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Encyclopedia > Horror film
Horror Portal

Horror films are movies that strive to elicit fright, fear, terror, or horror from viewers. In horror film plots, evil forces, events, or characters, sometimes of supernatural origin, intrude into the everyday world. Horror movies usually include a central villain. Early horror films often drew inspiration from characters and stories from classic literature, such as Dracula, Frankenstein, The Mummy, The Wolf Man, Phantom of the Opera and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Later horror films, in contrast, often drew inspiration from the insecurities of life after World War II, giving rise to the three distinct, but related, sub-genres: the horror-of-personality film, the horror-of-Armageddon film, and the horror-of-the-demonic film. The last sub-genre may be seen as a modernized transition from the earliest horror films, expanding on their emphasis on supernatural agents that bring horror to the world.[1] Skyhooks were an Australian rock band of the 1970s, sometimes classified as a glam rock band, although this is mainly the result of the bands flamboyant costumes and make-up. ... Horror Movie was the second single from the Skyhooks album Living in the Seventies and was their first number one single in Australia, making the top in March 1975 for 2 weeks. ... The Scary Movie series is a series of comedy films written by Jason Friedberg and Aaron Seltzer which mainly specialize in spoofing the current latest and most popular horror films. ... Image File history File links Screenshot from the 1922 film Nosferatu -- Public domain both by date and the fact tht the original work was deemed too derivative of the copyright on Dracula and was ordered destroyed. ... Image File history File links Screenshot from the 1922 film Nosferatu -- Public domain both by date and the fact tht the original work was deemed too derivative of the copyright on Dracula and was ordered destroyed. ... This article is about the 1922 silent film. ... Image File history File links Portal. ... For other uses, see Fear (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fear (disambiguation). ... Horror is the feeling of revulsion that usually occurs after something frightening is seen, heard, or otherwise experienced. ... For other uses, see Evil (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Supernatural (disambiguation). ... This article is about the novel. ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ... The Mummy is the title of: a 1932 movie starring Boris Karloff: see The Mummy (1932 movie) a 1959 movie starring Christopher Lee: see The Mummy (1959 movie) a 1999 movie starring Brendan Fraser: see The Mummy (1999 movie) a novel by Anne Rice: see The Mummy (novel) This is... For other uses, see Wolf man. ... The title character as depicted by Lon Chaney, Sr. ... Dr. Jekyll and Mr. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The horror-of-personality film is one of three sub-genres of the horror film that grew out of mid- and late-20th-Century American culture. ... For other uses, see Armageddon (disambiguation). ... The horror-of-the-demonic film is one of three sub-genres of the horror film that grew out of mid- and late-20th-Century American culture. ...


Horror films have been criticized for their graphic violence and dismissed as low budget B-movies and exploitation films. Nonetheless, all the major studios and many respected directors, including Alfred Hitchcock, Roman Polanski, Stanley Kubrick and Francis Ford Coppola, have made forays into the genre. The famous Hindi movie director and producer Ram Gopal Varma has experimented with several horror films, including Raat (The Night) (1992), Darna Mana Hai (Being Afraid is not allowed) (2003), and Darna Zaroori Hai (Being Afraid is necessary) (2006). Serious critics have analyzed horror films through the prisms of genre theory and the auteur theory. Some horror films incorporate elements of other genres such as science fiction, fantasy, mockumentary, black comedy, and thrillers. Many horror films are in the public domain (e.g. The Little Shop of Horrors, Night of the Living Dead, The Terror, Suspiria, Embryo)[2] The term B-movie originally referred to a film designed to be distributed as the lower half of a double feature, often a genre film featuring cowboys, gangsters or vampires. ... Grindhouse redirects here. ... Director Herbert Brenon with actress Alla Nazimova on the set of War Brides, 1916 A director is a person who directs the making of a film. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Roman Raymond Polanski (born August 18, 1933) is an Academy Award-winning film director, writer, actor and producer. ... Kubrick redirects here. ... Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is a five-time Academy Award winning American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... Ram Gopal Varma born April 7, 1962) is an Indian film director, writer and film producer from Andhra Pradesh. ... Darna Mana Hai (Hindi: डरना मना है, Urdu: ڈرنا منع ہے) is a Bollywood production, released on July 25, 2003. ... Darna Zaroori Hai (Hindi: डरना ज़रूरी है, Urdu: ڈرنا ضروری ہے) is a 2006 Indian portmanteau film, in which an old lady tells six scary stories to a group of five children. ... Genre studies are a structuralist approach to literary theory, film theory, and other cultural theories. ... Auteurs redirects here. ... Poster for The Day the Earth Stood Still, an archetypal science fiction film. ... Fantasy films are films with fantastic themes, usually involving magic, supernatural events, make-believe creatures, or exotic fantasy worlds. ... Mockumentary (also known as a pseudo-documentary)[1], a portmanteau of mock and documentary, is a film and TV genre, or a single work of the genre. ... This article is about the tone of comedy. ... Thriller films are movies that primarily use action and suspense to engage the audience. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... This article is about 1960 Roger Corman film. ... This article is about the 1968 film directed by George A. Romero. ... The Terror is a 1963 American horror film produced by Roger Corman. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Contents

History

1890s-1920s

The horror genre is nearly as old as film itself. The first depictions of supernatural events appear in several of the silent shorts created by film pioneers such as Georges Méliès in the late 1890s, the most notable being his 1896 Le Manoir du diable (aka "The House of the Devil") which is sometimes credited as being the first horror film. Another of his horror projects was 1898's La Caverne maudite (aka "The Cave of the Demons", literally "the accursed cave"). [3] Japan made early forays into the horror genre with Bake Jizo and Shinin no Sosei, both made in 1898.[4] In 1910, Edison Studios produced the first film version of Frankenstein, thought lost for many years, film collector Alois Felix Dettlaff Sr. found a copy and had a 1993 rerelease.[5] It can now be viewed on youtube.[6][7] Image of Lon Chaney, Sr. ... Image of Lon Chaney, Sr. ... The 1925 silent film version of The Phantom of the Opera, directed by Rupert Julian, is a classic adaptation of Gaston Lerouxs novel The Phantom of the Opera, starring Lon Chaney in the title role as the masked and facially disfigured Phantom who haunts the Paris Opera House, causing... Georges Méliès (December 8, 1861 – January 21, 1938), full name Marie-Georges-Jean Méliès, was a French filmmaker famous for leading many technical and narrative developments in the earliest cinema. ... Le Manoir du diable (The Devils Castle) is a two minute long French film directed by Georges Melies. ... Japanese cinema (映画; Eiga) has a history in Japan that spans more than 100 years. ... Japanese cinema (映画; Eiga) has a history in Japan that spans more than 100 years. ... See also: 19th century in film 1897 in film 1898 1899 in film years in film film Events Births September 14 - Hal B. Wallis, major American film producer (d. ... See also: 1909 in film 1910 1911 in film years in film film Events The newsreel footage of the funeral of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom is shot in Kinemacolor, making it the first color newsreel. ... The Black Maria (pronounced b. ... Frankenstein is a 1910 film made by Edison Studios that was written and directed by J. Searle Dawley. ... A lost film is a feature film or short film that no longer exists in either studio archives or private collections. ... The year 1993 in film involved many significant films. ... YouTube is a popular video sharing website where users can upload, view and share video clips. ...


The early 20th century brought more milestones for the horror genre including the first monster to appear in a full-length horror film, Quasimodo, the hunchback of Notre-Dame who had appeared in Victor Hugo's book, "Notre-Dame de Paris" (published in 1831). Films featuring Quasimodo included Alice Guy's Esmeralda (1906), The Hunchback (1909), The Love of a Hunchback (1910) and Notre-Dame de Paris (1911). [8] For the 20th century Italian poet awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1959, see Salvatore Quasimodo. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced ) (February 26, 1802 — May 22, 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... The Hunchback of Notre Dame (original French title, Notre-Dame de Paris) is an 1831 French novel written by Victor Hugo. ... Alice Guy-Blaché (July 1, 1873–March 24, 1968) was a pioneer filmmaker who was the first female director in the motion picture industry and is considered to be the first ever director of a fiction film. ...


Many of the earliest feature length 'horror films' were created by German film makers in 1910s and 1920s, during the era of German Expressionist films. Many of these films would significantly influence later Hollywood films. Paul Wegener's The Golem (1915) was seminal; in 1920 Robert Wiene's The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, with its Expressionist style, would influence film-makers from Orson Welles to Tim Burton and many more for decades. The era also produced the first vampire-themed feature, F. W. Murnau's Nosferatu (1922), an unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula. [9] Fritz Lang's Metropolis (1927), though more of a science fiction film, is considered a landmark film of the German Expressionist era. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... ... Paul Wegener (born December 11, 1874 in Arnoldsdorf (Westpreußen; now Jarantowice, Poland); died September 13, 1948 in Berlin) was a German actor and film director. ... The Golem (original German name Der Golem, also known as The Monster of Fate) is a 1915 silent horror directed and written by Paul Wegener and Henrik Galeen. ... Robert Wiene (born April 27, 1873 in Breslau; died 17 July 1938 in Paris) was a German film director. ... Dr. Caligari, Caligari, and Doctor Caligari all redirect here. ... The Scream by Edvard Munch (1893) which inspired 20th century Expressionists Portrait of Eduard Kosmack by Egon Schiele Rehe im Walde by Franz Marc Elbe Bridge I by Rolf Nesch On White II by Wassily Kandinsky, 1923. ... George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, actor and producer for film, stage, radio and television. ... Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-nominated American film director, writer and designer notable for the quirky and often dark gothic atmosphere in his high-profile films. ... F W Murnau Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau (December 28, 1888 - March 11, 1931) was one of the most influential directors of the silent film era. ... This article is about the 1922 silent film. ... Abraham Bram Stoker (8 November 1847 – 20 April 1912) was an Irish writer of novels and short stories, who is best known today for his 1897 horror novel Dracula. ... This article is about the novel. ... Friedrich Christian Anton Fritz Lang (December 5, 1890 – August 2, 1976) was an Austrian-German-American film director, screenwriter and occasional film producer, one of the best known émigrés from Germanys school of Expressionism. ... Metropolis Metropolis is a science fiction film produced in Germany set in a futuristic urban dystopia. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ...


