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Encyclopedia > House of M
House of M

Cover to House of M #1.
Art by Esad Ribic.
Publisher Marvel Comics
Format a core limited series including crossovers
Publication date 2005
Number of issues 8 plus tie-ins
Main character(s) the Marvel Universe
Creative team
Writer(s) Brian Michael Bendis
Penciller(s) Olivier Coipel
Inker(s) Tim Townsend
Colorist(s) Frank D'Armata
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House of M was an eight-part comic book crossover storyline published by Marvel Comics in 2005. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x610, 44 KB) Summary House of M #1. Art by Olivier Coipel. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... It has been suggested that Gaming crossovers be merged into this article or section. ... This is a list of comics-related events in 2005. ... This article is about the shared universe setting used by many Marvel Comics titles. ... Brian Michael Bendis (born August 18, 1967) is an American comic book writer and erstwhile artist. ... Olivier Coipel is a comic book artist. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... It has been suggested that Gaming crossovers be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This is a list of comics-related events in 2005. ...


Written by Brian Michael Bendis, and illustrated by Olivier Coipel, its first issue debuted in June 2005, as a follow-up to the events of the Planet X and Avengers Disassembled storylines, in which the mutant superhero Scarlet Witch suffered a mental breakdown and tried to alter the fabric of reality to recreate her lost children. Scarlet Witch's father Magneto and her twin brother Quicksilver played major roles in the series. Brian Michael Bendis (born August 18, 1967) is an American comic book writer and erstwhile artist. ... Olivier Coipel is a comic book artist. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in June June 27: Shelby Foote June 27: John T. Walton June 26: Richard Whiteley June 25: John Fiedler June 25: Chet Helms June 24: Paul Winchell June 21: Jaime Cardinal Sin June 20: Jack Kilby... Cover to New X-Men #147. ... Avengers Disassembled, referred to in some participating series as Disassembled, is a crossover event between several Marvel Comics series. ... A mutant within the Marvel comic books, particularly those of the X-Men mythos, is an individual who possesses a genetic trait called an X-gene that allows them to naturally develop superhuman powers and abilities. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... The Scarlet Witch (Wanda Maximoff) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe, a mutant who was introduced as a super-villainess before reforming and becoming a superheroine early in her history. ... For other uses, see Reality (disambiguation). ... Magneto (Eric Magnus Lensherr) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... For Quicksilver (DC Comics), see Max Mercury. ...

Contents

Introduction

Bendis, lead writer for the House of M event, was quoted in the House of M #1 Director's Cut that the series would "shake the world and break the internet wide open". In addition to the main eight-issue limited series, House of M was heralded by being a lead-in arc in Excalibur #13-14, and had several tie-ins to ongoing series, including Uncanny X-Men, New X-Men: Academy X and Wolverine. (See Comic tie-ins below.) Prior to the event, Bendis also mentioned in several interviews that the event will have a lasting effect on the Marvel Universe, but remained tight-lipped as to what. The reduction of the mutant community was the only rumored effect that actually came about. The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... Excalibur is a Marvel Comics superhero group, an offshoot of the X-Men, usually based in the United Kingdom. ... For the second comic book series starring the X-Men, see X-Men (vol. ... The New Mutants #1. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ...


The crossover has been followed by a one-shot called House of M: Decimation - The Day After, a series called Son Of M which depicts Quicksilver dealing with his loss of powers and Generation M, which devoted each issue to a different mutant dealing with his/her loss of powers. Characters confirmed to star are Chamber, Jubilee, and Blob. Characters who lost their powers included Dani Moonstar, Magneto, Tag. The storyline also led to the reboot of Excalibur into New Excalibur, a shift in the creative teams of several comics, and the debut of several spinoff series, including X-Men: Deadly Genesis, X-Men: The 198 and Sentinel Squad O*N*E, "Ms. Marvel" and a new X-Factor series. Decimation event logo, as shown on the covers of tie-in comics Decimation is the name of the late 2005 Marvel Comics storyline spinning out of the House of M limited series, that focuses on the ramifications of the Scarlet Witchs stripping nearly all of the mutant population of... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For Quicksilver (DC Comics), see Max Mercury. ... Generation M is a five issue mini-series written by Paul Jenkins and pencilled by Ramon Bachs. ... Chamber (Jonothon Jono Evan Starsmore) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superhero associated with the X-Men. ... Wondra (Jubilation Lee, formerly known as Jubilee) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superheroine associated with the X-Men. ... For other uses, see Blob (disambiguation). ... Danielle Moonstar, originally codenamed Psyche and later Mirage, is a fictional Marvel Comics superheroine associated with the X-Men. ... Magneto (Eric Magnus Lensherr) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Tag (Brian Cruz) is a fictional character, a Puerto Rican mutant in the Marvel Universe, one of the student body in the Xavier Institute, and a member of the Hellions squad therein. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Excalibur (comics). ... A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... The Sentinels are a type of fictional robot in the Marvel Comics universe. ... For the other Marvel Comics character called Ms. ... X-Factor is a comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ...


The epilogue to the "House of M" and "Decimation" storylines, which served to answer to the mystery of the strange "energy-cloud" hovering in orbit around the Earth at the conclusion of House of M #8, was revealed in the pages of New Avengers # 16-20. (See also The Collective.) An epilogue, or epilog, is a piece of writing at the end of a work of literature or drama, usually used to bring closure to the work. ... For the unrelated TV show, see The New Avengers. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Synopsis

Variant cover to House of M #1. Art by Joe Quesada.
Variant cover to House of M #1. Art by Joe Quesada.

