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Encyclopedia > House of Hanover
British Royalty
House of Hanover
George I
   George II
   Sophia, Queen in Prussia
George II
   Frederick, Prince of Wales
   Anne, Princess of Orange
   Princess Amelia Sophia
   Princess Caroline Elizabeth
   William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland
   Mary, Landgravine of Hesse-Cassel
   Louise, Queen of Denmark
Grandchildren
   Augusta Charlotte, Duchess of Brunswick
   George III
   Edward Augustus, Duke of York
   Princess Elizabeth Caroline
   William Henry, Duke of Gloucester
   Henry Frederick, Duke of Cumberland
   Caroline Matilda, Queen of Denmark
Great-grandchildren
   Princess Sophia of Gloucester
   William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester
George III
   George IV
   Frederick, Duke of York
   William IV
   Charlotte, Queen of Württemberg
   Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent
   Princess Augusta Sophia
   Elizabeth, Landgravine of Hesse-Homburg
   Ernest Augustus I of Hanover
   Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex
   Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge
   Mary, Duchess of Gloucester
   Princess Sophia
   Princess Amelia
Grandchildren
   Charlotte, Princess Leopold of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfield
   Princess Elizabeth of Clarence
   Victoria
   George V, King of Hanover
   George, Duke of Cambridge
   Augusta, Grand Duchess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz
   Mary Adelaide, Duchess of Teck
George IV
   Charlotte, Princess Leopold of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfield
William IV
   Princess Charlotte of Clarence
   Princess Elizabeth of Clarence
Victoria

