FACTOID # 30: If Alaska were its own country, it would be the 26th largest in total area, slightly larger than Iran.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Horatio Kitchener
Enlarge
Horatio Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener of Khartoum

Horatio Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener of Khartoum This article concerns the British Sovereigns Privy Council. See also Privy Council (disambiguation). Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. Formerly, the Council was a powerful institution, but is now largely ceremonial. Most of its power is held by one... PC, Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions, in order of seniority: Knight or Dame Grand Cross... KBE, KCB is a TLA that may stand for: Keep Chicago Beautiful (kcb.org) Kekchi Council of Belize Kenya Commercial Bank (kcb.co.ke) Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath (see British honours system) Knottingley Concert Brass Koninklijk Conservatorium Brussel (kcb.be) Kyoto Convention Bureau KCB is the SIL... KCB, ADC is short for: analog to digital converter American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee Apple Developer Connection Apple Display Connector Aide-de-camp Automated Data Collection Americas Dumbest Criminals ADC Aircraft American Deserters Committee This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise... ADC ( June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 190 days remaining. Events 1100-1899 1128 - Battle of St.Mamede, near Guimarães. Portuguese forces led by Afonso I beat his mother D.Teresa and D.Fernão Peres de Trava... June 24, Events January 4 - The first American ice-skating club is formed (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania). January 29 - Henry Clay introduces the Compromise of 1850 to the U.S. Congress February 28 - University of Utah opens in Salt Lake City, Utah March 7 - United States Senator Daniel Webster gives his Seventh of March... 1850 - June 5 is the 156th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (157th in leap years), with 209 days remaining. Events 1783 - The Montgolfier brothers publicly demonstrate their montgolfière ( hot air balloon). 1817 - First Great Lakes steamer, the Frontenac, is launched. 1829 - HMS Pickle captures the armed... June 5, 1916 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) Events January-February January 1 -The first successful blood transfusion using blood that had been stored and cooled. Impressionist Monet paints Water Lilies. January 8 - Allied forces withdraw from Gallipoli January 17 - The Professional Golfers Association... 1916) was a This is a list of Field Marshals of the Kingdom of Great Britain and of the United Kingdom, with their respective years of appointment. George Hamilton, 1st Earl of Orkney (1736) John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll (1736) Richard Boyle, 2nd Viscount Shannon (1739) François de la Rochefoucauld, Marquis... British Field Marshal and statesman.


Kitchener was born in County Kerry (Irish: Ciarraí) is a county in the southwest of Ireland, in the Munster province of the Republic of Ireland, the county is informally referred to as The Kingdom. It has an area of 4,746 km² (1,832 square miles). The county town is Tralee. The county is... County Kerry, A true colour image of Ireland, captured by a NASA satellite on January 4, 2003. Scotland, the Isle of Man and Wales are visible to the east. Ireland is located west of the European landmass, which is part of the continent of Eurasia. Ireland (Éire in Irish) is the... Ireland. Educated in The Swiss Confederation or Switzerland is a landlocked federal state in Europe, with neighbours Germany, France, Italy, Austria and Liechtenstein. The country has a strong tradition of political and military neutrality, but also of international co-operation, and is home to many international organisations. Confoederatio Helvetica (CH), the Latin version... Switzerland and at the The Royal Military Academy was founded in 1741 in Woolwich, south-east London. It was intended to provide an education and produce good officers of Artillery and perfect Engineers. RMA Woolwich was commonly known as The Shop because its first building was a converted workshop of the Woolwich Arsenal. Notable... Royal Military Academy, he offered to fight with the France - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE55Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE60Fixes.css; /**/ France From Wikipedia The French Republic or France ( French: République française or France) is a country whose metropolitan territory is located in western Europe, and which is further made... French in the Battle of Gravelotte Main article: Battle of Gravelotte Battle of Sedan Main article: Battle of Sedan The French were soundly defeated in several battles owing to the military superiority of the Prussian forces and their commanders. At Sedan on September 2, the French emperor Napoleon III was taken prisoner with... Franco-Prussian War before he joined the Royal Engineers in 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). Events January - April January 18 - The member-states of the North German Confederation unite into a single nation-state known as the German Empire. The King of Prussia is declared the first German Emperor as Wilhelm I of... 1871. He served in The term Palestine may refer to: Palestine: A geographical region in the Middle East, centered on Jerusalem. It is claimed by Palestinians and (under the name Eretz Israel) Jews as their ancestral home. The West Bank and the Gaza Strip, sometimes collectively referred to as the Palestinian territories The Palestinian... Palestine, The Arab Republic of Egypt, commonly known as Egypt, (in Arabic: مصر, romanized Mişr or Maşr, in Egyptian dialect) is a republic mostly located in northeastern Africa. Covering an area of about 1,020,000 km², it includes the Sinai Peninsula (considered part of... Egypt, and Cyprus (in Greek Kypros Κύπρος and in Turkish Kıbrıs) is an island in the eastern Mediterranean Sea, 113 kilometres (70 miles) south of Turkey and around 120 km west of the Syrian coast. National motto: None National anthem: Ύμν... Cyprus as a surveyor, learned Arabic is a Semitic language, closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. It is spoken throughout the Arab world and is widely known throughout the Islamic world. Arabic has been a literary language for over 1500 years, and is the liturgical language of Islam. The expression Arabic may refer either to... Arabic, and prepared detailed trigonometrical maps of the areas.


