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Encyclopedia > Hot potato routing

Deflection routing, also known as hot potato routing, is a routing strategy for networks based on packet switching which can reduce the need of buffering packets. Every packet has preferred outputs along which it wants to leave the router, and when possible a packet is sent along one of these outputs. However, two or more packets may want to leave along the same output (which is referred to as a contention among packets), and then only one of the packets may be sent along the link, while the others are sent along available outputs, even though the other links are not preferred by the packets (because, for instance, those links do not yield shortest paths). In computer networking the term routing refers to selecting paths in a computer network along which to send data. ... In computer networking and telecommunications, packet switching is a communications paradigm in which packets (messages or fragments of messages) are individually routed between nodes, with no previously established communication path. ... A D-Link Wi-Fi NAT router, popular for home and small office networks A router is a computer networking device that forwards data packets across a network toward their destinations, through a process known as routing. ...


Depending on the rate of incoming packets and the capacity of the outgoing links, deflection routing can work without any packet buffering. Of course, it is always possible to simply drop packets in a network with a best effort delivery strategy. Best-effort delivery describes a network service in which the Network does not provide any special features that recover lost or corrupted packets. ...


In the jargon of routing technology, hot-potato routing is routing that forwards the packet towards the path with the lowest delay (as opposed, for example, to the more commonly used metric of least number of hops). In computer networking the term routing refers to selecting paths in a computer network along which to send data. ... A packet is the fundamental unit of information carriage in all modern computer networks that use packet switching. ... The hopcount is a measure of distance across an IP-based network. ...


Use of the terms "hot-potato routing" and "cold-potato routing" in commercial networking

In commercial network routing between autonomous systems, hot-potato routing is the practice of passing traffic off to another AS as quickly as possible, thus using their network for wide-area transit. Cold-potato routing is the opposite, where the originating AS holds onto the packet until it is as near to the destination as possible. In computer networking the term routing refers to selecting paths in a computer network along which to send data. ... In the Internet, an autonomous system (AS) is a collection of IP networks and routers, under the control of one or more entities, that presents a common routing policy to the Internet. ... In the Internet, an autonomous system (AS) is a collection of IP networks and routers, under the control of one or more entities, that presents a common routing policy to the Internet. ... In the Internet, an autonomous system (AS) is a collection of IP networks and routers, under the control of one or more entities, that presents a common routing policy to the Internet. ...


Hot-potato routing is the normal behavior of most settlement-free peering agreements. It is considered by default to expect that your peers will route packets destined for your network in this manner. Cold-potato routing, on the other hand, is more expensive to do, but keeps the traffic under your control for longer, allowing operators of well-provisioned networks to offer a higher QoS to their customers. In the fields of packet-switched networks and computer networking, the traffic engineering term Quality of Service (QoS) refers to control mechanisms that can provide different priority to different users or data flows, or guarantee a certain level of performance to a data flow in accordance with requests from the...


Cold-potato routing is prone to misconfiguration as well as poor coordination between two networks. In such scenarios, packets can be routed further distances as well as allow another autonomous system to manipulate routing in your network for various purposes. Cold-potato routing requires a level of trust between two networks that either side will not attempt to "cheat" the other.


Some content networks favor the use of cold-potato routing (MED exchange/honoring) in order to deliver content from replicated server farms closer to the end-user.


The terms can also be used to describe the route announcement policy of a network: by choosing to announce their network at a large number of points at the periphery of another AS, a provider can pull incoming traffic onto their network as soon as possible, ensuring that the traffic stays on their network all the way to their customer's connection.


External links

  • Webopedia - hot potato routing

  Results from FactBites:
 
Routing: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com - All about Routing (495 words)
Routing is the means by which logically addressed packets are forwarded from their local subnetwork toward their ultimate destination.
Routing occurs at layer 3 of the OSI seven-layer model.
Traditional IP routing is simple because it uses next-hop routing where the router only needs to consider where it sends the packet, and does not need to consider the subsequent path of the packet on the remaining hops.
Hot-potato routing - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (198 words)
In the jargon of routing technology, hot-potato routing is routing that forwards the packet towards the path with the lowest delay (as opposed, for example, to the more commonly used metric of least number of hops).
In commercial network routing between autonomous systems, hot-potato routing is the practice of passing traffic off to another AS as quickly as possible, thus using their network for wide-area transit.
Hot-potato routing is a cheapskate's approach to routing, and generally results in lower quality of service.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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