The House of Hanover (the Hanoverians) is a German royal dynasty which has ruled the Duchy of Braunschweig-Lüneburg, the Kingdom of Hanover and the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. It succeeded the House of Stuart as monarchs of Great Britain in 1714. They are sometimes referred to as the House of Brunswick and Lüneburg, Hanover line. The House of Hanover is a younger branch of the House of Welf, which in turn is a branch of the House of Este. The British monarchy is a shared monarchy; this article describes the monarchy from the perspective of the United Kingdom. ... George I (George Louis; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727) was the first Hanoverian King of Great Britain and King of Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. ... George II (George Augustus; 10 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... Sophia Dorothea of Hanover (March 16, 1687 – June 28, 1757) was a Princess of Hanover, being the daughter of Georg Ludwig of Brunswick-Lüneburg (later George I of Great Britain) and Sophia Dorothea of Celle. ... George II (George Augustus; 10 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... The Prince Frederick, Prince of Wales (Frederick Lewis; 1 February 1707 – 31 March 1751) was a member of the British Royal Family, the eldest son of King George II. He was born into the House of Hanover and, under the Act of Settlement passed by the English Parliament in 1701... Princess Anne of Orange, Princess Royal and Princess of Hanover, Princess-Regent of Friesland (2 November 1709–12 January 1759) was the second child and eldest daughter of King George II of Great Britain and his consort, Queen Caroline. ... For other persons known as Princess Amelia, see Princess Amelia The Princess Amelia Sophie (10 July 1711 – 31 October 1786), was a member of the British Royal Family, the second daughter of King George II. // Early Life Princess Amelia was born in Schloss Herrenhausen, Hanover, Germany. ... The Princess Caroline Elizabeth ( May 30, 1713 - December 28, 1757) was a member of the British Royal Family, the fourth child and third daughter of King George II. // Early Life Princess Caroline Elizabeth was born in Hanover, Germany. ... The Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, KG, KB, PC (15 April 1721–31 October 1765), a younger son of King George II of Great Britain and Queen Caroline, was a noted military leader. ... For other persons known as Princess Mary, see Princess Mary The Princess Mary (5 March 1723 – 14 January 1772) was a member of the British Royal Family, a daughter of George II and Caroline of Ansbach. ... Louise of Hanover and of Great Britain (December 18, 1724 - December 19, 1751) was the youngest surviving daughter of George II of Great Britain and Caroline of Ansbach, and became Queen consort of Denmark and Norway. ... Princess Augusta Charlotte of Wales (31 July 1737 - 23 March 1813), was a member of the British Royal Family, a granddaughter of King George II and sister of King George III. She later married into the Ducal House of Brunswick, of which she was already a member. ... George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of York (25 March 1739 – 17 September 1767) was the younger brother of George III of the United Kingdom, the second son of Frederick, Prince of Wales and Augusta of Saxe-Gotha. ... Princess Elizabeth Caroline of Wales (30 December 1740 - September 4, 1759) was a member of the British Royal Family, a grandchild of King George II and sister of George III of the United Kingdom Princess Elizabeth Caroline was born at Norfolk House, St Jamess Square, London. ... HRH Prince William Henry, Earl of Connaught, 1st Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh (November 14, 1743 - August 25, 1805) was a British prince and military officer, younger brother of King George III. He was born to Frederick Louis, Prince of Wales and Augusta of Saxe-Gotha at Leicester House in... Prince Henry Frederick, Duke of Cumberland and Strathearn (7 November 1745 - 18 September 1790) was the sixth child of Frederick, Prince of Wales and Augusta of Saxe-Gotha, and a younger brother of George III. // [edit] Early life HRH Prince Henry Frederick of Wales was born on 7 November 1745... Princess Caroline Matilda of Wales (July 11, 1751 - May 10, 1775), was a princess of Great Britain and Ireland, sister of King George III and Queen of Denmark from 1767 to 1772. ... Princess Sophia of Gloucester, Sophia Matilda (May 29, 1773 - November 29, 1844) was a member of the British Royal Family, a niece of King George III. Sophia was born on May 29, 1773 in London. ... His Royal Highness Prince William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh (January 15, 1776 - November 30, 1834) was a member of the British Royal Family, a great grandson of King George II. Early Life Prince William was born on 15 January 1776 in Rome, Italy. ... George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... The Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany (Frederick Augustus) (16 August 1763 - 5 January 1827) was a member of the British Royal Family, the second eldest child, and second son of King George III. From 1820 until his death in 1827, he was the heir presumptive to his elder... William IV (William Henry; 21 August 1765 – 20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom and of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death. ... Queen Charlotte of Württemberg, (born The Princess Charlotte, later The Princess Royal) (Charlotte Augusta Matilda), (29 September 1766-5 October 1828) was a member of the British Royal Family, the eldest daughter of King George III. She was later the Queen consort of Frederick I of Württemberg. ... HRH The Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent and Strathearn The Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent and Strathearn (2 November 1767 – 23 January 1820) was a member of the British Royal Family, the fourth son of King George III and the father of Queen Victoria. ... Augusta Sophia (November 8, 1768-September 22, 1840), Princess of Great Britain and Ireland, Princess of Hanover, Duchess of Brunswick and Lüneburg. ... The Princess Elizabeth (22 May 1770 - 10 January 1840) was a member of the British Royal Family, the 7th child and 3rd daughter of George III of the United Kingdom. ... Ernest Augustus I of Hanover Ernest Augustus I, King of Hanover (5 June 1771 – 18 November 1851), also known (1799-1837) as the Duke of Cumberland, was the fifth son and eighth child of King George III of the United Kingdom and Queen Charlotte. ... Portrait of Prince Augustus Frederick by Louis Gauffier Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex (27 January 1773 – 21 April 1843), was the sixth son of King George III of the United Kingdom and his consort, Queen Charlotte. ... Prince Adolphus Frederick, Duke of Cambridge (24 February 1774-8 July 1850), was the tenth-born child and seventh son of King George III of the United Kingdom and Queen Charlotte. ... The Princess Mary, Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh (25 April 1776 - 30 April 1857) was a member of the British Royal Family, the eleventh child and fourth daughter of King George III. // Early life Princess Mary was born, on 25 April 1776, at Buckingham Palace, London. ... The Princess Sophia (Sophia Matilda; 2 November 1777 - 27 May 1848) was a member of the British Royal Family, the twelfth child and fifth daughter of George III. // The Princess Sophia was born at Buckingham Palace, London. ... For other persons known as Princess Amelia, see Princess Amelia The Princess Amelia (7 August 1783 - 2 November 1810), was a member of the British Royal Family. ... Engraving from a portrait of Princess Charlotte Augusta of Wales, in the National Portrait Gallery, attributed to Sir Thomas Lawrence Princess Charlotte Augusta of Wales (January 7, 1796 – November 6, 1817) was the only child of the ill-fated marriage between George IV (at that time the Prince of Wales... Princess Elizabeth of Clarence (Elizabeth Georgiana Adelaide) (10 December 1820 – 4 March 1821) was a member of the British Royal Family, a granddaughter of King George III. At the time of her birth she was third in the line of succession to the British throne. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... George V, King of Hanover and 2nd Duke of Cumberland and Teviotdale, Georg Friedrich Alexander Karl Ernst August (27 May 1819 – 12 June 1878) was the only son of Ernst August I, King of Hanover and 1st Duke of Cumberland (fifth son of King George III of the United Kingdom... Prince George, 2nd Duke of Cambridge Prince George, Duke of Cambridge (26 March 1819 – 17 March 1904), was a member of the British Royal Family, a male-line grandson of King George III. The Duke was an army officer and served as commander-in-chief of the British Army from... Princess Augusta Caroline Charlotte Elizabeth Mary Sophia Louise of Cambridge (19 July 1822 – 5 December 1916), was a member of the British Royal Family, a granddaughter of King George III. She later married into the Grand Ducal House of Mecklenburg-Strelitz and became the Grand Duchess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. ... Her Royal Highness Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge (Mary Adelaide Wilhelmina Elizabeth), (November 27, 1833 – October 27, 1897), was a member of the British Royal Family, a granddaughter of King George III. She later held the title of Duchess of Teck by marriage. ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... Engraving from a portrait of Princess Charlotte Augusta of Wales, in the National Portrait Gallery, attributed to Sir Thomas Lawrence Princess Charlotte Augusta of Wales (January 7, 1796 – November 6, 1817) was the only child of the ill-fated marriage between George IV (at that time the Prince of Wales... William IV (William Henry; 21 August 1765 – 20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom and of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death. ... Her Highness Princess Charlotte of Clarence (Charlotte Augusta Louisa) (March 21, 1819-March 21, 1819) was a member of the British Royal Family, a granddaughter of King George III. At the time of her birth she was third in the line of succession to the British throne. ... Princess Elizabeth of Clarence (Elizabeth Georgiana Adelaide) (10 December 1820 – 4 March 1821) was a member of the British Royal Family, a granddaughter of King George III. At the time of her birth she was third in the line of succession to the British throne. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... Members of the royal family shared amongst the Commonwealth Realms. ... // For other uses, see Dynasty (disambiguation). ... Brunswick-Lüneburg was a historical state within the Holy Roman Empire. ... Hanover (German Hannover) is a historical territory in todays Germany. ... Scotland, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom see British Isles (terminology). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Battle of Gangut, by Maurice Baquoi, 1724-27. ... The possessions of the Guelfs in the days of Henry the Lion The House of Welf (or House of Guelph) is a European dynasty that has included many German and British monarchs from the 11th century until the 20th century. ... For Tolkiens fictional character, see Estë To know more about the city, see Este The House of Este is a European princely dynasty. ...

