activists disrupted Howard's 122nd anniversary celebrations, and eventually occupied the university's Administration building.[21] Within days, both Atwater and Howard's President, James E. Cheek, resigned. The Board of Trustees accepted many of the students' other demands, including promised improvements to campus housing and academic credit for community work.[22] The Republican National Committee (RNC) provides national leadership for the Republican Party of the United States. ... Harvey Leroy Lee Atwater (February 26, 1951 – March 29, 1991) was an American Republican political consultant and strategist. ...



The Division of Nursing faced losing its accreditation and being placed on probation for a second time because of the program's deficiencies. The Division of Allied Health Science, Physical Therapy and Physician Assistant program are also on probational accreditation status.[23] In addition, the residency programs at Howard University Hospital received a much-publicized unfavorable assessment by the Accrediting Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME).[24] Swygert announced in May 2007 he will retire from Howard in June 2008.[25]


In May of 2007, media mogul Oprah Winfrey was conferred the honorary doctorate of Humanities at the university's 139th commencement. She gave a highly publicized oration before a crowd of over 30,000 people.[26] Oprah Winfrey, (born January 29, 1954) is a multiple-Emmy Award winning host of The Oprah Winfrey Show, the highest rated talk show in television history. ...


Schools and colleges

Howard Bison logo
Howard Bison logo

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Research Centers

Moorland-Spingarn Research Center

Main article: Moorland-Spingarn Research Center

The Moorland-Spingarn Research Center (MSRC) is recognized as one of the world's largest and most comprehensive repositories for the documentation of the history and culture of people of African descent in Africa, the Americas, and other parts of the world. As one of the university's major research facilities, the MSRC collects, preserves, and makes available for research a wide range of resources chronicling the Black experience.[1] The Moorland-Spingarn Research Center (MSRC) is recognized as one of the worlds largest and most comprehensive repositories for the documentation of the history and culture of people of African descent in Africa, the Americas, and other parts of the world. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas in an equal-area projection The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... A research library is a library which contains an in-depth collection of material on one or several subjects. ...


Publications

Howard University is the publisher of The Journal of Negro Education which began publication in 1932


Presidents of Howard University

•  Charles B. Boynton 1867
•  Byron Sunderland 18671869
•  Oliver Otis Howard 18691874
•  Edward P. Smith 18751876
•  William W. Patton 18771889
•  Jeremiah E. Rankin 18901903
•  John Gordon 19031906
•  Wilbur P. Thirkield 19061912
•  Stephen M. Newman 19121918
•  J. Stanley Durkee 19181926
•  Mordecai Wyatt Johnson 19261960
•  James M. Nabrit 19601969
•  James E. Cheek 19691989
•  Franklyn G. Jenifer 19901994
•  H. Patrick Swygert 1995 – present

Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Portrait of Oliver O. Howard by Mathew Brady, ca. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) // January 31 - United States orders all Indigenous peoples in the United States to move onto reservations February 2 - The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs of Major League Baseball is formed. ... William W. Patton Rev. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... The Right Honourable John Gordon, Mr Justice Gordon (November 23, 1849 - September 26, 1922) was an Irish lawyer and politician, who served as Attorney-General for Ireland and a Judge of the High Court. ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Year 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Wilbur Patterson Thirkield was born on September 25, 1854 in Franklin, Ohio. ... Year 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mordecai Wyatt Johnson (1890 - 1976) was a U.S. educator. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... H. Patrick Swygert is an American higher education executive. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ...