Early Hollywood dramas dabbled in horror themes, including versions of The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923) and The Monster (1925) (both starring Lon Chaney, Sr., the first American horror movie star). His most famous role, however, was in The Phantom of the Opera (1925), perhaps the true predecessor of Universal's famous horror series. [10] ... The 1923 film version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, starring Lon Chaney as Quasimodo and Patsy Ruth Miller as Esmeralda, and directed by Wallace Worsley, is one of the more famous adaptations of Victor Hugos novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame. ... The Monster is a 1925 silent horror directed by Roland West, based on the play by Crane Wilbur. ... Lon Chaney (April 1, 1883 – August 26, 1930), nicknamed The Man of a Thousand Faces, was an American actor during the age of silent films. ... A movie star or film star is a celebrity who is a person known for his or her roles in motion pictures. ... The 1925 silent film version of The Phantom of the Opera, directed by Rupert Julian, is a classic adaptation of Gaston Lerouxs novel The Phantom of the Opera, starring Lon Chaney in the title role as the masked and facially disfigured Phantom who haunts the Paris Opera House, causing... A gallery of classic Universal monsters Universal Horror is the name given to the distinctive series of horror films made by Universal Studios in California from the 1920s through to the 1950s. ...


1930s & 1940s

Boris Karloff as Frankenstein's Monster
Boris Karloff as Frankenstein's Monster

It was in the early 1930s that American film producers, particularly Universal Pictures Co. Inc., popularized the horror film, bringing to the screen a series of successful Gothic features including Dracula (1931), and The Mummy (1932), some of which blended science fiction films with Gothic horror, such as James Whale's Frankenstein (1931) and The Invisible Man (1933). Tod Browning, director of Dracula, also made the extremely controversial Freaks based on Spurs by Ted Robbins, it is about a band of circus freaks. It was so controversial the studio burned about 30 minutes and disowned it. These films, while designed to thrill, also incorporated more serious elements, and were influenced by the German expressionist films of the 1920s. Some actors began to build entire careers in such films, most notably Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi. Image File history File linksMetadata Frankenstein_Karloff. ... This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole The gothic novel was a literary genre that belonged to Romanticism and began in the United Kingdom with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole. ... Dracula is a 1931 horror film produced by Universal Pictures Co. ... Boris Karloff as Ardath Bey AKA Prince Imhotep in The Mummy. ... Science fiction film is a film genre that uses speculative, science-based depictions of imaginary phenomena such as extra-terrestrial lifeforms, alien worlds, and time travel, often along with technological elements such as futuristic spacecraft, robots, or other technologies. ... James Whale (July 22, 1889 – May 29, 1957) was a ground-breaking British Hollywood film director, best known for his work in the horror movie genre, making such pictures as Frankenstein, Bride of Frankenstein, and The Invisible Man. ... Frankenstein is a 1931 science fiction film from Universal Pictures directed by James Whale and very loosely based on the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. ... The Invisible Man is a movie produced by Universal Pictures in 1933 and directed by James Whale. ... Spurs, a plural of spur, may also refer to Spurs, the abbreviated name for Tottenham Hotspur, an association football team from North London, England. ... Boris Karloff (born William Henry Pratt) (November 23, 1887 – February 2, 1969) was an English actor who emigrated to Canada in the 1910s. ... Bela Lugosi as Dracula United States stamp. ...


In 1931, Fritz Lang released his epic thriller M, which chillingly told the story of a serial killer of children, played by Peter Lorre. M (original German title: M - Eine Stadt sucht einen Mörder, M - a city in search of a murderer) is a 1931 German film noir directed by Fritz Lang and written by Thea von Harbou. ... Serial killers are individuals who have a history of multiple slayings of victims who were usually unknown to them beforehand. ... Peter Lorre (June 26, 1904 – March 23, 1964), born László Löwenstein, was an Hungarian[1] - Austrian - American actor frequently typecast as a sinister foreigner. ...


Other studios of the day had less spectacular success, but Rouben Mamoulian's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Paramount, 1931) and Michael Curtiz's Mystery of the Wax Museum (Warner Brothers, 1933) were both important horror films. Rouben Mamoulian (October 8, 1897 – December 4, 1987) was an American film and theatre director. ... Dr. Jekyll and Mr. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... Michael Curtiz (December 24, 1886 - April 10, 1962) was an Academy Award-winning Hungarian-American film director. ... Mystery of the Wax Museum is a mystery/horror Technicolor film released in 1933, and directed by Michael Curtiz. ... Warner Bros. ...


Universal's horror films continued into the 1940s with The Wolf Man 1941, not the first werewolf film, but certainly the most influential. Throughout the decade Universal also continued to produce more sequels in the Frankenstein series, as well as a number of films teaming up several of their monsters. Also in that decade, Val Lewton would produce atmospheric B-pictures for RKO Pictures, including Cat People (1942), I Walked with a Zombie (1943) and The Body Snatcher (1945). For other uses, see Wolf man. ... For other uses, see Werewolf (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ... Val Lewton Vladimir Ivan Leventon (7 May, 1904-14 March, 1951) was an American screenwriter and producer who was born in what is now Yalta, Ukraine. ... The term B-movie originally referred to a film designed to be distributed as the lower half of a double feature, often a genre film featuring cowboys, gangsters or vampires. ... RKO redirects here. ... This article is about the 1942 film; Cat People is also the name of a 1982 film. ... I Walked with a Zombie is a 1943 horror film directed by Jacques Tourneur. ... The Body Snatcher (also known as Robert Louis Stevensons The Body Snatcher) is a 1945 horror directed by Robert Wise based on the short story The Body Snatcher by Robert Louis Stevenson. ...


The first horror film produced by an Indian film industry was Mahal, a Hindi film. It was a supernatural thriller and the earliest known film dealing with the theme of reincarnation. The Indian film industry is the largest in the world in terms of ticket sales and number of films produced annually (877 feature films and 1177 short films were released in the year 2003 alone). ... Mahal (Devnagari: महल) is a 1949 Indian film directed by Kamal Amrohi and starring Ashok Kumar and Madhubala. ... Bollywood (Hindi: , Urdu: ) is the informal term popularly used for Mumbai-based Hindi-language film industry in India. ... This article is about the theological concept. ...


