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Encyclopedia > Horn (anatomy)
A goat with spiral horns
A goat with spiral horns

A horn is a pointed projection of the skin on the head of various mammals, consisting of a covering of horn (keratin and other proteins) surrounding a core of living bone. True horns are found only among the ruminant artiodactyls,[citation needed] in the families Antilocapridae (pronghorn) and Bovidae (cattle, goats, antelope etc.). These animals have one or occasionally two pairs of horns, which usually have a curved or spiral shape, often with ridges or fluting. In many species only the males have horns. Horns start to grow soon after birth, and continue to grow throughout the life of the animal (except in pronghorns, which shed the outer layer annually, but retain the bony core). Similar growths on other parts of the body are not usually called horns, but spurs, claws or hoofs. Horn may refer to: horn (anatomy), a hollow, pointed projection of the skin of various animals Horn, Austria horn (diacritic), a diacritic mark used to indicate that a normally rounded vowel such as o or u is to be pronounced unrounded horn (instrument) horn, a slang term for any wind... This article is about the domestic species. ... For other uses, see Skin (disambiguation). ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of sweat glands, including milk producing sweat glands, and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex... Not to be confused with kerogen or carotene. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin showing coloured alpha helices. ... This article is about the skeletal organs. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Ruminantia. ... Families Suidae Hippopotamidae Tayassuidae Camelidae Tragulidae Moschidae Cervidae Giraffidae Antilocapridae Bovidae The even-toed ungulates form the mammal order Artiodactyla. ... Binomial name Antilocapra americana Ord, 1815 The pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) is the only surviving member of the family Antilocapridae, and the fastest land animal in North America running at speeds up to 54 mph (90 km/h). ... Binomial name Antilocapra americana Ord, 1815 Subspecies The Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) is the only surviving member of the family Antilocapridae, and the fastest mammal in North America running at speeds of 58 mph (90 km/h). ... Subfamilies Bovinae Cephalophinae Hippotraginae Antilopinae Caprinae A bovid is any of almost 140 species of cloven-hoofed mammals belonging to the family Bovidae. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... This article is about the domestic species. ... This article is about the herbivorous mammals. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Binomial name Antilocapra americana Ord, 1815 The pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) is the only surviving member of the family Antilocapridae, and the fastest land animal in North America running at speeds up to 54 mph (90 km/h). ... A spur is a metal instrument composed of a shank, neck, and prick, rowel (sharp-toothed wheel), or blunted end fastened to the heel of a horseman. ... Cat claw A claw is a curved pointed appendage, found at the end of a toe or finger or, in arthropods, of the tarsus. ... Rear hooves of a horse Rear hoof of a giraffe A hoof (plural: hooves) is the foot of an ungulate, all of which walk more or less on their toes and have toes with a horny (keratin) covering. ...

Contents

Other hornlike growths

The term "horn" is also popularly applied to other hard and pointed features attached to the head of animals in various other families:

  • Giraffidae: Giraffes have one or more pairs of bony bumps on their heads. These are covered with furred skin, and although they look as if they ought to have horns on them, they do not.
  • Cervidae: Most deer have antlers, which are not true horns. When fully developed antlers are dead bone without a horn or skin covering; they are borne only by adults (usually males) and are shed and regrown each year.
  • Rhinocerotidae: The "horns" of rhinoceroses are made of keratin and grow continuously, but do not have a bone core.
  • Ceratopsidae: The "horns" of the Triceratops were extensions of its skull bones although debate exists over whether they had a keratin covering.
  • Horned lizards (Phrynosoma): These lizards have horns on their heads which have a hard keratin covering over a bony core, like mammalian horns.
  • Monodontidae: Male narwhals have a single long tusk, a modified tooth, which looks like a horn, and is twisted like that of the fictional unicorn.
  • Insects: Some insects (such as rhinoceros beetles) have horn-like structures on the head or thorax (or both). These are pointed outgrowths of the hard chitinous exoskeleton. Some (such as stag beetles) have greatly enlarged jaws, also made of chitin.