Download high resolution version (600x900, 177 KB)Cover to House of M #1, featuring the Scarlet Witch. ... Download high resolution version (600x900, 177 KB)Cover to House of M #1, featuring the Scarlet Witch. ... Joseph Joe Quesada (born December 1, 1962), colloquially known as Joe Q, is the editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics and a comic book writer and artist. ...

Genesis

The story begins with a birth. Wanda Maximoff, also known as the Scarlet Witch, is surrounded by friends and family while giving birth. Her attending physician, Doctor Strange, hands Wanda her newborn twins and declares the birth a great success. At Wanda's side is her husband, The Vision, who is very proud of his wife and children. From across the room comes a cold and distant voice—that of Professor Charles Xavier (Professor X) who demands Wanda return the world to normal. She refuses, clinging to her babies, who shatter and disappear. There are no friends, no family and certainly no babies. Instead, Wanda is resting in a dark room in the devastated mutant paradise of Genosha. Using his fantastic mental powers, Professor X forces Wanda to sleep. Magneto appears, dressed humbly, and asks Professor X about his progress with his daughter. Professor X informs Magneto that his power will no longer be enough to hold back Wanda and that a solution must be found. Magneto, blaming himself for twisting his children through the strength of his own dreams and ambitions, walks on a magnetic field towards the center of the island to be alone. The Scarlet Witch (Wanda Maximoff) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe, a mutant who was introduced as a super-villainess before reforming and becoming a superheroine early in her history. ... This article is about the Marvel comics superhero. ... The Vision is the name of three fictional comic-book characters in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Charles Francis Xavier, also known as Professor X, is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, known as the leader and founder of the X-Men. ... Flag of Genosha under Magnetos reign. ...


Meanwhile, Xavier arranges a meeting of superheroes to decide the fate of Wanda Maximoff. Calling the Avengers, the X-Men and several lone heroes, a meeting ensues high atop Avengers Tower, presided over by Professor X himself. Emma Frost, reading the minds of all those in attendance, concludes that killing Wanda is the only way to end her destructive magic. Captain America, however, argues that the group should seek alternate methods of dealing with Wanda including suppression of her powers and her insanity. The X-Men argue that if word about Wanda and her destructive powers gets out, it will set back human-mutant relations by centuries. As the conversation progresses, it is revealed that Professor X asked Doctor Strange to help Wanda, but unfortunately neither was strong enough to combat her magic. Wolverine speaks up, saying that there is no other way—Wanda must be killed. The rest of the group, however, decides that they must talk to Wanda in person before making their decision. Emma Grace[1] Frost, formerly known as the White Queen, is a fictional character appearing in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... This article is about the comic book superhero Captain America. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ...


Back in Genosha, a distraught Quicksilver rushes to Magneto and reveals that he was just in New York where he heard that the X-Men and Avengers are planning on killing Wanda. Magneto angrily replies that he does not know what to do. Quicksilver falls to the floor sobbing and Magneto glances over at his sleeping daughter. For Quicksilver (DC Comics), see Max Mercury. ...


Xavier takes the two groups to Genosha, only to discover that Wanda is missing. Suddenly, the members of the group start to disappear one by one. Spider-Man is soon the only one left and becomes engulfed by a white light… Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ...


New world

When the light departs, we see that the world has changed: Spider-Man is married to Gwen Stacy in New York; Cyclops and Emma Frost are married; Dr. Strange is a psychologist; Carol Danvers—known usually as Ms. Marvel—is now Captain Marvel, America's most beloved superhero; Gambit is a criminal; and Steve Rogers is an aged veteran. As we follow vignettes of their lives, it becomes readily apparent that none of them remember the change. Meanwhile, Wolverine is now in charge of S.H.I.E.L.D.'s House of Magnus Red Guard, and wakes up onboard a helicarrier sleeping next to Mystique. Unlike his comrades, Wolverine remembers. For the Christian hardcore band, see Gwen Stacy (band). ... For other uses, see Cyclops (disambiguation). ... Emma Grace[1] Frost, formerly known as the White Queen, is a fictional character appearing in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Doctor Strange is a sorcerer, featured in Marvel Comics. ... For the Marvel Comics character with the same codename, see Sharon Ventura. ... Gambit (Remy LeBeau) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superhero that has been a member of the X-Men. ... This article is about the comic book superhero Captain America. ... S.H.I.E.L.D. (originally an acronym for Supreme Headquarters, International Espionage, Law-Enforcement Division, changed in 1991 to Strategic Hazard Intervention, Espionage and Logistics Directorate) is a fictional counterterrorism and intelligence agency in the Marvel Universe that often deals with superhuman threats. ... The Helicarrier, an aircraft carrier specifically designed to be itself capable of independent powered flight in addition to the conventional functions of aircraft carriers, is the signature capital ship of the fictional intelligence/defence agency S.H.I.E.L.D., usually shown in Marvel Comics-published comic book magazines. ... Mystique (Raven Darkholme) is a Marvel Comics character associated with the X-Men franchise. ...


Wolverine immediately rushes outside for a breath of fresh air. Leaping from the helicarrier, he finds himself in a world where Homo superior, instead of Homo sapiens, rule the planet. // Marvel Comics In Marvel comic books, particularly those of the X-Men franchise, a mutant is a human being who is born with genetic modifications that allow for abilities not possessed by normal humans. ... Homo sapiens (Latin: wise man) is the scientific name for the human species. ...


