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Encyclopedia > Howard Dean
Howard Brush Dean III
Howard Dean

Howard Dean at the 2004 "March for Women's Lives" rally Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (941x1213, 165 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Howard Dean Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Marchers on the National Mall Participants leaving the Washington Metro at Stadium-Armory after the march The March for Womens Lives was a demonstration for abortion rights and womens rights, held April 25, 2004 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., and possibly the largest protest ever...


In office
1991 – 2003
Lieutenant(s) Barbara Snelling, Douglas A. Racine
Preceded by Richard A. Snelling
Succeeded by Jim Douglas

Born November 17, 1948 (1948-11-17) (age 58)
New York City, New York
Political party Democratic
Spouse Judith Steinberg Dean
Profession Doctor / Politician
Religion United Church of Christ

Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. This is a list of Governors of Vermont: As an Independent Republic Thomas Chittenden (None) 1778-1789 Moses Robinson (None) 1789-1790 Thomas Chittenden (None) 1790-1791 As a State Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Vermont ... This is a list of Lieutenant Governors of Vermont in chronological order: As an Independent Republic As a State Sources http://vermont-archives. ... Barbara W. Snelling was elected lieutenant governor of Vermont in 1992 and served two terms until suffering a cerebral hemorrhage in 1996 while campaigning for governor. ... Douglas A. Racine is a former Lieutenant Governor of Vermont. ... Richard Arkwright Snelling (February 18, 1927 – August 14, 1991) was the Governor of Vermont from 1977 to 1985 and from January 10, 1991 until his death. ... James H. Jim Douglas (born June 21, 1951) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... New York, NY redirects here. ... NY redirects here. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... Judith Steinberg Dean (born May 9, 1953) is a physician from Burlington, Vermont, and as the wife of Democratic politician Howard Dean, was First Lady of Vermont from 1991 to 2003. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the United States denomination known as United Church of Christ. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Politics of the United States of America takes place in a framework of a presidential... The Doctor by Samuel Luke Fildes This article is about the term physician, one type of doctor; for other uses of the word doctor see Doctor. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties Libertarian Party State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ...


Before entering politics, Dean received his medical degree from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in 1978. Dean was elected to the Vermont House of Representatives as a Democrat in 1982 and was elected lieutenant governor in 1986. Both were part-time positions that enabled him to continue practicing medicine. In 1991, Dean became Governor of Vermont when Richard A. Snelling died in office. Dean was subsequently elected to five two-year terms, serving as governor from 1991 to 2003, making him the second longest-serving Governor in Vermont history, after Thomas Chittenden (1778–1789 and 1790–1797). Dean served as chairman of the National Governors Association from 1994 to 1995; during his term, Vermont paid off much of its public debt and had a balanced budget 11 times, lowering income taxes twice. Dean also oversaw the expansion of the "Dr. Dynasaur" program, which ensures universal health care for children and pregnant women in the state. The Medicinæ Doctor or Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or D.M.) is a doctorate level degree held by medical doctors. ... The Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM) is a private medical school located at 1300 Morris Park Ave, Bronx, New York (see website link). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Vermont General Assembly. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of Governors of Vermont: As an Independent Republic Thomas Chittenden (None) 1778-1789 Moses Robinson (None) 1789-1790 Thomas Chittenden (None) 1790-1791 As a State Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Vermont ... Richard Arkwright Snelling (February 18, 1927 – August 14, 1991) was the Governor of Vermont from 1977 to 1985 and from January 10, 1991 until his death. ... Mount Mansfield, at 4,393 feet, is the highest elevation point in Vermont. ... Thomas Chittenden (January 6, 1730 – August 25, 1797) was an important figure in the founding of Vermont. ... The National Governors Association (NGA) is an organization of the governors of the fifty U.S. states and five U.S. territories (American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary. ... From a Keynesian point of view, a balanced budget in the public sector is achieved when the government has enough fiscal discipline to be able to equate the revenues with expenditure over the business cycles. ... An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income of persons, corporations, or other legal entities. ... // Program Description The Dr. Dynasaur Logo Image The Dr. Dynasaur program was created in Vermont, United States in 1989 as a state-funded program for pregnant woman and children through age 6, who did not have health insurance, and who did not qualify for traditional Medicaid. ... Universal health care is a state in which all residents of a geographic or political entity have access to health care by means of provision of health insurance or direct provision of health care. ... A pregnant woman near the end of her term Pregnancy is the carrying of one or more embryos or fetuses by female mammals, including humans, inside their bodies. ...


An early front-runner in the 2004 Democratic Presidential nomination, Dean denounced the 2003 invasion of Iraq along with Democrats whom he felt should have more strongly opposed the Bush Administration and showed strong fundraising ability; however, he eventually lost the nomination to Senator John Kerry of Massachusetts. Dean formed the organization Democracy for America and later was elected chairman of the Democratic National Committee in February 2005. Front-runner is a term to describe the leader in a race, whether political or atheletic. ... John Kerry arrives at the 2004 Democratic National Convention, where he was officially designated as the Democratic Party nominee. ... Combatants Coalition Forces: United States United Kingdom South Korea Australia Poland Romania others. ... The Bush administration includes President George W. Bush, Vice President Richard Cheney, Bushs Cabinet, and other select officials and advisors. ... Fundraising is the process of soliciting and gathering money or other gifts in-kind, by requesting donations from individuals, businesses, charitable foundations, or governmental agencies. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... Al Gore (born December 11, 1943) is a Vietnam Veteran and the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Democracy for America (DFA) is a political action committee dedicated to supporting fiscally responsible, socially progressive candidates at all levels of government—from school board to the presidency. ... Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... February 2005 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → Pope John Paul II is taken to a hospital suffering from a serious case of influenza. ...

Contents

Early life and education

East Hampton and New York City childhood

Dean was born in the Town of East Hampton, New York, to Howard Brush Dean, Jr. and Andrée Belden Maitland, an art appraiser.[1] He is the oldest of their four children, all boys.[1] The town of East Hampton is located in southeastern Suffolk County, New York and is the easternmost town on the South Shore of Long Island. ...


Howard's father worked on Wall Street for Dean Witter Reynolds; the family was quite wealthy, Republican, and belonged to the very exclusive Maidstone Golf Club in East Hampton, which excluded Jews and other minorities. Dean's genealogy includes Richard Maitland,[1] as well as three lines of descent to royalty: "through colonial forebears Thomas Trowbridge of New Haven and Mrs. Agnes Harris Spencer Edwards of Hartford, and also through Dean's great-great-grandfather, James William Maitland (died 1860) of New York, who was descended three times over from James IV, King of Scots who led the Scottish troops in the Battle of Flodden and was the grandfather of Mary, Queen of Scots."[2] Dean's family has ties to Long Island dating back to the 1700s including several family members who were in the whaling business in nearby Sag Harbor, New York.[3] Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... Dean Witter Reynolds was an American stock brokerage catering to the middle class. ... Maidstone Golf Club is an 18-hole private golf course on the Atlantic Ocean in East Hampton (village), New York. ... East Hampton is a village located in Suffolk County, New York on the South Shore of Long Island. ... Genealogy is the study and tracing of family pedigrees. ... Sir Richard Maitland, Lord Lethington (1496‑March 20, 1586), poet, father of William Maitland of Lethington, Secretary of State to Mary I of Scotland. ... Nickname: The Elm City Location in Connecticut Coordinates: NECTA New Haven Region South Central Region Settled 1638 Incorporated (city) 1784 Consolidated 1895 Government  - Type Mayor-board of aldermen  - Mayor John DeStefano, Jr. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... James IV (March 17, 1473-September 9, 1513) was King of Scots from 1488 to his death. ... This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain... Combatants England Scotland Commanders Thomas Howard, Earl of Surrey James IV † Strength 26,000 approx 30,000 approx Casualties 1,500 dead 10,000 dead Western side of the battlefield, looking south-south-east from the monument erected in 1910. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Map showing Long Island; to the north is Connecticut and to the west are New York City and New Jersey. ... The crew of the oceanographic research vessel Princesse Alice, of Albert Grimaldi (later Prince Albert I of Monaco) pose while flensing a catch. ... Sag Harbor is a village in Suffolk County, New York, United States, shared by the towns of East Hampton and Southampton. ...