1950s-1960s

With the dramatic advances in technology that occurred in the 1950s, the tone of horror films shifted away from the gothic towards science fiction. A seemingly endless parade of low-budget productions featured humanity overcoming threats from "outside": alien invasions and deadly mutations to people, plants, and insects. These films provided ample opportunity for audience exploitation, with gimmicks such as 3-D and "Percepto" (producer William Castle's pseudo-electric-shock technique used for 1959's The Tingler) drawing audiences in week after week for bigger and better scares. The classier horror films of this period, including The Thing from Another World (1951; attributed on screen to Christian Nyby but widely considered to be the work of Howard Hawks) and Don Siegel's Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) managed to channel the paranoia of the Cold War into atmospheric creepiness without resorting to direct exploitation of the events of the day. Filmmakers would continue to merge elements of science fiction and horror over the following decades. [11] One of the most notable films of the era was 1957's The Incredible Shrinking Man, from Richard Matheson's existentialist novel. While more of a "science-fiction" story, the film conveyed the fears of living in the "Atomic Age" and the terror of social alienation. The alien invasion is a common theme in science fiction stories and film, in which a technologically-superior extraterrestrial society invades Earth with the intent to replace human life, or to enslave it under a colonial system, or in some cases, to use humans as food. ... For linguistic mutation, see Apophony. ... In film, the term 3-D (or 3D) is used to describe any visual presentation system that attempts to maintain or recreate moving images of the third dimension, the illusion of depth as seen by the viewer. ... William Castle (April 24, 1914–May 31, 1977) born William Schloss, was an American film director, producer, and actor. ... The Tingler is a 1963 film by the American producer and director William Castle. ... The Thing from Another World is a 1951 science fiction film which tells the story of an Air Force crew and scientists at a remote Arctic research outpost who fight a malevolent alien being. ... Christian Nyby (September 1, 1913 _ September 17, 1993) was an American television and film director. ... Howard Winchester Hawks (May 30, 1896 – December 26, 1977) was an American film director, producer and writer of the classic Hollywood era. ... Don Siegel (October 26, 1912 - April 20, 1991) was an influential American film director. ... Invasion of the Body Snatchers is a 1956 science fiction film. ... For other senses of this word, see paranoia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... The Incredible Shrinking Man is a 1957 science fiction film directed by Jack Arnold and adapted for the screen by Richard Matheson from his novel The Shrinking Man. ... Richard Matheson (born February 20, 1926) is an American author and screenwriter, typically of fantasy, horror, or science fiction. ... Existentialism is a philosophical movement emphasizing individualism, individual freedom, and subjectivity. ... The Atomic Age was a phrase used for a time in the 1950s in which it was believed that all power sources in the future would be atomic in nature. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The late 1950s and early 1960s saw the rise of production companies focused on producing horror films, including the British company Hammer Film Productions. Hammer enjoyed huge international success from full-blooded technicolor films involving classic horror characters, often starring Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee, such as The Curse of Frankenstein (1957), Dracula (1958), and The Mummy (1959) and many sequels. Hammer, and director Terence Fisher, are widely acknowledged as pioneers of the modern horror movie. Other companies contributed to a boom in horror film production in Britain in the 1960s and '70s, including Tigon-British and Amicus, the latter best known for their anthology films like Dr Terror's House of Horrors (1965). New company logo as introduced in May 2007 A poster for Dracula: Prince of Darkness (1966). ... Peter Wilton Cushing, OBE, (26 May 1913 - 11 August 1994) was an English actor, known for his many appearances in Hammer Films, in which he played Baron Frankenstein and Dr. Van Helsing, amongst many other roles, often appearing opposite his close friend Christopher Lee. ... For other persons named Christopher Lee, see Christopher Lee (disambiguation). ... The Curse of Frankenstein is a 1957 British horror film by Hammer Film Productions. ... Dracula is a 1958 British horror film, and the first of a series of Hammer Horror films inspired by the Bram Stoker novel Dracula. ... The Mummy is a 1959 British Hammer Horror film starring Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing. ... Terence Fisher (February 23, 1904 - June 18, 1980), was a film director who worked for Hammer Films. ... Tigon British Film Productions was a film production and distribution company founded by Tony Tenser in 1966. ... Amicus Productions was founded in the UK by American producer and screenwriter Milton Subotsky, and served primarily as vehicle for Subotskys anthology horror films such as Dr. Terrors House of Horrors (1964), directed by genre stalwart Freddie Francis, and The House That Dripped Blood. ... Dr. Terrors House of Horrors is a 1965 British horror film from Amicus Productions, directed by veteran horror film director Freddie Francis and starring Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee. ...


American International Pictures (AIP) also made a series of Edgar Allan Poe–themed films produced by Roger Corman and starring Vincent Price. These sometimes controversial productions paved the way for more explicit violence in both horror and mainstream films. The early AIP logo. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Roger William Corman (born April 5, 1926), sometimes nicknamed King of the Bs for his output of B-movies (though he himself rejects this appellation as inaccurate), is a prolific American producer and director of low-budget exploitation movies, many of which are some of the most influential movies made. ... Vincent Leonard Price Jr. ...


In Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960), the object of horror does not look like a monstrous or supernatural other, but rather a normal human being. The horror has a human explanation, too, based in Freudian psychology and sex. Other seminal examples include Peeping Tom (Michael Powell, 1960), Homicidal (William Castle, 1961), What Ever Happened to Baby Jane (Robert Aldrich, 1962), Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte (Robert Aldrich, 1964), Pretty Poison (Noel Black, 1968), and The Collector (William Wyler, 1965). Films of the horror-of-personality sub-genre continue to appear through the turn of the century, with 1991's The Silence of the Lambs a noteworthy example. Some of these films further blur the distinction between horror film and crime or thriller genre. Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Psycho is a 1960 suspense/horror film directed by auteur Alfred Hitchcock from the screenplay by Joseph Stefano about a psychotic killer. ... For other uses, see Supernatural (disambiguation). ... Peeping Tom is a 1960 psychological thriller film by the British film director Michael Powell. ... Michael Latham Powell (September 30, 1905 – February 19, 1990) was a British film director, renowned for his partnership with Emeric Pressburger which produced a series of classic British films. ... Homicidal is a 1961 thriller film produced and directed by the self-proclaimed King of Showmanship, William Castle. ... William Castle (April 24, 1914–May 31, 1977) born William Schloss, was an American film director, producer, and actor. ... What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? is a novel by author Henry Farrell published in 1960. ... Robert Aldrich (August 9, 1918 – December 5, 1983) was a United States film director, writer and producer notable for a number of films including What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?, Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte, and The Dirty Dozen. ... Hush. ... Robert Aldrich (August 9, 1918 – December 5, 1983) was a United States film director, writer and producer notable for a number of films including What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?, Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte, and The Dirty Dozen. ... Pretty Poison is the name of a 1968 film directed by Noel Black, starring Anthony Perkins and Tuesday Weld, about an ex-convict and high school cheerleader who commit a series of crimes. ... Noel Black (born April 19, 1989, Valley Grove, West Vrignia) is a powerpop superstar. ... The Collector is the title of a 1963 novel by John Fowles. ... William Wyler (July 1, 1902 – July 27, 1981) was a prolific, Oscar-winning motion picture director. ... The Silence of the Lambs is a 1991 Academy Award-winning film directed by Jonathan Demme and starring Jodie Foster and Anthony Hopkins. ... Thriller films are movies that primarily use action and suspense to engage the audience. ...


Ghosts and monsters still remained popular, but many films that still relied on supernatural monsters expressed a horror of the demonic. The Innocents (Jack Clayton, 1961) and The Haunting (Robert Wise, 1963) were two such horror-of-the-demonic films from the early 1960s, with high production values and gothic atmosphere. Perhaps the most recognizable milestone of the sub-genre remains Rosemary's Baby (Roman Polanski, 1968), in which the devil is made of flesh. "Curse of the Demon/Night of the Demon" was a superior film by Jaques Touneur featuring Dana Andrews as the skeptic doctor searching out witchcraft. For other uses, see Ghost (disambiguation). ... This article is about the legendary creature. ... The horror-of-the-demonic film is one of three sub-genres of the horror film that grew out of mid- and late-20th-Century American culture. ... The Innocents is a 1961 film based on the novel The Turn of the Screw by Henry James. ... Jack Clayton (March 1, 1921–February 26, 1995) was a British film director who specialised in bringing literary works to the screen. ... The Haunting is a 1963 horror film directed by Robert Wise and adapted by Nelson Gidding from the novel The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson. ... Robert Wise (September 10, 1914 – September 14, 2005) was a sound effects editor, film editor, and Academy Award-winning American film producer and director. ... Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole The gothic novel was a literary genre that belonged to Romanticism and began in the United Kingdom with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole. ... Rosemarys Baby is an Academy Award-winning 1968 horror film directed by Roman Polanski and starring Mia Farrow. ... Roman Raymond Polanski (born August 18, 1933) is an Academy Award-winning film director, writer, actor and producer. ...


Hitchcock's The Birds (1963) had a more modern backdrop; it was a prime example of a menace stemming from nature gone mad and one of the first American examples of the horror-of-Armageddon sub-genre. One of the most influential horror films of the late 1960s was George Romero's Night of the Living Dead (1968). This horror-of-Armageddon film about zombies was later deemed "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" enough to be preserved by the United States National Film Registry. Blending psychological insights with gore, it moved the genre even further away from the gothic horror trends of earlier eras and brought horror into everyday life. [12] The Birds is a 1963 horror film by Alfred Hitchcock, loosely based on the short story The Birds by Daphne du Maurier. ... George A. Romero (born 4 February 1940) is an American director, writer, editor, actor and composer. ... This article is about the 1968 film directed by George A. Romero. ... This article is about the living dead. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...


Low-budget gore-shock films from the likes of Herschell Gordon Lewis also appeared. Examples included 1963's Blood Feast (a devil-cult story) and 1964's Two Thousand Maniacs (a ghost town run by the shades of Southerners), which featured splattering blood and bodily dismemberment. Poster art for Blood Feast (1963) A splatter film or gore film is a type of horror film that deliberately focuses on graphic portrayals of gore and graphic violence. ... Herschell Gordon Lewis (born 15 June 1926, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA) is a film-maker best known for creating the splatter film subgenre of horror. ... Blood Feast, a 1963 film directed by Herschell Gordon Lewis, is an American exploitation film often considered the first gore or splatter film. ... This is an overview of the Devil. ... Two Thousand Maniacs! (alternative spelling 2,000 Maniacs!) is a low budget 1964 horror splatter film directed and written by Herschell Gordon Lewis. ... For other uses, see Ghost town (disambiguation). ... Historic Southern United States. ... Dismemberment is the act of cutting, tearing, pulling, wrenching or otherwise removing, the limbs of a living thing. ...


1970s

Regan MacNeil, portrayed by Linda Blair in The Exorcist.
Regan MacNeil, portrayed by Linda Blair in The Exorcist.

