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Encyclopedia > Horseradish
Horseradish

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Brassicales
Family: Brassicaceae
Genus: Armoracia
Species: A. rusticana
Binomial name
Armoracia rusticana
P.G. Gaertn., B. Mey. & Scherb
Root of the horseradish plant
Root of the horseradish plant
Prepared horseradish

Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana, syn. Cochlearia armoracia) is a perennial plant of the Brassicaceae family, which includes mustard and cabbages. The plant is probably native to southeastern Europe and western Asia, but is popular around the world today. It grows up to 1.5 metres (five feet) tall and is mainly cultivated for its large white, tapering root. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 641 KB) Armoracia rusticana Photo: Pethan May 2005, Botanic Garden in Utrecht, Netherlands File links The following pages link to this file: Horseradish ... Scientific classification or biological classification is a method by which biologists group and categorize species of organisms. ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants or angiosperms are the most widespread group of land plants. ... Orders See text. ... Families See text. ... Genera See text. ... Binomial name Armoracia rusticana P.G. Gaertn. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dr Bernhard Meyer (1767 - 1836) was a German physician and ornithologist. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (552x930, 126 KB) Horseradish, prepared I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (552x930, 126 KB) Horseradish, prepared I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Red Valerian, a perennial plant. ... Genera See text. ... Species See text The mustards are several plant species in the genus Brassica whose proverbially tiny mustard seeds are used as a spice and, by grinding and mixing them with water, vinegar or other liquids, are turned into a condiment also known as mustard. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ...


The horseradish root itself has hardly any aroma. When cut or grated, however, enzymes from the damaged plant cells break down sinigrin (a glucosinolate) to produce allyl isothiocyanate (mustard oil), which irritates the sinuses and eyes. Once grated, if not used immediately or mixed in vinegar, the root darkens and loses its pungency and becomes unpleasantly bitter when exposed to air and heat. Ribbon diagram of the enzyme TIM, surrounded by the space-filling model of the protein. ... Sinigrin is a glucoside found in the seeds of black mustard (Brassica nigra). ... The glucosinolates are a class of organic compounds that contain sulfur, nitrogen and a group derived from glucose. ... Allyl isothiocyanate is the chemical compound responsible for the pungent taste of mustard, horseradish and wasabi. ... The term mustard oil is used for two different oils that are made from mustard seeds: a fatty vegetable oil resulting from pressing the seeds, an essential oil resulting from grinding the seeds, mixing them with water, and extracting the resulting volatile oil by distillation. ... Sinus may refer to: In anatomy, where a sinus is a sac or cavity in any organ or tissue: Paranasal sinus, an air cavity in the cranial bones, especially those near the nose Sinus (anatomy), description of the general term Anal sinuses, the furrows which separate the columns in the... For other uses, see Eye (disambiguation). ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ...

Contents

History

Horseradish was cultivated in antiquity. According to Greek mythology, the Delphic Oracle told Apollo that the horseradish was worth its weight in gold.[verification needed] Horseradish was known in Egypt in 1500 BC and has traditionally been used by Jews in Passover Seders. [1] Cato discusses the plant in his treatises on agriculture, and a mural in Pompeii showing the plant has survived until today. Horseradish is probably the plant mentioned by Pliny the Elder in his Natural History under the name of Amoracia, and recommended by him for its medicinal qualities, and possibly the Wild Radish, or raphanos agrios of the Greeks.[verification needed] The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... The word Sibyl comes (via Latin) from the ancient Greek word sibylla, meaning prophetess. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... Marcus Porcius Cato (Latin: M·PORCIVS·M·F·CATO[1]) (234 BC, Tusculum–149 BC) was a Roman statesman, surnamed the Censor (Censorius), Sapiens, Priscus, or the Elder (Major), to distinguish him from Cato the Younger (his great-grandson). ... For other uses, see Pompeii (disambiguation). ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... Naturalis Historia Pliny the Elders Natural History is an encyclopedia written by Pliny the Elder. ...


Both root and leaves were used as a medicine during the Middle Ages and the root was used as a condiment on meats in Germany, Scandinavia, and Britain.[2] It was brought to North America during Colonial times.[3] Medicine is the science and art of maintaining andor restoring human health through the study, diagnosis, and treatment of patients. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ...