Many mammal species in various families have tusks, which often serve the same functions as true horns, but are in fact oversize teeth. These include the Moschidae (Musk deer, which are ruminants), Suidae (Wild Boars), Proboscidea (Elephants), Monodontidae (Narwhals) and Odobenidae (Walruses). Species  Okapia johnstoni  Giraffa camelopardalis The biological family Giraffidae contains just two members, the Giraffe and the Okapi. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Range map The giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is an African even-toed ungulate mammal, the tallest of all land-living animal species. ... Genera About 15 in 4 subfamilies. ... This article is about the ruminent animal. ... For the Poet Laureate of Milwaukee, see Antler (Poet). ... Species Ceratotherium simum Dicerorhinus sumatrensis Diceros bicornis Rhinoceros unicornis A rhinoceros is any of five surviving species of odd-toed ungulate in the family Rhinocerotidae. ... For other uses, see Rhinoceros (disambiguation). ... Genera Centrosaurinae    Achelousaurus    Centrosaurus    Einiosaurus    Styracosaurus    Pachyrhinosaurus Ceratopsinae    Chasmosaurus    Diceratops    Pentaceratops    Protoceratops    Torosaurus    Triceratops Ceratopsids, or members of the Ceratopsidae (or Ceratopidae), are a diverse group of marginocephalian dinosaurs like Triceratops and Styracosaurus. ... Species (type) Marsh, 1890 Triceratops (IPA: ) was a herbivorous genus of ceratopsid dinosaur that lived during the late Maastrichtian stage of the Late Cretaceous Period, around 68 to 65 million years ago (mya) in what is now North America. ... Species See text. ... Genera Delphinapterus Monodon The cetacean family Monodontidae comprises two unusual whale species, the Narwhal, in which the male has a long tusk, and the white Beluga. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Narwhal range (in blue) The Narwhal (Monodon monoceros) is an Arctic species of cetacean. ... The gentle and pensive maiden has the power to tame the unicorn, in this fresco in Palazzo Farnese, Rome, probably by Domenichino, ca 1602 For other uses, see Unicorn (disambiguation). ... Genera See text. ... Diagram of a tsetse fly, showing the head, thorax and abdomen The thorax is a division of an animals body that lies between the head and the abdomen. ... Structure of the chitin molecule, showing two of the N-Acetylglucosamine units that repeat to form long chains in beta-1,4 linkage. ... An exoskeleton is an external anatomical feature that supports and protects an animals body, in contrast to the internal endoskeleton of, for example, a human. ... Subfamilies not a complete list Aesalinae Figulinae Lampriminae Lucaninae Nicaginae Penichrolucaninae Syndesinae Mating pair Stag beetles are a group of about 1,200 species of beetle in the family Lucanidae. ... For other uses, see Tusk (disambiguation). ... The four species of musk deer make up the family Moschidae. ... Genera Babirusas, Babyrousa Giant forest hogs, Hylochoerus Warthogs, Phacochoerus Bush pigs, Potamochoerus Pigs, Sus Suidae is the biological family to which pigs and their relatives belong. ... Binomial name Sus scrofa Linnaeus, 1758 The Wild Boar (Sus scrofa) is the wild ancestor of the domesticated pig. ... Groups Jozaria (extinct) Anthracobunidae (extinct) Moeritheriidae (extinct) Euproboscidea Numidotheriidae (extinct) Barytheriidae (extinct) Deinotheriidae (extinct) Elephantiformes Phiomiidae (extinct) Palaeomastodontidae (extinct) Hemimastodontidae (extinct) Euelephantoidea Choerolophodontidae (extinct) Amebelodontidae (extinct) Gnathabelodontidae (extinct) Gomphotheriidae (extinct) Elephantidae Mammutidae (extinct) Proboscidea is an order containing only one family of living animals, Elephantidae, the elephants, with three species... Genera and Species Loxodonta Loxodonta cyclotis Loxodonta africana Elephas Elephas maximus Elephas antiquus † Elephas beyeri † Elephas celebensis † Elephas cypriotes † Elephas ekorensis † Elephas falconeri † Elephas iolensis † Elephas planifrons † Elephas platycephalus † Elephas recki † Stegodon † Mammuthus † Elephantidae (the elephants) is a family of pachyderm, and the only remaining family in the order Proboscidea... Genera Delphinapterus Monodon The cetacean family Monodontidae comprises two unusual whale species, the Narwhal, in which the male has a long tusk, and the white Beluga. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Narwhal range (in blue) The Narwhal (Monodon monoceros) is an Arctic species of cetacean. ... Binomial name Odobenus rosmarus (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies Walruses are large semi-aquatic mammals that live in the cold Arctic seas of the Northern Hemisphere. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Distribution of Walrus Subspecies Walruses (Odobenus rosmarus) are large semi-aquatic mammals that live in the cold Arctic seas of the Northern Hemisphere. ...


polled animals or pollards are those of normally-horned (mainly domesticated) species whose horns have been removed, or which have not grown. In some cases such animals have small horny growths in the skin where their horns would be – these are known as scurs. Domesticated animals, plants, and other organisms are those whose collective behavior, life cycle, or physiology has been altered as a result of their breeding and living conditions being under human control for multiple generations. ...


Animal uses of horns

Animals have a variety of uses for horns and antlers, including defending themselves from predators and fighting members of their own species for territory, dominance or mating priority. In addition, horns may be used to root in the soil or strip bark from trees. In animal courtship many use horns in displays. For example, the male blue wildebeest reams the bark and branches of trees to impress the female and lure her into his territory. Some animals with true horns use them for cooling, the blood vessels in the bony core allowing the horns to function as a radiator. IT FEELS REALLY GOOD IF YOU IMATATE THE ANIMALS. LOL! “Mounting” redirects here. ... Suitor redirects here. ... Binomial name (Burchell, 1823) The Blue Wildebeest is a large ungulate mammal of the genus Connochaetes which grows to 1. ... In ethology, sociobiology and behavioral ecology, the term territory refers to any geographical area that an animal of a particular species consistently defends against conspecifics (and, occasionally, animals of other species). ... Not to be confused with radiata. ...