As a child of a wealthy and prominent New York family, he spent much of his time growing up in East Hampton; the family built a house on Hook Pond[4] there in the mid-1950s. There the boys — Howard, Charlie, Jim and Bill — "rode bikes, played with a model train set, [and] built elaborate underground forts." While in New York, the family had a three-bedroom apartment on the Upper East Side part of Park Avenue, which Dean still sometimes stays in when he visits the city. The apartment was rented by Dean's father for $200 a month after World War II and eventually bought for $9,500.[1] East Hampton is a village located in Suffolk County, New York on the South Shore of Long Island. ... Charlie Dean Charles Charlie Dean was the brother of Democratic National Committee Chairman Howard Dean, Democracy for America Chairman Jim Dean and their brother Bill. ... Jim Dean Speaks at a Democracy for New Hampshire fundraiser in Concord, New Hampshire James H. Dean is a U.S. politician. ... The Upper East Side at Sunset The Upper East Side is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, between Central Park and the East River. ... Park Avenue in the Upper East Side (2004) Park Avenue (formerly Fourth Avenue) is a wide boulevard that carries traffic north and south in Manhattan in New York City. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Howard attended the Browning School in Manhattan until he was 13, then went to St. George's School, a preparatory school in Middletown, Rhode Island.[5] The Browning School was founded as a college preparatory school for boys in 1888 by John A. Browning. ... Manhattan is a borough of New York City, USA, coterminous with New York County. ... St. ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... Middletown is a town located in Newport County, Rhode Island. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Political opponents have been reluctant to seize upon Dean's privileged early life. UPI quoted one of Dean's friends in his youth as saying "By Hamptons standards, the Deans were not rich. No safaris in Africa or chalets in Switzerland. Howard's father went to work every day. He didn't own a company, or have a father or grandfather who founded one, as mine did."[6] Peggy Noonan wrote in the Wall Street Journal that "he doesn't seem like a WASP. I know it's not nice to deal in stereotypes, but there seems very little Thurston Howell III, or George Bush the elder for that matter, in Mr. Dean...He seems unpolished, doesn't hide his aggression, is proudly pugnacious. He doesn't look or act the part of the WASP...It will be harder for Republicans to tag Mr. Dean as Son of the Maidstone Club than it was for Democrats to tag Bush One as Heir to Greenwich Country Day. He just doesn't act the part."[7] Front of UPI Headquarters, Washington, D.C. United Press International (UPI) is a global news agency headquartered in the United States filing news in English, Spanish and Arabic. ... Map of Africa 1890 Look up safari in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Chalet A chalet (pronounced ), also called Swiss chalet, is a type of building in the Alpine region made of wood. ... Peggy Noonan, on Hannity and Colmes. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with a worldwide average daily circulation of more than 2. ... Suborder Apocrita See text for explanation. ... For the 1996 Blur single, see Stereotypes (song). ... Thurston J. Howell III was a character on the CBS television sitcom Gilligans Island, which was in first-run from 1964 to 1967, and has been rerun ever since in syndication. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region South Western Region Settled 1640 Joined Connecticut 1656 Government type Representative town meeting  - First selectman James A. Lash  - Town administrator Edward Gomeau  - Town meeting moderator Thomas J. Byrne Area    - City 174. ...


The Yale years

Dean attended Yale University. As a freshman, he requested specifically to room with an African-American. The university housing office complied and Dean roomed with two Southern black students and one white student from Pennsylvania.[8] One of Dean's roommates was Ralph Dawson, the son of a sheet metal worker in Charleston, South Carolina and today a New York City labor lawyer. Dawson said of Dean: “Yale” redirects here. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Historic Southern United States. ... Official language(s) English, Pennsylvania Dutch Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35...

Unless you operated from a stereotypic understanding of the Yale white boy as rich, you wouldn’t know that about Howard…When it came to race — and I don’t know whether this was a function of intent or just came naturally — Howard was not patronizing in any way. He was willing to confront in discussion what a lot of white students weren’t. He would hold his ground. He would respect that I knew forty-two million times more about being black than he did. But that didn't mean he couldn’t hold a view on something relating to civil rights that would be as valid as mine. There were lots of well-meaning people at Yale who wanted you to understand that they understood your plight; you’d get into a conversation and they would yield too soon, so we didn’t get the full benefit of the exchange. Howard very much thought he was capable of working an issue through. He was inquisitive. And when he came to a conclusion he would be as strong as anybody else. I don't think he's stubborn. He’s a guy who's always been comfortable in his own skin. That’s something you still see in him today, and it gets him into some degree of controversy.[9]

At Yale, Dean was a member of the Zeta Psi fraternity. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in political science in 1971. Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... The Zeta Psi Fraternity of North America Inc. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... Bachelor of Arts (B.A., BA or A.B.), from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus is an undergraduate bachelors degree awarded for either a course or a program in the liberal arts or the sciences, or both. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ...


Though now eligible to be conscripted into the military, he received a draft deferment for an unfused vertebra. He spent the next year, according to Time magazine, "skiing and bumming around...He hit the slopes, tried pot, washed dishes, poured concrete and drank impressive amounts of beer." He returned home and briefly tried a career as a stock broker before deciding on a career in medicine, completing pre-medicine classes at Columbia University. In 1974, Dean's younger brother Charlie, who had been traveling through southeast Asia at the time, was captured and killed by Laotian guerrillas, a tragedy widely reported to have an enormous influence in Dean's life; he wore his brother's belt every day of his presidential campaign. Time, (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... A dried flowered bud of the Cannabis sativa plant. ... Stock brokers are people who deal with stock & bonds. ... Columbia University is a private research university in the United States. ... Charlie Dean Charles Charlie Dean was the brother of Democratic National Committee Chairman Howard Dean, Democracy for America Chairman Jim Dean and their brother Bill. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Motto: Peace, Independence, Democracy, Unity and Prosperity Anthem: Pheng Xat Lao Capital Vientiane Largest city Vientiane Official languages Lao Government Socialist Republic  - President Choummaly Sayasone  - Prime Minister Bouasone Bouphavanh Independence from France   - Date 19 July 1949  Area  - Total 236,800 km² (83rd) 91,429 sq mi   - Water (%) 2 Population  - 2005... Look up guerrilla in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The move to Vermont as a doctor

Dean received his medical degree from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in 1978 and began a medical residency at the University of Vermont. In 1981, he married fellow doctor Judith Steinberg, whom he met in medical school, and together they began a family medical practice in Burlington, Vermont (where she continued to use her maiden name to avoid confusion with her husband). Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or MD, from the Latin Medicinae Doctor meaning teacher of medicine,) is an academic degree for medical doctors. ... The Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM) is a private medical school located at 1300 Morris Park Ave, Bronx, New York (see website link). ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with residency (medicine). ... UVM redirects here. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Judith Steinberg Dean (born May 9, 1953) is a physician from Burlington, Vermont, and as the wife of Democratic politician Howard Dean, was First Lady of Vermont from 1991 to 2003. ... A medical school or faculty of medicine is a tertiary educational institution or part of such an institution that teaches medicine. ... Burlington is the largest city in the U.S. state of Vermont and is the shire town of Chittenden County, Vermont. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and appeal to a wider international audience, this article may require cleanup. ...