He later served as a Vice-Consul in Anatolia ( Greek: ανατολή anatolē or anatolí, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia... Anatolia, and in 1884 is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar). Events January 4 - The Fabian Society is founded in London. February 1 - Edition one of the Oxford English Dictionary is published. March 13 - The siege of Khartoum, Sudan begins (ends on January 26, 1885). April 22 - Colchester... 1884 as an Aide de Camp during the failed Gordon relief expedition in the Foreign relations Main article: Foreign relations of Sudan Sudan has a territorial dispute with Egypt over the Halaib Triangle. States Main article: States of Sudan Sudan has 26 states or wilayat: Al Jazirah, Al Qadarif, Bahr al Jabal, Blue Nile, East Equatoria, Junqali, Kassala, Khartoum, Lakes, North Bahr al... Sudan. At this time his fiancee, and possibly the only love of his life, Hermione Baker, died of This is about the disease typhoid fever. See typhus for an unrelated disease with a similar name. Typhoid fever is an illness caused by the bacterium Salmonella typhi. Very common worldwide, it is transmitted by food or water contaminated with feces from an infected person. After infection, symptoms include a... typhoid fever in Cairo.

Contents

Egypt, Sudan and Khartoum

He earned national fame on his second tour in Foreign relations Main article: Foreign relations of Sudan Sudan has a territorial dispute with Egypt over the Halaib Triangle. States Main article: States of Sudan Sudan has 26 states or wilayat: Al Jazirah, Al Qadarif, Bahr al Jabal, Blue Nile, East Equatoria, Junqali, Kassala, Khartoum, Lakes, North Bahr al... the Sudan ( 1886 is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. January 29 - Karl Benz patents the first successful gasoline-driven automobile. March 17 - Carrollton Massacre: 20 African Americans are killed... 1886 1899 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). Events January January 1 - End of Spanish rule in Cuba. January 1 - Queens and Staten Island merge with New York City. January 3 - The first known use of the word automobile, in an editorial in the New York... 1899), being made An aide-de-camp (French: camp assistant) is a personal assistant, secretary, or adjutant to a person of high rank, usually a senior military officer or a head of state. The first aide-de-camp is the foremost personal aide. In some countries, aide-de-camp is considered to be... Aide de Camp to Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. Her reign lasted more than sixty-three years—longer than... Queen Victoria and collecting a Knighthood and Military Badge of the Order of the Bath The Most Honourable Order of the Bath is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. The name derives from the ancient ceremony wherein individuals participated in a vigil of fasting, prayer, and bathing on the day... Order of the Bath. After becoming A Sirdar is a Sherpa mountain guide who manages all the other Sherpas in a climbing expedition or trekking group. The Sirdar is typically the most experienced guide and can usually speak English fluently. The Sirdars responsibilities include: assigning responsibilities to the other guides hiring and paying local porters... Sirdar of the Egyptian Army he headed the victorious Anglo-Egyptian army at the At the Battle of Omdurman (September 2, British General Sir Horatio Kitchener defeated the army of the Khalifa, the Dervishes. It was a bloody demonstration of the superiority of machine guns and artillery over older weapons and marked the successful end of British efforts to re-conquer the Sudan. Omdurman... Battle of Omdurman in 1898 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). Events January January 1 - New York City annexes land from surrounding counties, creating the City of Greater New York. The city is geographically divided into five boroughs: Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, The Bronx, and Staten Island. January 13 - Emile... 1898, a victory made possible by the massive rail construction program Kitchener had instituted in the area.


