FACTOID # 17: Though Rhode Island is the smallest state in total area, it has the longest official name: The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > House of Bruce

The House of Bruce was a Scottish Royal House in the 14th century. Two members of the house were kings of Scotland:


History

The House of Bruce originated in Normandy in the 11th century, where the family took its name from Bruis (present-day Brix). It was here that the earliest known member of the family, Adam de Brus, built a castle. His descendant, Robert de Brus, was a Norman knight who came to England with William the Conqueror and was granted lands in Yorkshire. His son, the second Robert de Brus, Lord of Annandale. Robert de Brus]] (c.1078-1141), received from David I of Scotland the lordship of Annandale, in Scotland. He renounced his lordship of Annandale after supporting the English in the Battle of the Standard 1138, but it was later restored to his younger son, the 2nd Lord of Annandale.


His grandson, Robert, 4th Lord of Annandale, married in 1219 Isabella, the second daughter of David of Huntingdonm and the great-grandaughter of David 1. This marriage provided the Bruces with an important link to the Scottish Royal House, and a future claim to the throne. The 5th Lord of Annandale, Robert the Bruce's grandfather, was named as heir-presumptive to the childless Alexander III, but never gained the throne as Alexander later fathered three children. Bruce's grandfather was also a competitor for the throne in 1292, but his claim was ignored in favour of that of John Balliol


Scottish Monarchs

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
House of Bruce - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (355 words)
The House of Bruce was a Scottish Royal House in the 14th century.
Bruce's grandfather was also a competitor for the throne in 1292, but his claim was ignored in favour of that of John Balliol.
Robert I of Scotland (Robert the Bruce) who ruled from 1306 to 1329, and claimed the throne as a sixth-generation descedant of David I of Scotland of the House of Dunkeld, and came to the throne during the Wars of Scottish Independence.
Robert I of Scotland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3571 words)
Bruce was born the first child and eldest son of Robert de Brus, 6th Lord of Annandale (d.
In April 1294, the younger Bruce had permission to visit Ireland for a year and a half, and, as a further mark of Edward's favour, he received a respite for all the debts owed by him to the English Exchequer.
Robert the Bruce died on 7 June 1329, at the Manor of Cardross in Cardross Parish, Dunbarton (the exact location is uncertain and it may not have been very near the modern village of Cardross).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m