William Turner mentions horseradish as Red Cole in his "Herbal" (1551-1568), but not as a condiment. In "The Herball, or Generall Historie of Plantes" (1597), John Gerard describes it under the name of raphanus rusticanus, stating that it occurs wild in several parts of England. After referring to its medicinal uses, he says: "the Horse Radish stamped with a little vinegar put thereto, is commonly used among the Germans for sauce to eate fish with and such like meates as we do mustarde."[verification needed] William Turner (c. ... Year 1551 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Events March 23 - Peace of Longjumeau ends the Second War of Religion in France. ... For other uses, see: 1597 (number). ... John Gerard John Gerard (1545 in Nantwich – 1611/12 in London) was an English botanist famous for his herbal garden. ...


Cultivation

Horseradish is perennial in hardiness zones 5 - 9 and can be grown as an annual in other zones, though not as successfully as in zones with both a long growing season and winter temperatures cold enough to ensure plant dormancy. After the first frost in the autumn kills the leaves, the root is dug and divided. The main root is harvested and one or more large offshoots of the main root are replanted to produce next year's crop. Horseradish left undisturbed in the garden spreads via underground shoots and can become invasive. Older roots left in the ground become woody, after which they are no longer culinarily useful, although older plants can be dug and redivided to start new plants. [4] [5] Red Valerian, a perennial plant. ... Temperature scale of hardiness zones, showing the average annual minimum temperature boundaries for the zones A hardiness zone is a geographically-defined zone in which a specific category of plant life is capable of growing, as defined by temperature hardiness, or ability to withstand the minimum temperatures of the zone. ... Peas are an annual plant. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Lantana invasion of abandoned citrus plantation; Moshav Sdey Hemed, Israel The term invasive species refers to a subset of introduced species or non-indigenous species that are rapidly expanding outside of their native range. ...


Culinary uses

Cooks use the terms 'horseradish' or 'prepared horseradish' to refer to the grated root of the horseradish plant mixed with vinegar. Prepared horseradish is white to creamy-beige in color. It will keep for months refrigerated but eventually will start to darken, indicating it is losing flavor and should be replaced. The leaves of the plant, which while edible aren't commonly eaten, are referred to as 'horseradish greens.' Although technically a vegetable, horseradish is generally treated as a condiment or ingredient.


In the USA, prepared horseradish is commonly used as an ingredient in Bloody Mary cocktails, in cocktail sauce, as a sauce or spread on meat, chicken, and fish, and in sandwiches. The American fast-food restaurant chain Arby's uses horseradish in its "Horsey Sauce", which is provided as a regular condiment, alongside ketchup, mustard, and mayonnaise. Bloody Mary may refer to: Bloody Mary(film) Mary I of England, notorious for persecution of Protestants Bloody Mary (person), other Bloody Marys include ghosts. ... Cocktail sauce in its simplest form is ketchup mixed with prepared horseradish (In the United Kingdom and Iceland, mayonnaise is usually mixed with the ketchup, similar to fry sauce). ... Arbys is a fast food restaurant franchise in the United States and Canada that is primarily known for selling roast beef sandwiches, chicken sandwiches, potato cakes, curly fries, Jamocha milkshakes and chicken strips. ... A bottle of Heinz Organic Ketchup Ketchup (or less commonly catsup) also known as Red Sauce or Tomato Sauce is a condiment, usually made with ripened tomatoes. ... Mustard on bread. ... For the song by The Smashing Pumpkins, see Mayonaise (song). ...


Horseradish sauce made from prepared horseradish and cream is a popular condiment in the United Kingdom. It is often served with roast beef, but can be used in a number of other dishes also.


In Jewish and Romanian cuisine a sweetened horseradish-vinegar sauce called chrain or hrean traditionally accompanies gefilte fish. There are two varieties of chrain. "Red" chrain and is mixed with red beet and "white" chrain contains no beet. It is also popular in Poland where it is called chrzan and in Hungary where they call it torma. Having chrzan or torma on the Easter table is a part of Polish and Hungarian Easter tradition. A variety with red beet also exists and it is called ćwikła z chrzanem or simply ćwikła. Horseradish (often grated and mixed with cream, hardboiled eggs, or apples) is also a traditional Easter dish in Slovenia. Jewish cuisine isnt one unified cuisine, but rather a collection of international cookery traditions, loosely linked by kashrut, the Jewish dietary laws. ... Romanian cuisine is diverse, blending the dishes of the several traditions which it has come into contact with, as well as maintaining its own character. ... Gefilte fish, (Yiddish: געפילטע פיש) is a ground de-boned fish recipe using a variety of kosher fish meat that is then made into fish loaves or balls, popular with many people of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. ... Binomial name Carolus Linnaeus Beta vulgaris, commonly known as beet is a flowering plant species in the family Chenopodiaceae. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Easter, the Sunday of...