Kitchener quite possibly prevented war between France - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE55Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE60Fixes.css; /**/ France From Wikipedia The French Republic or France ( French: République française or France) is a country whose metropolitan territory is located in western Europe, and which is further made... France and The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the British Commonwealth and European Union. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, UK or, inaccurately, as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent parts. Three of these parts... Britain when he dealt firmly but non-violently with the French military expedition to claim Fashoda, in what became known as the The Fashoda Incident (1898) was the climax of territorial disputes between imperial Britain and France in Eastern Africa. It brought Britain and France to the verge of war but ended in a diplomatic victory for Britain. During the late 19th century, Africa was rapidly being occupied by European colonial powers... Fashoda Incident.


He was made Baron Kitchener, of Khartoum (in Arabic, al-Khartûm: الخرطوم, meaning elephant trunk) is the capital of Sudan, at the point where the White Nile coming from Uganda meets the Blue Nile coming from Ethiopia. The Nile flows north from here towards Egypt and the Mediterranean Sea... Khartoum and of Aspall in the County of Suffolk, on November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years), with 43 remaining. Events 1000-1899 1095 - The Council of Clermont began. The council was called by Pope Urban II to discuss sending the First Crusade to the Holy Land. 1302 - Pope Boniface VIII issued the Papal... November 18, 1898 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). Events January January 1 - New York City annexes land from surrounding counties, creating the City of Greater New York. The city is geographically divided into five boroughs: Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, The Bronx, and Staten Island. January 13 - Emile... 1898 for his successes, and began a program restoring good governance to the Sudan. The program had a strong foundation based on education, Gordon Memorial College is an educational institution in Sudan. It was built between 1899 and 1902 as part of Lord Kitcheners wide-ranging educational reforms. Named for General Chinese Charles George Gordon of the British army, who was killed during the Mahdis uprising in 1885, it was officially... Gordon Memorial College being its centrepiece, and not simply for the children of the local elites - children from anywhere could apply to study.


He ordered the A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. Masjid ( Arabic: مسجد - pronounced: mŭsjĭd) is the Arabic, Urdu, Persian, Malay, Hindi, Gujarati, and Marathi term for a mosque. This term is used widely throughout the Islamic world, and... mosques of Khartoum rebuilt and instituted reforms which recognised Friday - the Muslim holy day - as the official day of rest, and guaranteed freedom of religion to all citizens of the Sudan. He went so far as to prevent evangelical Christian missionaries from attempting to convert Muslims to Christianity.


Kitchener rescued a substantial charitable fund which had been diverted into the pockets of the Khedive (from Persian for lord) was a title created in 1867 by the Ottoman Sultan Abd-ul-Aziz for the then-governor of Egypt, Ismail Pasha. Ismails son Tewfik Pasha inherited the title, as did Tewfiks son Abbas. Abbas was deposed by the British in 1914, and the... Khedive of The Arab Republic of Egypt, commonly known as Egypt, (in Arabic: مصر, romanized Mişr or Maşr, in Egyptian dialect) is a republic mostly located in northeastern Africa. Covering an area of about 1,020,000 km², it includes the Sinai Peninsula (considered part of... Egypt, and put it to use improving the lives of the ordinary Sudanese.