Personal life

Dean has kept an unusually strict separation between his political career and his personal life. His wife, who has continued practicing medicine, mostly stayed out of the limelight during his presidential campaign, giving few interviews and not traveling with her husband on the campaign trail until the final days in Iowa and New Hampshire. She maintained that if her husband were elected president, she would continue practicing medicine and forgo many of the traditional activities of the First Lady. She had shunned the limelight of the campaign until Dean's later much-publicized "scream" gaffe. Dean brought her out for a lengthy sit-down network interview, where she dismissed the "scream" as silly. This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,359 sq mi (24,239 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 3. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Though he was raised an Episcopalian, Dean joined the United Church of Christ in 1982 after a dispute with the local Episcopal diocese over a bike trail (see below). By his own account, he does not attend church "very often"; at one point, when asked to name his favorite book in the New Testament, he offered the Old Testament Book of Job, then corrected himself an hour later.[10] Dean has stated he is more "spiritual" than religious. He and his wife have raised their two children, Anne and Paul, in Judaism. The Episcopal Church or the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America is the American Church of the Anglican Communion. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the United States denomination known as United Church of Christ. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... John 21:1 Jesus Appears to His Disciples--Alessandro Mantovani: the Vatican, Rome. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh. ... The Book of Job (איוב) is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


A personal finance statement filed for his presidential campaign put the couple's net worth between US$2.2 and $5 million.


Vermont political career

In 1980, Dean spearheaded a (successful) grassroots campaign to stop a condominium development on Lake Champlain, instead favoring the construction of a bicycle trail. The effort succeeded, and helped launch his political career. That same year, he was also a volunteer for Jimmy Carter's re-election campaign. In 1982, he was elected to the Vermont House of Representatives, where he remained until being elected lieutenant governor in 1986. Both were part-time positions which enabled him to continue practicing medicine. This article refers to a form of housing. ... Landsat photo Lake Champlain (French: lac Champlain) is a large lake in North America, mostly within the borders of the United States (states of Vermont and New York) but partially situated across the US-Canada border in the province of Quebec. ... This article is becoming very long. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Vermont General Assembly. ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On August 14, 1991, Dean was examining a patient when he received word that then-Governor Richard A. Snelling had died of a heart attack while Snelling was cleaning his own swimming pool. Dean assumed the office, which he called the "greatest job in Vermont." He was subsequently elected to five two-year terms in his own right, making him the second longest-serving governor in Vermont's history. From 1994 to 1995, Dean was the chairman of the National Governors Association. August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (227th in leap years), with 139 days remaining. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard Arkwright Snelling (February 18, 1927 – August 14, 1991) was the Governor of Vermont from 1977 to 1985 and from January 10, 1991 until his death. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Governors Association (NGA) is an organization of the governors of the fifty U.S. states and five U.S. territories (American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). ...


Dean was faced with an economic recession and a $60 million budget deficit. He bucked many in his own party to immediately push for a balanced budget (Vermont is the only state whose constitution does not require one), an act which marked the beginning of a record of fiscal restraint. During his tenure as governor, the state paid off much of its debt, balanced its budget eleven times, raised its bond rating, and lowered income taxes twice.


Dean also focused on health care issues, most notably through the "Dr. Dynasaur" program, which ensures near-universal health coverage for children and pregnant women in the state; the uninsured rate in Vermont dropped from 12.7% to 9.6% under his watch. Child abuse and teen pregnancy rates were cut roughly in half. // Program Description The Dr. Dynasaur Logo Image The Dr. Dynasaur program was created in Vermont, United States in 1989 as a state-funded program for pregnant woman and children through age 6, who did not have health insurance, and who did not qualify for traditional Medicaid. ...


By far the most controversial decision of his career, and the first to draw serious national attention came in 2000, when the Vermont Supreme Court ruled that the state's marriage laws unconstitutionally excluded same-sex couples and ordered that the state legislature either allow gays and lesbians to marry or create a parallel status. Facing calls to amend the state constitution to prohibit either option, Dean chose to support the latter one, and signed the nation's first civil unions legislation into law, spurring a short-lived "Take Back Vermont" movement which helped Republicans gain control of the State House. 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A civil union is a recognized union similar to marriage. ...


Dean would receive some flak during his 2004 presidential campaign for another decision related to the civil unions. Shortly before leaving office, he had some of his Vermont papers sealed for at least the next decade, a timeframe far longer than most outgoing governors use. He claimed he was protecting the privacy of many gay supporters who sent him personal letters about the issue. On the campaign trail, he demanded Vice President Dick Cheney release his energy committee papers. Many people, including then-Democratic Senator Joe Lieberman, accused Dean of hypocrisy. Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is an American politician from Connecticut. ...


As governor, Dean was endorsed by the National Rifle Association several times, furthering his moderate image; though he never returned the endorsement, nor was he ever a member of the NRA. This article concerns the National Rifle Association of the USA. For the UK organisation, see National Rifle Association of the United Kingdom The National Rifle Association, or NRA, is a non-profit group for the promotion of marksmanship, firearm safety, and the protection of hunting and personal protection firearm rights...


Vermont election results

Source: Vermont Secretary of State[11]
Year Office Incumbent Party Votes Pct Challenger Party Votes Pct 3rd Party Party Votes Pct
1982 VT House Howard Dean[12] Democratic 596 66.4% Timothy K. McKenzie Citizens 300 33.4%
1984 VT House Howard Dean Democratic 1092 98.9%
1986 Lt. Gov. Susan Auld[13] Republican 84,413 44.4% Howard Dean Democratic 99,929 52.5%
1988 Lt. Gov. Howard Dean Democratic 154,660 66.5% Pan B. Zolotas Republican 69,731 30.0% Lisa Steckler Liberty Union 7,952 3.4%
1990 Lt. Gov. Howard Dean Democratic 120,956 58.1% Michael Bernhardt Republican 80,706 38.7%
1992 Gov. Howard Dean Democratic 213,523 74.73% John McClaughry Republican 65,837 23.04%
1994 Gov. Howard Dean Democratic 145,661 68.6% David F. Kelley Republican 40,292 19.0% Thomas J. Morse Independent 15,000 7.0%
1996 Gov. Howard Dean Democratic 179,544 70.5% John L. Gropper Republican 57,161 22.4%
1998 Gov. Howard Dean Democratic 121,425 55.6% Ruth Dwyer Republican 89,726 41.1%
2000 Gov. Howard Dean Democratic 148,059 50.4% Ruth Dwyer Republican 111,359 37.9% Anthony Pollina Progressive 28,116 9.5%

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Vermont General Assembly. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... The Citizens Party was a short lived United States political party organized by environmental scientist Barry Commoner in approximately 1980. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Vermont General Assembly. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... This is a list of Lieutenant Governors of Vermont in chronological order: http://vermont-archives. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Democratic Party. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... This is a list of Lieutenant Governors of Vermont in chronological order: http://vermont-archives. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Democratic Party. ... The Liberty Union Party of Vermont defines itself as a nonviolent socialist party. ... This is a list of Lieutenant Governors of Vermont in chronological order: http://vermont-archives. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Democratic Party. ... This is a list of Governors of Vermont: As an Independent Republic Thomas Chittenden (None) 1778-1789 Moses Robinson (None) 1789-1790 Thomas Chittenden (None) 1790-1791 As a State Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Vermont ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Democratic Party. ... This is a list of Governors of Vermont: As an Independent Republic Thomas Chittenden (None) 1778-1789 Moses Robinson (None) 1789-1790 Thomas Chittenden (None) 1790-1791 As a State Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Vermont ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Democratic Party. ... This is a list of Governors of Vermont: As an Independent Republic Thomas Chittenden (None) 1778-1789 Moses Robinson (None) 1789-1790 Thomas Chittenden (None) 1790-1791 As a State Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Vermont ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Democratic Party. ... This is a list of Governors of Vermont: As an Independent Republic Thomas Chittenden (None) 1778-1789 Moses Robinson (None) 1789-1790 Thomas Chittenden (None) 1790-1791 As a State Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Vermont ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Democratic Party. ... This is a list of Governors of Vermont: As an Independent Republic Thomas Chittenden (None) 1778-1789 Moses Robinson (None) 1789-1790 Thomas Chittenden (None) 1790-1791 As a State Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Vermont ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Democratic Party. ... The Vermont Progressive Party is perhaps the United States most consistently successful current third party, although it is active in only one state. ...