Contents

History

George, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, is considered the first member of the House of Hanover. When the Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg was divided in 1635, George inherited the principalities of Calenberg and Göttingen, and in 1636 he moved his residence to Hanover. His son, Duke Ernest Augustus, was elevated to prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire in 1692. Ernest Augustus's wife, Sophia of the Palatinate, was declared heiress of the throne of Great Britain (then England and Scotland) by the Act of Settlement of 1701, which decreed Roman Catholics could not accede to the throne. Sophia was at that time the nearest Protestant relative to King William III. William himself was actually of the Dutch House of Orange-Nassau, but both his wife and mother were Stuart princesses. George (17 November 1582, Celle – 2 April 1641, Hildesheim) was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. ... Brunswick-Lüneburg was an historical state within the Holy Roman Empire. ... Events February 10 - The Académie française in Paris is expanded to become a national academy for the artistic elite. ... Capital Hanover Head of State King of Hanover Hanover (German: Hannover) is a historical territory in todays Germany. ... The Principality of Göttingen was a subdivision of the Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg in the Holy Roman Empire with Göttingen as its capital. ... Year 1636 (MDCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Hanover (German: , IPA: ), on the river Leine, is the capital of the federal state of Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany. ... Ernest Augustus (German: Ernst August; 20 November 1629, Herzberg – 23 January 1698, Herrenhausen) was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and ruled over the Calenberg (or Hanover) subdivision of the duchy. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... The extent of the Holy Roman Empire in c. ... Events February 13 - Massacre of Glencoe March 1 - The Salem witch trials begin in Salem Village, Massachusetts Bay Colony with the charging of three women with witchcraft. ... Electress Sophia of Hanover (born Sophia, Countess Palatine of Simmern; 14 October 1630 – 8 June 1714) was the youngest daughter of Frederick V, Elector Palatine, of the House of Wittelsbach, the Winter King of Bohemia, and Elizabeth Stuart. ... The Electress Sophia The Act of Settlement (12 & 13 Wm 3 c. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... William III King of England, Scotland and Ireland William III and II (14 November 1650–8 March 1702; also known as William Henry and William of Orange) was Prince of Orange from his birth, King of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scotland from 11... The House of Orange-Nassau (in Dutch: Huis van Oranje-Nassau), a branch of the German House of Nassau, has played a central role in the political life of the Netherlands - and at times in Europe - since William I of Orange (also known as William the Silent and Father of...


Hanovererian kings of Great Britain and the United Kingdom

Their son, George I — who would otherwise have been the 52nd in line to the throne of Great Britain — became the first British monarch of the House of Hanover. [1] George I (George Louis; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727) was the first Hanoverian King of Great Britain and King of Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. ...


The dynasty provided six British monarchs:


Of the Kingdom of Great Britain: Scotland, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom see British Isles (terminology). ...

Of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland: George I (George Louis; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727) was the first Hanoverian King of Great Britain and King of Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. ... Battle of Gangut, by Maurice Baquoi, 1724-27. ... Events 1727 to 1800 - Lt. ... George II (George Augustus; 10 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... Events 1727 to 1800 - Lt. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right1 Anthem God Save the King (Queen) Territory of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Capital London Language(s) English2 Government Constitutional monarchy Monarch  - 1801–1820 George III  - 1820–1830 George IV  - 1830–1837 William IV  - 1837–1901...

George I, George II, and George III also served as electors and dukes of Brunswick-Lüneburg, informally called electors of Hanover (see an account of that personal union). Beginning in 1814, when Hanover was made into a kingdom, the British monarch served jointly as king of Hanover. George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... William IV (William Henry; 21 August 1765 – 20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom and of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Brunswick-Lüneburg was an historical state within the Holy Roman Empire. ... Hanover (German: , IPA: ), on the river Leine, is the capital of the federal state of Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany. ... It has been suggested that Dynastic union be merged into this article or section. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The following is a list of rulers of the Principality of Calenberg, a subdivision of the Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg, which was later known as Hanover. ...


The thrones of the United Kingdom and Hanover diverged in 1837 as the throne of Hanover, unlike that of the UK, was under the Salic law, and so did not pass to Queen Victoria but instead passed to her uncle, the Duke of Cumberland. [3] When Victoria died in 1901, the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha ascended to the UK throne as her son and heir, Edward VII, as son of her husband, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, genealogically belonged to that House - whereby it was asserted that the name of the UK Royal House changed because the surname of his father was Edward VII's surname too. [4] Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The King of the Franks, in the midst of the military chiefs who formed his Treuste -- or armed court, dictates the Salic Law (Code of the Barbaric Laws). ... Ernest Augustus I of Hanover Ernest Augustus I, King of Hanover (5 June 1771 – 18 November 1851), also known (1799-1837) as the Duke of Cumberland, was the fifth son and eighth child of King George III of the United Kingdom and Queen Charlotte. ... Saxe-Coburg-Gotha or Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (German: Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha) was once the name given to the two German duchies of Saxe-Coburg and Saxe-Gotha in Germany, in the present states of Bavaria and Thuringia, which were in personal union between 1826 and 1918. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (Francis Charles Augustus Albert Emmanuel, of the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha branch of the House of Wettin) (26 August 1819 - 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ...