He also reformed the debt laws, preventing rapacious moneylenders from stripping away all assets of impoverished farmers, guaranteeing them five acres (20,000 m²) of land to farm for themselves and the tools to farm with. In 1899 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). Events January January 1 - End of Spanish rule in Cuba. January 1 - Queens and Staten Island merge with New York City. January 3 - The first known use of the word automobile, in an editorial in the New York... 1899 Kitchener was presented with a small island in the There is also Nile, a death metal band from South Carolina, USA. The Nile in Egypt Length 6 695 km Elevation of the source 1 134 m Average discharge 2 830 m³/s Area watershed 3 400 000 km² Origin Africa Mouth the Mediterranean Basin... Nile at Aswan (أسوان Aswān) (24 05 N 32 56 E, population 200,000) is a city in the south of Egypt, the capital of the governorate of the same name. It stands on the east bank of the Nile at the first cataract and is... Aswan as in gratitude for his services; the island was renamed Kitchener's Island in his honour.


The Boer War

During the Second Boer guerrillas during the Second Boer War There were two Boer wars, one in December 16, 1880- March 23, 1881 and the second from October 11, 1899- May 31, 1902 both between the British and the settlers of Dutch origin (called Boere, Afrikaners or Voortrekkers) in South Africa that put... Boer War ( 1899 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). Events January January 1 - End of Spanish rule in Cuba. January 1 - Queens and Staten Island merge with New York City. January 3 - The first known use of the word automobile, in an editorial in the New York... 1899 Events January-April January 28 - The Carnegie Institution is founded in Washington, DC with a $10 million gift from Andrew Carnegie. France, Loisys Lévangile et lEglise which inaugurates the Modernist Crisis February 11 - Police beat up universal suffrage demonstrators in Brussels. February 15 – Berlin underground opened... 1902), Kitchener arrived with Frederick Sleigh Roberts, 1st Earl Roberts of Kandahar, Pretoria and Waterford, VC, KG, KP, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCIE, PC (September 30, 1832 - November 14, 1914) was a distinguished British soldier and one of the most successful commanders of the Victorian era. Born at Cawnpore, India, the son of General Sir... Lord Roberts and the massive British reinforcements of December 1899 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). Events January January 1 - End of Spanish rule in Cuba. January 1 - Queens and Staten Island merge with New York City. January 3 - The first known use of the word automobile, in an editorial in the New York... 1899. Kitchener was made overall commander in November 1900 is a common year starting on Monday. Events January January 1 - Nigeria becomes a British protectorate January 2 - John Hay announces the Open Door Policy to promote trade with China. January 2 - Chicago Canal opens. January 5 - Irish leader John Edward Redmond calls for a revolt against British rule... 1900 following Roberts's removal due to illness.


Following the defeat of the conventional Boer forces, and the failure of a reconciliatory peace treaty in February 1901 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). Events January-March January 1 - World celebrates what is regarded as the start of the new century. ( Zero-ists argument that new century should be celebrated in 1900 rejected worldwide). January 1 - The British colonies of New South... 1901 (due to British cabinet veto), which Kitchener had negotiated with the Afrikaners (sometimes known as Boers) are white South Africans, predominantly of Calvinist German, French Huguenot, Friesian and Walloons descent who speak Afrikaans. Some settlers from other parts of Europe (e.g. Scandinavia and Britain) also joined the ranks of the Afrikaners. Non-Europeans (including Malay, Indian, Khoi and Bantu) make... Boer leaders, Kitchener inherited and expanded the successful strategies devised by Roberts to crush the Boer guerrillas.