With the demise of the Production Code of America in 1964, and the financial successes of the low-budget gore films churned out in the ensuing years, plus an increasing public fascination with the occult, the genre was able to be reshaped by a series of intense, often gory horror movies with sexual overtones, made as "A-movies" (as opposed to "B-movies").[citation needed] Some of these films were made by respected auteurs. [13] [14] The critical and popular success of Rosemary's Baby (1968) prompted the 1970s occult explosion, which included the box office smash The Exorcist (1973) (directed by William Friedkin and written by William Peter Blatty, who also wrote the novel), and scores of other horror films in which the Devil became the supernatural evil, often by impregnating women or possessing children. "Evil children" and reincarnation became popular subjects (as in Robert Wise's 1977 film Audrey Rose, which dealt with a man who claims his daughter is the reincarnation of another dead person). Alice, Sweet Alice (1976), is another Catholic themed horror slasher about a little girl's murder and her sister being the prime suspect. Another popular Satanic horror movie was The Omen (1976), where a man realizes his five year old adopted son is the Antichrist. Being by doctrine invincible to solely human intervention, Satan-villained films also cemented the relationship between horror film, postmodern style and a dystopian worldview. Another notable example is The Sentinel, which is not to be confused with the Michael Douglas/Kiefer Sutherland film of the same name, as a fashion model discovers her new brownstone residence may actually be a portal to Hell. The movie is most notable for having a mix of seasoned actors like Ava Gardner, Burgess Meredith and Eli Wallach alongside future stars Christopher Walken and Jeff Goldblum. Image File history File links Exorcist-regan. ... Image File history File links Exorcist-regan. ... Linda Denise Blair (born January 22, 1959 in St. ... The Exorcist is an Academy Award-winning 1973 American horror film, adapted from the 1971 novel of the same name by William Peter Blatty, dealing with the demonic possession of a young girl, and her mother’s desperate attempts to win back her daughter through an exorcism conducted by two... The Production Code (also known as the Hays Code) was a set of industry guidelines governing the production of American motion pictures. ... For other uses, see Occult (disambiguation). ... The term B-movie originally referred to a film designed to be distributed as the lower half of a double feature, often a genre film featuring cowboys, gangsters or vampires. ... The term auteur (French for author) is used to describe film directors (or, more rarely, producers or writers) who are considered to have a distinctive, recognizable vision, because they (a) repeatedly return to the same subject matter, (b) habitually address a particular psychological or moral theme, (c) employ a recurring... The Exorcist is an Academy Award-winning 1973 American horror film, adapted from the 1971 novel of the same name by William Peter Blatty, dealing with the demonic possession of a young girl, and her mother’s desperate attempts to win back her daughter through an exorcism conducted by two... William Friedkin (born August 29, 1935 in Chicago, Illinois) is an Academy Award-winning American movie and television director, producer and screenwriter best known for directing The Exorcist and The French Connection in the early 1970s. ... William Peter Blatty (born January 7, 1928) is an American writer. ... The Exorcist is a horror novel written by William Peter Blatty first published in 1971. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... This article is about the theological concept. ... Robert Wise (September 10, 1914 – September 14, 2005) was a sound effects editor, film editor, and Academy Award-winning American film producer and director. ... Audrey Rose DVD cover Audrey Rose is a 1977 thriller directed by Robert Wise. ... Alice, Sweet Alice (aka Communion) is a 1976 horror/slasher which featured Brooke Shields in her first movie. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... In Christian eschatology, the Antichrist or anti-Christ means a person, office, or group recognized as fulfilling the Biblical prophecies about one who will oppose Christ and substitute himself in Christs place. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Postmodernism (sometimes abbreviated Po-mo[1]) is a term originating in architecture, literally after the modern, denoting a style that is more ornamental than modernism, and which borrows from previous architectural styles, often in a playful or ironic fashion. ... A dystopia (or alternatively cacotopia) is a fictional society, usually portrayed as existing in a future time, when the conditions of life are extremely bad due to deprivation, oppression, or terror. ... The Sentinel is a 1977 horror film starring Chris Sarandon & Cristina Raines. ... For other people bearing this name, see Michael Douglas (disambiguation) Michael Kirk Douglas (born September 25, 1944) is an American actor and producer, primarily in movies and television. ... Kiefer William Frederick Dempsey George Rufus Sutherland (born December 21, 1966) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe Award-winning British actor, well known for his lead role of Jack Bauer on the television series 24. ... This article is about the theological or philosophical afterlife. ... Ava Lavinia Gardner (December 24, 1922 – January 25, 1990) was an Academy Award-nominated American actress. ... Oliver Burgess Meredith (November 16, 1907[1] – September 9, 1997) was a versatile two-time Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Eli Herschel Wallach (born December 7, 1915) is an American film, TV and stage actor. ... Christopher Walken (born March 31, 1943) is an Academy Award-winning American film and theatre actor. ... Jeffrey Lynn Goldblum (born October 22, 1952) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ...


The ideas of the 1960s began to influence horror films, as the youth involved in the counterculture began exploring the medium. Wes Craven's The Last House on the Left (1972) and Tobe Hooper's The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) both recalled the horrors of the Vietnam war and pushed boundaries to the edge; George Romero satirised the consumer society in his 1978 zombie sequel, Dawn of the Dead; Canadian director David Cronenberg updated the "mad scientist" movie subgenre by exploring contemporary fears about technology and society, and reinventing "body horror", starting with Shivers (1975). [15] // The counterculture of the 1960s was a social revolution between the period of 1960 and 1973[1] that began in the United States as a reaction against the conservative social norms of the 1950s, the political conservatism (and perceived social repression) of the Cold War period, and the US government... Wesley Earl Craven (born August 2, 1939 in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American film director and writer best known as the creator of many horror films, including the famed Nightmare on Elm Street series featuring the redoubtable Freddy Krueger character. ... The Last House on the Left is a 1972 horror film written and directed by Wes Craven and produced by Sean S. Cunningham. ... Tobe Hooper (born Tobias Paul Hooper on January 25, 1943) is an American television and film director best known for his work in the horror film genre, including Lifeforce, Poltergeist, Toolbox Murders and the cult classic The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974). ... This article is about the 1974 film. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... George A. Romero (born 4 February 1940) is an American director, writer, editor, actor and composer. ... Consumers refers to individuals or households that use goods and services generated within the economy. ... For other uses, see Sequel (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... David Paul Cronenberg OC, FRSC (born March 15, 1943[2]) is a Canadian film director and occasional actor. ... They LAUGHED at my theories at the institute! Fools! Ill destroy them all! Caucasian, male, aging, crooked teeth, messy hair, lab coat, spectacles/goggles, dramatic posing — one popular stereotype of mad scientist. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Shivers (also known as The Parasite Murders, or They Came from Within) is a 1975 Canadian horror film written and directed by David Cronenberg. ...


Also in the 1970s, horror author Stephen King, a child of the 1960s, first arrived on the film scene. Many of his books were adapted for the screen, beginning with Brian DePalma's adaptation of King's first published novel, Carrie (1976), which went on to be nominated for Academy Awards—although it has often been noted that its appeal was more for its psychological exploration as for its capacity to scare. John Carpenter, who had previously directed the stoner comedy Dark Star (1974) and the Howard Hawks-inspired action film Assault on Precinct 13 (1976), created the hit Halloween (1978), kick-starting the modern "slasher film". This subgenre would be mined by dozens of increasingly violent movies throughout the subsequent decades, and Halloween has also become one of the most successful independent films ever made. Other notable '70s slasher films include Bob Clark's Black Christmas (1974), which had came out before Halloween, and was another start of the sub-genre. For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... Brian De Palma (born September 11, 1940 in Newark, New Jersey) is an American film director. ... Carrie is a 1976 American horror film directed by Brian De Palma based on the novel by Stephen King, with a screenplay written by Lawrence D. Cohen. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... For other persons named John Carpenter, see John Carpenter (disambiguation). ... A stoner film (or stoner movie) is colloquial term referring to a subgenre of movies depicting the use and/or the users of marijuana. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ... Howard Winchester Hawks (May 30, 1896 – December 26, 1977) was an American film director, producer and writer of the classic Hollywood era. ... Look up Action film in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Assault on Precinct 13 is a 1976 action / thriller movie, directed by John Carpenter. ... Halloween (film) redirects here. ... The original 1974 Black Christmas is considered the first authentic slasher. ... The original 1974 Black Christmas is considered the first authentic slasher. ... Benjamin Bob Clark (August 5, 1941[1] – April 4, 2007) was an American director known for the 1982 hit film Porkys and its sequel Porkys II: The Next Day. ... Black Christmas is a 1974 Canadian horror film, directed by Bob Clark. ... Halloween (film) redirects here. ...


In 1975, Steven Spielberg began his ascension to fame with Jaws, a film notable for not only its expertly crafted horror elements but also for its success at the box office. The film kicked off a wave of killer animal stories such as Orca, and Up From The Depths. The 1978 comedy film Piranha, directed by Joe Dante, is a spoof of such films. Jaws is often credited as being one of the first films to use traditionally B-movie elements such as horror and mild gore in a big-budget Hollywood film. Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director, producer and screenwriter. ... Jaws is a 1975 thriller/horror film directed by Steven Spielberg, based on Peter Benchleys best-selling novel inspired by the Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916. ... Orca is a 1977 horror film directed by Michael Anderson and produced by Dino De Laurentiis and starring Richard Harris and Charlotte Rampling. ... This is a list of comedy horror films: // 1923 Puritan Passions 1925 The Monster Dr. Pyckle and Mr. ... For the 1995 remake, see Piranha (1995 film). ... Joe Dante (born November 28, 1946 in Morristown, New Jersey) is an American film director and producer of films generally with humorous and scifi content. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... The term B-movie originally referred to a film designed to be distributed as the lower half of a double feature, often a genre film featuring cowboys, gangsters or vampires. ...