Kings of Hanover after the break up of the personal union

After the death of William IV in 1837, the following kings of Hanover continued the dynasty:

The Kingdom of Hanover came to an end in 1866 when it was annexed by Prussia. Ernest Augustus I of Hanover Ernest Augustus I, King of Hanover (5 June 1771 – 18 November 1851), also known (1799-1837) as the Duke of Cumberland, was the fifth son and eighth child of King George III of the United Kingdom and Queen Charlotte. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... George V, King of Hanover and 2nd Duke of Cumberland and Teviotdale, Georg Friedrich Alexander Karl Ernst August (27 May 1819 – 12 June 1878) was the only son of Ernst August I, King of Hanover and 1st Duke of Cumberland (fifth son of King George III of the United Kingdom... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Hanover (German Hannover) is a historical territory in todays Germany. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Motto Suum cuique Latin: To each his own Prussia at its peak, as leading state of the German Empire Capital Königsberg, later Berlin Government Duke1  - 1525–68 Albert I (first)  - 1688–1701 Frederick III (last) King1  - 1701–13 Frederick I (first)  - 1888–1918 William II (last) Prime Minister1,2...


Duchy of Brunswick

In 1884, the senior branch of the House of Welf became extinct. By House Law, the House of Hanover would have acceded to the Duchy of Brunswick, but there had been strong Prussian pressure against having George V of Hanover or his son, the Duke of Cumberland, succeed to a member state of the German Empire, at least without strong conditions, including swearing to the German constitution. By a law of 1879, the Duchy of Brunswick established a temporary council of regency to take over at the Duke's death, and if necessary appoint a regent. Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Brunswick-Lüneburg was an historical state within the Holy Roman Empire. ... Ernst August 3rd Duke of Cumberland Crown Prince Ernst August II of Hanover, 3rd Duke of Cumberland, (Ernst August Wilhelm Adolf Georg Friedrich) (21 September 1845-14 November 1923), was the eldest child and only son of King George V of Hanover and his wife, Princess Marie of Saxe-Altenburg. ...


The Duke of Cumberland proclaimed himself Duke of Brunswick at the Duke's death, and lengthy negotiations ensued, but were never resolved. Prince Albert of Prussia was appointed regent; after his death in 1906, Duke John Albert of Mecklenburg succeeded him. The Duke of Cumberland's eldest son died of a car accident in 1912; the father renounced Brunswick in favor of his youngest son, who married the Kaiser's daughter, swore allegiance to the German Empire, and was allowed to ascend the throne of the Duchy in November 1913. He was a major-general during the First World War; but he was overthrown as Duke of Brunswick in 1918. His father was also deprived of his British titles in 1919, for "bearing arms against Great Britain". Prince (Friedrich Wilhelm Nikolaus) Albrecht of Prussia (8 May 1837-13 September 1906) was a Prussian general field marshal and, from 1885, regent of the Duchy of Brunswick. ... Duke Johann Albrecht Duke Johann Albrecht Ernst Konstantin Friedrich Heinrich of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (8 December 1857-16 February 1920) was the regent of the Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin from 1897-1901 and the Duchy of Brunswick from 1907-1913. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ...


Claimants

The later heads of the House of Hanover have been:

see Line of succession to the Hanoverian Throne Ernst August, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg Prince Ernst August III of Hanover, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (17 November 1887, Penzing-30 January 1953), reigning Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (2 November 1913-8 November 1918), was a grandson of King George V of Hanover, whom the Prussians deposed... Ernest Augustus IV, Prince of Hanover (German Prinz Ernst August von Hannover; 18 March 1914 - 9 December 1987) was the eldest son of Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and Princess Viktoria Luise of Prussia. ... Ernst August, Prince of Hanover (German: Ernst August Albert Otto Rupprecht Oskar Berthold Friedrich-Ferdinand Christian-Ludwig Prinz von Hannover, in English also known as Ernest Augustus of Hanover) (born 26 February 1954 in Hanover, Lower Saxony, Germany) is the eldest son of Ernest Augustus IV, Prince of Hanover (1914... The Monarchy of Hanover was abolished in 1866 and the Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg in 1918. ...