2004 presidential candidacy

Howard Dean declared his candidacy for the 2004 Democratic Party presidential nomination on June 23, 2003, in Burlington, Vermont
Howard Dean declared his candidacy for the 2004 Democratic Party presidential nomination on June 23, 2003, in Burlington, Vermont

Dean began his bid for President as a "long shot" candidate. ABC News ranked him eighth out of 12 in a list of potential presidential contenders in May of 2002. That summer, his campaign was featured as the cover article in The New Republic and in the following months he received expanded media attention. His campaign slowly gained steam, and by autumn of 2003, Dean had become the apparent frontrunner for the Democratic nomination, performing strongly in most polls and outpacing his rivals in fundraising. This latter feat was attributed mainly to his innovative embrace of the Internet for campaigning, and the majority of his donations came from individual Dean supporters, who came to be known as Deanites, or, more commonly, Deaniacs. (Critics often labeled them "Deany Boppers", or "Deanie Babies", a reference to his support from young activists.) Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1022x767, 122 KB) Image shows Howard Dean giving a speech at his declaration of candidacy in the 2004 presidential election. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1022x767, 122 KB) Image shows Howard Dean giving a speech at his declaration of candidacy in the 2004 presidential election. ... ABC News is a division of ABC television and radio networks (ABC), owned by The Walt Disney Company. ... For other uses, see the New Republic disambiguation page. ...


During his presidential campaign, conservative critics labeled Dean's political views as those of an extreme liberal; however, in liberal Vermont, Dean, long known as a staunch advocate of fiscal restraint, was regarded as a moderate. Many left-wing critics who supported fellow Democrat Dennis Kucinich or independent Ralph Nader charged that, at heart, Dean was a "Rockefeller Republican" — socially liberal, while fiscally conservative. This article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... Dennis John Kucinich (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician of the Democratic party. ... Ralph Nader Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934), is an American attorney and political activist. ... In the United States, the term Rockefeller Republican refers to those members of the Republican party who hold moderate views similar to those of the late Nelson Rockefeller, governor of New York from 1959 to 1973 and vice president of the United States under President Gerald Ford in the mid...


Message and themes

Dean began his campaign by emphasizing health care and fiscal responsibility, and championing grassroots fundraising as a way to fight special interests. However, his opposition to the U.S. plan to invade Iraq (and his forceful criticism of Democrats in Congress who voted to authorize the use of force) quickly eclipsed other issues. By challenging the war in Iraq at a time when mainstream Democratic leaders were either neutral or cautiously supportive, Dean positioned himself to appeal to his party's activist base. Dean often quoted the late Minnesota Senator Paul Wellstone (who had recently died in a plane crash) as saying that he represented "the Democratic wing of the Democratic Party". His message resonated among frustrated Democratic primary voters who felt that their party hadn't done enough to oppose the policies of the Republicans. Thus, Dean also succeeded in differentiating himself from his primary opponents. Advocacy is an umbrella term for organized activism related to a particular set of issues. ... Combatants Coalition Forces: United States United Kingdom South Korea Australia Poland Romania others. ... Paul David Wellstone (July 21, 1944 – October 25, 2002) was an American politician and two-term U.S. Senator from Minnesota. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...


Dean's approach organizationally was also novel. His campaign made extensive use of the Internet, pioneering techniques quickly adopted by politicians of all political persuasions. His supporters organized real-world meetings, participated in online forums, donated money online, canvassed for advertising ideas, and distributed political talking points. In terms of money, publicity and activism, Dean therefore quickly staked out a leadership position in the field of candidates. In this way, he was able to bypass existing party and activist infrastructure and built his own online network of supporters. In terms of traditional "ground troops", however, Dean remained at a disadvantage. Dean adopted a coffee shop strategy to visit grassroot activists in all 99 Iowa counties, but he lacked the campaign infrastructure to get voters to the polls that his opponents had.


Those committed to the policies of the Democratic Leadership Council — which supported the use of force in Iraq — found the otherwise moderate Dean a threat not only to their position on the war but to their influence in the post-Clintonian Democratic Party. Thinly-veiled DLC "527" organizations funded relentless PR coverage of Dean's "scream" in order to beat back his surprising candidacy, as the conventional wisdom in Washington did not expect a campaign based on the president's lack of credibility to gain the support that Dean had garnered.[citation needed] Quite simply, Washington did not intend for Dean to become a threat to the campaigns of longtime party loyalists Gephardt and Kerry; Dean's campaign was supposed to draw a percentage of the party's left-wing away from Nader (and to some extent, Kucinich). Nobody in Washington expected to see the widespread anger that Dean's campaign corralled.[citation needed] Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ...


Use of the Internet

Dean For America's official website during the height of the campaign

Dean's presidential campaign was remarkable at the time for its extensive use of the Internet to reach out to its supporters. The candidate's staff, and occasionally even the candidate, frequently "blogged" while on the campaign trail and even sought advice on important campaign-related decisions — in at least two instances even making decisions through online polls of supporters. By soliciting contributions online, the campaign shattered previous fundraising records for the Democratic presidential primary. The Dean campaign also encouraged its supporters to join monthly Meetups, which would lay the groundwork for volunteers at the local level. Dean has been credited with being the first national candidate to play to the strengths of the Internet, in particular by engaging the American public directly in the political process. His Internet success is often attributed to campaign manager Joe Trippi. Image File history File links Deanwebsite. ... Image File history File links Deanwebsite. ... Blog for America was the title of the official Howard Dean campaign weblog from March 2003 to March, 2004. ... Joe Trippi is the worlds foremost authority on Diet Pepsi, a fact that dismays the Cocal Cola company to no end. ...


Fundraising

The popular Dean for America bat was regularly featured on the site challenging supporters to break fundraising records.

In the "invisible primary" of raising campaign dollars, Howard Dean led the Democratic pack in the early stages of the 2004 campaign. Among the candidates, he ranked first in total raised ($25.4 million as of September 30, 2003) and first in cash-on-hand ($12.4 million). However, even this performance paled next to that of George W. Bush, who by that date had raised $84.6 million for the Republican primary campaign, in which he had no real challenger. Prior to the 2004 primary season, the Democratic record for most money raised in one quarter by a primary candidate was held by Bill Clinton in 1995, raising $10.3 million during a campaign in which he had no primary opponent. In the third quarter of 2003, the Dean campaign raised $14.8 million, shattering Clinton's record. All told, Dean's campaign raised around $50 million. Image File history File links Deansbat. ... Image File history File links Deansbat. ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...


While presidential campaigns have traditionally obtained finance by tapping wealthy, established political donors, Dean's funds came largely in small donations over the Internet; the average overall donation size was just under $80. This method of fundraising offered several important advantages over traditional fundraising, in addition to the inherent media interest in what was then a novelty. First, raising money on the Internet was relatively inexpensive, compared to conventional methods such as events, telemarketing, and direct mail campaigns. Secondly, as donors on average contributed far less than the legal limit ($2,000 per individual), the campaign could continue to resolicit them throughout the election season.


Dean's director of grassroots fundraising, Larry Biddle, came up with the idea of the popular fundraising "bat", an image of a cartoon baseball player and bat which appeared on the site every time the campaign launched a fundraising challenge. The bat encouraged Web site visitors to contribute money immediately through their credit cards. This would lead to the bat filling up like a thermometer with the red color indicating the total funds. The site often took suggestions from the netroots on their blog. One of these suggestions led to one of the campaigns biggest accomplishments — an image of Dean eating a turkey sandwich encouraged supporters to donate $250,000 in three days to match a big-donor dinner by Vice President Dick Cheney. The online contributions from that day matched what Cheney made from his fundraiser.[14] It has been suggested that List of temperature sensors be merged into this article or section. ... Netroots is a recent term coined to describe political activism organized through blogs and other online media, including wikis and social network services. ...