Attempting to make sense of the strange world he finds himself in, Wolverine first seeks Professor X at the Xavier Institute for Higher Learning. He finds, however, a family who has lived in the mansion for fifteen years and who have no recollection of any Charles Xavier. Wolverine then sets out to find either Peter Parker or Tony Stark, the Iron Man. However, when he reaches the lobby of Stark Tower, he is stopped by his teammates in the elite Red Guards. He escapes, but is promptly contacted by his former New Avengers teammate, Luke Cage, when he is transported to the hideout of the "Human Resistance Movement" by Cloak. To make matters even stranger, he is then threatened by Hawkeye. In the fictional Marvel Comics universe, the X-Mansion, the common name for the Xavier Mansion, is the base of operations and training site of the X-Men and the location of a school for mutant teenagers, the Xavier Institute for Higher Learning, formerly Xaviers School for Gifted Youngsters. ... This article is about Iron Man, the Marvel Comics superhero. ... The Avengers are a superhero team that appear in the fictional Marvel Universe. ... Luke Cage, born Carl Lucas and also called Power Man, is a fictional superhero appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... Cloak and Dagger (Tyrone Ty Johnson & Tandy Bowen) are a fictional teenage mutant comic book superhero duo in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Hawkeye (Clint Barton) is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, a longtime member of the Avengers. ...


After enduring a less-than-pleasant security check from Hawkeye, Wolverine realizes that the Red Guard has followed the tracking chip that Hawkeye just removed from his neck. The room explodes and Wolverine's teammates storm the underground headquarters. In the middle of the battle, Cloak teleports everyone he can to The Kingpin's office, which he knew would be empty. There, Wolverine relates to the Sapien Underground Resistance the series of events that led to the establishment of this alternate world, including the Scarlet Witch's nervous breakdown and the subsequent murders of Hawkeye, Vision, Jack of Hearts, and Ant-Man, resulting in the destruction of the Avengers. Wolverine theorizes that his personal history under the Weapon X program had so drastically wiped clean his memory that he alone could remember how things were. Furthermore, Wolverine asserts that as of yesterday he could remember every day of his life, and that he had what he most desired. Eventually, Wolverine hypothesizes that Magneto used his daughter to give everyone what they wanted, so that the Master of Magnetism could have what he wanted—global domination and a world where mutants rule over the common man. The Kingpin (Wilson Fisk) is a Marvel Comics supervillain who has battled many Marvel crime-fighters. ... Jack of Hearts (Jack Hart) is a fictional character, a superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Yellowjacket. ...


An incredulous Luke Cage asks how Magnus knew what they wanted; Wolverine simply states that Charles Xavier, whom Magneto had kidnapped prior to the final transition into the House of M, would have the power to ascertain these desires. When Wolverine questions if the group believes his story, they say that yes, they do. Questioning why they believe him so easily when his story is so fantastic, Wolverine is presented with young Layla Miller, a mutant girl in the alternate world who awoke that morning to realize she had the power to show people the real world. Wolverine decides that the best way to proceed is to get all his former teammates together to kill Magneto and the rest of the House of M. Wolverine and the resistance then arrive, via Cloak's transportational power, at Emma Frost's home; Wolverine asks Layla Miller to "enlighten" Ms. Frost, just as she had previously done with Luke Cage. It is still unknown why Layla remembers the world before the change, but it is believed she is a mutant with the ability to see alterations in reality. Layla Rose Miller, also known as Butterfly, is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ...


Wake-up call

Having illuminated Emma Frost, the resistance movement then contacts various heroes, including Cyclops, Spider-Man, Shadowcat, Doctor Strange, Iron Man, She-Hulk, Daredevil, Rogue, Mystique, Nightcrawler, Toad and Spider-Woman. As Layla awakened the heroes, Rogue, being distraught and confused, touched Layla; the power appeared overwhelming for Rogue as it emanated from her and awakened others in the vicinity. Hawkeye, unable to handle reliving his own death, flees the group, and is seen again in The Pulse #10 acknowledging his own death. The group considers reawakening Captain America, but appears (since Layla's eyes are seen flashing green, which signals her using her power, even after Emma Frost has told her not to illuminate the aged hero) to decide against it, seeing that, in this reality, Steve Rogers was never frozen during World War II, is now roughly in his early eighties, and thus unable to aid them in the fight against Magneto. Meanwhile, in Genosha, Lord Magnus ignores his daughter, Lorna, in order to look at a memorial gravestone in the Genosha gardens that commemorates the death of Professor Charles Xavier. For other uses, see Cyclops (disambiguation). ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... Katherine Kitty Pryde, also commonly known by the codename Shadowcat, is a Marvel Comics mutant superhero and a member of the X-Men. ... This article is about the Marvel comics superhero. ... This article is about the comic book character. ... She-Hulk (Jennifer Walters) is a Marvel Comics superheroine. ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... Rogue (Anna Marie[1]) is a Marvel Comics superheroine, a member of the X-Men. ... Mystique (Raven Darkholme) is a Marvel Comics character associated with the X-Men franchise. ... This article is about the comic character. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Spider-Woman (Jessica Drew) is a superheroine, a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ...