The family has been resident in Austria since 1866; it has held titles of only courtesy since 1919.


Trivia

The streets of Brisbane's Central Business District are named after members of the House of Hanover. Streets running parallel with Queen Street are named for female members, with streets running perpendicular named after male members. Brisbane (pronounced ) is the capital and most populous city of the Australian state of Queensland, as well as the third largest city in Australia, with a greater metropolitan population of 1. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Queen Street Mall is a mall in the centre of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. ...


Hanover Square in downtown New York City is also named for the family, as is the province of New Brunswick in Canada, and several other towns in the eastern United States and Canada. Hanover Square is a square and public park in the Financial District, Manhattan, New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Motto: Spem reduxit (Hope restored) Capital Fredericton Largest city Saint John Official languages English, French (the only constitutionally bilingual province in the country) Government - Lieutenant-Governor Herménégilde Chiasson - Premier Shawn Graham (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 10 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st... Red shows states east of the Mississippi River, pink shows states not fully eastern or western The U.S. Eastern states are the states east of the Mississippi River. ...


The city of Adelaide in Australia is named after Adelaide, the queen consort of William IV, thus after a member of the House of Guelph. Adelaide is the capital and most populous city of the Australian state of South Australia, and is the fifth largest city in Australia, with a population of over 1. ... Princess Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen (Adelaide Louise Theresa Caroline Amelia) ( 13 August 1792 - 2 December 1849 ) as Queen Adelaide was the Queen consort of King William IV of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Picknett, Lynn, Prince, Clive, Prior, Stephen & Brydon, Robert (2002). War of the Windsors: A Century of Unconstitutional Monarchy, p. 13. Mainstream Publishing. ISBN 1-84018-631-3.
  2. ^ The Kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland merged in 1801 forming the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.
  3. ^ Picknett, Prince, Prior & Brydon, pp. 13, 14.
  4. ^ Picknett, Prince, Prior & Brydon, p. 14.

Further reading

  • Fraser, Flora. Princesses: The Six Daughters of George III. Knopf, 2005.
  • Plumb, J. H. The First Four Georges. Revised ed. Hamlyn, 1974.
  • Redman, Alvin. The House of Hanover. Coward-McCann, 1960.
  • Van der Kiste, John. George III’s Children. Sutton Publishing, 1992.

See also

Capital Hanover Head of State King of Hanover Hanover (German: ) was a historical territory in todays Germany, at various times a principality, an electorate of the Holy Roman Empire, a kingdom and a province of Prussia and of Germany. ... This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain...

External links

*Royal House*
House of Hanover
Cadet branch of the House of Welf
Preceded by
New Creation
Ruling House of the Electorate of Hanover
16921803
Electorate Abolished
Hanover occupied by France
Preceded by
Electorate of Hanover
Ruling House of the Kingdom of Hanover
18141866
Kingdom Abolished
Annexed by Prussia
Preceded by
House of Stuart
Ruling House of the Kingdom of Great Britain
17141800
Succeeded by
United Kingdom
See Act of Union 1800
Preceded by
Kingdom of Great Britain
Ruling House of the United Kingdom
18011901
Succeeded by
House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

  Results from FactBites:
 
House of Hanover - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (803 words)
The House of Hanover is a younger branch of the House of Welf, which in turn is a branch of the House of Este.
In 1884, the senior branch of the House of Welf became extinct.
By House Law, the House of Hanover would have acceded to the Duchy of Brunswick, but there had been strong Prussian pressure against having George V of Hanover or his son, the Duke of Cumberland, succeed to a member state of the German Empire, at least without strong conditions, including swearing to the German constitution.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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