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Encyclopedia > Hotels
A small hotel in Mureck, Styria, Austria which has preserved its 1960s exterior and interior
A small hotel in Mureck, Styria, Austria which has preserved its 1960s exterior and interior
The lobby of the Hotel Reineldis
The lobby of the Hotel Reineldis
The 4-star Manor House Hotel at Castle Combe, Wiltshire, England. Built in the fourteenth century, the hotel has 48 rooms and 365 acres (1.5 km²) of gardens.
The 4-star Manor House Hotel at Castle Combe, Wiltshire, England. Built in the fourteenth century, the hotel has 48 rooms and 365 acres (1.5 km²) of gardens.

A hotel is an establishment that provides lodging, usually on a short-term basis. Hotels often provide a number of additional guest services such as a restaurant, a swimming pool or childcare. Some hotels have conference services and encourage groups to hold conventions and meetings at their location. Hotel Reineldis in Mureck, Styria, Austria, built in the late 1950s. ... Hotel Reineldis in Mureck, Styria, Austria, built in the late 1950s. ... The lobby of the Hotel Reineldis in Mureck, Styria, Austria, built in the late 1950s. ... The lobby of the Hotel Reineldis in Mureck, Styria, Austria, built in the late 1950s. ... Download high resolution version (1500x1053, 454 KB) The 4-star Manor House Hotel at Castle Combe. ... Download high resolution version (1500x1053, 454 KB) The 4-star Manor House Hotel at Castle Combe. ... A bridge over the river Avon at Bradford-on-Avon in Wiltshire Wiltshire (abbreviated Wilts) is a large southern English county. ... People who travel and stay away from home for more than a day need lodging mainly for sleeping. ... Toms Diner, a restaurant in New York made familiar by Suzanne Vega and the television sitcom Seinfeld A restaurant is an establishment that serves prepared food and beverages to be consumed on the premises. ... 50 meter indoor swimming pool For the 2003 film, see Swimming Pool. ... Childcare is the act of caring for and supervising minor children. ... The term conference can be used to describe any meeting of people that confer about a certain topic. ... Convention has at least two separate and very distinct meanings. ... Meetings are sometimes held around conference tables. ...


Hotels differ from motels in that most motels have drive-up, exterior entrances to the rooms, while hotels tend to have interior entrances to the rooms, making them safer and more relaxing to people. The word motel originates from the Motel Inn of San Luis Obispo, first built in 1925 by Arthur Heinman. ...

Contents


Origins of the term

The word hotel derives from the French hôtel, which originally referred to a French version of a townhouse, not a place offering accommodation (in contemporary usage, hôtel has the meaning of "hotel", and hôtel particulier is used for the old meaning). The French spelling (with the circumflex) was once also used in English, but is now rare. The circumflex replaces the 's' once preceding the 't' in the earlier hostel spelling, which over time received a new, but closely related meaning. Leinster House Henrietta Street In the United Kingdom, Ireland and in some other countries, a townhouse was a residence of a peer or member of the aristocracy in the capital or major city. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Youth hostel in Rome. ...


