FACTOID # 15: A mere 0.8% of West Virginians were born in a foreign country.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying
How to Succeed in Business
Without Really Trying
1995 Revival Logo
Music Frank Loesser
Lyrics Frank Loesser
Book Abe Burrows
Jack Weinstock
Willie Gilbert
Based upon How to Succeed Without
Really Trying
by Shepherd Mead
Productions 1961 Broadway
1963 West End
1995 Broadway revival
Awards Tony Award for Best Musical
Tony Award for Best Book
1962 Pulitzer Prize for Drama

How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying is a 1961 musical, initially running for 1,417 performances. With music and lyrics by Frank Loesser and book by Abe Burrows, Jack Weinstock, and Willie Gilbert, the show won seven Tony Awards and the 1962 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. In 1967, it was produced as a film by United Artists, with many of the original cast recreating their roles. A highly-regarded 1995 revival starring Matthew Broderick and Megan Mullally garnered a Tony for Broderick's performance. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image:FrankLoesser1. ... Abe Burrows (b. ... Pen name of William Willie Gomberg, born 1916 in Cleveland, Ohio, died 1980 in New York City. ... How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (original subtitle: The dastards guide to fame and fortune) was a humorous 1952 book by Shepherd Mead. ... Shepherd Mead, born Edward Shepherd Mead IV, (April 26, 1914-August 15, 1994), was an American writer. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre in... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... A revival is a restaging of a former hit play at a later date. ... // 1940s 1949 Kiss Me, Kate - Music and lyrics by Cole Porter, book by Bella and Samuel Spewack. ... The Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical is the Tony awarded to the librettist(s) of the musical. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Drama was first awarded in 1918. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theater combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Image:FrankLoesser1. ... Abe Burrows (b. ... Pen name of William Willie Gomberg, born 1916 in Cleveland, Ohio, died 1980 in New York City. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Drama was first awarded in 1918. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... The current United Artists logo (a variant was used during the 1980s). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Matthew Broderick (born March 21, 1962) is a Tony Award winning American film and stage actor who is perhaps best known for his role as the title character in Ferris Buellers Day Off. ... Megan Mullally (born November 12, 1958 in Los Angeles, California, USA) is a three-time SAG and two-time Emmy Award-winning American actress, talk show host, singer and comedian, best known for her role as Karen Walker on Will & Grace. ...


Shepherd Mead's 1952 book of the same name was a huge success. Playwright Willie Gilbert and neurosurgeon Jack Weinstock created a dramatic interpretation, but it had gone unproduced for five years. Agent Abe Newborn brought the work to the attention of producers Cy Feuer and Ernest Martin, with the intention of retooling it as a musical. Feuer and Martin had great success with the 1950 adaptation of Guys and Dolls, and brought in the creative team from that show to work on How to.... Abe Burrows and Frank Loesser set to work on the new adaptation, with rehearsals beginning in August 1961. Shepherd Mead, born Edward Shepherd Mead IV, (April 26, 1914-August 15, 1994), was an American writer. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Cy Feuer (born January 15, 1911 in Brooklyn, New York) is a producer and director of Broadway musicals. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Guys and Dolls Original Broadway Cast recording (1950) Guys And Dolls is a hit 1950 musical, with the music and lyrics written by Frank Loesser. ... Abe Burrows (b. ... Image:FrankLoesser1. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Under the direction of Abe Burrows, Robert Morse was cast as Finch, the irrepressible window washer, Charles Nelson Reilly as his nemesis Bud Frump, and Rudy Vallee as the stuffy company president. The show opened on October 14, 1961, nominated for several Tony Awards and winning in the areas of Best Musical, Best Book, Best Direction of a Musical, Best Conductor and Musical Director, Best Producers of a Musical, Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical for Robert Morse, and Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical for Charles Nelson Reilly.[1] Actor Robert Morse photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1958 Robert Morse (b. ... Charles Nelson Reilly (January 13, 1931–May 25, 2007) was an American actor, director and drama teacher known for his comedic roles in movies, childrens television, animated cartoons, and as a panelist on the game show Match Game. ... Rudy Vallee (July 28, 1901 - July 3, 1986) was a popular United States singer, actor, bandleader, and entertainer. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... // 1940s 1949 Kiss Me, Kate - Music and lyrics by Cole Porter, book by Bella and Samuel Spewack. ... The Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical is the Tony awarded to the librettist(s) of the musical. ... The Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical has been given since 1960. ... The Tony Award for Best Conductor and Musical Director [1] // In the following list, the winner is displayed first; the non-winning nominees, where known, are second. ... The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical is awarded to the actor who was voted as the best actor in a musical play, whether a new production or a revival. ... The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical is awarded to the actor who is voted the best non-starring actor in a musical, whether a new production or a revival. ...