In a brutal campaign, these strategies removed the civilian support from the Boers by destroying Boer farms, building blockhouses, and moving civilians into the first A concentration camp is a large detention centre created for political opponents, aliens, specific ethnic or religious groups, civilians of a critical war-zone, or other groups of people, often during a war. The term refers to situations where the internees are persons selected for their conformance to broad criteria... concentration camps. Conditions in these camps, which had been conceived by Roberts as a form of humanitarian aid to the families whose farms he had destroyed, began to rapidly degenerate as the large influxes of Boers outstripped the minuscule ability of the British to cope. Despite being largely rectified by late 1901, they led to wide opprobrium both at home and abroad.


One of the Boer commandos' most provocative tactics was to steal the uniforms of captured troops and masquerade as British soldiers in order to gain a tactical advantage in battle; in response Kitchener ordered that Boers found wearing British uniforms were to be tried on the spot and the sentence, death, confirmed by the commanding officer. This order - which Kitchener later denied issuing - led to the famous Breaker Morant case, in which several Australian soldiers, including the celebrated horseman and bush poet Harry Breaker Morant (1864- 27 February 1902) was an Anglo-Australian drover, horseman, poet and soldier whose renowned skill with horses earned him the nickname The Breaker. Articulate, intelligent and well educated, he was also a published poet and became one of the better-known back-block bards of the... Lt. Harry "Breaker" Morant, were arrested and A court-martial (plural courts-martial) is a military court that determines punishments for members of the military subject to military law. They are generally found in all nations with militaries to try members of the military for breaches of military discipline. In addition, they may be used to try... court-martialled for summarily Death Penalty World Map Color Key: Blue: Abolished for all crimes Green: Abolished for crimes not committed in exceptional circumstances (such as crimes committed in time of war) Orange: Abolitionist in Practice Red: Legal Form of Punishment Criminal law Execution is the act of putting a person to death, with... executing Boer prisoners and civilians including children, Africans, and also the murder of a German missionary.


Morant and another Australian, Lt. Peter Handcock, were found guilty, sentenced to death and shot by firing squad at Polokwane (previously known as Pietersburg) is the capital of Limpopo Province (the province with the greatest increase in growth rate for 2003) in South Africa. . History In the 1840s, Voortrekkers under the leadership of Andries Potgieter established Zoutpansbergdorp, a town 100km to the south east. This settlement had to be... Pietersburg on February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 307 days remaining, 308 in leap years. Events 1500-1899 1560 - The Treaty of Berhick, which would expel the French from Scotland, is signed by England and the Congregation of Scotland 1594 - Henry IV is... February 27, Events January-April January 28 - The Carnegie Institution is founded in Washington, DC with a $10 million gift from Andrew Carnegie. France, Loisys Lévangile et lEglise which inaugurates the Modernist Crisis February 11 - Police beat up universal suffrage demonstrators in Brussels. February 15 – Berlin underground opened... 1902. Their death warrants were personally signed by Kitchener. The trial and execution remain controversial, especially in Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is the sixth-largest country in the world, the only one to occupy an entire continent, and the largest in the region of Australasia/ Oceania. It also includes a number of secondary islands, the largest of which is the State of Tasmania. Australia is... Australia, where it is widely believed that the court-martial was flawed, that Kitchener disappeared on tour immediately following the trial in order to prevent a last-minute appeal, and that Morant and Handcock were scapegoats who unfairly took the blame for the killings in order to cover up the extent of Kitchener's no prisoners policy. This situation has been exacerbated by the loss of the court-martial documents relating to the case, leaving only a book written by one of the men found guilty, George Witton, as primary evidence of the proceedings.