Services and facilities

Basic accommodation of a room with a bed, a cupboard, a small table and a washstand only has largely been replaced by rooms with en-suite bathrooms and climate control. Other features found may be a telephone, an alarm clock, a TV, and broadband Internet connectivity. Food and drink may be supplied by a mini-bar (which often includes a small refrigerator) containing snacks and drinks (to be paid for on departure), and tea and coffee making facilities (cups, spoons, an electric kettle and sachets containing instant coffee, tea bags, sugar, and creamer or milk). A double bed A bed is a piece of furniture or location primarily used or intended for sleeping upon, but also commonly used for sexual activities, and for relaxing, sitting and reading. ... The term en-suite, from French in room, is usually used to refer to bathrooms that are connected to a bedroom. ... A typical American bathroom A bathroom is a room that may have different functions depending on the cultural context it is used in. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A wind-up alarm clock An alarm clock is a clock that is designed to make an alarm sound at a specific time. ... Television is a telecommunication system for broadcasting and receiving moving pictures and sound over a distance. ... Broadband in general refers to data transmission where multiple pieces of data are sent simultaneously to increase the effective rate of transmission. ... A mini-bar is a small, private snack and beverage bar often found in upscale Western-style hotel rooms. ... The inside of a fridge A refrigerator (often shortened to fridge) or freezer is an electrical appliance that uses refrigeration to help preserve food. ... A snack food is seen in Western culture as a type of food that is not meant to be eaten as part of one of the main meals of the day (breakfast, lunch, supper). ... The word drink is primarily a verb, meaning to ingest liquids. ... A hot cup of tea A tea bush. ... Coffee beans and a cup of coffee Coffee as a drink, usually served hot, is prepared from the roasted seeds (beans) of the coffee plant. ... A common silver spoon A spoon is a common eating utensil, or item of cutlery, like a small spade, that occurs in a number of sizes and forms and is also suitable for liquid food and for stirring, and can have a number of other uses. ... Categories: Stub ... Instant coffee is a beverage derived from coffee. ... A tea bag is a small bag that holds tea leaves or herbal tea infusions, either the amount needed to brew a single cup of tea; popular in countries such as the United States, or a larger one, of which one or two are used for a whole teapot; found... A sugar is a carbohydrate which is sweet to taste. ... This article is about cream, the food item. ... A glass of cows milk Milk most often means the nutrient fluid produced by the mammary glands of female mammals. ...


However, in Japan the capsule hotel supplies minimal facilities and room space. Capsules in Osaka View in a capsule, with TV in the upper left corner A capsule hotel (Japanese カプセルホテル kapuseru hoteru) is a hotel system of extremely dense occupancy. ...


Classification

The cost and quality of hotels are usually indicative of the range and type of services available. Due to the enormous increase in tourism worldwide during the last decades of the 20th century, standards, especially those of smaller establishments, have improved considerably. For the sake of greater comparability, rating systems have been introduced, with the one to five stars classification being most common. A tourist boat travels the River Seine in Paris, France Beaches make popular tourist resorts Tourist redirects here; for the album by Athlete, see Tourist (album) Tourism can be defined as the act of travel for the purpose of recreation, and the provision of services for this act. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... The 4-star Manor House Hotel at Castle Combe, Wiltshire, England. ...


Boutique hotels

"Boutique Hotel" is a term originating in North America to describe intimate, usually luxurious or quirky hotel environments. Boutique hotels differentiate themselves from larger chain or branded hotels by providing an exceptional and personalized level accommodation, services and facilities. World map showing location of North America A satellite composite image of North America North America is a continent in the northern hemisphere, bounded on the north by the Arctic Ocean, on the east by the North Atlantic Ocean, on the south by the Caribbean Sea, and on the west...


Typically boutique hotels are furnished in a themed, stylish and/or aspirational manner. Although usually considerably smaller than a mainstream hotel (ranging from 3 to 100 guest rooms) boutique hotels are generally fitted with telephony and wi-fi Internet connections, honesty bars and often cable/pay TV. Guest services are attended to by 24 hour hotel staff. Many boutique hotels have on site dining facilities, and the majority offer bars and lounges which may also be open to the general public. Wi-Fi (sometimes written ttt, WiFi, Wifi, wifi) is a trademark for sets of product compatibility standards for wireless local area networks (WLANs). ... An honesty bar is an unattended beverage bar where payment is left to the patron. ...


Of the total travel market a small percentage are discerning travelers, who place a high importance on privacy, luxury and service delivery. As this market is typically corporate travelers, the market segment is referral-rich, non-seasonal, high-yielding and repeat, and therefore one which boutique hotel operators target as their primary source of income.