Horseradish dyed green is often substituted for the more expensive wasabi traditionally served with sushi, even in Japan.[6] The Japanese botanical name for horseradish is seiyōwasabi (セイヨウワサビ, 西洋山葵?), or "Western wasabi". Binomial name Matsum. ...


Nutritional value

Horseradish contains potassium, calcium, magnesium and phosphorus, as well as volatile oils, such as mustard oil, which is an antibiotic. Fresh, the plant contains 177.9 mg/100 g of vitamin C.[citation needed] General Name, symbol, number potassium, K, 19 Chemical series alkali metals Group, period, block 1, 4, s Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight 39. ... General Name, Symbol, Number calcium, Ca, 20 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, Period, Block 2, 4, s Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight 40. ... General Name, symbol, number magnesium, Mg, 12 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, period, block 2, 3, s Appearance silvery white solid at room temp Standard atomic weight 24. ... General Name, Symbol, Number phosphorus, P, 15 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 15, 3, p Appearance waxy white/ red/ black/ colorless Standard atomic weight 30. ... The term mustard oil is used for two different oils that are made from mustard seeds: a fatty vegetable oil resulting from pressing the seeds, an essential oil resulting from grinding the seeds, mixing them with water, and extracting the resulting volatile oil by distillation. ... Staphylococcus aureus - Antibiotics test plate. ... This article is about the nutrient. ...


Research applications

The enzyme horseradish peroxidase, found in the plant, is increasingly important in biochemical research fields.[citation needed] Ribbon diagram of the enzyme TIM, surrounded by the space-filling model of the protein. ... The enzyme horseradish peroxidase, found in horseradish, is used extensively in molecular biology in antibody amplification and detection, among other things[1]. For example, In recent years the technique of marking neurons with the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has become a major tool. ...


Medicinal applications

Known to have diuretic properties, the roots have been used to treat various minor health problems, including urinary tract infections, bronchitis, sinus congestion, and coughs.[7] Compounds found in horseradish have been found to kill some bacterial strains. [8] A diuretic (colloquially called a water pill) is any drug or herb that elevates the rate of bodily urine excretion (diuresis). ...

