FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Host (Holy Communion)
Big and small host
Big and small host
tongs for baking hosts
tongs for baking hosts
detail of tongs for baking hosts
detail of tongs for baking hosts
jagger for making hosts
jagger for making hosts

A host is a thin, round wafer made from bread and used for Holy Communion in many Christian churches. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1960 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Host (Holy Communion) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1960 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Host (Holy Communion) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1728x2304, 1315 KB) See also: File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Host (Holy Communion) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1728x2304, 1315 KB) See also: File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Host (Holy Communion) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x1728, 1505 KB) See also: File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Host (Holy Communion) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x1728, 1505 KB) See also: File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Host (Holy Communion) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1899x897, 734 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Host (Holy Communion) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1899x897, 734 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Host (Holy Communion) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... The Eucharist is either the Christian sacrament of consecrated bread and wine or the ritual surrounding it. ... Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). ...


The word is from the Latin, "hostia", which means "victim" or "sacrificial animal." The term can be used to the bread both before and after consecration, though it is more correct to use it after consecration - "altar bread" being preferred before consecration. Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... To consecrate an inanimate object is to dedicate it in a ritual to a special purpose, usually religious. ...


In the Catholic Church, hosts are often made by nuns as a means of supporting themselves. It is required that the hosts be made from wheat flour and water only (Code of Canon Law, Canon 924). The Church teaches that at the words of consecration the bread is changed into the Body of Christ through transubstantiation. The name Catholic Church can mean a visible organization that refers to itself as Catholic, or the invisible Christian Church, viz. ... Nun in cloister, 1930; photograph by Doris Ulmann A nun is a woman who has taken special vows committing her to a religious life. ... Canon Law is the ecclesiastical law of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Body of Christ is a term used by Christians to describe believers in Christ. ... Transubstantiation (in Latin, transsubstantiatio) is the change of the substance of bread and wine into that of the body and blood of Christ that, according to the belief of the Roman Catholic Church, occurs in the Eucharist and that is called in Greek (see Metousiosis). ...


In the Latin Rite, unleavened bread is used. The Eastern Rite Catholic Churches and the Eastern Orthodox Churches use leavened bread. However both traditions insist that the bread must be made from wheat for a valid consecration to take place. Latin Rite, in the singular and accompanied, in English, by the definite article (the Latin Rite), designates the particular Church, within the Catholic Church, which developed in western Europe and northern Africa, when Latin was the language of education and culture, and so also of the liturgy. ... An image of a machine-made Matzo Matzo (also Matzoh, Matzah, Matza, Hebrew מַצָּה maṣṣā), an unleavened bread, is the official food of Passover. ... The Eastern Catholic Churches are autonomous particular Churches in full communion with the Pope in Rome. ... The Eastern Orthodox Church is a Christian body that views itself as the historical continuation of the original Christian community established by Jesus and the Twelve Apostles, preserving the traditions of the early church unchanged, accepting the canonicity of the first seven ecumenical councils held between the 4th and the...


The General Instruction of the Roman Missal, 321 recommends "that the eucharistic bread ... be made in such a way that the priest at Mass with a congregation is able in practice to break it into parts for distribution to at least some of the faithful. ... The action of the fraction or breaking of bread, which gave its name to the Eucharist in apostolic times, will bring out more clearly the force and importance of the sign of unity of all in the one bread, and of the sign of charity by the fact that the one bread is distributed among the brothers and sisters." The General Instruction of the Roman Missal or GIRM is the liturgical document which governs the celebration of the Eucharist in the Catholic Church with the force of canon law. ... The Fraction is the ceremonial act of breaking the bread during Communion in some Christian denominations. ... For the death metal band from Sweden, see Eucharist (band) The Eucharist (or Communion or The Lords Supper etc. ...


See also

The Body of Christ is a term used by Christians to describe believers in Christ. ... OpÅ‚atek (plural : opÅ‚atki) is an Eastern European Christmas tradition celebrated in Polish, Slovak and Lithuanian families during Wigilia (Christmas Eve Vigil). ... The Anti-Sacrilege Act (1825–1830) was a French law against blasphemy and sacrilege passed in January 1825 under King Charles X. The law was never applied (except for a minor point) and finally revoked under King Louis-Philippe in the first months of the July monarchy. ...

External link


  Results from FactBites:
 
Eucharist - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4460 words)
The hosts are kept in a tabernacle after the celebration of the Mass, so that they can be brought to the sick and dying outside the time of Mass, and also so that the Eucharistic presence may be worshipped and adored.
The ordinary ministers of Holy Communion are Bishops, Priests and Deacons, the latter traditionally ministering the chalice.
The historical position of the Anglican Communion is found in the Thirty-Nine Articles of 1571, which state "the Bread which we break is a partaking of the Body of Christ"; and likewise that "the Cup of Blessing is a partaking of the Blood of Christ" (Articles of Religion, Article XXVIII: Of the Lord's Supper).
Eucharist (2494 words)
Communion is taken promptly by those who are not in a state of sin, preferably by those who have recently been to confession.
In Catholic and Anglican traditions, the bread, often referred to as the "host", is usually unleavened, often in the form of communion wafers, matzoh, or pita bread, in imitation of the Passover seder.
Denominations that practice closed communion will only share the Eucharist with members of their own church and with members of churches they consider to be in full communion with themselves.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m