Meanwhile, the 'awakened' heroes travel to the S.H.I.E.L.D. helicarrier where Emma Frost uses her mental powers to commandeer a vehicle to take them to Genosha. While travelling, the heroes sit down in the ship's cafeteria to enjoy a meal. While there, Cyclops informs the team that since the upcoming battle with Magneto may be the most important battle of their lifetimes, no one should hold back in the least. This causes Jessica Drew to object; if Magneto has given each of them everything they've ever wanted in this illusion, shouldn't they be content to just live in his world? Wolverine quickly dismisses the idea.

House of Magnus, from left to right: Quicksilver, Scarlet Witch, her two children William and Thomas, Magneto and Polaris.

Back in Genosha, Magneto receives the incoming representative from Latveria....Victor Von Doom. There is to be a great event held that night to commemorate the mutant triumph over humanity, an event for which the House of M will act as host. Magneto and Doom smile and pose for the cameras, but it's clear that there is no love lost between the two. The party begins in the Royal Magnus Palace as the guests are introduced: King T'Challa (also known as the Black Panther) of the African Commonwealth of Wakanda, King of Latveria Victor Von Doom, Genis-Vell (a visiting delegate from the Kree Empire), Princess Ororo (also known as Storm) of Kenya and King Namor of the Kingdom of Atlantis. Finally, the hosts of the evening are introduced: the House of Magnus, composed of Magneto, the Scarlet Witch, Quicksilver, Polaris, and Magneto's two grandchildren, William and Thomas. Suddenly, from high above, a S.H.I.E.L.D. Sentinel plunges towards the castle. Magneto uses his magnetic powers to hold the Sentinel back from crashing into the castle when the awakened heroes attack. Leading the attack are Wolverine, Daredevil, Nightcrawler and Spider-Man. From the back, Cyclops calls out Magneto's name. When he turns, Cyclops unleashes a furious optic blast, apparently vaporizing Magneto on the spot. Rogue, finally able to unleash her powers to their full extent, tackles both Namor and Princess Ororo and absorbs their abilities, causing her to overflow with power. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For Quicksilver (DC Comics), see Max Mercury. ... The Scarlet Witch (Wanda Maximoff) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe, a mutant who was introduced as a super-villainess before reforming and becoming a superheroine early in her history. ... Magneto (Eric Magnus Lensherr) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Polaris (Lorna Dane) is a Marvel Comics superhero, a member of the X-Men. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Cover to Heroes Reborn: Fantastic Four #5. ... The Black Panther (TChalla) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe who is the first modern Black superhero. ... Genis-Vell, also known as Legacy, Captain Marvel and Photon, is a fictional character, a superhero (and sometime anti-hero) in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Kree, also known as the Ruul, are a scientifically and technologically advanced militaristic alien race in the fictional Marvel Universe. ... This article is about the X-Men character. ... Namor the Sub-Mariner is a fictional comic-book character in the Marvel Comics Universe, and one of the first superheroes, debuting in Spring 1939. ... Atlantis is a fictional location in the Marvel Comics Universe and the DC Comics Universe. ... Polaris (Lorna Dane) is a Marvel Comics superhero, a member of the X-Men. ...


Elsewhere, Cloak transports Emma Frost and Layla Miller to Magneto's Genosha garden. Searching for Xavier, they instead find the memorial commemorating his death. Emma Frost collapses to the ground weeping, crying out that "It's all over!" Suddenly, Cloak fades into the ground and reemerges, revealing that Xavier's remains aren't in his grave. Layla Rose Miller, also known as Butterfly, is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ...


Battle with big consequences

The battle between the House of M and the heroes continues with great ferocity. While the chaos ensues, the Scarlet Witch disappears from the battlefield only to be discovered by Dr. Strange in a tower with her children. The two begin to talk as Dr. Strange attempts to discover the origin of the madness that is happening. Wanda reveals the answer to him in a flashback to the beginning when Quicksilver is confronting Magneto about the fate of Wanda. It turns out that Quicksilver himself was the one responsible for the creation of the alternate world, conspiring with Wanda to make everyone happy in an almost-perfect world. After this revelation, Emma Frost tells Strange to ask about the fate of Charles Xavier. Before he can tell Emma, Wanda is struck in the back by an arrow.


The attacker is Hawkeye, who begins to break down emotionally to Wanda about his death in the real timeline. After a heated exchange, Hawkeye is killed for the second time as one of the Scarlet Witch's antagonised sons - who, as in Avengers Disassembled, are both conduits for Wanda's own almost schizophrenic mind - uses his mutant powers to make the poor avenger non-existent again. Meanwhile in the memorial garden, Magneto confronts Emma Frost and Layla Miller, who reveals the truth to Magneto about all that has happened. He then unleashes his wrath on everyone, especially his son Quicksilver. He nearly kills Quicksilver by pummeling him to a bloody pulp with large pieces of steel. Suddenly the Scarlet Witch appears, stopping Magneto and returning her brother to healthy form. She begins to lash out saying, "We're freaks, Mutants... you chose this over us and you ruined us..." Then, with four words, "Daddy... No More Mutants", things begin to break down and everything burns out to white once again. Avengers Disassembled, referred to in some participating series as Disassembled, is a crossover event between several Marvel Comics series. ... Schizophrenia is a psychiatric diagnosis denoting a persistent, often chronic, mental illness variously affecting behavior, thinking, and emotion. ...