Herbs: basil Herbs (IPA: hÉ™()b, or É™b; see pronunciation differences) are seed-bearing plants without woody stems, which die down to the ground after flowering. ... For other uses, see Spice (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Angelica archangelica L. Garden Angelica (Angelica archangelica) is a biennial plant from the umbelliferous family Apiaceae. ... Binomial name L. Basil (Ocimum basilicum) (pronounced BAY-zl or BAZZ-il), of the Family Lamiaceae, is also known as Sweet Basil. ... Binomial name L. Synonyms Ocimum sanctum L. Ocimum tenuifolium (known as Holy basil in English, and Tulasi in Sanskrit), is a well known aromatic plant in the family Lamiaceae. ... Thai Basil is a cultivar of basil and is a major ingredient in many Thai dishes. ... bay leaves Bay leaf in Greek Daphni (plural bay leaves) is the aromatic leaf of several species of the Laurel family (Lauraceae). ... Boldo (Peumus boldus Molina) is a plant native to the coastal region of Chile. ... Binomial name Borago officinalis L. Borage (Borago officinalis), also known as starflower, is an annual herb native to central and eastern Europe. ... Look up Cannabis in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Binomial name Anthriscus cerefolium (L.) Hoffm. ... Binomial name Allium schoenoprasum L. Chives (Allium schoenoprasum), is the smallest species of the onion family[1] Alliaceae, native to Europe, Asia and North America[2]. They are referred to only in the plural, because they grow in clumps rather than as individual plants. ... Binomial name L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Binomial name Murraya koenigii (L.) Sprengel The Curry Tree or Curry-leaf Tree (Murraya koenigii; syn. ... For other uses, see Dill (disambiguation). ... Binomial name L. Epazote, Wormseed, Jesuits Tea, Mexican Tea, or Herba Sancti Mariæ (Chenopodium ambrosioides) is an herb native to Central America, South America, and southern Mexico. ... Binomial name L. Eryngium foetidum (also known as Bhandhanya, Chandon benit, Culantro, Culantro Coyote, (Fitweed, Long coriander, Mexican coriander, Wild coriander, Recao, Shado beni (English-speaking Caribbean), Spiritweed, (Ngò gai (Vietnam), Sawtooth), )Saw-leaf herb, or Cilantro cimarron) is a tropical perennial and annual herb in the family Apiaceae. ... Binomial name Piper auritum Kunth Hoja santa (Piper auritum, synonymous with Piper sanctum[1]) is an aromatic herb with a heart shaped leaf which grows in tropic Mesoamerica. ... Genera See text. ... Species See text Hyssop (Hyssopus) is a genus of about 10-12 species of herbaceous or semi-woody plants in the family Lamiaceae, native from the Mediterranean east to central Asia. ... Binomial name Lavandula officinalis Mill. ... Binomial name Melissa officinalis Linnaeus Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), not to be confused with bee balm, Monarda species, is a perennial herb in the mint family Lamiaceae, native to southern Europe and the Mediterranean region. ... Species About 55, see text Cymbopogon (lemon grass, lemongrass, citronella grass or fever grass) is a genus of about 55 species of grasses, native to warm temperate and tropical regions of the Old World. ... Binomial name Aloysia triphylla (LHér. ... Binomial name Limnophila aromatica (Lam. ... Binomial name Levisticum officinale L. Koch. ... Binomial name L. Marjoram (Origanum majorana, Lamiaceae) is a somewhat cold-sensitive perennial herb or undershrub with sweet pine and citrus flavors. ... “Mint” redirects here. ... Species See text. ... Binomial name Origanum vulgare L. Oregano or Pot Marjoram (Origanum vulgare) is a species of Origanum, native to Europe, the Mediterranean region and southern and central Asia. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Perilla is a genus of annual herb that is a member of the mint family, Lamiaceae. ... Binomial name L. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Rosmarinus officinalis Wikispecies has information related to: Rosmarinus officinalis Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on Rosemary Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is a woody, perennial herb with fragrant evergreen needle-like leaves. ... Binomial name Ruta graveolens L. The Common Rue (Ruta graveolens), also known as Herb-of-grace, is a species of rue grown as a herb. ... Binomial name L. Sage leaves - first variety Sage leaves - second variety Common sage (Salvia officinalis) is a small evergreen subshrub, with woody stems, grayish leaves, and blue to purplish flowers native to southern Europe and the Mediterranean region. ... Species hortensis (summer savory) montana (winter savory) viminea (serpentine savory) Savory is an herb, of the genus Satureja, best known for flavoring beans. ... Binomial name Rumex acetosa L. The common sorrel, or spinach dock, Ambada bhaji is a perennial herb, which grows abundantly in meadows in most parts of Europe and is cultivated as a leaf vegetable. ... Species About 150 species, including: Stevia eupatoria Stevia ovata Stevia plummerae Stevia rebaudiana Stevia salicifolia Stevia serrata Stevia is a genus of about 150 species of herbs and shrubs in the sunflower family (Asteraceae), native to subtropical and tropical South America and Central America. ... This article is about the herb; for the Freedom Call CD see Taragon. ... Species About 350 species, including: Thymus adamovicii Thymus altaicus Thymus amurensis Thymus bracteosus Thymus broussonetii Thymus caespititius Thymus camphoratus Thymus capitatus Thymus capitellatus Thymus camphoratus Thymus carnosus Thymus cephalotus Thymus cherlerioides Thymus ciliatus Thymus cilicicus Thymus cimicinus Thymus comosus Thymus comptus Thymus curtus Thymus disjunctus Thymus doerfleri Thymus glabrescens Thymus... Binomial name Persicaria odorata Lour. ... Binomial name Galium odoratum (L.) Scop. ... The term Grains of Selim refers to the seeds of a shrubby tree, Xylopia aethiopica, found in Africa. ... Ajwain seeds Ajwain (also known as carom seeds or bishops weed), is an uncommon spice except in certain areas of Asia. ... The Aleppo Pepper is a variety of Capsicum annuum named after the town Aleppo in northern Syria. ... Binomial name Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr. ... Species About 35 species, including: Mangifera altissima Mangifera applanata Mangifera