The Treaty of Vereeninging was signed in Events January-April January 28 - The Carnegie Institution is founded in Washington, DC with a $10 million gift from Andrew Carnegie. France, Loisys Lévangile et lEglise which inaugurates the Modernist Crisis February 11 - Police beat up universal suffrage demonstrators in Brussels. February 15 – Berlin underground opened... 1902 following a tense six months. During this period, Kitchener struggled against the Governor of the Map of European presence in 1652 The Cape Colony was a part of South Africa under British occupation during the 19th century. It stretched from the Atlantic Ocean eastwards: the final eastern boundary, after several wars against the Xhosa, stood at the Fish River. In the north, the Orange River... Cape Colony and the British government; eventually, though, he won a peace of reconciliation which recognised certain rights of the Boers and promised future self-government ( Louis Botha Louis Botha (1862-1919) was an Afrikaaner and first Prime Minister of the modern South African state, then called the Union of South Africa. He became a member of the parliament of Transvaal in 1897, representing the district of Vryheid. Two years later he was made a general... Louis Botha, the Boer leader Kitchener negotiated his aborted peace treaty with in 1901, became the first Prime Minister of the self-governing Union of South Africa in 1910). The Treaty also agreed to pay for reconstruction following the end of hostilities. Six days later Kitchener was created Viscount Kitchener, of Khartoum and of the Vaal in the Colony of Transvaal and of Aspall in the County of Suffolk.


India and Egypt

Following this, Kitchener was made Commander-in-Chief in India ( Events January-April January 28 - The Carnegie Institution is founded in Washington, DC with a $10 million gift from Andrew Carnegie. France, Loisys Lévangile et lEglise which inaugurates the Modernist Crisis February 11 - Police beat up universal suffrage demonstrators in Brussels. February 15 – Berlin underground opened... 1902 1909 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). Events January – March January 16 - Ernest Shackletons expedition finds the magnetic South Pole. January 28 - United States troops leave Cuba after being there since the Spanish-American War. February 12 - The National Association for the Advancement... 1909), where he reconstructed the greatly disorganised Indian army, against the wishes of the bellicose viceroy George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston (January 11, 1859 - March 20, 1925), was a conservative British statesman and sometime Viceroy of India. Eldest son of the 4th Baron Scarsdale, rector of Kedleston, Derbyshire, Curzon was educated at Eton College and Balliol College, Oxford. At Oxford he was president... Lord Curzon of Kedleston, who became a passionate and lifelong enemy. Kitchener was promoted to Field Marshal in 1910 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). Events January-April January - In Greece, the Military League forces parliament and the king to summon National Assembly to revise Constitution. January 15- In the United Kingdom, General Election held in response to House of Lords rejection of... 1910; however, largely due to a Curzon-inspired whispering campaign - he was turned down for the post of Viceroy of India in 1911 is a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). Events January-June January 1 - Northern Territory is separated from South Australia January 3 - In London, in what becomes known as the Siege of Sidney Street, the Metropolitan Police and the Scots Guards engage in a shootout... 1911. He then he returned to Egypt as Viceroy of Egypt and the Sudan ( 1911 is a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). Events January-June January 1 - Northern Territory is separated from South Australia January 3 - In London, in what becomes known as the Siege of Sidney Street, the Metropolitan Police and the Scots Guards engage in a shootout... 1911 1914 is a common year starting on Thursday. (see link for calendar) Events January 4 - 77 seal hunters freeze to death on ice near Labrador. January 5 - Ford Motor Company announces an eight-hour workday and a minimum wage of $5 for a days labor. February 13 - Copyright: In... 1914).


He was created Earl Kitchener, of Khartoum and of Broome in the County of Kent, on June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 185 days remaining. Events 1600-1899 1613 - The Globe Theatre burns to the ground. 1749 - New Governor, Charles de la Ralière Des Herbiers, arrives at Isle Royale (Cape Breton Island). 1786... June 29, 1914 is a common year starting on Thursday. (see link for calendar) Events January 4 - 77 seal hunters freeze to death on ice near Labrador. January 5 - Ford Motor Company announces an eight-hour workday and a minimum wage of $5 for a days labor. February 13 - Copyright: In... 1914. Unusually, provision was made for the title to be passed to his brother and nephew, since Kitchener was not married and had no children.