In November 2003, after a much-publicized online vote among his followers, Dean became the first Democrat to forgo federal matching funds (and the spending limits that go with them) since the system was established in 1974. (John Kerry later followed his lead.) In addition to state-by-state spending limits for the primaries, the system limits a candidate to spending only $44.6 million until the Democratic National Convention in July, which sum would almost certainly run out soon after the early primary season. (George W. Bush declined federal matching funds in 2000 and did so again for the 2004 campaign.) 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Al Gore (born December 11, 1943) is a Vietnam Veteran and the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In a sign that the Dean campaign was starting to think beyond the primaries, they began in late 2003 to speak of a "$100 revolution" in which 2 million Americans would give $100 in order to compete with Bush.


Endorsements

Though Dean lagged in early endorsements, he acquired many critical ones as his campaign snowballed. By the time of the Iowa caucuses, he led among commitments from superdelegates — elected officials and party officers entitled to convention votes by virtue of their positions. On November 12, 2003, he received the endorsements of the Service Employees International Union and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, two politically powerful (and often rivalrous) labor unions. Dean received the endorsement of former Vice President and presidential candidate Al Gore, on December 9, 2003. In the following weeks Dean was endorsed by former U.S. senators Bill Bradley and Carol Moseley Braun, unsuccessful Democratic presidential candidates from the 2000 and 2004 primaries, respectively. Superdelegates are delegates to a party convention in the United States who are not bound by the decisions of party primaries or caucuses. ... November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 49 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Service Employees International Union (SEIU) is a labor union representing 1. ... The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) is the second- or third-largest labor union in the United States and one of the fastest-growing, representing over 1. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... December 9 is the 343rd day (344th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Carol Elizabeth Moseley Braun (born August 16, 1947) is an American politician and lawyer who represented Illinois in the United States Senate from 1993 to 1999. ...


Other high-profile endorsers included:[15]

Several celebrities from the entertainment industry also endorsed him, including Martin Sheen, Rob Reiner, Susan Sarandon, Paul Newman, and Robin Williams[16] Bruce Edward Babbitt (born June 27, 1938), a Democrat, served as United States Secretary of the Interior and as Governor of Arizona. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... James Edward Jim McGreevey (born August 6, 1957) is a United States Democratic politician. ... Toney Anaya (born April 29, 1941), served as Governor of New Mexico from 1983 to 1987. ... Dorothy Ann Willis Richards (September 1, 1933 – September 13, 2006) was an American politician and teacher from Texas. ... Thomas Richard Tom Harkin (born November 19, 1939) is the junior United States Senator from Iowa. ... credited to the United States Senate Historical Office Fred Roy Harris (born November 13, 1930) was a Democratic United States Senator from the state of Oklahoma from 1964 until 1973. ... Howard Metzenbaum Howard Morton Metzenbaum (born June 4, 1917) is an American politician who served for almost 20 years as a Democratic member of the U.S. Senate (1974, 1976-1995). ... James Merrill Jim Jeffords (born May 11, 1934 in Rutland, Vermont) is currently the junior U.S. Senator from Vermont and the only Independent in the United States Senate. ... Patrick Joseph Leahy (born March 31, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Vermont. ... Jesse Jackson, Jr. ... John Conyers, Jr. ... Major Owens Major Robert Odell Owens (born June 28, 1936) is a New York politician, currently representing the states 11th Congressional district (map), in the United States House of Representatives. ... Sheila Jackson Lee Sheila Jackson Lee (born January 12, 1950 in Queens, New York), an American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1995. ... Nickname: Monument City, Charm City, Mob Town[1][2], B-more Motto: The Greatest City in America,[3] Get in on it. ... For the journalist, see Martin OMalley (journalist). ... Martin Sheen (born Ramón Gerardo Antonio Estévez on August 3, 1940) is an Emmy Award-winning American actor, perhaps best known for his role as Captain Willard in the film Apocalypse Now and, most recently, as President Josiah Bartlet on the acclaimed television drama The West Wing. ... Robert Rob Reiner (born March 6, 1947) is an American actor, director, producer, and writer. ... Susan Sarandon (born October 4, 1946) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Paul Leonard Newman (born January 26, 1925) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Cannes Award, and Emmy Award winning American iconic actor and film director. ... Robin McLaurim Williams (born July 21, 1951 or 1952)[1] is an Academy Award-winning American actor and comedian. ...


Many pundits would blame such endorsements for the campaign's eventual collapse. Dean was running as an outsider, and accepting the support of such establishment figures was seen by some as hypocritical.


Iowa results and the "Dean Scream"

On January 19, 2004, Dean's campaign suffered a blow when a last-minute surge by rivals John Kerry and John Edwards led to an embarrassing third-place defeat for Dean in the 2004 Iowa Democratic caucuses, representing the first votes cast in primary season. Dean had been a strong contender for weeks in advance in that state, battling with Dick Gephardt for first place in the polls. To the surprise of the Dean and Gephardt campaigns, Dean finished third in Iowa behind Kerry and John Edwards, with Gephardt finishing fourth. Since Dean had spent months leading Iowa tracking polls, his third-place finish was widely considered a sign that the campaign was losing momentum. Most analysts blamed intense negative campaigning between Dean and Gephardt as the reason for their losses. Many Dean supporters questioned whether allegedly unfair media coverage played a role in the result. The Atlantic Monthly’s Joshua Green reported that in early January, the Wesley Clark campaign had leaked information to the press showing Dean to be "unelectable." Though every campaign, including Dean's, sends negative information to the press about rival candidates, Green claims the media turned against both Clark and Dean. Other insiders attribute the loss to staff and supporters inexperienced with the caucus process. January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Al Gore (born December 11, 1943) is a Vietnam Veteran and the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... Johnny Reid John Edwards (born June 10, 1953) was the Democratic nominee for Vice President in 2004, and a one-term U.S. Senator from North Carolina. ... In the United States, the 2004 Iowa Democratic caucuses (held January 19) were the first major test of some of the leading contenders for the Democratic Partys nomination as its candidate for the 2004 presidential election. ... Primary is an adjective meaning first or first hand. It may refer to: Primary education or Primary school Primary care. ... Richard Andrew Dick Gephardt (born January 31, 1941) is senior counsel at the global law firm DLA Piper and a former prominent American politician of the Democratic Party. ... The Atlantic redirects here; for the ocean, see Atlantic Ocean. ... Wesley Kanne Clark (born December 23, 1944) is a retired four-star general of the United States Army. ...


Dean attended a post-caucus rally for his volunteers at the Val-Air Ballroom in West Des Moines, Iowa and delivered his concession speech, aimed at cheering up those in attendance. Dean was shouting over the cheers of his enthusiastic audience, but the crowd noise was being filtered out by his unidirectional microphone, leaving only his full-throated exhortations audible to the television viewers. To those at home, it sounded as if he was raising his voice out of sheer emotion. Additionally, Dean began his speech with a flushed-red face, clenching his teeth as he rolled up his sleeves.[17] In politics, a concession is the act of a losing candidate publicly yielding to a winning candidate after an election, when the overall result of the vote has become clear. ... A Neumann U87 capacitor microphone A microphone, sometimes referred to as a mike or mic (both IPA pronunciation: ), is an acoustic to electric transducer or sensor that converts sound into an electrical signal. ...


According to a Newsday Editorial written by Verne Gay, some members of the television audience criticized the speech as loud, peculiar, and unpresidential.[18] In particular, this quote from the speech was aired repeatedly in the days following the caucus: Newsday is a daily tabloid-size newspaper that primarily serves Long Island and the New York City borough of Queens, although it is sold throughout the New York City metropolitan area. ... Look up editorial, op-ed in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Not only are we going to New Hampshire, Tom Harkin, we're going to South Carolina and Oklahoma and Arizona and North Dakota and New Mexico, and we're going to California and Texas and New York … And we're going to South Dakota and Oregon and Washington and Michigan, and then we're going to Washington, D.C., to take back the White House! Byaaah!!!

This final "Byaaah!!!" has become known in American political folklore as either "the Dean Scream" or the "I Have a Scream" speech (an allusion to I Have a Dream). Thomas Richard Tom Harkin (born November 19, 1939) is the junior United States Senator from Iowa. ... Howard Dean during the Dean Scream Speech The Dean Scream refers to a speech on Monday, January 19, 2004, following Howard Deans third place loss in the Iowa caucuses despite a advantages in fundraising , volunteer recruitment, and public opinion polls. ... Martin Luther King, Jr. ...