caesia Mangifera camptosperma Mangifera casturi Mangifera decandra Mangifera foetida Mangifera gedebe Mangifera griffithii Mangifera indica Mangifera kemanga Mangifera laurina Mangifera longipes Mangifera macrocarpa Mangifera mekongensis Mangifera odorata Mangifera pajang Mangifera pentandra Mangifera persiciformis Mangifera quadrifida Mangifera siamensis Mangifera similis Mangifera... Pimpinella species, but the name anise is frequently applied to Fennel. ... Binomial name Kaempferia galanga (Linn. ... Binomial name Ferula assafoetida L. Asafoetida (Ferula assafoetida, family Apiaceae) is a species of Ferula native to Iran. ... Binomial name Cinnamomum camphora (L.) Sieb. ... Categories: | | | | ... Genera Amomum Elettaria The name cardamom is used for herbs within two genera of the ginger family Zingiberaceae, namely Elettaria and Amomum. ... Binomial name Amomum subulatum Roxb. ... Binomial name Cinnamomum aromaticum Nees Cassia (Cinnamomum aromaticum, synonym ), also called Chinese cinnamon, is an evergreen tree native to southern China and mainland Southeast Asia west to Myanmar. ... A large red cayenne The Cayenne is a hot red chili pepper used to flavor dishes, and for medicinal purposes. ... Binomial name L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... The chili pepper, or more simply just chili, is the fruit of species of the plant Capsicum from the nightshade family, Solanaceae. ... Binomial name J.Presl Cassia (Chinese cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... Binomial name (L.) Merrill & Perry A single dried clove flower bud Cloves (Syzygium aromaticum, syn. ... Binomial name L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Binomial name Piper cubeba L. Cubeb (Piper cubeba), or tailed pepper, is a plant in genus Piper, cultivated for its fruit and essential oil. ... Binomial name L. Cumin (Cuminum cyminum) (sometimes misspelled cummin) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native from the east Mediterranean to East India. ... Binomial name Bunium persicum (Boiss. ... For other uses, see Dill (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Foeniculum vulgare Mill. ... Binomial name Trigonella foenum-graecum L. Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) belongs to the family Fabaceae. ... Binomial name Boesenbergia rotunda (L.) Mansf. ... Binomial name Alpinia galanga (L.) Willd. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... For other uses, see Ginger (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Aframomum melegueta K. Schum. ... Juniper berries, here still attached to a branch, are actually modified conifer cones. ... Binomial name Glycyrrhiza glabra L. Liquorice or licorice (see spelling differences) (pronounced IPA: licorish) is the root of Glycyrrhiza glabra, from which a sweet flavour can be extracted. ... It has been suggested that Legal drugs#Nutmeg be merged into this article or section. ... Mahlab, Mahleb, or Mahlepi, is an aromatic spice from the puverized pit of the black cherry, Cerasus mahaleb or (Prunus mahaleb). ... Malabathrum, also known as Malabar leaf is the name used in classical and medieval texts for the leaf of the plant Cinnamomum tamala. ... Binomial name Brassica nigra L. Black mustard (Brassica nigra) is an annual weedy plant cultivated for its seeds, which are commonly used as a spice. ... Binomial name Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. ... Binomial name Sinapis alba White mustard (Sinapis alba) is a plant of the family Cruciferae. ... Species About 80 species, see text. ... Binomial name L. Nigella sativa is an annual flowering plant, native to southwest Asia. ... It has been suggested that Legal drugs#Nutmeg be merged into this article or section. ... Capsicum fruit which comes in various shapes and colours can be used to make paprika. ... Binomial name Piper nigrum L. Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. ... Binomial name Piper nigrum L. Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. ... Binomial name Piper longum L. Long pepper (Piper longum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. ... Binomial name Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi Brazilian Pepper (Schinus terebinthifolius; also known as Aroeira or Florida Holly) is a sprawling shrub or small tree 7-10 m tall, native to subtropical and tropical South America, in southeastern Brazil, northern Argentina and Paraguay. ... Binomial name Schinus molle Raddi Peruvian Pepper (Schinus molle, also known as California pepper tree, molle, pepper tree, pepperina, Peruvian mastictree and Peruvian peppertree) is a tree or shrub that grows to between 5 and 18 m tall. ... Binomial name Piper nigrum L. Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. ... Binomial name L. For the color see: Pomegranate (color) The Pomegranate (Punica granatum) is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree growing to 5–8 m tall. ... A wild field of poppies, West Azarbaijan Province, Iran A poppy is any of a number of showy flowers, born one per stem, belonging to the poppy family. ... Binomial name Crocus sativus L. Saffron (IPA: ) is a spice derived from the flower of the saffron crocus (Crocus sativus), a species of crocus in the family Iridaceae. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article is about the Sassafras tree. ... Binomial name Sesamum indicum L. Sesame (Sesamum indicum) is a flowering plant in the genus Sesamum. ... Sichuan pepper (or Szechuan pepper) is the outer pod of the tiny fruit of a number of species in the genus Zanthoxylum (most commonly Zanthoxylum piperitum, Zanthoxylum simulans, and Zanthoxylum sancho), widely grown and consumed in Asia as a spice. ... Binomial name Illicium verum Hook. ... Species About 250 species; see text Rhus is a genus approximately 250 species of woody shrubs and small trees in the family Anacardiaceae. ... Species (not a complete list) Tasmannia is a genus of woody, evergreen flowering plants of the family Winteraceae. ... Binomial name Tamarindus indica L. This article refers to the tree – for other uses see Tamarindo (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Linnaeus Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family, Zingiberaceae which is native to tropical South Asia. ... Binomial name Matsum. ... Binomial name Curcuma zedoaria (Christm. ...