The original Broadway production credited the choreography to an obscure dance director named Hugh Lambert, while the much better-known Bob Fosse received only a "musical staging by..." credit. Abe Burrows explains this in his autobiography Honest, Abe. While How to Succeed... was in its early development, producer Cy Feuer attended a trade show and was extremely impressed by an elaborate dance number created by Lambert, prompting Feuer to hire Lambert to choreograph the new musical. According to Burrows, it soon became clear in rehearsals that Lambert's creative abilities were completely used up in that one elaborate dance number. Bob Fosse was brought in to replace him, but Fosse was unwilling to hurt Lambert's career by having him fired. Lambert's trade-show dance number was recycled as the "Treasure Hunt" dance in How to Succeed..., while Fosse agreed to take a "musical staging" credit for choreographing all the other dance numbers. Burrows also reveals that another crisis arose in rehearsals when former recording star Rudy Vallee wanted to interpolate some of his hit songs from the 1930s. Hugh Lambert (May 27, 1944-December 26, 2005) was an Irish journalist. ... Bob Fosse, early promotional image Bob Fosse (June 23, 1927 – September 23, 1987) was a musical theater choreographer and director. ... Cy Feuer (born January 15, 1911 in Brooklyn, New York) is a producer and director of Broadway musicals. ... A trade fair (or trade show) is an exhibition organised so that companies in a specific industry can showcase and demonstrate their new products and services. ...


A London production opened at the Shaftesbury Theatre on March 28, 1963 and ran for 520 performances. It was also directed by Abe Burrows and Bob Fosse, and featured a new London cast. The Shaftesbury Theatre is located on Shaftesbury Ave in London, England. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


A 1967 United Artists film was made of the musical, directed by David Swift. Robert Morse, Rudy Vallee, Michele Lee, Sammy Smith, and Ruth Kobart recreated their roles for the film, and Bob Fosse again choreographed. This was the debut of actress Michele Lee, who later went on to star in a few more movies, before starring in the popular 1980s soap opera, Knots Landing. The current United Artists logo (a variant was used during the 1980s). ... David Swift (born 1933) is a British actor, best known for his role in the sitcom, Drop the Dead Donkey. ... Actor Robert Morse photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1958 Robert Morse (b. ... Rudy Vallee (July 28, 1901 - July 3, 1986) was a popular United States singer, actor, bandleader, and entertainer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Knots Landing was a primetime television soap opera that aired for 14 seasons, from December 27th, 1979 to May 13th, 1993 on CBS. Set in a fictitious coastal suburb of Los Angeles in California, the show initially centered around the lives of four married couples residing in a cul-de...


A Broadway revival opened at the Richard Rodgers Theatre on March 23, 1995 and ran for 548 performances. It was directed by Des McAnuff and choreographed by Wayne Cilento. Matthew Broderick won a Tony for his performance of Finch, with Rosemary being played by Megan Mullally. In a pre-recorded performance, Walter Cronkite was the Book Voice. One of the later replacements for Mullally would be Broderick's future wife, Sarah Jessica Parker. The Richard Rodgers Theatre was built by Irwin Chanin in 1925. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Des McAnuff is the highly celebrated, Tony award-winning director of such hit Broadway musicals as Big River, The Whos Tommy, Titanic, and most recently, Urinetown. ... Wayne Cilento (born August 28, 1949) is an award-winning American dancer and choreographer. ... Sarah Jessica Parker (born March 25, 1965) is a Golden Globe and Emmy-winning American actress and an Emmy-winning producer, with a portfolio of television, movie, and theater performances. ...

Contents

Synopsis

Act One

Scene One

As the Overture fades, lights come up on J. Pierrepont Finch, a young Window cleaner with a mind for advancement. He is at work squeegeeing the windows of the World Wide Wicket Company, though his mind is more closely focused on the book in his other hand. A disembodied voice, the "Book Voice", tells him that "everything [he] needs to know about the science of getting ahead" is contained within the pages of How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying. His scaffold descends, he removes his overalls to reveal the business suit beneath, and he quickly disappears into the high-pressure world of Corporate America. A window cleaner. ... Corporate America is an informal phrase describing both the independent for-profit and independent non-profit world of corporations within the United States not under government ownership. ...