Dean conceded that the speech did not project the best image, jokingly referring to it as a "crazy, red-faced rant" on The Late Show with David Letterman. In an interview later that week with Diane Sawyer, he said he was "a little sheepish … but I'm not apologetic."[19] Sawyer and many others in the national broadcast news media later expressed some regret about overplaying the story.[17] In fact, CNN issued a public apology and admitted in a statement that they indeed may have "overplayed" the incident. The incessant replaying of the "Dean Scream" by the press became a debate on the topic of whether Dean was the victim of media bias. Such reports certainly fit with reports of "unelectability," as shown by Green's Atlantic Monthly piece. The scream scene was shown an estimated 633 times by cable and broadcast news networks in just four days following the incident, a number that does not include talk shows and local news broadcasts.[20] However, those who were in the actual audience that day insist that they were not aware of the infamous scream until they returned to their hotel rooms and saw it on TV.[17] Late Show with David Letterman is an hour-long weeknight comedy and talk show broadcast by CBS from the Ed Sullivan Theater on Broadway in New York City. ... Diane Sawyer is a television journalist for the U.S. network ABC News and co-anchor of ABCs Good Morning America, along with with Robin Roberts. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


On January 27 Dean again suffered a defeat, finishing second to Kerry in the New Hampshire primary. As late as one week before the first votes were cast in Iowa's caucuses, Dean had enjoyed a 30% lead in New Hampshire opinion polls; accordingly, this loss represented another major setback to his campaign. January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Hampshire primary marks the opening of the quadrennial U.S. presidential election. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,359 sq mi (24,239 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 3. ... Opinion polls are surveys of opinion using sampling. ...


Iowa and New Hampshire were only the first in a string of embarrassing losses for the Dean campaign, culminating in a disappointing third place showing in the Wisconsin primary on February 17, 2004. Two days before the Wisconsin primary, campaign advisor and former AIPAC chairman Steve Grossman "announced" through an article written by New York Times Dean campaign correspondent Jodi Wilgoren that he would offer his services to any of the other major candidates "should Dean not win in Wisconsin." This "scoop" further undermined Dean's campaign. Grossman later issued a public apology. The next day, Dean announced that his candidacy had "come to an end," though he continued to urge people to vote for him, so that Dean delegates would be selected for the convention and could influence the party platform. He later won the Vermont primaries on Super Tuesday, March 2, 2004. This latter victory, a surprise even to Dean himself, was due in part to the lack of a serious anti-Kerry candidate in Vermont (John Edwards had declined to put his name on the state's ballot, expecting Dean to win in a landslide), and in part to a television ad produced, funded, and aired in Vermont by grassroots Dean supporters. Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42°30N to 47°3N  - Longitude 86°49W to 92°54W Population  Ranked... February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. President George W. Bush addresses AIPAC members in Washington on May 18, 2004. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... In the United States, Super Tuesday commonly refers to a Tuesday in early March of a presidential election year. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... Johnny Reid John Edwards (born June 10, 1953) was the Democratic nominee for Vice President in 2004, and a one-term U.S. Senator from North Carolina. ...


Impact

While his presidential bid ultimately ended in failure, his supporters felt it was not a lost cause, serving to frame the White House race by tapping in to voters' concerns about the war in Iraq, in the process energizing Democrats and sharpening criticism of incumbent George W. Bush. At present, many political pundits affirm that Dean's contribution was "cathartic" for the party. Dean's lone Pennsylvania delegate, State Rep. Mark B. Cohen of Philadelphia, said Dean's decision, ultimately emulated by Kerry, to forgo primary federal matching funds and exceed the matching fund spending limits "marked the day the Democratic Party became a serious contender for national power in 2004." George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Mark B. Cohen is a state legislator in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. ...


Campaign timeline

See also U.S. Democratic Party presidential nomination, 2004, U.S. presidential election, 2004 timeline. May 31 is the 151st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (152nd in leap years), with 214 days remaining. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Presidential election results map. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Meetup. ... June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 191 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 9 is the 343rd day (344th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dick Cheney 46th and current Vice President (2001- ) The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is a heartbeat from the presidency. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 359 days (360 in leap years) remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Carol Elizabeth Moseley Braun (born August 16, 1947) is an American politician and lawyer who represented Illinois in the United States Senate from 1993 to 1999. ... Privacy is the ability of an individual or group to keep their lives and personal affairs out of public view, or to control the flow of information about themselves. ... Liberty is generally considered a concept of political philosophy and identifies the condition in which an individual has immunity from the arbitrary exercise of authority. ... This page covers security in the sense of protection from hostile action. ... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Roy Neel|Roy M. Neel is a United States Democratic Party operative and lobbyist who served as a top assistant to Vice President Al Gore and President Bill Clinton. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Joe Trippi is the worlds foremost authority on Diet Pepsi, a fact that dismays the Cocal Cola company to no end. ... February 18 is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 18 is the 77th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (78th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Democracy for America (DFA) is a political action committee dedicated to supporting fiscally responsible, socially progressive candidates at all levels of government—from school board to the presidency. ... An advocacy group, interest group or lobbying group is a group, however loosely or tightly organized, doing advocacy: those determined to encourage or prevent changes in public policy without trying to be elected. ... March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Al Gore (born December 11, 1943) is a Vietnam Veteran and the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... John Kerry arrives at the 2004 Democratic National Convention, where he was officially designated as the Democratic Party nominee. ... The following is a timeline of events during the 2004 U.S. presidential election: 2002 May 31 - Vermont Governor Howard B. Dean III forms a presidential exploratory committee. ...


Post-campaign and Democracy for America

Following Dean's withdrawal after the Wisconsin primary, he pledged to support the eventual Democratic nominee. Though many supporters encouraged him to support the only remaining "non-establishment candidate," John Edwards, he remained neutral until John Kerry became the presumptive nominee. Dean endorsed Kerry on March 25, 2004, in a speech at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ...


On March 18, 2004, Dean founded the group Democracy for America. This group was created to house the large, Internet-based organization Dean created for his presidential campaign. Its goal is to help like-minded candidates get elected to local, state and federal offices. It has endorsed several sets of twelve candidates known as the Dean Dozen. Dean turned over control of the organization to his brother, Jim Dean, when he became Chairman of the Democratic National Committee. March 18 is the 77th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (78th in leap years). ... Democracy for America (DFA) is a political action committee dedicated to supporting fiscally responsible, socially progressive candidates at all levels of government—from school board to the presidency. ... The Dean Dozen, in American politics, was the collective term for six groups of 12 candidates endorsed by Democracy for America, the political action committee led by former Vermont governor and presidential candidate Howard Dean, in the 2004 elections. ... Jim Dean Speaks at a Democracy for New Hampshire fundraiser in Concord, New Hampshire James H. Dean is a U.S. politician. ... Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ...


Dean strongly urged his supporters to support Kerry as opposed to Ralph Nader, arguing that a vote for Nader would only help to re-elect President Bush because he believed that most who vote for Nader are likely to have voted for Kerry if Ralph Nader was not running. However fears that Ralph Nader would play a "spoiler" role that would harm the Democrats in the 2004 election proved unfounded — Kerry's margins of loss in states won by President Bush were all substantially larger than the percentage of votes gathered by Nader. Dean argued that Nader would be more effective if he lobbied on election law reform issues during his campaign. Dean supported several election law reform issues such as campaign finance reform, and Instant Runoff Voting. Ralph Nader Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934), is an American attorney and political activist. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Campaign finance. ... When the single transferable vote voting system is applied to a single-winner election it is sometimes called instant-runoff voting (IRV), as it is much like holding a series of runoff elections in which the lowest polling candidate is eliminated in each round until someone receives majority vote. ...