See also

This is a list of vegetables in the culinary sense, which means it includes some botanical fruits like pumpkins and doesnt include herbs, spices, cereals and most culinary fruits and culinary nuts. ... Species About 25 species, see text Scurvy-grass (Cochlearia species; a. ... Binomial name Matsum. ... Cocktail sauce in its simplest form is ketchup mixed with prepared horseradish (In the United Kingdom and Iceland, mayonnaise is usually mixed with the ketchup, similar to fry sauce). ... Albert sauce is a sauce used principally in British cuisine to enhance the flavour of brasied beef. ... A Bloody Mary is a cocktail containing vodka, tomato juice, and usually other spices or flavorings such as Worcestershire sauce, Tabasco sauce, beef consomme or bouillon, horseradish, celery or celery salt, salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper, and lemon juice. ... Maror are traditionally Jewish bitter herbs eaten on Passover, symbolizing the bitterness of slavery in Egypt. ... Beef on Weck sandwich from Charlie the Butchers in Buffalo, New York, USA A kummelweck, or sometimes kimmelweck or even kümmelweck, is a salty roll, made only in the Buffalo-Rochester area. ... New England Boiled Dinner is a one-pot meal native to New England which contains various ingredients such as corned beef, cabbage, carrots, turnips and potatoes. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... British cuisine is shaped by the countrys temperate climate, its island geography and its history. ... The cuisine of Denmark, like that in the other Scandinavian countries (Sweden and Norway), as well as that of northern Germany, its neighbor to the south, is traditionally heavy and rich in fat, consisting mainly of carbohydrates, meat and fish. ... Canadian cuisine varies widely from region to region. ... Lithuanian cuisine consists mostly of the traditional Lithuanian dishes . ... Romanian cuisine is diverse, blending the dishes of the several traditions which it has come into contact with, as well as maintaining its own character. ... Corned beef is a cut of beef (usually brisket, but sometimes round) cured or pickled in a seasoned brine. ... Herbal rubefacients are applied externally, causing dilation of the capillaries and an increase in blood circulation. ... The glucosinolates are a class of organic compounds that contain sulfur, nitrogen and a group derived from glucose. ...

References

  1. ^ Pleasant, Barbara. "Horseradish", Mother Earth News, Oct-Nov 2003. Retrieved on 2007-07-01. 
  2. ^ Pleasant, Barbara. "Horseradish", Mother Earth News, Oct-Nov 2003. Retrieved on 2007-07-01. 
  3. ^ Pleasant, Barbara. "Horseradish", Mother Earth News, Oct-Nov 2003. Retrieved on 2007-07-01. 
  4. ^ How To Grow Horseradish. Retrieved on 2007-07-01.
  5. ^ Pleasant, Barbara. "Horseradish", Mother Earth News, Oct-Nov 2003. Retrieved on 2007-07-01. 
  6. ^ Downey, Roger. "Green and Grate", Seattle Weekly, 2003-03-22. Retrieved on 2007-07-01. 
  7. ^ Medicinal Properties of Horseradish. Retrieved on 2007-07-01.
  8. ^ Pleasant, Barbara. "Horseradish", Mother Earth News, Oct-Nov 2003. Retrieved on 2007-07-01. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • International Horseradish Festival
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Armoracia rusticana

  Results from FactBites:
 
Horseradish: A Root with Roots (583 words)
During the Renaissance, horseradish consumption spread from Central Europe northward to Scandinavia and westward to England.
By the late 1600s, horseradish was the standard accompaniment for beef and oysters among all Englishmen.
It was common in the northeast by 1806, and it grew wild near Boston by 1840.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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