Scene Two

Finch's first act in the corporate world is to knock J.B. Biggley, the president of the company, to the ground. Unfazed, Finch presses Biggley for a job, who dismisses him to the personnel manager, Mr. Bratt. Having seen all of this, Rosemary Pilkington, a secretary, is impressed with Finch and offers to help him meet Mr. Bratt. Bratt initially treats Finch brusquely -- that is, until Finch mentions Mr. Biggley's name and implies that they are old friends. Finch is given a job in the mailroom, where he works with the lazy and nepotism-minded nephew of Mr. Biggley, Bud Frump. Rosemary dreams of a life in the suburbs ("New Rochelle. Or maybe White Plains.") with a smartly-attired junior executive. Regarding Finch, she tells her friend Smitty that she'd be Happy to Keep his Dinner Warm. Human Resources has at least two meanings depending on context. ...


Scene Three

Coffee break! The fatigued workers fall over each other in their rush to get to the coffee machine, only to find it bone dry. Frustrated with no discernible advancement in his first week, Finch flatters Miss Jones, Mr. Biggley's secretary. The two are introduced by Rosemary, and Finch is sure to add a bad word about Bud Frump. A coffee break is a daily social gathering for a snack and short downtime practiced by employees in business and industry. ...


Scene Four

"One word of caution about the mailroom: it is a place out of which you must get. Do not get stuck in the mailroom. Plan to rise." Twimble, head of the mailroom, is moving to the shipping department, but not without some words of wisdom for our young hero. He tells Finch that the secret to longevity at the company is to play things The Company Way: overwhelming fear of being fired coupled with absolute faith in the company's wisdom. After twenty-five years in the mail room, Twimble hands the reins to Finch. Finch, heeding the words of his trusty book, declines the promotion, saying that Bud Frump is more qualified. Frump accepts, vowing to play things The Company Way, too. Twimble and Bratt are impressed, again, by Finch, and Bratt offers him a job as a junior executive in the Plans and Systems department, headed by Gatch. Frump, seeing that he has been outdone, fumes. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Publicly and privately held for-profit corporations often confer corporate titles or business titles on company officials as a means of identifying their function in the organization. ...


Scenes Five and Six

Enter Miss Hedy LaRue. In her skin-tight leopard dress, Hedy is the epitome of the classic blonde bombshell and can't take two steps without being ogled. This gorgeous Marilyn Monroe-esque career woman goes against the cliché; she may not be a natural secretary (her shorthand and typing are appalling), but she is shrewd enough to know how to use her "assets" to her advantage. Although she is Mr. Biggley's mistress, she leaves the men around the office panting in her wake wherever she goes. Mr. Bratt reminds his men that A Secretary Is Not a Toy. Relationships with one's secretary are not to be tolerated, but panting, catcalling, and generally driving oneself to the brink of insanity certainly is! The term bombshell is a forerunner to the sex symbol and originally used to describe popular female sex icons. ... Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson on June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe Award-winning American actress, singer, model and pop icon. ...


Scene Seven

It is Friday afternoon, just after five o'clock. As they make their way to the elevators, the secretaries complain of unwanted attention from their bosses, while the men talk of sales figures. The ever-alert Finch learns that Biggley is extremely proud of his alma mater, Old Ivy, and learns that he will be in the office Saturday morning to pick up his golf clubs for his game with Wally Womper, the Chairman of the Board.


Rosemary and Smitty encounter Finch at the elevator and Smitty knows that, despite their awkward silence, the two like each other. They agree that it's Been a Long Day, and Smitty points out a special "dinner for two" at a local restaurant. As the three enter the elevator, Finch and Rosemary decide to take advantage of the special.


Frump runs into Biggley and Hedy, arguing about her job. Frump realizes their relationship and blackmails Biggley into giving him a promotion, also rising the corporate ladder.


Scene Eight

Saturday morning, and Finch enters early and begins setting the scene: he begins strewing crumpled and paper around his office, breaks a few pencils, overturns the trash can, and scatters cigarette butts everywhere to make it appear that he has been working all night. Biggley arrives, and Finch "absent-mindedly" begins humming Grand Old Ivy -- the Old Ivy fight song. Finch convinces the Old Man that he, too, is a proud alumnus.


Scenes Nine and Ten

In a show of alumni favoritism, Biggley insists that Finch be given his own office and secretary. Bratt assigns Hedy, prompting the Book Voice to warn him to beware of secretaries who have many talents, none of them secretarial. Finch realizes that Biggley must be her advocate, and sends her on an errand to Gatch, knowing that he won't be able to resist making a pass at her. We next see Finch seated behind Gatch's desk, Gatch having been dispatched to Venezuela.