Public Domain image of original Kitchener WWI Recruitment poster by Alfred Leete ? is it ely public domain, wheres it from, Pre-1928: This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. See Copyright. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete...
Public Domain image of original Kitchener WWI Recruitment poster by Alfred Leete ? is it ely public domain, wheres it from, Pre-1928: This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. See Copyright. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete... Enlarge
Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. Battle aftermath. Remains of the Chateau Wood World War I, also known as the First World War, the Great War, the War of the Nations, and the War to End All Wars, was a world conflict occurring from 1914 to... World War I recruitment poster featuring Kitchener

World War I

At the outset of Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. Battle aftermath. Remains of the Chateau Wood World War I, also known as the First World War, the Great War, the War of the Nations, and the War to End All Wars, was a world conflict occurring from 1914 to... World War I, Prime Minister Herbert Henry Asquith, 1st Earl of Oxford and Asquith (September 12, 1852 - February 15, 1928) served as the Liberal Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1908 to 1916. Born in Morley, Yorkshire and educated at the City of London School, he won a scholarship to Balliol College, Oxford. After... Herbert Henry Asquith quickly appointed Lord Kitchener as The position of Secretary of State for War, commonly called War Secretary, a British cabinet-level position, first applied to Henry Dundas (appointed in 1794). In 1801 the post became that of Secretary of State for War and the Colonies. The position was re-instated in 1854 and remained until... Secretary of State for War. Against cabinet opinion, Kitchener correctly predicted a long war that would last at least three years, require huge new armies to defeat Germany, and suffer huge casualties before the end would come.


A massive recruitment campaign began, which soon featured a distinctive poster of himself, taken from a magazine front cover. It has proved to be one of the most enduring images of the Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. Battle aftermath. Remains of the Chateau Wood World War I (also known as the First World War, the Great War, the War of the Nations, and the War to End All Wars) was a world conflict occurring from 1914 to... Great War and arguably resulted in three million men enlisting.


In an effort to find a way to relieve pressure on the Western front, he proposed an invasion of Iskenderun, formerly known in the west as Alexandretta, is a city in the Turkish province of Hatay. It is located on the Mediterranean coast at the foot of the Amonos Mountains in the far southeast of Turkey. The current population is around 230,000. Iskenderun preserves the name, but probably... Alexandretta with The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (popularly abbreviated as ANZAC) was originally an army corps of Australian and New Zealand troops who fought in World War I at Gallipoli, in the Middle East and on the Western Front. Within Australasia the Anzacs came to stand not just for the... ANZAC, Following the outbreak of hostilities in the Great War the then British Secretary of State for War Horatio Kitchener, Lord Kitchener of Khartoum, advised forming a volunteer army of a million men. Officially called the New Army it was often referred to as Kitcheners Army. Origins Contrary to general... New Army and The Republic of India is the second most populous country in the world, with a population of more than one billion, and is the seventh largest country by geographical area. India has grown significantly, both in population and in strategic importance in the last two decades. The Indian economy is... Indian troops. Alexandretta was an area with a large Christian population and was the strategic centre of the The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Imperial motto El Muzaffer Daima The Ever Victorious (as written in tugra) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital İstanbul ( Constantinople/Asitane/Konstantiniyye ) Sovereigns Sultans of the Osmanli Dynasty Population ca 40 million Area 12+ million km² Establishment 1299 Dissolution October... Ottoman Empire's railway network - its capture would have cut the empire in two. Yet he was eventually persuaded to support The Right Honourable Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill KG, OM, CH, FRS ( November 30, 1874 – January 24, 1965) was a British statesman, best known as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during World War II. At various times an author, soldier, journalist, and politician, Churchill is generally regarded as... Winston Churchill's disastrous Gallipoli, called Gelibolu in modern Turkish, is a town in northwestern Turkey. The name derives from the Greek Kallipolis, meaning Beautiful City. It is located on the Gallipoli Peninsula (Gelibolu Yarimadasi), with the Aegean Sea to the west and the Dardanelles straits to the east. In Australia, New Zealand and... Gallipoli campaign in 1915 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). Events January 12 - The Rocky Mountain National Park is established by an act of the U.S. Congress. January 12 - United States House of Representatives rejects proposal to give women the right to vote. January 13 – An... 1915 1916 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) Events January-February January 1 -The first successful blood transfusion using blood that had been stored and cooled. Impressionist Monet paints Water Lilies. January 8 - Allied forces withdraw from Gallipoli January 17 - The Professional Golfers Association... 1916. That failure, combined with the ammunition crisis, was to deal Kitchener's political reputation a heavy blow; he offered to resign but Asquith refused, although responsibility for munitions was moved to a new ministry headed by David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd George of Dwyfor, OM (January 17, 1863–March 26, 1945) was a British statesman and the last Liberal to be Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Upbringing Although born in Manchester in 1863, David Lloyd George was a Welsh-speaking Welshman, the only... David Lloyd George. In May 1916 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) Events January-February January 1 -The first successful blood transfusion using blood that had been stored and cooled. Impressionist Monet paints Water Lilies. January 8 - Allied forces withdraw from Gallipoli January 17 - The Professional Golfers Association... 1916 preparations were made for Kitchener and Lloyd George to visit Russia on a diplomatic mission. Lloyd George was otherwise engaged with his new Ministry and so it was decided to send Kitchener alone.