1979's Alien combined the naturalistic acting and graphic violence of the 1970s with the monster movie plots of earlier decades, and re-acquainted horror with science fiction. It spawned a long-lasting franchise, and countless imitators. This article is about the first film in a series. ... Science fiction film is a film genre that uses speculative, science-based depictions of imaginary phenomena such as extra-terrestrial lifeforms, alien worlds, and time travel, often along with technological elements such as futuristic spacecraft, robots, or other technologies. ...


At the same time, there was an explosion of horror films in Europe, particularly from the hands of Italian filmmakers like Mario Bava, Dario Argento and Lucio Fulci, and Spanish filmmakers like Jacinto Molina (aka Paul Naschy) and Jess Franco, which were dubbed into English and filled drive-in theaters that could not necessarily afford the expensive rental contracts of the major producers. These films were influenced by the success of Hammer in the 1960s and early '70s, and generally featured traditional horror subjects - e.g. vampires, werewolves, psycho-killers, demons, zombies - but treated them with a distinctive European style that included copious gore and sexuality (of which mainstream American producers overall were still a little skittish). Notable national outputs were the "giallo" films from Italy and the Jean Rollin romantic/erotic films from France. [16] For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The history of Italian cinema began just a few months after the Lumière brothers had discovered the medium, when Pope Leo XIII was filmed for a few seconds in the act of blessing the camera. ... Mario Bava (July 30, 1914 - April 25, 1980) was an Italian director and cinematographer remembered as one of the greatest names from the golden age of Italian horror films. ... Dario Argento (born September 7, 1940) is an Italian film director, producer and screenwriter. ... German gore director Andreas Schnaas (left) and the late Lucio Fulci (right) at the 1994 Eurofest, London, England Lucio Fulci (June 17, 1927 - March 13, 1996) was an Italian film director, screenwriter, and actor. ... The art of motion-picture making within the nation of Spain or by Spanish filmmakers abroad is collectively known as Spanish Cinema. ... Paul Naschy, from his real name Jacinto Molina, is a Spanish movie actor and screenwriter. ... Jesus (or Jess) Franco (born May 12, 1930 as Jesús Franco Manera) is a Spanish film director, writer, cinematographer and actor. ... Hulls Drive In Theatre, outside Lexington, Virginia A drive-in theater is a form of cinema structure consisting of a large screen, a projection booth, a concession stand and a large parking area for automobiles. ... Further reading Christopher Frayling - Vampyres: Lord Byron to Count Dracula 1992. ... A werewolf in folklore and mythology is a person who changes into a wolf, either by purposefully using magic in some manner or by being placed under a curse. ... Serial killers are individuals who have a history of multiple slayings of victims who were usually unknown to them beforehand. ... The demon Satan In folklore, mythology, and religion, a demon is a supernatural being that is generally described as an evil spirit, but is also depicted to be good in some instances. ... For other uses see Zombie (disambiguation) A zombie is a kind of undead, or figuratively, a very apathetic person. ... A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ... S.S. Van Dines The Benson Murder Case, the first giallo ever published (1929). ... Jean Rollin on the set of La Vampire nue, 1969. ...


Meanwhile, in Hong Kong, filmmakers were starting to be inspired by Hammer and Euro-horror to produce exploitation horror with a uniquely Asian twist. Shaw Studios produced Legend of the Seven Golden Vampires (1973) in collaboration with Hammer, and went on to create their own original films. The genre boomed at the start of the 1980s, with Sammo Hung's Close Encounters of the Spooky Kind (1981) launching the sub-genre of "kung-fu comedy horror", a sub-genre prominently featuring hopping corpses and tempting ghostly females known as fox spirits (or kitsune), of which the best known examples were Mr. Vampire (1985) and A Chinese Ghost Story (1987). [17] But Hammer Film Productions would stop making movies in the 1970s as the demand for slasher films increased, following the success of The Texas Chain Saw Massacre and Halloween, among others. The Shaw Studio (邵氏片場), owned by Shaw Brothers (HK) Ltd. ... Sammo Hung Kam-Bo (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Cantonese: Hung4 Gam1 Bou2) (born January 7, 1952, Hong Kong) is a Chinese actor, producer and director known for his work in many kung fu films and Hong Kong action cinema. ... In popular Chinese mythology, hopping corpses (Traditional Chinese: 僵屍 or 殭屍; Simplified Chinese: 僵尸; Pinyin: JiāngshÄ«; literally stiff corpses) are reanimated corpses that hop around, killing living creatures to absorb life essence (qi) from their victims. ... nine-tailed fox, from the Qing edition of the Shan Hai Jing Fox spirits (狐狸精 hÇ”lijÄ«ng) in Chinese mythology are spirits of a fox type that are akin to European faeries, demons, or to the Japanese yōkai known as kitsune (Kumiho in Korean mythology). ... Mr Vampire, aka Geungsi Sinsang (Chinese: 殭屍先生 JiāngshÄ« Xiānsheng) is Ricky Laus 1985 highly acclaimed film in Hong Kong action cinema. ... A Chinese Ghost Story (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chien-nü Yu-hun, literal meaning: The Ethereal Spirit of a Beauty) is a 1987 Hong Kong movie starring Leslie Cheung, Joey Wong and Wu Ma, directed by Ching Siu-tung and produced by Tsui Hark. ... New company logo as introduced in May 2007 A poster for Dracula: Prince of Darkness (1966). ... This article is about the 1974 film. ... Halloween (film) redirects here. ...


1980s

Freddy Krueger played by Robert Englund.
Freddy Krueger played by Robert Englund.

The 1980s were marked by the growing popularity of horror movie sequels. 1982's Poltergeist (directed by Tobe Hooper) was followed by two sequels and a television series. The seemingly-endless sequels to Halloween, Friday the 13th (1980), and Wes Craven's successful supernatural slasher A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) were the popular face of horror films in the 1980s, a trend reviled by most critics. Another popular horror film of the '80s, Stephen King and George A. Romero's Creepshow, spawned two generally-considered 'lesser' sequels in 1987 & 1990 respectively, Creepshow 2 and Tales from the Darkside: The Movie (aka. Creepshow 3) as did The Evil Dead (1981). Image File history File links Size of this preview: 448 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (475 × 636 pixel, file size: 405 KB, MIME type: image/png) Production still of actor Robert Englund as Freddy Krueger from A Nightmare on Elm Street. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 448 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (475 × 636 pixel, file size: 405 KB, MIME type: image/png) Production still of actor Robert Englund as Freddy Krueger from A Nightmare on Elm Street. ... Robert Barton Englund (born June 6th, 1949), is an American actor from Glendale, California. ... The Poltergeist movies are a trilogy of horror films produced in the 1980s. ... Tobe Hooper (born Tobias Paul Hooper on January 25, 1943) is an American television and film director best known for his work in the horror film genre, including Lifeforce, Poltergeist, Toolbox Murders and the cult classic The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974). ... Halloween (film) redirects here. ... Friday the 13th is a 1980 independent slasher film directed by Sean S. Cunningham and written by Victor Miller. ... A Nightmare on Elm Street is a 1984 American horror film directed and written by Wes Craven. ... For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... George Andrew Romero (born February 4, 1940) is an American director, writer, editor and actor. ... Creepshow is a classic 1982 anthology horror movie directed by George A. Romero (of Night of the Living Dead and Dawn of the Dead fame), and written by Stephen King (The Shining, Misery, The Stand). ... Creepshow 2 is a 1987 horror anthology film directed by Michael Gornick (who was George A. Romeros cinematographer on the original Creepshow). ... Tales from the Darkside is an anthology TV series from the 1980s produced by George A. Romero. ... Creepshow 3 is the second sequel to Stephen King & George A. Romeros 1982 horror classic, Creepshow. The film consists of five new tales of horror: Alice, Rachel the Call Girl, The Radio, The Haunted Dog & Professor Daytons Wife. The film is slated for a late 2006 straight-to... For other uses, see The Evil Dead (disambiguation). ...


Nevertheless, original horror films continued to appear sporadically: Clive Barker's Hellraiser (1987) and Tom Holland's Child's Play (1988) were both praised by some, although their success again launched multiple sequels, which were considered inferior by fans and critics alike. Also released in 1980 was Stanley Kubrick's austere adaptation of the Stephen King supernatural thriller The Shining which became one of the most popular and influential horror films of the decade.[citation needed] For the South African football (soccer) coach, see Clive Barker (soccer). ... For other topics with similar names, see Hellraiser (disambiguation). ... Tom Holland was born on July 11th, 1943 in Phoughkeepsie, New York, USA. He has directed five movies including: Childs Play Fright Night External Links Tom Holland at the Internet Movie Database Categories: Movie stubs ... For other uses, see Childs Play (disambiguation). ... Kubrick redirects here. ... For other uses of this term, see Shining. ...