Unusual hotels

Treehouse hotels

Some hotels, such as the Costa Rica Tree House in the Gandoca-Manzanillo Wildlife Refuge, Costa Rica, or Treetops Hotel in Aberdares National Park, Kenya, are built with living trees as structural elements, making them treehouses. Treetops Hotel is a hotel in Aberdare National Park in Kenya, 6,450 feet above sea level and in sight of Mount Kenya. ... A tree house (also spelled treehouse) is a house that is built among the branches of a mature tree. ...


Cave hotels

Desert Cave Hotel in Coober Pedy, South Australia and the Cuevas Pedro Antonio de Alarcón (named after the author) in Guadix, Spain, as well as several hotels in Cappadocia, Turkey, are notable for being built into natural cave formations, some with rooms underground. Coober Pedy, population 3,500, is a small town in South Australia, 846 kilometres north of Adelaide on the Stuart Highway at 28°56′ S 134°45′ E. It is self-described as the opal capital of the world and is indeed the largest source of this precious stone. ... Pedro Antonio de Alarcón y Ariza Pedro Antonio de Alarcón y Ariza (10 March 1833 - 19 July 1891) was a Spanish author, writer and political figure. ... Guadix, a city of southern Spain, in the province of Granada; on the left bank of the river Guadix, a sub-tributary of the Guadiana Menor, and on the Madrid-Valdepeñas-Almería railway. ... Cappadocia in 188 BC In ancient geography, Cappadocia (Greek: Καππαδοκία; see also List of traditional Greek place names) was an extensive inland district of Asia Minor (modern Turkey). ... Alternate meanings: Cave (disambiguation) The outside world viewed from a cave A cave is a natural underground void large enough for an adult human to enter. ...


Ice hotels

Main article: Ice hotel An Ice hotel is a temporary building made up entirely of snow and sculpted blocks of ice. ...


Ice hotels, such as the canonical Ice Hotel in Jukkasjärvi, Sweden, melt every spring and are rebuilt out of ice and snow every winter. Jukkasjärvi Lapland Court District, or Jukkasjärvi lappmarks tingslag, was a district of Laponia in Sweden. ...


Underwater hotels

As of 2005, the only hotel with an underwater room that can be reached without Scuba diving is Utter Inn in Lake Mälaren, Sweden. It only has one room, however, and Jules' Undersea Lodge in Key Largo, Florida, which requires scuba diving, is not much bigger. 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Early ideas of autonomous under-water systems appear in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea Scuba diving is the use of independent breathing equipment to stay underwater for long periods of time for recreational diving and professional diving. ... Mälaren at dusk Mälaren is the third largest lake in Sweden, after lakes Vänern and Vättern. ... Key Largo may mean the following: The island in the Florida Keys, see Key Largo (island) The city on that island, see Key Largo, Florida The play Key Largo written in blank verse by Maxwell Anderson The 1948 film Key Largo starring Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, based on the...


Hydropolis is an ambitious project to build a luxury hotel in Dubai, UAE, with 220 suites, all on the bottom of the Persian Gulf, 20 meters (66 feet) below the surface. Its architecture will feature two domes that break the surface and an underwater train tunnel, all made of transparent materials such as glass and acrylic. Hydropolis is an underwater hotel being built in Dubai, and due to open in September 2006. ... Dubai or Dubayy (in Arabic: دبيّ, IPA , generally in English) refers to either one of the seven emirates that make up the United Arab Emirates on the Arabian Peninsula, or that emirates main city, sometimes called Dubai City to distinguish it from the emirate. ... UAE redirects here; for other uses of that term, see UAE (disambiguation) The United Arab Emirates is an oil-rich country situated in the south-east of the Arabian Peninsula in Southwest Asia, comprising seven emirates: Abu Dhabi, Ajman, Dubai, Fujairah, Ras al-Khaimah, Sharjah and Umm al-Quwain. ... Map of the Persian Gulf. ... Structure of PMMA: (C5O2H8)n Structure of methyl methacrylate Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) or poly(methyl-2-methylpropanoate) is the synthetic polymer of methyl methacrylate. ...