Successful campaign for DNC Chair

Dean was elected Chairman of the Democratic National Committee on February 12, 2005, after all his opponents dropped out of the race when it became apparent Dean had the votes to become Chair. Those opponents included former Congressman Martin Frost, former Denver Mayor Wellington Webb, former Congressman and 9/11 Commissioner Tim Roemer, and strategists Donnie Fowler, David Leland, and Simon Rosenberg. Other prominent Democrats considered running but ultimately declined. Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Congressman Martin Frost Jonas Martin Frost III (born January 1, 1942) is an American politician, who was the Democratic representative to the U.S. House of Representatives for the Texas 24th Congressional District from 1979 to 2005. ... Wellington E. Webb (born 1941) is a former mayor of Denver. ... Timothy J. Roemer is a Democratic politician in the United States. ... Donnie Fowler Donnie Fowler is an American political activist who ran John Kerrys campaign in the state of Michigan, during the presidential election of 2004. ... Rosenberg gives a speech on behalf of NDN. Simon Rosenberg is the founder of the New Democrat Network, an organization formerly allied with the Democratic Leadership Council, and was a candidate for the Democratic National Committee Chair in 2005. ...


Many prominent Democrats opposed Dean's campaign; House Leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Leader Harry Reid are rumored to be among them. Dean satisfied his critics by promising to focus on fundraising and campaigning as DNC Chair, and avoid policy statements. Nancy Patricia Pelosi or The Lioness (born Nancy Patricia DAlesandro on March 26, 1940) is currently the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives and is the first woman to hold that position. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ...


50-state strategy

After Dean became Chairman of the DNC, he pledged to bring reform to the Party. Rather than focusing just on 'swing states,' Dean proposed what has come to be known as the 50-State Strategy. The goal, the DNC says, is for the Democratic Party to be committed to winning elections at every level in every region of the country, with Democrats organized in every single voting precinct in the country. State party chairs have lauded Dean with praise for raising money directly for the individual state parties. A precinct is generally the lowest-level minor civil division in the United States. ...


Dean’s strategy uses a post-Watergate model taken from the Republicans of the mid-seventies. Working at the local, state and national level, the GOP built the party from the ground up. Dean's plan is to seed the local level with young and committed candidates, building them into state candidates in future races. Dean has traveled extensively through out the country with the plan, including places like Utah, Mississippi, and Texas, states in which Republicans have dominated the political landscape. Official language(s) English Capital Salt Lake City Largest city Salt Lake City Area  Ranked 13th  - Total 84,876 sq mi (219,887 km²)  - Width 270 miles (435 km)  - Length 350 miles (565 km)  - % water 3. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Official language(s) No Official Language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ...


Further changes have been made in attempting to make the stated platform of the Democratic Party more coherent and compact. Overhauling the website, the official platform of the 2004 campaign, which was largely criticized as avoiding key issues and being the product of party insiders, was replaced with a simplified, though comprehensive categorizing of positions on a wide range of issues. This strategy paid off in a historic victory as the Democrats took over control of the House of Representatives and the Senate in the 2006 mid-term elections. While it is likely this is also attributable to the short-comings of the Republican party in their dealings with the Iraq War and the scandals that occurred shortly before the election, Dean's emphasis on connecting with socially conservative, economic moderates in previous Republican states appears to have made some impact. Indeed, Democratic candidates won elections in such 'red states' as Kansas, Indiana and Montana.


Fundraising

Through grassroots fundraising Howard Dean has been able to raise millions more than the previous DNC Chairman at the same point after the 2000 election. Dean has raised the most money by any DNC Chairman in a similar post election period. This was especially apparent when the Federal Election Commission reported that the DNC had raised roughly $86.3 million in the first six months of 2005, an increase of over 50% on the amount raised during the same period of 2003. In comparison, the RNC fundraising activities represented a gain of only 2%. Additional attempts to capitalize on this trend was the introduction of "Democracy Bonds", a program under which small donors would give a set amount every month. Although it only reached over 31,000 donors by May 2006, far off-pace from the stated goal of 1 million by 2008, it has, nonetheless, contributed considerably to the funding of the DNC. Dean has continued to further develop online fundraising at the DNC. Just one month before Election Day 2006, he became the first to introduce the concept of a "grassroots match," where donors to the DNC pledged to match the first donation made by a new contributor. The DNC claims that the resulting flood of contributions led to 10,000 first-time donors in just a few days. A grassroots political movement is one driven by the constituents of a community. ... Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Controversial statements

Dean has made numerous controversial statements, both during his run for the presidency and during his tenure as DNC chair, mostly relating to either U.S. foreign policy or the Republican Party: President of the United States, George W. Bush (right) at Camp David in March 2003, hosting the British Prime Minister Tony Blair. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Democratic Party. ...

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

In response to his Iraq war radio comments, some Democrats, especially those in Republican-leaning areas, dissented with the chairman's opinion. Democratic representative Jim Marshall of Georgia said, "Dean's take on Iraq makes even less sense than the scream in Iowa; both are uninformed and unhelpful."[21] North Dakota Representative Earl Pomeroy was critical of Dean for making policy recommendations as chair of the DNC, telling a radio audience, "my words to Howard Dean are simple — shut up."[22] Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... James Creel Jim Marshall (born March 31, 1948) is an American politician, and has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 2003, representing the 3rd District of Georgia (map). ... Earl Pomeroy (born September 2, 1952) is an American lawyer and politican from the U.S. state of North Dakota. ...


Believing that Howard Dean's comments will alienate many voters, various Republicans have been indifferent to and even welcomed Dean's remarks. Senator John McCain for example told reporters outside a Rock the Vote event, "Howard Dean is the gift that keeps on giving."[23] John Sidney McCain III (born August 29, 1936) is an American Republican politician, currently the senior U.S. Senator from Arizona. ... Rock the Vote is a non-profit political advocacy organization founded in Los Angeles in 1990 by Jeff Ayeroff, co-chief of Virgin Records. ...


On January 29, 2005, Dean spoke to a crowd at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York City while vying to be the DNC chairman, saying, "I hate the Republicans and everything they stand for."[24] January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A prominent landmark situated on Madison Avenue and 45th Street in midtown New York City, The Roosevelt Hotel was named in honor of President Theodore Roosevelt. ... New York, NY redirects here. ...


On September 1st, 2005, Dean released a statement suggesting the way for George W. Bush to help the people in New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina was to "stand up to his big oil cronies who are making record profits as gas prices surge".[25] September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ...


On May 10, 2006, Dean went on the 700 Club and incorrectly stated that "[t]he Democratic Party platform from 2004 says marriage is between a man and a woman." The error resulted in widespread outrage against and criticism of Dean from homosexual and liberal groups and individuals, even after the DNC issued a statement the following day in which Dean wrote, "I misstated the Democratic Party's platform, which does not say that marriage should be limited to a man and a woman, but says the party is committed to full inclusion of gay and lesbian families in the life of our nation and leaves the issue to the states to decide. The Democratic Party remains committed to equal protection under the law for all Americans. How we achieve that goal continues to be the subject of a contentious debate, but our party continues to oppose constitutional amendments that seek to short circuit the debate on how to achieve equality for all Americans."[26] May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (131st in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The on-air personalities of The 700 Club The 700 Club is the flagship news talk show of the Christian Broadcasting Network, airing on cables ABC Family and in syndication throughout the United States and Canada. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... A political platform is a list of the principles which a political party supports in order to appeal to the general public for the purpose of having said partys candidates voted into office. ... “Matrimony” redirects here. ... Since its coinage, the word homosexuality has acquired multiple meanings. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... A lesbian is a woman who is romantically and sexually attracted only to other women. ... A constitutional amendment is an alteration to the constitution of a nation or a state. ...


During a teleconference with reporters on January 15, 2004, Dean claimed, "No doctor is going to do an abortion on a live fetus. That doesn't happen. Doctors don't do that. If they do, they'll get their license pulled, as well they should."[27] January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Chairman Howard Dean and DNC Vice Chair Susan Turnbull have recently been criticized for allegedly not mentioning the religious significance of Passover and Easter in the DNC's recent messages in honor of both holidays. [28] The acronym DNC can mean: Democratic National Committee, the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... Susan Turnbull has served as a Vice Chair of the Democratic National Committee since February 2005. ... This article is about the Jewish holiday. ... Easter, the Sunday of the Resurrection, Pascha, or Resurrection Day, is the most important religious feast of the Christian liturgical year, observed at some point between late March and late April each year (early April to early May in Eastern Christianity), following the cycle of the moon. ...