No more mutants

In a blinding flash, the world seemingly comes back to the way it had been. New York is back to normal and Layla Miller wakes up from what she thinks must have been a lucid dream where she played an important part.


Peter Parker wakes up confused with Mary Jane Watson at his side. Together with the Avengers, they try to make sense of what happened that night, (some of them remember, others do not), only to be confronted by a distraught Doctor Strange who states that the House of M really took place and its effects are slowly being felt on a wider scale.


Outside of the X-Mansion, Emma Frost awakes with her nose bleeding. Screams come pelting from the mansion as the students of the Xavier's School for Higher Learning one by one faint and lose their powers. Two students confirmed to lose their powers are Wind Dancer and Tag from New X-Men: Academy X. Helplessly, the X-Men watch most of their students lose their gifts, hoping in vain that Emma would soon give them an answer to all their questions. As Nightcrawler races to find Wolverine, Emma Cerebro-scans the whole world for mutant activity only to find out the great decimation the mutant population has endured. Among the depowered is Iceman who is covered with water as his previous ice-form shut down. Meanwhile, Wolverine awakes remembering everything about his past. Wind Dancer is a fictional character, a mutant in the Marvel Universe, one of the student body in the Xavier Institute, and a member of the New Mutants squad therein. ... Tag (Brian Cruz) is a fictional character, a Puerto Rican mutant in the Marvel Universe, one of the student body in the Xavier Institute, and a member of the Hellions squad therein. ... New Mutants may also refer to the genetically engineered superhumans of Mutant X (TV series). ... Iceman (Robert Bobby Louis Drake) is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, a member of the X-Men. ...


Back at the Stark Tower, the Avengers are seeking possible explanations from whatever useful sort of media report they can get when they are interrupted by an abrupt appearance of someone in the Mansion's ruins. When they arrived there, they had seen Hawkeye's uniform and an article written by Kat Farell publicizing Hawkeye's death, which brings tears and a great sense of pride to his former teammates.


Still in desperate pursuit of answers, the X-Men fly to Genosha to confront Magneto who has also lost all his powers. He is not able to satisfy them with the answers they have been seeking. Instead of killing Magneto for all his evil deeds, Wolverine consigns him to live the life of a powerless, aging, normal human: the kind of person Magneto never wished to be.


The heroes can only guess about what has caused the majority of the mutant population to lose their powers. With Xavier still missing, and with the Scarlet Witch probably depowered (as she could not be detected by the Cerebro scanner or by Doctor Strange, though she later appears to be living a normal life), the mutant population can only hold on to Henry Pym's words that all these powers could not simply vanish... they are contained somewhere; and that every action has an equal and opposite reaction. The question remains, as Henry Pym said, "What will be the reaction?"


As if to punctuate this statement, a colossal red ribbon of energy begins to orbit Earth...


World

Unlike previous alternate timelines like Days of Future Past and Age of Apocalypse, the world of House of M is much the same as the mainstream universe. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Cover to Uncanny X-Men #141. ... The Age of Apocalypse is a popular X-Men story arc. ...


In this world, Magneto was attacked by Sentinels over Manhattan in 1979 (taking advantage of Marvel's sliding timescale policy, there are no heroes active in the 1970s). At the end of the attack, Magneto revealed an alleged international anti-mutant conspiracy involving Richard M. Nixon. The main result of this was that Magneto was granted sovereignty of the island of Genosha as the leader of the world's mutants. Another result was that the protection of mutant life was judged to be the first worry of all laws (as a result, stem cell research on mutant embryos is illegal, but stem cell research on altered human embryos is permitted). Because of this, the world is a racist society, with mutants controlling governments, businesses and culture, and Humans (or "Sapiens") are looked down on as inferior (essentially a reversal of the status quo in the mainstream Marvel universe, where mutants are looked down on and despised instead). A floating timeline (also known as a sliding timescale) is a device used in fiction, particularly by DC and Marvel Comics, to explain why characters created years or even decades ago, seem to have aged little or at all since their inception. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Flag of Genosha under Magnetos reign. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells. ...


Some exceptions apply to sapiens who live with privileges like Carol Danvers (Ms. Marvel in Earth-616 continuity, but Captain Marvel in the World of M) and Spider-Man. However, while Carol Danvers is widely known to be a sapien, Spider-Man is believed by the House of M world at large to be a mutant. For the Marvel Comics character with the same codename, see Sharon Ventura. ... For the other Marvel Comics character called Ms. ... In the fictional Marvel Universe, Earth-616 or Earth 616 is the name used to identify the primary continuity in which most Marvel Comics titles take place. ... Captain Marvel may refer to: Captain Marvel (DC Comics), a young boy who transforms into a superhero by saying the word Shazam!; originally published by Fawcett Comics and currently published by DC Comics. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ...


Given that the House of M reality was created by the Scarlet Witch and Charles Xavier combining their powers to give the assembled New Avengers and X-Men their heart's desires, it appears that Magneto's heart's desire was threefold. Primarily he wanted the entire world to acknowledge that his paranoid fantasies about baseline humans wanting to exterminate mutants were true (hence the Sentinel attack over New York in 1979 which concluded with the release of evidence that the world's human leaders were involved in a genocidal anti-mutant conspiracy). Secondly, he wanted to be acknowledged as a heroic figure and the rightful leader of all mutantkind (hence the disappearance of Charles Xavier and the timing of Magneto's rise to dominance, before other superheroes had appeared on the scene to challenge him). And thirdly, a massive speeding-up of the natural evolution of homo-sapiens into homo-superior until, by the modern era, they accounted for almost 50% of the global population, providing him with a power base sufficient to take over the governments of the world and use them to oppress baseline humans. The Scarlet Witch (Wanda Maximoff) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe, a mutant who was introduced as a super-villainess before reforming and becoming a superheroine early in her history. ... Professor X Professor X (full name Charles Francis Xavier) is a comic book character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ...