Scenes Eleven and Twelve

A reception for the new Advertising Department head, Benjamin Burton Daniel Ovington, is being held, and Rosemary hopes to impress Finch with her new Paris Original. She arrives first, only to watch all of the women in the office enter wearing an identical design of dress. Hedy enters last in her Paris Original to calls of Wow! What a dress from the men. Hedy has a bit too much to drink, and Biggley asks Bratt to take her home. Bratt in turn asks Frump, and after some consideration (and planning) he agrees.


Scenes Thirteen and Fourteen

After much convincing and arguing, Frump convinces Hedy that it is time to go. She grabs Frump by the tie and kisses him, telling him he's cute but "not as cute as Finchy" as she exits to shower in Biggley's office. Frump, seeing an opportunity, tells Finch that Biggley is waiting in his office for him. Hoping to trap Finch and Hedy, Frump goes off to find Biggley. In the office, Hedy makes a pass at Finch, and, as they are kissing passionately, Finch realizes that he is in love with Rosemary, who enters as Hedy returns to the bathroom. Finch proposes to her and, as she is about to accept, Hedy comes out of the bathroom clad in only a towel. In a huff, Rosemary leaves the office, only to find Frump and Biggley just outside the door. Hedy returns to the bathroom, and Finch and Rosemary embrace -- just in time for Frump and Biggley to walk through the door. In search of Biggley, Bratt and Ovington enter. Ovington resigns a few moments later: after being prompted for his alma mater by Finch, Biggley realizes that Ovington matriculated from Old Ivy's bitter rival. Biggley names Finch Vice-President in Charge of Advertising, just in time for a big meeting two days hence. Biggley leaves as Finch and Rosemary declare their love for J. Pierrepont Finch, and Bud Frump states "I will return!"


Act Two

Scene One

It is the morning of the big meeting, and Rosemary is feeling neglected by Finch. She decides to quit, but her fellow secretaries convince her to stay: she's living their dream of marrying an executive and becoming Cinderella, Darling. (In the 1995 revival, this song was replaced with a reprise of How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, with the lyrics suggesting ways in which a girl can get hold of a man's financial assets.)


Scene Two

"So you are now a Vice-President.... You have done beautifully. Unless you are Vice-President in Charge of Advertising. In that case you are in terrible trouble. There is only one thing that can save you: you must get a brilliant idea," warns the Book. Foreseeing that he may not have a brilliant idea, the Book suggests that he steal one. Bud Frump comes in and tells Finch about his idea for a treasure hunt. Finch loves the idea, unaware that Biggley has already heard the idea and shot it down. Finch bounces the idea off Rosemary, who tells him that, no matter what, she'd be Happy to Keep His Dinner Warm (reprise).


Scene Three

Hedy flounces her way into Biggley's office in a huff and catches him off guard and doing an unlikely hobby: knitting. She is extremely unhappy with her secretarial duties and announces to Biggley that she is leaving for California. He begs her to stay, and they sing the unlikely love duet, Love From a Heart of Gold while Hedy caresses Biggley's head on her chest.


Scene Four

In the executive washroom, Frump assures the others that Finch's plan will fail and, with it, his career. Finch enters and gives himself a pep talk, telling himself I Believe in You, while the other executives vow his downfall.


Scene Five

Finch presents "his" idea: he will hide five thousand shares of company stock in each of the ten offices around the country, and give the audience weekly clues as to their whereabouts. Biggley is about to reject this idea yet again, when Finch explains that the clue each week will be given by the scantily-dressed World Wide Wicket Girl: Miss Hedy LaRue.


Scene Six

During the first television show, the Treasure Girl is asked to swear on a Bible that she doesn't know the location of the prizes. Hedy, whom Biggley had told the night previous where the treasure was hidden, panics and accidentally reveals this to the entire television audience.


Scenes Seven and Eight

"How To Handle a Disaster. In every businessman's career, there are times when things go a bit wrong. However, should you be the cause of a disaster that's really disastrous, we suggest that your best bet is to review the first chapter of this book: How to Apply for a Job." Treasure hunters have wrecked World Wide Wicket Company offices across the country, and the executives, including Chairman of the Board Wally Womper, are waiting in Biggley's office for Finch's resignation. Finch tells Rosemary that he will probably have to go back to washing windows and she tells him "I Believe in You". Frump arrives to escort Finch to Biggley's office.


Scenes Nine and Nine-A

About to sign his letter of resignation, Finch mentions that he'll probably be going back to washing windows. Womper hears this, immediately being drawn to Finch as he, too, was a former washer of windows and that the both "Had a book" Wally's book being a book of betting records. Finch manages to place the blame for the treasure show on Bud, also mentioning that Frump is Biggley's nephew. Womper is about to "clean house from top to bottom", when Finch steps in on everyone's behalf. Finch tells the executives that they're all part of the Brotherhood of Man. Everyone is spared, except Frump, who is fired.