A ram with three horns
A ram with three horns

Look up RAM, Ram, ram in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Human uses of horns

Use of animal horns is controversial, especially if the animal was specifically hunted for the horn as a hunting trophy or object of decoration or utility. Some animals are threatened or endangered to reduced populations partially from pressures of such hunting. This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ...


Some peoples use bovid horns as musical instruments, for example the shofar. These have evolved into brass instruments in which, unlike the trumpet, the bore gradually increases in width through most of its length — that is to say, it is conical rather than cylindrical. These are called horns, though made of metal. A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... A shofar made from the horn of a kudu, in the Yemenite Jewish style. ... Image of a trumpet, foreground, a piccolo trumpet behind, and a flugelhorn in background. ... Trumpeter redirects here. ... This article is about the geometric object, for other uses see Cone. ... A right circular cylinder An elliptic cylinder In mathematics, a cylinder is a quadric surface, with the following equation in Cartesian coordinates: This equation is for an elliptic cylinder, a generalization of the ordinary, circular cylinder (a = b). ... For other uses, see Horn. ... This article is about metallic materials. ...


Drinking horns' are bovid horns removed from the bone core, cleaned and polished and used as drinking vessels. (See also the legend of the Horn of plenty, or Cornucopia). A drinking horn was a drinking vessel formerly common in some parts of the world. ... Drinking is the act of consuming a liquid through the mouth. ... Cornucopia held by the Roman goddess Aequitas on the reverse of this antoninianus struck under Roman Emperor Claudius II. The cornucopia (Latin Cornu Copiae), literally Horn of Plenty and also known as the Harvest Cone, is a symbol of food and abundance dating back to the 5th century BC. In...


Powder horns were originally bovid horns fitted with lids and carrying straps, used to carry gunpowder. Powder flasks of any material may be referred to as powder horns. Black powder was the original gunpowder and practically the only known propellant and explosive until the middle of the 19th century. ... A modern black powder substitute for muzzleloading rifles in FFG size Gunpowder (also called black powder) is a pyrotechnic composition, an explosive mixture of sulfur, charcoal and potassium nitrate (also known as saltpetre or saltpeter) that burns rapidly, producing volumes of hot solids and gases which can be used as...


Antelope horns are used in traditional Chinese medicine.


Horn can also refer to keratin, the material of which a horn is made, sometimes including keratin from other parts of animals, such as hoofs. Horn may be used as a material in tools, furniture and decoration, among other uses. In these applications, horn is valued for its hardness, and it has given rise to the expression hard as horn. Horn is somewhat thermoplastic and (like tortoiseshell) was formerly used for many purposes where plastic would now be used. Horn may be used to make glue. Not to be confused with kerogen or carotene. ... For other uses, see Plastic (disambiguation). ... Tortoiseshell can refer to: a Tortoiseshell cat a pattern used in clothing and jewellery the Small Tortoiseshell, a butterfly the Hawksbill turtle This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see Plastic (disambiguation). ... Look up glue in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Horn bows are bows made from a combination of horn, sinew and usually wood. These materials allow more energy to be stored in a short bow than wood would. A composite bow is a bow made from disparate materials laminated together, usually applied under tension. ... A tendon or sinew is a tough band of fibrous connective tissue, attached on one end to a muscle and on the other to a bone. ...


Ivory comes from the teeth of animals, not horns. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Types of teeth Molars are used for grinding up foods Carnassials are used for slicing food. ...


"Horn" buttons are usually made from deer antlers, not true horn. For other uses, see Button (disambiguation). ...


See also

Horn may refer to: horn (anatomy), a hollow, pointed projection of the skin of various animals Horn, Austria horn (diacritic), a diacritic mark used to indicate that a normally rounded vowel such as o or u is to be pronounced unrounded horn (instrument) horn, a slang term for any wind... For other uses, see Horn. ... Representation of a horned helmet from a Danish toy. ... Tortoiseshell can refer to: a Tortoiseshell cat a pattern used in clothing and jewellery the Small Tortoiseshell, a butterfly the Hawksbill turtle This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

External links

  • A site with information about the history of the cow horn as a musical instrument.
Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Horn (anatomy) Summary (1273 words)
The association of horns with fertility was further encouraged by their phallic shape and symbolic identification with both the rays of the sun and the crescent moon.
In Christian iconography, the foremost association of horns is with devils and demons, although the Virgin Mary is sometimes depicted with the "horns" of the moon.
Horns are, therefore, ideal attributes for evil and libidinous demons, devils, and monsters.
Horn (anatomy) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (406 words)
A horn is a hollow, pointed projection of the skin of various animals., consisting mainly of keratin as well as other proteins.
True horns are found only among the ruminant artiodactyls, in the families Antilocapridae (pronghorn) and Bovidae (cows, buffaloes, yaks, goats, antelope etc.).
"Horn" buttons are usually made from deer antlers, not true horn.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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