Decimation

Main article: Decimation (comics)

The House of M has created some serious consequences in the Marvel Universe. The greatest so far is the reduction of the mutant population from millions to hundreds. Only two current members of the X-Men (Polaris and Professor X) suffered this fate, although the X-Men's main villain Magneto has lost his abilities as well, as have two members of the Avengers: Quicksilver and Scarlet Witch. Magneto and Xavier have since been repowered, whilst Polaris and Quicksilver (and others) have either gained new powers (sometimes almost exactly like their old powers) or regained lost powers via other means (such as through Quicksilver himself), within a span of well under two years. Other reasonably popular mutants have also been repowered by technology, such as Chamber and Jubilee. Decimation event logo, as shown on the covers of tie-in comics Decimation is the name of the late 2005 Marvel Comics storyline spinning out of the House of M limited series, that focuses on the ramifications of the Scarlet Witchs stripping nearly all of the mutant population of... Polaris (Lorna Dane) is a Marvel Comics superhero, a member of the X-Men. ... Charles Francis Xavier, also known as Professor X, is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, known as the leader and founder of the X-Men. ... Chamber (Jonothon Jono Evan Starsmore) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superhero associated with the X-Men. ... Wondra (Jubilation Lee, formerly known as Jubilee) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superheroine associated with the X-Men. ...


Other consequences include:

  • The temporary disappearance of Charles Xavier (he returned in X-Men: Deadly Genesis without his powers), Scarlet Witch, and Quicksilver. Quicksilver's disappearance is explained in the Son of M limited series.
  • Wolverine's total recall of his past, which caused a serious change in his status.
  • Though not explicitly expressed in the House of M series, as of New Avengers #26, Clint Barton has been revived in the Marvel Universe.
  • The Collective, a new villain that destroyed the Canadian superhero team Alpha Flight, was created as a result of the Decimation event. The Collective was apparently formed from all of the mutant energies displaced by Wanda's actions.
  • The Shadow King was able to return to this reality with the Dark X-Men when Wanda shifted reality.
  • Onslaught was reborn.
  • Jim Jaspers was brought back to life and fused with The Fury.
  • The sacrifice or at least disappearance of Meggan and return of Captain Britain to England as a result of preventing the destruction of all realities from the strain of the 'House of M' rewriting the 616 reality.
  • Due to the vast depowerment of mutants, America won the super powers war without lifting a finger.[1]

The Scarlet Witch (Wanda Maximoff) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe, a mutant who was introduced as a super-villainess before reforming and becoming a superheroine early in her history. ... For Quicksilver (DC Comics), see Max Mercury. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... New Avengers is a comic book published by Marvel Comics. ... Hawkeye (Clint Barton) is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, a longtime member of the Avengers. ... Xorn is a fictional character published by Marvel Comics. ... Alpha Flight is a Marvel Comics superhero team, noteworthy for being one of the few Canadian superhero teams. ... For the band of the same name, see Shadow King (band). ... Shadow-X (also known as Dark X-Men) is a Marvel Comics supervillian group that first appeared in New Excalibur #1. ... Onslaught is a fictional character, a psionic entity in the Marvel Comics universe created from the consciousness of two characters: Professor Charles Xavier, founder and leader of the X-Men, and the villainous mutant known as Magneto. ... Meggan is a comic book superheroine in the Marvel Comics universe. ...

Worlds Tour

The Exiles begin their Worlds Tour in Exiles #69 to chase down Proteus here. It was their first stop of six. The Exiles are a group of fictional comic book characters from Marvel Comics. ... Kevin MacTaggert, best known as Proteus and also called Mutant X, is a Marvel Comics character, associated with the X-Men. ...


House of M: Avengers

The House of M: Avengers five-issue limited series debuted in November 14, 2007, written by Christos Gage and drawn by Mike Perkins. The series spans from 1979 to the present day and acts as a prequel to the original House of M miniseries, showing the formation of Luke Cage's Human Resistance Movement.[2] is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Christos N. Gage, also known as Christos Gage and Chris Gage, is an American screenwriter and writer of comic books. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Luke Cage, born Carl Lucas and also called Power Man, is a fictional superhero appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ...


Comic tie-ins

As a universe-wide event, House of M stretches beyond its main series with the storyline interacting with the following comics:

The Black Panther (TChalla) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe who is the first modern Black superhero. ... Cable & Deadpool is a comic book published by Marvel Comics beginning in 2004. ... This article is about the comic book superhero Captain America. ... Excalibur is a Marvel Comics superhero group, an offshoot of the X-Men, usually based in the United Kingdom. ... The Exiles are a group of fictional comic book characters from Marvel Comics. ... Carol Danvers is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... This article is about the superheroes. ... This article is about the comic book character. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... The Incredible Hulk The Hulk, often called The Incredible Hulk, is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... District X is a fictional location in Marvel Comics. ... For other uses, see Thunderbolt (comics). ... New X-Men refers to two superhero comic books published by Marvel Comics within the hugely popular X-Men franchise. ... The Pulse is a comic book published by Marvel Comics, written by Brian Michael Bendis, about the people who work on The Pulse, a weekly section in the fictional Daily Bugle newspaper, focusing on superheroes. ... The Pulse is a comic book published by Marvel Comics, written by Brian Michael Bendis, about the people who work on The Pulse, a weekly section in the fictional Daily Bugle newspaper, focusing on superheroes. ... For the second comic book series starring the X-Men, see X-Men (vol. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ...