Notes and References

  1. ^ a b c d Cloud, John. "The cool passion of Dr. Dean.", Time, August 3, 2003. Retrieved on 2006-08-18. 
  2. ^ Roberts, Gary Boyd. Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States. Genealogical: 2004. ISBN 0-8063-1745-0. Quoted in "Royal Ancestry of the Next U.S. President", Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter, February 9, 2004.[1]
  3. ^ Reitwiesner, William Addams. Ancestry of Gov. Howard Dean. Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
  4. ^ http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q=east+hampton,+ny&ll=40.953585,-72.176056&spn=0.035264,0.097504
  5. ^ Grove, Lloyd. "Dean looks back, dryly." November 2, 2003. [2]
  6. ^ Sailer, Steve. "Analysis: Is Howard Dean a modern Puritan?" UPI. October 16, 2003.[3]
  7. ^ Noonan, Peggy. "The Dean Disappointment." The Wall Street Journal. January 8, 2004.[4]
  8. ^ Gilgoff, Dan. "The Yale Men." U.S. News & World Report. December 29, 2003.[5]
  9. ^ Singer, Mark. "Running on Instinct", The New Yorker, January 12, 2004. 
  10. ^ VandeHei, Jim. "Dean Now Willing to Discuss His Faith", Washington Post, January 4, 2004, p. A01. Retrieved on 2007-04-15. 
  11. ^ http://vermont-archives.org/govhistory/elect/
  12. ^ Dean was not the incumbent, the district of Chittenden 7-4 was being used for the first time.
  13. ^ Auld was not the incumbent, Peter Smith, a fellow Republican, did not seek reelection but instead ran unsuccessfully for Governor.
  14. ^ [6]
  15. ^ Politics 1, "Howard Dean Profile", page archived in 2004. Retrieved Nov. 27, 2006.
  16. ^ Diary Entry: Meeting Doctor Dean. HBO (March 10, 2003). Retrieved on Nov. 27, 2006.
  17. ^ a b c Salzman, Eric. "Dean's Scream: Not What It Seemed", CBS News, January 26, 2004. Retrieved on November 27, 2006.. 
  18. ^ Verne Gay, Seattle Times, "Dean's theatrics draw mixed reviews", January 21, 2004. Retrieved Nov. 27, 2006.
  19. ^ Sawyer, Diane (January 22, 2004). The Doctors’ Words; Transcript: Howard Dean and Judy Dean Speak to ABCNEWS’ Primetime. ABC News. Retrieved on September 10, 2004. (available on archive.org as of January 27, 2007.)
  20. ^ Loyola Phoenix, "The scream that left us blind", 2/11/04. Retrieved Nov. 27, 2006.
  21. ^ Jim VandeHei and Shalaigh Murray, Washington Post, "Democrats Fear Backlash at Polls for Antiwar Remarks", December 7, 2005. Retrieved Nov. 27, 2006.
  22. ^ Mary Clare Jalonick, Bismarck Tribune, "Pomeroy to Howard Dean:Shut up". Retrieved Nov. 27, 2006.
  23. ^ Marc Morano, Cybercast News Service, "Senator Obama Says Dean Using 'Religion to Divide'", June 9, 2005. Retrieved Nov. 27, 2006.
  24. ^ Dean's howling to lead DNC
  25. ^ [7]
  26. ^ Joshua Lynsen, New York Blade, "Howard Dean slams gay marriage on '700 Club'", May 10, 2006. Retrieved Nov. 27, 2006.
  27. ^ Carol Tobias, National Right to Life, Kerry Takes Early Lead, Feb. 2004
  28. ^ Gonzalez, Nathan. "Dean Fails To Reach Evangelicals", Political Wire, April 10, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-04-16. 

A pocket watch, a device used to tell time Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... April 15 is the 105th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (106th in leap years). ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... April 15 is the 105th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (106th in leap years). ... Peter Plympton Smith, the son of prominent banker and state senator Frederick P. Smith, was born October 31, 1945. ... HBO (Home Box Office) is an American premium cable television network. ... CBS News is the news division of American television and radio network CBS. Its current president is Sean McManus who is also head of CBS Sports. ... The daily Seattle Times is the leading newspaper in Seattle, Washington, United States. ... ABC News is a division of ABC television and radio networks (ABC), owned by The Walt Disney Company. ... September 10, 2004 An air strike in Iraq reportedly kills Habib Akdas, a man thought to be the leader of a terrorist cell responsible for the November 2003 bombings of two synagogues, a bank, and an embassy in Istanbul. ... ... The Bismarck Tribune is a daily newspaper printed in Bismarck, North Dakota. ... The Cybercast News Service (also CNSNews. ... The New York Blade is a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) newspaper in New York, New York. ... The National Right to Life Committee is a right to life/pro-life organization, that was founded in in Detroit as a non-sectarian, non-partisan group, opposed to abortion, euthanasia and infanticide. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (107th in leap years). ...

Further reading

  • Dean, Howard. You Have the Power: How to Take Back Our Country and Restore Democracy in America. Simon & Schuster, 2004. ISBN 0-7432-7013-4
  • Dean, Howard. Winning Back America. Simon & Schuster, 2003. ISBN 0-7432-5571-2
  • Dunnan, Dana. Burning at the Grassroots: Inside the Dean Machine. Pagefree (vanity press), 2004. ISBN 1-58961-261-2
  • Trippi, Joe. The Revolution Will Not Be Televised. ReganBooks, 2004. ISBN 0-06-076155-5
  • Van Susteren, Dirk. Howard Dean: A Citizen's Guide to the Man Who Would Be President. Steerforth, 2003. ISBN 1-58642-075-5

External links

Find more information on Howard Dean by searching Wikipedia's sister projects
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Official

Media

  • A copy of the speech, in addition to an audio file available for Windows Media Player, is available here.
  • Howard Dean Delivers the Keynote Address at Yearly Kos on June 10, 2006

Windows Media Player (WMP) is a digital media player and media library application developed by Microsoft that is used for playing audio, video and images on personal computers running the Microsoft Windows operating system, as well as on Pocket PC and Windows Mobile-based devices. ... YearlyKos is a political convention for American liberal political activists, organized by readers and writers of Daily Kos, an influential American political blog. ...

Other

  • Howard Dean on the Tavis Smiley show October 2006
  • December 08 2004 Speech At GWU On The Democratic Party
  • [8] Photograph of the official portrait of Howard Dean at the Vermont State House by Sara Lovering
  • List of contributors to Howard Dean's 2004 presidential campaign
  • Dean's Iowa Caucus Rally
  • E-Democracy's Top 50 Howard Dean Links
  • Dean Campaign Organization Wiki
  • Dean's genealogy — includes King James IV of Scotland
  • Podcast of TimesTalks interview with Howard Dean with New York Times contributing writer Matt Bai on the future of the Democratic Party
Preceded by
Peter P. Smith
Lieutenant Governor of Vermont
1987–1991
Succeeded by
Barbara Snelling
Preceded by
Richard A. Snelling
Governor of Vermont
1991–2003
Succeeded by
Jim Douglas
Preceded by
Terry McAuliffe
Chairman of the Democratic National Committee
2005–
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Persondata
NAME Dean, Howard
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Dean, Howard Brush III
SHORT DESCRIPTION Chairman of the Democratic National Committee
DATE OF BIRTH 17 NOV 1948
PLACE OF BIRTH New York City, New York
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Howard Dean - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5742 words)
Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont.
A Democrat, Dean was elected to the Vermont House of Representatives in 1982 and was elected lieutenant governor in 1986.
Dean was born in the Town of East Hampton, New York, to Howard Brush Dean, Jr.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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