Alumni

Howard University has conferred over 99,318 degrees and certificates in its 140-year history. Noteworthy alumni include Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison, actor Ossie Davis, Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall (School of Law), Claude Brown, Stokeley Carmichael, Tracie Thoms, Roberta Flack, Lance Gross, Shaka Hislop, Phylicia Rashad, Richard Smallwood and many other educators, politicians, diplomats, writers, prominent international figures, and corporate executives. The 1990s R&B group Shai was formed on the campus of Howard University. Their hit song "If I Ever Fall In Love" was recorded there as well. The Hollywood Reporter reported that when Howard alumna Debbie Allen became the producer-director of the popular television series A Different World, she "drew from her college experiences in an effort to accurately reflect in the show the social and political life on black campuses." The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... For the Louisiana politician, see deLesseps Morrison, Jr. ... Ossie Davis in The Green Pastures, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1951 Ossie Davis (December 18, 1917 – February 4, 2005) was an African American film actor, director and social activist. ... For people and institutions etc. ... Claude Brown (February 23, 1937 - February 2, 2002) is the author of Manchild in the Promised Land, which tells the story of his coming of age during the 1940s and 1950s in Harlem. ... Stokely Standiford Churchill Carmichael (June 29, 1941 – November 15, 1998), also known as Kwame Ture, was a Trinidadian-American black activist active in the 1960s American Civil Rights Movement. ... Tracie Thoms (born August 19, 1975) is an American television, film, and stage actress. ... Roberta Flack Roberta Flack (born February 10, 1937 in Asheville, North Carolina) is an American singer. ... Neil Shaka Hislop (born February 22, 1969 in Hackney, London) is a 6 ft 6 inch football goalkeeper who currently plays for West Ham United F.C. Hislop is the first choice keeper for the Trinidad and Tobago national football team. ... In a Mothers Day survey, Rashads character on The Cosby Show, Claire Huxtable, was named, TV mom closest to your own mom in spirit. ... Richard Smallwood is an American gospel music artist from Atlanta, Georgia who formed The Richard Smallwood Singers in 1977. ... Shai was an early 1990s vocal R&B/soul quartet. ... The Hollywood Reporter is one of two major trade papers of the film industry in the United States, the other being Variety. ... Debbie Allen (born Deborrah Kaye Allen on January 16, 1950 in Houston, Texas) is an American actor, choreographer, film director, television producer and a member of the Presidents Committee on the Arts and Humanities. ... A Different World was an American television sitcom. ...

Howardites are persons affiliated with Howard University, commonly including alumni, current and former faculty members, students, and others. ...

Student organizations originated at Howard University

A number of student organizations were founded at Howard University, including:

Howard University is also host to other Greek letter organizations, including Alpha Phi Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi, Sigma Gamma Rho, Gamma Iota Sigma, Iota Phi Theta, Phi Mu Alpha, Sigma Alpha Iota, Delta Sigma Pi, Phi Sigma Pi, Alpha Phi Omega, Gamma Sigma Sigma, Kappa Kappa Psi, and Tau Beta Sigma. Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΆΚΆ) is the first Greek-lettered sorority established and incorporated by African-American college women. ... Omega Psi Phi (ΩΨΦ) is a national fraternity, and was the first black national fraternal organization to be founded at a historically black college. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ... Zeta Phi Beta (ΖΦΒ) Sorority, Inc. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second-oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ... Sigma Gamma Rho (ΣΓΡ) was founded on November 12, 1922, by seven educators in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Gamma Iota Sigma (GIS) is a college academic fraternity, founded on April 16, 1966 at Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. ... The Brotherhood of Iota Phi Theta was a local service fraternity at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio, from 1973 to 2001. ... The ΦΜΑ Sinfonia (usually referred to as Sinfonia rather than ΦΜΑ) is a collegiate social fraternity for men of musicianly character. ... Sigma Alpha Iota (ΣΑΙ) is a music fraternity for women. ... Phi Sigma Pi (ΦΣΠ) is a national coeducational honor fraternity. ... Alpha Phi Omega (commonly known as APO, but also ΑΦΩ, A-Phi-O, and A-Phi-Q) is a co-ed service fraternity organized to provide community service, leadership development, [1] and social opportunities to college students. ... Gamma Sigma Sigma (ΓΣΣ) is a national service sorority. ... Kappa Kappa Psi is a national honorary band fraternity dedicated to serving college and university bands. ... Tau Beta Sigma is a co-educational national honorary band sorority dedicated to serving college and university bands. ...


See also

This is a list of historically black colleges of the United States organized by states. ...