Trade paperbacks

The trade paperbacks collect many of the issues involved with the House of M storyline. Arranged in order, the books form the House of M logo. They include:

  • Excalibur: Prelude to the House of M (Excalibur #11-14)
  • House of M (House of M #1-8)
  • House of M: Incredible Hulk (Incredible Hulk #83-87)
  • House of M: Fantastic Four and Iron Man (Fantastic Four: House of M #1-3, Iron Man: House of M #1-3)
  • House of M: Uncanny X-Men (Uncanny X-Men #462-465, first half of Secrets of the House of M)
  • Mutopia X (Mutopia X #1-5)
  • House of M: New X-Men (New X-Men: Academy X #16-19, second half of Secrets of the House of M)
  • House of M: Spider-Man (Spider-Man: House of M #1-5)
  • World of M Featuring Wolverine (Wolverine #33-35, Captain America #10, Black Panther #7, Pulse #10)

It should be noted that each storyline/paperback contains a mostly standalone sidestory, and can be read individually without any continuity problems. Only the House of M mini-series itself deals with the main storyline.


See also

House of M was an eight-part comic book crossover storyline published by Marvel Comics in 2005. ... Within Marvel Comics, most tales take place within the fictional Marvel Universe, this in turn is part of a larger multiverse. ...

References

  1. ^ Avengers: The Initiative #1
  2. ^ Marvel Comics' solicitation for House of M: Avengers #1