As the cinema box office returns for serious, gory modern horror began to dwindle (as exemplified by John Carpenter's The Thing in 1982), the genre found a new audience in the growing home video market, although the new generation of films was less sombre in tone. Motel Hell (1980) and Frank Henenlotter's Basket Case (1982) were among the first 1980s films to campily mock the dark conventions of the previous decade (zombie films like Night of the Living Dead and Dawn of the Dead had contained black comedy and satire, but were in general more dark than funny). David Cronenberg's graphic and gory remake of The Fly, was released in 1986, about a few weeks from the James Cameron film Aliens, Stuart Gordon's Re-Animator, Dan O'Bannon's The Return of the Living Dead, and Lloyd Kaufman's The Toxic Avenger (all 1985), soon followed. In Evil Dead II (1987), Sam Raimi's explicitly slapstick sequel to the relatively sober The Evil Dead (1981), the laughs were often generated by the gore, defining the archetypal splatter comedy. New Zealand director Peter Jackson followed in Raimi's footsteps with the ultra-gory micro-budget feature Bad Taste (1987). The same year, from Germany's Jörg Buttgereit, came Nekromantik, a disturbing film about the life and death of a necrophiliac. The term box office can refer to either: A place where tickets are sold to the public for admission to a venue The amount of business a particular production, such as a movie or theatre show, does. ... The Thing is a 1982 science fiction film directed by John Carpenter, written by Bill Lancaster and stars Kurt Russell. ... The home video business rents and sells videocassettes and DVDs to the public. ... Motel Hell is a 1980 horror/comedy film directed by Kevin Connor and starring Rory Calhoun as farmer, butcher, and meat entrepreneur Vincent Smith. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Basket Case is a 1982 horror comedy directed and written by Frank Henenlotter. ... This article is about the 1968 film directed by George A. Romero. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the tone of comedy. ... 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... David Paul Cronenberg OC, FRSC (born March 15, 1943[2]) is a Canadian film director and occasional actor. ... The Fly is a 1986 science fiction/horror/romantic tragedy film produced by Brooksfilms and 20th Century Fox, directed by David Cronenberg, and starring Jeff Goldblum, Geena Davis and John Getz. ... For other persons named James Cameron, see James Cameron (disambiguation). ... Aliens is a 1986 science fiction movie directed by James Cameron and starring Sigourney Weaver, Michael Biehn, Lance Henriksen, Carrie Henn, Bill Paxton and Paul Reiser. ... // Biography Stuart Gordon (born August 11, 1947) in Chicago, Illinois) is a director, writer and producer of films. ... Re-Animator (1985) is the first in a series of films based on the H.P. Lovecraft story Herbert West: Reanimator. ... Dan OBannon (born Daniel Thomas OBannon on September 30, 1946 in St. ... This article is about the film. ... Lloyd Kaufman Lloyd Kaufman is an American film director, producer, and documentarian. ... The Toxic Avenger, first released in late 1985, is the most famous movie made by Troma Entertainment, known for producing low budget B-movies with campy concepts. ... Evil Dead II (also known as Evil Dead 2: Dead by Dawn or The Sequel to the Ultimate Experience in Grueling Terror) is an American horror film, released in 1987 . ... For the American opera singer, see Samuel Ramey. ... For other uses, see Slapstick (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see The Evil Dead (disambiguation). ... Poster art for Blood Feast (1963) A splatter film or gore film is a type of horror film that deliberately focuses on graphic portrayals of gore and graphic violence. ... For other persons named Peter Jackson, see Peter Jackson (disambiguation). ... Bad Taste is a low-budget 1987 cult film, one of the first directed by Peter Jackson, in which aliens invade the fictional New Zealand village of Kaihoro (population 78) in order to harvest human beings for their intergalactic fast food franchise but are repelled by a four-man paramilitary... Jörg Buttgereit (born December 20, 1963) is a German writer/director known for his controversial films. ... NEKRomantik is a 1987 German horror film directed by Jörg Buttgereit. ...


Horror films continued to cause controversy: in the United Kingdom, the growth in home video led to growing public awareness of horror films of the types described above, and concern about the ease of availability of such material to children. Many films were dubbed "video nasties" and banned (notably foreign films such as The Anthropophagus Beast, A Blade in the Dark, The New York Ripper and Tenebre but US and Canadian films like Madman, Nightmares in a Damaged Brain, Don't Go in the House & Maniac). In the USA, Silent Night, Deadly Night, a very controversial film from 1984, failed at theatres and was eventually withdrawn from distribution due to its subject matter: a killer Santa Claus. Video nasty was a term coined in the United Kingdom in the 1980s that originally applied to a number of films distributed on video cassette that were criticised for their violent content by elements in the press and commentators such as Mary Whitehouse. ... The Anthropophagus Beast is a 1980 Italian language horror film, directed by Joe dAmato and co-written by dAmato and George Eastman, who also starred in the film. ... The New York Ripper is a 1982 film directed and co-written by Lucio Fulci. ... Tenebrae (also known as Tenebre) is a 1982 Italian horror thriller film written and directed by Dario Argento. ... Madman (also known as Madman Marz and The Legend Lives) is a 1982 horror film similar in style and feel to Friday the 13th. ... Nightmare/Nightmares in a Damaged Brain (also known as Blood Splash) is Psychological horror/Mystery/Splatter/Exploitation film directed by Romano Scavolini that has been branded a video nasty is can only be purchased in the UK, USA or Canada in edited format (concerning alterations in the three deaths involving... Dont Go in the House (also known as Pyromaniac in France) is low budget Psychological horror/Horror-of-personality/Supernatural horror/Splatter/Exploitation/Slasher (which emulated Psycho) that gained notoriety as a video nasty (and is still banned in some countries even today). ... Maniac is an American slasher film, about a disturbed and traumatized serial killer who scalps his victims. ... Silent Night, Deadly Night is a slasher film that was released in 1984 and starred Robert Brian Wilson, Lilyan Chauvin, Gilmer McCormick, Toni Nero, Britt Leach and Leo Geter. ... A typical depiction of Santa Claus. ...


1990s

Scream (1996) revitalized horror of the 1990s and 2000s.
Scream (1996) revitalized horror of the 1990s and 2000s.

In the first half of the 1990s, the genre continued many of the themes from the 1980s. Sequels from the Child's Play and Leprechaun series enjoyed some commercial success. The slasher films A Nightmare on Elm Street, Friday the 13th, and Halloween all saw sequels in the 1990s, most of which met with varied amounts of success at the box office, but all were panned by fans and critics, with the exception of Wes Craven's New Nightmare. Image File history File links Scream promotional poster This is a copyrighted poster. ... Image File history File links Scream promotional poster This is a copyrighted poster. ... Scream is a 1996 horror film, directed by Wes Craven and written by Kevin Williamson. ... For other uses, see Childs Play (disambiguation). ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ...


New Nightmare, with In the Mouth of Madness, The Dark Half, and Candyman, were part of a mini-movement of self-reflective horror films. Each film touched upon the relationship between fictional horror and real-world horror. Candyman, for example, examined the link between an invented urban legend and the realistic horror of the racism that produced its villain. In the Mouth of Madness took a more literal approach, as its protagonist actually hopped from the real world into a novel created by the madman he was hired to track down. This reflective style became more overt and ironic with the arrival of Scream. Wes Cravens New Nightmare (1994) is the seventh entry in the Nightmare on Elm Street series of slasher films. ... In the Mouth of Madness (also known as John Carpenters In the Mouth of Madness) is a 1995 horror film (originally intended for a 1994 release) directed by John Carpenter and written by Michael de Luca, who was at the time in charge of New Line Cinema. ... The Dark Half is a 1993 horror film adaptation of the Stephen King novel of the same name. ... Candyman is a 1992 slasher film movie starring Virginia Madsen, Tony Todd and Xander Berkeley. ...


In 1994's Interview With the Vampire, the "Theatre de Vampires" (and the film itself, to some degree) envoked the Grand Guignol style, perhaps to further remove the undead performers from humanity, morality and class. The horror movie soon continued its search for new and effective frights. In 1985's novel The Vampire Lestat by author Anne Rice (who penned Interview...'s screenplay and the 1976 novel of the same name) suggests that its antihero Lestat inspired and nurtured the Grand Guignol style and theatre. Interview with the Vampire is a vampire novel by Anne Rice written in 1973 and published in 1976. ... Promotional poster for a Grand Guignol performance This article is about the Paris theatre. ... The Vampire Lestat (1985) is a novel by Anne Rice, and the second in her Vampire Chronicles, following Interview with the Vampire. ... Anne Rice (born on October 4, 1941) is a best-selling American author of gothic and later religious themed books. ... Promotional poster for a Grand Guignol performance This article is about the Paris theatre. ...


The Canadian film Cube (1997) was perhaps one of the few horror films of the 1990s to be based around a relatively novel concept; it was able to evoke a wide range of different fears, and touched upon a variety of social themes (such as fear of bureaucracy) that had previously been unexplored. The cinema of Canada has produced many people who have made an impact in the cinema of the world, despite the small scale of the Canadian film industry. ... For the 1969 film by Jim Henson, see The Cube. ... This article is about the sociological concept. ...


