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Encyclopedia > Hornbeam
Hornbeam

European Hornbeam foliage
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Fagales
Family: Betulaceae
Genus: Carpinus
Species

Carpinus betulus - European Hornbeam
Carpinus caroliniana - American Hornbeam
Carpinus cordata - Sawa Hornbeam
Carpinus fargesii - Farges' Hornbeam
Carpinus laxiflora - Aka-shide Hornbeam
Carpinus japonica - Japanese Hornbeam
Carpinus orientalis - Oriental Hornbeam
Carpinus tschonoskii - Chonowski's Hornbeam
Carpinus turczaninowii - Turkzaninov's Hornbeam Download high resolution version (730x989, 129 KB)European Hornbeam (Carpinus betulus) foliage - photo User:MPF File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... Divisions Green algae land plants (embryophytes) non-vascular embryophytes Hepatophyta - liverworts Anthocerophyta - hornworts Bryophyta - mosses vascular plants (tracheophytes) seedless vascular plants Lycopodiophyta - clubmosses Equisetophyta - horsetails Pteridophyta - true ferns Psilotophyta - whisk ferns Ophioglossophyta - adderstongue ferns seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta - seed ferns Pinophyta - conifers Cycadophyta - cycads Ginkgophyta - ginkgo Gnetophyta - gnetae Magnoliophyta - flowering... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants (also angiosperms or Magnoliophyta) are one of the major groups of modern plants, comprising those that produce seeds in specialized reproductive organs called flowers, where the ovulary or carpel is enclosed. ... Orders see text Dicotyledons or dicots are flowering plants whose seed contains two embryonic leaves or cotyledons. ... Families included in the Kew list: Fagaceae - Beech family   (including Nothofagaceae) Betulaceae - Birch family Corylaceae - Hazel family Ticodendraceae not included in the Kew list: Casuarinaceae - She-oak family Juglandaceae - Walnut family Rhoipteleaceae Myricaceae The Fagales are an order of flowering plants, including some of the best known trees. ... Genera Alnus - Alders Betula - Birches Betulaceae, or the Birch Family, includes two genera of trees and shrubs, the birches and the alders. ... Binomial name Carpinus betulus L. The European Hornbeam or Common Hornbeam (Carpinus betulus) is a hornbeam native to western, central and southern Europe, extending eastward as far as western Russia and the Ukraine. ... Binomial name Carpinus caroliniana Walter The American Hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana) is a small hardwood tree in the genus Carpinus. ...

The hornbeams (Carpinus) are a genus of relatively small hardwood trees, placed in the birch family Betulaceae, though some botanists separate it off together with the hazels (Corylus) and hop-hornbeams (Ostrya) into a segregate family Corylaceae. The 30-40 species occur across much of the north temperate regions, with the greatest number of species in east Asia, particularly China. Only two species occur in Europe, and only one in eastern North America. See genus (mathematics) for the use of the term in mathematics. ... Beech is a typical temperate zone hardwood The term hardwood designates wood from angiosperm trees. ... The coniferous Coast Redwood, the tallest tree species on earth A tree can be defined as a large, perennial, woody plant. ... Species many species see text and classification Birch is the name of any tree of the genus Betula, in the family Betulaceae, closely related to the beech/oak family, Fagaceae. ... Genera Alnus - Alders Betula - Birches Betulaceae, or the Birch Family, includes two genera of trees and shrubs, the birches and the alders. ... This article is about the tree; for other meanings of hazel, see Hazel (disambiguation). ... Species See text Ostrya is a genus of eight to ten small deciduous trees belonging to the hazel family Corylaceae. ... [[Im? Henry Jan age:LocationAsia. ... A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... World map showing location of North America A satellite composite image of North America North America is a continent in the northern hemisphere, bounded on the north by the Arctic Ocean, on the east by the North Atlantic Ocean, on the south by the Caribbean Sea, and on the west...


The leaves are deciduous, alternate, and simple with a serrated margin, and typically vary from 3-10 cm in length. The flowers are wind-pollinated pendulous catkins, produced in spring. The male and female flowers are on separate catkins, but on the same tree (monoecious). The fruit is a small nut about 3-6 mm long, held in a leafy bract; the bract may be either trilobed or simple oval. There are typically 10-30 seeds on each seed catkin. Deciduous means temporary or tending to fall off (deriving from the Latin word decidere, to fall off). ... A male catkin on a willow Catkins, or aments, are slim, cylindrical flower clusters, wind-pollinated and without petals, that can be found in many plant families, including Betulaceae, Fagaceae, Moraceae, and Salicaceae. ... Plant sexuality deals with the wide variety of sexual reproduction systems found across the plant kingdom. ...