References

  1. ^ <http://www.howard.edu/facts/facts.pdf>
  2. ^ <http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/usnews/edu/college/directory/brief/drglance_1448_brief.php>
  3. ^ <http://www.jbhe.com/news_views/46_blacks_doctoraldegrees.html>
  4. ^ http://media.www.thehilltoponline.com/media/storage/paper590/news/2007/08/17/Campus/Howard.Ranks.96.Of.100.In.Americas.top.Tier.Institutions-2931399.shtml>
  5. ^ <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_International_Encyclopedia]
  6. ^ <http://www.thurgoodmarshallfund.org/scholarships/pm.htm>
  7. ^ <http://www.gpoaccess.gov/usbudget/fy08/sheets/28_6.xls>
  8. ^ <http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9041231/Oliver-O-Howard>
  9. ^ <http://www.ushistory.org/more/timeline.htm>
  10. ^ <http://www.blinkbits.com/bits/viewforum/howard_university_bio?f=53687>
  11. ^ <http://www.africawithin.com/bios/alain_locke.htm>
  12. ^ <http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1950/bunche-bio.html>
  13. ^ <http://www.trinicenter.com/historicalviews/kwame.htm>
  14. ^ <http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1157/is_1998_July-Dec/ai_66191212>
  15. ^ <http://www.naswdc.org/diversity/black_history/2005/frazier.asp>
  16. ^ <http://chnm.gmu.edu/courses/122/hill/marshall.htm>
  17. ^ <http://www.howard.edu/campustour/life/Students/Greeks/Sororities/Default.htm>
  18. ^ <http://www.jstor.org/view/00222984/di990255/99p01982/0?frame=noframe&userID=803b639a@columbia.edu/01c05450110050bcdf&dpi=3&config=jstor>
  19. ^ <http://www.loc.gov/loc/lcib/94/9403/woodson.html>
  20. ^ <http://www.lbjlib.utexas.edu/johnson/archives.hom/speeches.hom/650604.asp>
  21. ^ <http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,957283,00.html>
  22. ^ <http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1264/is_n4_v20/ai_7754349><ref></ref> In April 2007 the head of the faculty senate called for the ouster of Howard University President H. Patrick Swygert, saying that the school is in a state of crisis and it was time to end “an intolerable condition of incompetence and dysfunction at the highest level.” This came on the heels of several criticisms of Howard University and its management. A National Science Foundation audit condemned Howard’s management of several federal research grants.<ref><http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/05/20/AR2007052001567.html></li> <li id="cite_note-22">'''[[#cite_ref-22|^]]''' <http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0WMX/is_5_24/ai_n19052933></li> <li id="cite_note-23">'''[[#cite_ref-23|^]]''' <http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0DXK/is_9_19/ai_89077182></li> <li id="cite_note-24">'''[[#cite_ref-24|^]]''' <http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/05/20/AR2007052001567.html></li> <li id="cite_note-25">'''[[#cite_ref-25|^]]''' <http://www.frostillustrated.com/full.php?sid=1309></li></ol></ref>

H. Patrick Swygert is an American higher education executive. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ...

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FastWeb: Howard University (0 words)
Howard University, founded in 1867, is a coeducational private doctoral/research-extensive university located in the northwestern section of Washington, D.C. Since its founding, Howard University has grown from a single-frame building to five campuses including 258 acres with 115 buildings and equipment valued at more than $1.2 billion.
The Howard University campus is situated on one of the highest elevations in the District of Columbia, overlooking downtown Washington.
Howard University is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, and its programs in specialized fields are accredited by numerous professional agencies.
Trans-Atlantic Graduate Exchange Program (698 words)
Howard University is a comprehensive, research-oriented, historically Black private university providing an educational experience of exceptional quality to students of high academic potential with particular emphasis upon the provision of educational opportunities to promising Black students.
Further, the University is dedicated to attracting and sustaining a cadre of faculty who are, through their teaching and research, committed to the development of distinguished and compassionate graduates and to the quest for solutions to human and social problems in the United States and throughout the world.
Howard University is a comprehensive research university, unique and irreplaceable, defined by its core values, the excellence of all its activities in instruction, research and service, and by its enduring commitment to educating youth, African Americans and other people of color in particular, for leadership and service to our nation and the global community.
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