External links

  • Marvel.com's House of M page
  • Interview with Bendis onHouse of M', along with related links, Comic Book Resources
  • Tom Brevoort on House of M
  • House of M cover gallery
  • Tom Brevoort on the House of M tie-ins, Newsarama
  • Bendis talks about House of M Postmortem Part 1 and Part 2, Newsarama
  • House of M analysis
  • House of M - Detailed issue summaries, at UXN.
The Ultimates is a set of superhero comic book limited series published by Marvel Comics. ... A-Next is the Marvel Comics MC2 universe version of the Avengers. ... The Avengers are a superhero team that appear in the fictional Marvel Universe. ... The Collector is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Count Luchino Nefaria is a fictional character, a supervillain in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Egghead is a fictional Marvel comics villain who first appeared in Tales to Astonish# 38. ... The Grandmaster is a fictional character published by Marvel Comics, he first appeared in Avengers #69. ... Grim Reaper is a fictional character, a supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Legion of the Unliving is a name used by five fictional groups in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Lethal Legion is a name used by four fictional supervillain teams in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Masters of Evil are a fictional team of supervillains in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Sons of the Serpent are a fictional supervillain group in in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Space Phantom is a name given to a number of fictional characters in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Squadron Supreme is a team of comic book superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe, a thinly disguised version of DC Comics Justice League of America. ... The Squadron Supreme is a team of comic book superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe, a thinly disguised version of DC Comics Justice League of America. ... For other uses, see Ultron (disambiguation). ... In the fictional Marvel Comics universe, the Avengers Mansion has traditionally been the base of the Avengers. ... Hydro-Base is a fictional base in the Marvel Universe. ... Stark Tower is a fictional high-rise building, named after its owner Tony Stark (AKA Iron Man). ... Avengers in Galactic Storm is a one-on-one beat em up arcade game released by Data East in 1995. ... Captain America and the Avengers is the title of a side-scrolling coin-op arcade game released by Data East in 1991 and based on the Marvel Comics series The Avengers. ... Ultimate Avengers (also known as Ultimate Avengers: The Movie) is a direct-to-video animated film based on the Marvel comic book The Ultimates. ... Ultimate Avengers 2 (also known as Ultimate Avengers 2: Rise of the Panther) is the sequel to Ultimate Avengers. ... The Avengers is a team of comic book superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Stephen Ditko (born 2 November 1927) is a renowned American comic book artist and writer best known as the co-creator of Spider-Man and Doctor Strange. ... Spider-Man, his Aunt May and wife Mary Jane. ... Mary Jane Watson-Parker is a fictional supporting character appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics, primarily in the Spider-Man titles as a friend, love interest and in some continuities wife of the title character (specifically, his alter-ego, Peter Parker). ... May Parker redirects here. ... Benjamin Ben Parker, usually called Uncle Ben, was a supporting character in the Marvel Universe’s Spider-Man stories. ... John Jonah Jameson (also known as J. Jonah Jameson, J.J., Jolly Jonah Jameson, or J.J.J.) is a fictional supporting character featured in various Marvel Comics, most prominently the Spider-Man title. ... Black Cat (Felicia Hardy) is a Marvel Comics anti-hero and one-time foe and ex-girlfriend of the Spider-Man. ... For the Christian hardcore band, see Gwen Stacy (band). ... This article is about the Marvel Comics character. ... Elizabeth Allan, who usually goes by the name Liz Allan (commonly misspelled, even in the published comics themselves, as Liz Allen), is a fictional comic book character in the Marvel Comics universe, part of the supporting cast of Spider-Man (Peter Parker). ... Debra Whitman was a fictional character from the Spider-Man universe, and a brief love interest of Peter Parker in the Spectacular Spider-Man and Amazing Spider-Man comic titles in the late 70s and early 80s. ... Betty Brant is a supporting character in Marvel Comics’ Spider-Man series. ... Ned Leeds is a comic book character in the Marvel Comics universe, part of the supporting cast of Spider-Man, first introduced in 1964 in The Amazing Spider-Man # 25, by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko. ... Joseph Robbie Robertson is a supporting character in Marvel Comicss Spider-Man series. ... John Jameson (also known by the alises Man-Wolf and Star-God) is a fictional character in the Marvel Universe. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... Eugene Flash Thompson is a supporting character in Marvel Comics’s Spider-Man series. ... Madame Web is a fictional supporting character in the Spider-Man comic book series. ... Spider-Woman (Jessica Drew) is a superheroine, a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... For the Marvel Comics character who is the daughter of Spider-Man, see Spider-Girl. ... Spider-Ham (Peter Porker) is a fictional character, an anthropomorphic funny animal parody of Marvel Comics popular Spider-Man character, created by Tom DeFalco and Mark Armstrong. ... This article is about the superheroes. ... For other uses, see Firestar (disambiguation). ... Spider-Man 2099 (Miguel OHara) is a Marvel Comics superhero, a fictional character created by Peter David and Rick Leonardi in 1992. ... Spider-Man 2211 is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... 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The Green Goblin is a supervillain that appears in the fictional Marvel universe. ... For the member of the Shiar Imperial Guard, see Hobgoblin (Imperial Guard). ... Hydro-Man (Morris Bench) is a fictional character, a supervillain in Marvel Comics universe. ... The Jackal (Dr. Miles Warren) is a Marvel Comics supervillain, an enemy of Spider-Man. ... The Kingpin (Wilson Fisk) is a Marvel Comics supervillain who has battled many Marvel crime-fighters. ... For the character from the Underworld films, see Kraven (Underworld). ... The Lizard is a fictional character, a comic book supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe, and an enemy of Spider-Man. ... Morbius the Living Vampire (Michael Morbius) is a fictional comic book character from the Marvel Comics universe, intended as a tragic anti-hero with vampire-like powers that actually had a biochemical origin. ... Morlun is a supervillain from the Marvel Comics universe, and one of the deadliest foes of Spider-Man. ... For the professional wrestler known by his stage name, Rey Mysterio, see Oscar Gutierrez. ... The Rhino (Aleksei Sytsevich) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Sandman (a. ... MacDonald Mac Gargan is a fictional character, a comic book supervillain in the Marvel Comics Universe created by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko. ... Silver Sable Issue #3 (1992) In Marvel Comics, Silver Sable (real name Silver Sablinova) is a female mercenary, hunter of war criminals, the leader of the Wild Pack and CEO of Silver Sable International. ... The Shocker is a fictional character and a supervillain from the Spider-Man comic book published by Marvel Comics. ... Venom (Edward Eddie Charles Brock), is a fictional character, a comic book supervillain and anti-hero from the Marvel Comics Universe. ... The Vulture is the name of three fictional characters that are comic book supervillains in the Marvel Comics universe. ... 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Spidey Super Stories was a live-action, recurring skit on the PBS childrens television series The Electric Company. ... The Amazing Spider-Man is the first live-action TV series made to the popular comic book The Amazing Spider-Man and was shown in the USA between 1977-1979. ... The Japanese tokusatsu version of Spider-Man ) was a television series produced by Toei Company in 1978, based on Marvels superhero of the same name. ... Spider-Man is the name of a syndicated animated TV series based on the popular Marvel Comics character of the same name. ... Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends is an animated series produced by Marvel Productions Ltd. ... This article is about Spider-Man: The Animated Series. ... Title Sequence. ... The Spectacular Spider-Man (entitled The Spectacular Spider-Man Animated Series) is an American animated television series that premiered on March 8,[1] 2008 during the Kids WB programming block of The CW. It premiered with a one hour event consisting of two back-to-back episodes. ... The Spider-Man film series currently consists of three superhero films based on the fictional Marvel Comics character of the same name, portrayed by Tobey Maguire. ... Spider-Man is a 2002 American superhero film based on the fictional Marvel Comics character Spider-Man. ... This article is about the 2004 film. ... Spider-Man 3 is a 2007 superhero film written and directed by Sam Raimi, with a screenplay by Ivan Raimi and Alvin Sargent. ... This article is about the video game. ... Spider-Man 2 is the name of several computer and video games based on the Spider-Man universe and particularly the Spider-Man 2 movie. ... Spider-Man 3 is a video game based on the Spider-Man 3 film. ... This article is about the fictional history of Marvel Comics character Spider-Man. ... Spider-Man, his Aunt May and wife Mary Jane. ... The many villains of Spider-Man. ... The fateful spider bite that gave Peter Parker his powers. ... Numerous electronic games featuring the popular Marvel Comics superhero Spider-Man have been released. ... The different incarnations of Spider-Man. ... Spider-Man is a fictional comic book character who has been adapted in various other media. ... Layout of the Bugle The Daily Bugle is a fictional New York City newspaper that is a regular fixture in the Marvel Universe, most prominently in Spider-Man and its derivative media. ...

 
 

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