Two main problems pushed horror backward during this period: firstly, the horror genre wore itself out with the proliferation of nonstop slasher and gore films in the eighties. Secondly, the adolescent audience which feasted on the blood and morbidity of the previous decade grew up, and the replacement audience for films of an imaginative nature were being captured instead by the explosion of science-fiction and fantasy, courtesy of the special effects possibilities with computer-generated imagery. [18] Science fiction film is a film genre that uses speculative, science-based depictions of imaginary phenomena such as extra-terrestrial lifeforms, alien worlds, and time travel, often along with technological elements such as futuristic spacecraft, robots, or other technologies. ... Computer-generated imagery[1] (also known as CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics or, more specifically, 3D computer graphics to special effects in films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally, and printed media. ...


To re-connect with its audience, horror became more self-mockingly ironic and outright parodic, especially in the latter half of the 1990s. Peter Jackson's Braindead (1992) (known as Dead Alive in the USA) took the splatter film to ridiculous excesses for comic effect. Francis Ford Coppola's Bram Stoker's Dracula (1992), featured an ensemble cast and the style of a different era, harking back to the sumptuous look of 1960s Hammer Horror, and a plot focusing just as closely on the romance elements of the Dracula tale as on the horror aspects. Wes Craven's Scream (written by Kevin Williamson) movies, starting in 1996, featured teenagers who were fully aware of, and often made reference to, the history of horror movies, and mixed ironic humour with the shocks. Along with I Know What You Did Last Summer (written by Kevin Williamson as well) and Urban Legend, they re-ignited the dormant slasher film genre. Ironic redirects here. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... Braindead (New Zealand 1992), released as Dead Alive in North America, is an extreme zombie horror-comedy directed by Peter Jackson. ... Poster art for Blood Feast (1963) A splatter film or gore film is a type of horror film that deliberately focuses on graphic portrayals of gore and graphic violence. ... Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is a five-time Academy Award winning American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... Bram Stokers Dracula is a 1992 horror romance film produced and directed by Francis Ford Coppola, based on the novel Dracula by Bram Stoker. ... Hammer horror refers to a series of gothic horror films produced from the late 1950s until the 1970s by the British film production company Hammer Film Productions Ltd. ... Scream is a 1996 horror film, directed by Wes Craven and written by Kevin Williamson. ... I Know What You Did Last Summer is an Award-winning 1997 horror film. ... Urban Legend is a 1998 horror film starring Alicia Witt, Jared Leto, Rebecca Gayheart, Robert Englund, Tara Reid, Joshua Jackson, Natasha Gregson Wagner, Michael Rosenbaum, Danielle Harris, John Neville, and Loretta Devine. ... The original 1974 Black Christmas is considered the first authentic slasher. ...


Among the popular English-language horror films of the late 1990s, only 1999's surprise independent hit The Blair Witch Project attempted straight-ahead scares. But even then, the horror was accomplished in the context of a mockumentary, or mock-documentary. Other films such as M. Night Shyamalan's The Sixth Sense (1999) also concentrated more on unnerving and unsettling themes than on gore. Japanese horror films, such as Hideo Nakata's Ringu in 1998, and Masuru Tsushima's Otsuyu (aka The Haunted Lantern) (1997) also found success internationally with a similar formula. The Blair Witch Project is a low-budget American horror film released in 1999. ... Mockumentary (also known as a pseudo-documentary)[1], a portmanteau of mock and documentary, is a film and TV genre, or a single work of the genre. ... Manoj Nelliattu Shyamalan (born August 6, 1970), known professionally as M. Night Shyamalan, //, is an Academy Award nominated screenwriter and director, who also performs smaller roles in his own movies. ... For the ability sometimes referred to as sixth sense, see Extra-sensory perception. ... Poster for Dark Water J-Horror is a term used to refer to Japanese contributions to horror fiction in popular culture. ... Hideo Nakata (中田秀夫 Nakata Hideo, born July 19, 1961, in Okayama, Japan) is a Japanese film director. ... Ring ) is a 1998 Japanese horror mystery film from director Hideo Nakata, adapted from a novel of the same name by Koji Suzuki. ...


2000s

Poster art for Saw (2004), an enormously popular low-budget horror film that sparked a wave of horror films with a greater emphasis on torture and gore.
Poster art for Saw (2004), an enormously popular low-budget horror film that sparked a wave of horror films with a greater emphasis on torture and gore.

The start of the 2000s saw a quiet period for the genre. The re-release of a restored version of The Exorcist in September of 2000 was successful despite the film having been available on home video for years. Franchises such as Freddy Vs. Jason also made a final stand in theaters. Final Destination (2000) marked a successful revival of clever, teen-centered horror, and spawned three sequels. Promotional poster for Saw, deemed This work is copyrighted. ... Saw is a 2004 horror film, and the first installment of the Saw film series. ... The Exorcist is an Academy Award-winning 1973 American horror film, adapted from the 1971 novel of the same name by William Peter Blatty, dealing with the demonic possession of a young girl, and her mother’s desperate attempts to win back her daughter through an exorcism conducted by two... Freddy vs. ... Final Destination is a 2000 horror film about a group of teenagers who cheat death by avoiding a plane crash when one has a premonition of their deaths, but soon after, they begin dying one by one in mysterious freak accidents. ...


Some notable trends have marked horror films in the 2000s. A French horror film Brotherhood of the Wolf became the second-highest-grossing French-language film in the United States in the last two decades. A minimalist approach which was equal parts Val Lewton's theory of "less is more" (usually employing low-budget techniques seen on 1999's The Blair Witch Project) has been evident, particularly in the emergence of Asian horror movies which have been remade into successful Americanized versions, such as The Ring (2002), The Grudge (2004), One Missed Call (2008), The Eye (2008), Shutter (2008) and The Uninvited (2009). This article is about a French film. ... French (français, pronounced ) is today spoken by about 350 million people around the world as either a native or a second language,[7] with significant populations in 54 countries. ... The Blair Witch Project is a low-budget American horror film released in 1999. ... “The Ring” redirects here. ... The Grudge is the 2004 American remake of the Japanese film Ju-on: The Grudge. ... One Missed Call is the 2008 American remake of the Japanese film Chakushin Ari. ... The Eye is an upcoming film starring Jessica Alba. ... Shutter is a 2008 remake of a 2004 film Shutter. ...


There has been a minor return to the zombie genre in horror movies made after 2000. The Resident Evil video game franchise was adapted into a film released in March of 2002. Two sequels have followed. The British film 28 Days Later (2002) featured an update on the genre with a new style of aggressive zombie. The film later spawned a sequel: 28 Weeks Later. An updated remake of Dawn of the Dead (2004) soon appeared as well as Land of the Dead (2005) and the comedy-horror Shaun of the Dead (2004). More recently the popular video game franchise Silent Hill (2006) was made into a feature film, based on an original story. Resident Evil (known in Japan as Biohazard )) is a survival horror video game series and media franchise consisting of comic books, novelizations, three Hollywood motion pictures, and a variety of collectibles, including action figures, strategy guides and publications. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... i eat poop alot A media franchise is an intellectual property involving the characters, setting, and trademarks of an original work of media (usually a work of fiction), such as a film, a work of literature, a television program, or a video game. ... Resident Evil is a 2002 science fiction horror film loosely based on the Resident Evil series of survival horror games developed by Capcom. ... 28 Days Later is a 2002 British post-apocalyptic science fiction horror film directed by Danny Boyle and starring Cillian Murphy, Naomie Harris and Christopher Eccleston. ... 28 Weeks Later is a 2007 British post-apocalyptic science fiction horror film, and sequel to the 2002 film 28 Days Later. ... Dawn of the Dead is a 2004 horror film reimagining of George A. Romeros 1978 film of the same name. ... For the remake, see Dawn of the Dead (2004 film) For the song by Schoolyard Heroes, see The Funeral Sciences Dawn of the Dead (also known as George A. Romeros Dawn of the Dead, and Zombi internationally) is a 1978 American independent horror film, written and directed by George... Land of the Dead (also known as George A. Romeros Land of the Dead) is the fourth in George A. Romeros Dead Series started by Night of the Living Dead, which continued with the sequels Dawn of the Dead and Day of the Dead. ... This is a list of comedy horror films: // 1923 Puritan Passions 1925 The Monster Dr. Pyckle and Mr. ... Shaun of the Dead is a zombie-themed romantic comedy (or rom zom com as it dubs itself) or zombie comedy released in 2004. ... This article is about the video game franchise. ...