European Hornbeam seed catkins
European Hornbeam seed catkins

The European Hornbeam (Carpinus betulus), is a small to medium sized tree, typically 10-20 m tall but occasionally reaching 30 m. It is native to most of Europe except for northern Britain and most of Scandinavia. The leaves are 5-9 cm long, and the seeds have a 3-4 cm long trilobed bract. European Hornbeam (Carpinus betulus) seed catkins - photo User:MPF File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... European Hornbeam (Carpinus betulus) seed catkins - photo User:MPF File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... Scandinavia, Fennoscandia, and the Kola Peninsula. ...


The Oriental Hornbeam (Carpinus orientalis) occurs in southeast Europe and southwest Asia, usually on hot dry sites at lower altitudes than C. betulus, and is a smaller tree, rarely over 10 m tall and often shrubby. It has small leaves, 3-5 cm long. The seeds differ from C. betulus in having a simple bract (not trilobed), about 2 cm long. A willow shrub A shrub or bush is a horticultural rather than strictly botanical category of woody plant, distinguished from a tree by its multiple stems and lower height, usually less than 6 m tall. ...


The Japanese Hornbeam (Carpinus japonica) is similar to C. orientalis in having unlobed seed bracts, but differs from it in having larger leaves, 8-10 cm long.


The North American species, American Hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana) is similar to C. betulus in leaf size and shape. The seed bract is also trilobed, but less deeply than in C. betulus.


The wood of hornbeams is very hard, and not used much due to the difficulty of working it. Its hardness has however lent it to use for carving boards, tool handles, coach wheels and other situations where a very tough, hard wood is required.

Individual European Hornbeam seed (enlarged; whole seed plus wing 4 cm long). The asymmetry of the seedwing makes it spin as it falls, improving wind dispersal. The shape of the wing is important in the identification of different hornbeam species.
Individual European Hornbeam seed (enlarged; whole seed plus wing 4 cm long). The asymmetry of the seedwing makes it spin as it falls, improving wind dispersal. The shape of the wing is important in the identification of different hornbeam species.

The common English name of "hornbeam" derives from the hardness of the wood (likened to horn) and the Old English beam, a tree (cognate with German "baum"). American Hornbeam is also occasionally known as blue-beech, ironwood, or musclewood; the first from the resemblance of the bark to that of the American Beech Fagus grandifolia, the other two from the hardness of the wood and the muscular appearance of the trunk respectively. European Hornbeam (Carpinus betulus) seed - photo User:MPF File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... European Hornbeam (Carpinus betulus) seed - photo User:MPF File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Wind is the quasi-horizontal movement of air (as opposed to an air current) caused by a horizontal pressure gradient force. ... Horn may refer to: horn (anatomy), a hollow, pointed projection of the skin of various animals Horn, Austria horn (diacritic), a diacritic mark used to indicate that a normally rounded vowel such as o or u is to be pronounced unrounded horn (instrument) horn, a slang term for any wind... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ... Species Fagus crenata - Japanese Beech Fagus engleriana - Chinese Beech Fagus grandifolia - American Beech Fagus hayatae - Taiwan Beech Fagus japonica - Japanese Blue Beech Fagus longipetiolata - South Chinese Beech Fagus lucida - Shining Beech Fagus mexicana - Mexican Beech or Haya Fagus orientalis - Oriental Beech Fagus sylvatica - European Beech Beech (Fagus) is a genus...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Hornbeam - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (494 words)
The hornbeams (Carpinus) are a genus of relatively small hardwood trees, placed in the birch family Betulaceae, though some botanists separate it off together with the hazels (Corylus) and hop-hornbeams (Ostrya) into a segregate family Corylaceae.
The common English name of "hornbeam" derives from the hardness of the wood (likened to horn) and the Old English beam, a tree (cognate with German "baum").
American Hornbeam is also occasionally known as blue-beech, ironwood, or musclewood; the first from the resemblance of the bark to that of the American Beech Fagus grandifolia, the other two from the hardness of the wood and the muscular appearance of the trunk respectively.
Hornbeam (375 words)
Hornbeam is a small, slow-growing, and short-lived tree that occupies the forest understory.
Hornbeam is a small to medium tree that reaches heights of 15' to 25'.
Hornbeam grows in moist, fertile soils of bottomland hardwoods on the edges of swamps, streams, and rivers.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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