Other unusual hotels

The Library Hotel in New York City is unique in that its ten floors are arranged according to the Dewey Decimal System. The Library Hotel [1] is a hotel in New York City, located at 299 Madison Avenue. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, the most densely populated major city in North America, and is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture. ... The Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC, also called the Dewey Decimal System) is a system of library classification developed by Melvil Dewey (1851–1931) in 1876, and since greatly modified and expanded in the course of the twenty-two major revisions which have occurred up until 2004. ...

Typical high-rise urban chain hotel: Westin in Cincinnati, Ohio.
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Typical high-rise urban chain hotel: Westin in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1685 KB) Westin Hotel in downtown Cincinnati across from Fountain Square. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1685 KB) Westin Hotel in downtown Cincinnati across from Fountain Square. ... A hotel chain is a group of hotels managed together under a business arrangement known as franchising. ... Westin Hotels chain is owned by Starwood Hotel and Resorts Worldwide. ... The article refers to the city in Ohio. ...

World-record setting hotels

Tallest hotel in the world is the Burj al-Arab in Dubai. However, this title may be taken by the less illustrious Ryugyong Hotel in Pyongyang, pending it's perhaps unlikely completion. The Burj al-Arab hotel, has quickly become an architectural icon of Dubai. ... Dubai or Dubayy (in Arabic: دبيّ, IPA , generally in English) refers to either one of the seven emirates that make up the United Arab Emirates on the Arabian Peninsula, or that emirates main city, sometimes called Dubai City to distinguish it from the emirate. ... The Ryugyong Hotel (or Ryu-Gyong Hotel) is a towering, empty concrete shell in Sojang-dong, in the Potong-gang District of Pyongyang, North Korea. ... Pyŏngyang (평양 / 平壤) is the capital city of North Korea, located in the northwest of the country, situated on the Taedong River. ...


Hotels in fiction

Hotels have often been chosen by authors as the setting of their literary works. They are perfect for mysterious, anonymous settings where multiple characters may gather in equal positions. It is especially true of crime fiction, farces, and mysteries. Hotels also feature in films , television series, songs and even theme park rides. Sherlock Holmes, pipe-puffing hero of crime fiction, confers with his colleague Dr. Watson; together these characters popularized the genre. ... // Definition A farce is a comedy written for the stage, or a film, which aims to entertain the audience by means of unlikely and extravagant - yet often possible - situations, disguise and mistaken identity, verbal humour of varying degrees of sophistication, which may include puns and sexual innuendo, and a fast... In modern colloquial English, a mystery is a subgenre of detective fiction (see mystery fiction). ... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed Film is a term that encompasses motion pictures as individual projects, as well as the field in general. ... A song is a relatively short musical composition for the human voice (possibly accompanied by other musical instruments), which features words (lyrics). ... Theme Park Theme Park is a simulation computer game designed by Bullfrog Productions, released in 1994, in which the player designs and operates an amusement park. ...


Examples:

Grand Hotel is a 1932 art deco movie, and is considered as a classic of the sort. ... Room Service is a 1938 Marx Brothers comedy film in which they portray producers of a play, Hail and Farewell. ... Plaza Suite is 1971 sketch-based movie starring Walter Matthau and Maureen Stapleton. ... Categories: Literature stubs | 1981 books | Novels | Books starting with H ... The cast of Fawlty Towers, clockwise from top: Basil Fawlty (John Cleese), Sybil Fawlty (Prunella Scales), Manuel (Andrew Sachs) and Polly Sherman (Connie Booth) Fawlty Towers was a British sitcom made by the BBC and first broadcast on BBC2 in 1975. ... For other White Horse Inns see the White Horse disambiguation page. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Hotel California was the title song from The Eagles 1976 album of the same name. ... Agatha Christie Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie, DBE (September 15, 1890 – January 12, 1976), was a British crime fiction writer. ... Maggie Smith Evil Under the Sun it the title of a 1941 mystery novel by Agatha Christie, and a 1982 film based upon the novel. ... A Caribbean Mystery (published in 1964) is a detective fiction novel by Agatha Christie featuring the detective Miss Marple. ... At Bertrams Hotel is a 1965 crime novel by Agatha Christie. ... Cyril Hare (1900 - 1958) has written Tenant for Death, German edition rororo thriller 2046: Ruhige Wohnung mit eigener Leiche. Categories: 1900 births | 1958 deaths | Writer stubs ... Movie poster for Hotel Rwanda Hotel Rwanda is a 2004 drama film directed by Terry George. ... The Twilight Zone Tower of Terror, more commonly known as Tower of Terror, is a simulated freefall thrill ride at Disney-MGM Studios in Lake Buena Vista, Florida and at Disneys California Adventure in Anaheim, California. ... The 100-foot-tall (30m) Sorcerers apprentice hat, the symbol of Disney-MGM Studios Disney-MGM Studios is a theme park in the Walt Disney World Resort, Florida, USA. It opened on May 1, 1989. ... Skyline of Orlando at night, from across Lake Eola The city of Orlando is the county seat of Orange County, Florida. ... State nickname: Sunshine State Other U.S. States Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Governor Jeb Bush (R) Official languages English Area 170,451 km² (22nd)  - Land 137,374 km²  - Water 30,486 km² (17. ... The Shining can refer to: the Stephen King book: see The Shining (book) the Stanley Kubrick film based on the book: see The Shining (film) the ABC mini-series scripted by Stephen King: The Shining (mini-series) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that...

Other usage

In Australia, the word "hotel" often refers to a public house, a drinking establishment which does not necessarily provide accommodations. In India, the word may also refer to a restaurant, since earlier the best restaurants were always situated next to a good hotel. An amusingly named pub (the Old New Inn) at Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswold Hills of South West England A pub in the Haymarket area of Edinburgh, Scotland A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada... Toms Diner, a restaurant in New York made familiar by Suzanne Vega and the television sitcom Seinfeld A restaurant is an establishment that serves prepared food and beverages to be consumed on the premises. ...


See also

The following is a list of famous hotels by location. ... A hotel chain is a group of hotels managed together under a business arrangement known as franchising. ... The word motel originates from the Motel Inn of San Luis Obispo, first built in 1925 by Arthur Heinman. ... Extended stay hotels are a type of lodging with features unavailable at standard hotels. ... A hotel bar is a bar in a hotel. ... A resort is a place used for relaxation or recreation. ... Hospitality Services are networks of people who exchange accommodation. ... This is a selected list of types of lodging. ... Youth hostel in Rome. ... Description Hostal is an accommodation category (Spain, Mexico, Central and South America) similar to small hotel, but is more or less equivalent to guest house. ... An apartment (or flat) is a self-contained housing unit that occupies only part of a building. ... B&B is also an acronym used for the American CBS soap opera The Bold and The Beautiful or the MTV cartoon Beavis and Butthead. ... A suite in a hotel, mostly denotes a class of luxury rooms. ... A tourist boat travels the River Seine in Paris, France Beaches make popular tourist resorts Tourist redirects here; for the album by Athlete, see Tourist (album) Tourism can be defined as the act of travel for the purpose of recreation, and the provision of services for this act. ... In French, a hôtel de ville or mairie is a town hall (and not a hotel). ... Hilberts paradox of the Grand Hotel - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Manhattan Luxury Hotel | Hudson River | Gansevoort | New York City Hotels (170 words)
Hotel Gansevoort, with breathtaking 360 degree panoramic views of New York City and sunsets over the Hudson River, is the first and only luxury, full service resort in Manhattan’s vibrant Meatpacking District.
Hotel Gansevoort offers a chic retreat from the urban metropolis that redefines the world of luxury accommodations.
The hotel's 187 spacious guestrooms and 23 stylish suites - many with seating nooks in bay windows, step out balconies, stunning Manhattan and Hudson River views - offer downtown chic infused with uptown luxury.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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