Scene Ten

The show ends with the announcement to the employees that Biggley is still president, that Womper is retiring to travel the world with his new wife, Hedy, and that Finch will become Chairman of the Board. Rosemary stands by his side as she plants the seed for aspiring to the Presidency of the United States. Bud Frump is lowered on a window-washing scaffold, outside the building, squeegee in one hand and How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying in the other.[2]


Musical numbers

Act I
  • Overture
  • How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying
  • Happy to Keep His Dinner Warm
  • Coffee Break
  • The Company Way
  • The Company Way (Reprise)
  • A Secretary is Not a Toy
  • Been a Long Day
  • Been a Long Day (Reprise)
  • Grand Old Ivy
  • Paris Original
  • Rosemary
  • Finale to Act I
Act II
  • Cinderella, Darling
    • 1995 revival replacement: How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (reprise)
  • Happy to Keep His Dinner Warm (Reprise)
  • Love From a Heart of Gold
  • I Believe in You
  • I Believe in You (Reprise)
  • Brotherhood of Man
  • Finale: The Company Way
Cast of various productions of How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying
J. Pierrepont Finch Rosemary Pilkington Bud Frump J.B. Biggley Hedy LaRue Miss Jones Book Voice
Original 1961 Broadway Robert Morse Bonnie Scott Charles Nelson Reilly Rudy Vallee Virginia Martin Ruth Kobart
Original 1963 London Warren Berlinger Patricia Michael David Knight Billy De Wolfe Eileen Gourlay Olice Lucius
1967 United Artists Film Robert Morse Michele Lee Anthony "Scooter" Teague Rudy Vallee Maureen Arthur Ruth Kobart
1995 Broadway Revival Matthew Broderick Megan Mullally Jeff Blumenkrantz Ronn Carroll Luba Mason Lillias White Walter Cronkite

Actor Robert Morse photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1958 Robert Morse (b. ... Charles Nelson Reilly (January 13, 1931–May 25, 2007) was an American actor, director and drama teacher known for his comedic roles in movies, childrens television, animated cartoons, and as a panelist on the game show Match Game. ... Rudy Vallee (July 28, 1901 - July 3, 1986) was a popular United States singer, actor, bandleader, and entertainer. ... Warren Berlinger (born August 31, 1937) is an American character actor, and also the nephew of comedian Milton Berle. ... David Knight is an English Enduro rider. ... Billy De Wolfe (born 18 February 1907 in Wollaston, Massachusetts – died 5 March 1974 in Los Angeles, California) was an American character actor. ... The current United Artists logo (a variant was used during the 1980s). ... Actor Robert Morse photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1958 Robert Morse (b. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rudy Vallee (July 28, 1901 - July 3, 1986) was a popular United States singer, actor, bandleader, and entertainer. ... Maureen Arthur (born: 15 April 1934 in San Jose, California) is an American actress. ... Matthew Broderick (born March 21, 1962) is a Tony Award winning American film and stage actor who is perhaps best known for his role as the title character in Ferris Buellers Day Off. ... Megan Mullally (born November 12, 1958 in Los Angeles, California, USA) is a three-time SAG and two-time Emmy Award-winning American actress, talk show host, singer and comedian, best known for her role as Karen Walker on Will & Grace. ... Jeff Blumenkrantz (born June 3, 1965) is an American actor and musical theatre composer/lyricist. ... Lillias White on the poster for the Sydney production of her one-woman show Lillias White (born July 21, 1951) is an award-winning American singer and actress. ... Walter Leland Cronkite, Jr. ...

References

  1. ^  Frank Loesser Home Page
  2. ^  Musical Theater International synopsis

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (800 words)
S the curtain rises, Finch, a window-cleaner, is diligently studying How to Succeed in Business.
After that Finch is never at a loss for the proper maneuver, word of cajolery, successful intrigue or correct gesture by which to gain continual promotions in the firm.
All the while Rosemary has become more determined than ever to capture Finch, and though he is much too busy with getting ahead to think of romance, he is finally maneuvered into taking her out for dinner ("Been a Long Day").
How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying theatre reviews Chichester festival (562 words)
In contrast to those young business people, who showed little facial expression during their performance, the company employees at "World Wide Wickets" were full of animation and expression.
But this is no ordinary job-seeker; he is aiming, with a little help from his secret book "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying", (snippets of which were read by the voice-over of an American accented Alistair McGowan), to make a meteoric rise to the top of the company ladder.
“How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying” is in repertoire at Chichester from the 29th April to the 10th September, 2005.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m