A larger trend is a return to the extreme, graphic violence that characterized much of the type of low-budget, exploitation horror from the Seventies and the post-Vietnam years. Films like Audition (1999), Wrong Turn (2003), House of 1000 Corpses (2003), The Devil's Rejects and the Australian film Wolf Creek (2005), took their cues from The Last House on the Left (1972), The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974), and The Hills Have Eyes (1977). The latter two have also been remade: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre in 2003, and The Hills Have Eyes in 2006 both followed by a prequel in the same year and a sequel in the following year. An extension of this trend was the emergence of a type of horror with emphasis on depictions of torture, suffering and violent deaths, (variously referred to as "horror porn", "torture porn", Splatterporn, and even "gore-nography") with films such as FeardotCom, Turistas, Captivity, and most recently Untraceable, WΔZ, Saw, Hostel, Pathology and their respective sequels in particular being frequently singled out as examples of emergence of this sub-genre. Audition (オーディション; ÅŒdishon) is a 1999 film directed by Takashi Miike based on a Ryu Murakami novel of the same title, starring Ryo Ishibashi and Eihi Shiina. ... Wrong Turn is a 2003 horror film, directed by Rob Schmidt and written by Alan B. McElroy. ... For the song of the same name, see House of 1000 Corpses (song) House of 1000 Corpses is a 2003 horror film written and directed by Rob Zombie, and is his directoral debut as a filmmaker. ... The Devils Rejects is a 2005 horror film written and directed by Rob Zombie. ... Ned Kelly depicted in the first ever feature-length narrative film The cinema of Australia has a long history and has produced many internationally-recognized films, actors and filmmakers. ... Wolf Creek is a 2005 Australian horror film, written, co-produced and directed by Greg McLean. ... The Last House on the Left is a 1972 horror film written and directed by Wes Craven and produced by Sean S. Cunningham. ... This article is about the 1974 film. ... The Hills Have Eyes may refer to: The Hills Have Eyes Series The Hills Have Eyes (1977 film), a 1977 film by Wes Craven The Hills Have Eyes Part II, the 1985 sequel The Hills Have Eyes III, the 1995 sequel, also known as The Outpost and Mindripper The Hills... The Texas Chainsaw Massacre is a horror film, and a re-imagining of the 1974 film The Texas Chain Saw Massacre. ... The Hills Have Eyes is a 2006 remake of Wes Cravens 1977 film of the same name, about a family who becomes the target of a group of mutants after their car breaks down in the desert. ... The Hills Have Eyes 2 is the 2007 feature film sequel to the 2006 horror film. ... Poster art for Blood Feast (1963) A splatter film or gore film is a type of horror film that deliberately focuses on graphic portrayals of gore and graphic violence. ... FearDotCom is a motion picture of the horror-genre released in 2002 by Warner Bros. ... Turistas (translates as Tourists in English) is a 2006 horror film, directed by John Stockwell. ... Captivity is a 2007 thriller film directed by Roland Joffé. It was released in the United Kingdom, Spain and Argentina on June 22, and in the United States on July 13. ... Untraceable is an upcoming 2008 thriller which stars Diane Lane, Joseph Cross, Billy Burke, and Colin Hanks. ... The Saw film series is a horror/thriller film franchise created by James Wan and Leigh Whannell, beginning in 2004 and continuing to the present and into the future. ... Hostel is a 2005 horror film written and directed by Eli Roth, starring Jay Hernandez, Derek Richardson, Jennifer Lim, Eythor Gudjonsson and Barbara Nedeljáková. The movie is rated R in the United States for its scenes of torture and violence, strong sexual content, language, and drug use. ... Pathology is an upcoming film directed by Marc Schoelermann. ...


Remakes of late 1970s horror movies became routine in the 2000s. In addition to 2004's remake of Dawn of the Dead and 2003's remake of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, in 2007 Rob Zombie wrote and directed a remake of John Carpenter's Halloween. The film focused more on Michael's backstory than the original did, devoting the first half of the film to Michael's childhood. It was critically panned by most,[19][20] but was a success in its theatrical run. Production of re-makes looks set to continue in 2008 and beyond, with Quarantine (a remake of REC), Friday the 13th,[21] A Nightmare on Elm Street and even Attack of the Killer Tomatoes being remade. Dawn of the Dead is a 2004 horror film reimagining of George A. Romeros 1978 film of the same name. ... The Texas Chainsaw Massacre is a horror film, and a re-imagining of the 1974 film The Texas Chain Saw Massacre. ... Robert Cummings (born January 12, 1965 in Haverhill, Massachusetts), better known as Rob Zombie, is an American musician, film director, and writer. ... Halloween is a reimagining of the 1978 film of the same name. ... Halloween (film) redirects here. ... REC (or [●REC]) is a 2007 horror film co-directed by Jaume Balagueró and Paco Plaza. ... On October 5, 2004, Paramount released the first, and to-date only, box set of the Friday the 13th film series, which includes new interviews with the cast and crew, as well as four new commentaries. ... A Nightmare on Elm Street is a series of horror films that were exceptionally popular in the 1980s. ... Attack of the Killer Tomatoes is a 1978 comedy film directed by John De Bello and starring David Miller. ...


References

  1. ^ Charles Derry, Dark Dreams: A Psychological History of the Modern Horror Film; Macfarland, 1977
  2. ^ Public Domain Movies Films Videos Desert Island Films, Largest Source in Broadcast Quality High Definition
  3. ^ The True Origin of the Horror Film
  4. ^ Seek Japan :: J-Horror: An Alternative Guide
  5. ^ Edison's Frankenstein
  6. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v6QlCIu-pCQ
  7. ^ YouTube - FRANKENSTEIN - EDISON FILM - 1910 - pt2
  8. ^ The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939)- Moria The Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Review
  9. ^ http://silentmoviemonsters.tripod.com/germanexpressionism.html
  10. ^ Horror Films
  11. ^ http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0412/is_1_29/ai_73036226
  12. ^ National Film Registry: 1989-2007
  13. ^ Horror Films
  14. ^ Halloween (1978)
  15. ^ like your films with a little more aaargggh!!!??? acmi presents the horror for halloween
  16. ^ Bright Lights Film Journal | European Sex and Horror Films
  17. ^ GreenCine | Hong Kong Horror Comedies
  18. ^ Horror Films in the 1980s
  19. ^ Halloween - Rotten Tomatoes. Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 2007-09-07
  20. ^ Halloween (2007): Reviews. Metacritic. Retrieved 2007-09-07
  21. ^ Friday the 13th: The Remake. Retrieved on 2008-05-26.

This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

The original 1974 Black Christmas is considered the first authentic slasher. ... Grindhouse redirects here. ... S.S. Van Dines The Benson Murder Case, the first giallo ever published (1929). ... Poster for Dark Water J-Horror is a term used to refer to Japanese contributions to horror fiction in popular culture. ... The thriller is a broad genre of literature, film, and television. ... Monster Movie is the debut album by Krautrock Band Can. ... Poster art for Blood Feast (1963) A splatter film or gore film is a type of horror film that deliberately focuses on graphic portrayals of gore and graphic violence. ... The final girl is a horror film trope that specifically refers to the last person (usually a woman or girl) alive to confront the killer, ostensibly the one left to tell the story. ... Screenshot of Bloody-Disgusting. ... FEARnet is a multi-platform horror network created by Rogers, Comcast, and Sony. ... Cannibalism is a recurring theme in popular culture. ... This is a list of comedy horror films: // 1923 Puritan Passions 1925 The Monster Dr. Pyckle and Mr. ... This is chronological list of horror films split by decade. ... K-Horror is the term given to horror films made in Korea. ... German underground horror is a sub-genre of the horror film, which has achieved cult popularity since first appearing in the mid-1980s. ... This is a list of films featuring werewolves: The Wolf Man (1941) An American Werewolf in London (1981) and An American Werewolf in Paris (1997) Bad Moon (1996) The Howling Silver Bullet Teen Wolf (1985) and Teen Wolf Too Scooby Doo and the Reluctant Werewolf Bad Moon Ginger Snaps (2000... Vampire films have been a staple since the silent days, so much so that the depiction of vampires in popular culture is strongly based upon their depiction in movies throughout the years. ... A group of actors portraying zombies in a film Zombies are regularly encountered in horror- and fantasy-themed fiction and entertainment. ...

External links

  • IMDb Entry on Best/Worst "Horror" Titles
  • Horror Film Bibliography (via UC Berkeley)
  • ESplatter - Daily horror movie news and reviews
  • Fangoria — Magazine devoted to the horror genre
  • Rue Morgue - Canadian horror magazine
  • About: Horror & Suspense Movies — News and reviews about current and classic horror movies
  • British Horror Films - Site devoted to the British film industry
  • BlackHorrorMovies.com - Site devoted to African American horror films
  • OMGHorror - Horror games and movies
  • China Bans Horror Movies - Shanghai Daily, March 2008
  • I Spit on Your Horror Movie Remakes - MSNBC 2005 opinion piece on horror remakes
  • Box Office for Horror Movies Is Weak: Verging on Horrible: New York Times, June 11, 2007

  Results from FactBites:
 
the horror film (4434 words)
When classifying genre, especially a genre as wide-ranging as horror, it is necessary to strike a balance between flexibility and prescription since genre is, in Andrew Tudor's words, `a social construction and as such is subject to constant negotiation and re-formulation' [2].
Art--dread, however, does not cover the films in the psyche category which, in the main, remain on the margins of Carroll's art--horror, the degree of marginality or exclusion depending on the extent to which the demonic is invoked in tandem with psychosis.
In its very nature, these films suppose, the psyche nurtures the seeds of its own destruction, and the contingent corruption occasioned by a desire for knowledge, ambition and progress; horror movie psychosis is deep- rooted human malevolence made manifest [14].
Horror film - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2997 words)
The horror film is often associated with low budgets and exploitation, but major studios and well-respected directors have made intermittent forays into the genre.
The Canadian film Cube (1997) was perhaps one of the few horror films of the 1990s to be based around a relatively novel concept; it was able to evoke a wide range of different fears, and touched upon a variety of social themes (such as fear of bureaucracy) that had previously been unexplored.
Other advances in horror were in Japanese animation (for example the gruesome 'guro' animation), as Japanese culture reached new heights of popularity in the West (although the first horror-themed anime had begun appearing in the West by the late 1980s).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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