A week before his death Kitchener confided to Edward George Villiers Stanley, 17th Earl of Derby (4 April 1865 - 4 February 1948) was an English politician around the turn of the 20th century. He was the son of the 16th Earl of Derby. He joined the Grenadier Guards as a lieutenant, and served in that regiment between 1885... Lord Derby that he intended to press relentlessly for a peace of reconciliation, regardless of his position, when the war was over, as he feared that the politicians would make a bad peace.


On June 4 is the 155th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (156th in leap years), with 210 days remaining. Events 780 BC - The first historic solar eclipse is recorded in China. 1039 - Henry II becomes King of Germany. 1615 - Forces under the shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu take Osaka Castle... June 4, 1916 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) Events January-February January 1 -The first successful blood transfusion using blood that had been stored and cooled. Impressionist Monet paints Water Lilies. January 8 - Allied forces withdraw from Gallipoli January 17 - The Professional Golfers Association... 1916, he personally answered questions asked by politicians of his running of the war; they learned that immediately at the start of the war Kitchener had placed huge orders for munitions with American companies, who had delivered 480 of two million rifles ordered. He received the resounding vote of thanks from the 200+ A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. Australia In Australia, the term Member of Parliament refers specifically to a member of the Australian House of Representatives. See also... MPs who had arrived to question him; Sir George Arthur who only a week before had introduced a failed vote of censure in the In some bicameral parliaments of a Westminster System, the House of Commons has historically been the name of the elected lower house. The Commons generally holds much more power than the upper house (the senate or House of Lords). The leader of the majority party in the House of Commons... House of Commons personally seconded the motion.


Death

At Scapa Flow is a body of water in the Orkney Islands, Scotland, United Kingdom. Surrounded by the islands of Mainland, Graemsay, Burray, South Ronaldsay and Hoy, it is best known as the site of the United Kingdoms chief naval base during the First and Second World Wars. Already used... Scapa Flow, Kitchener embarked aboard the The armored cruiser was a naval cruiser protected by armor on its sides as well as on the decks and gun positions. This class was used from around 1875 until mid-World War I, and in auxiliary roles in the 1930s and even during World War II. The development of... armoured cruiser HMS Hampshire was a Devonshire-class armoured cruiser of the Royal Navy. She was constructed at the Chatham Dockyard, Kent and commissioned in 1905 at a cost of around £900,000. She served in World War I and fought at the battle of Jutland on May 31, 1916. Immediately after... HMS Hampshire for his diplomatic mission to Russia. On June 5 is the 156th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (157th in leap years), with 209 days remaining. Events 1783 - The Montgolfier brothers publicly demonstrate their montgolfière ( hot air balloon). 1817 - First Great Lakes steamer, the Frontenac, is launched. 1829 - HMS Pickle captures the armed... June 5, 1916 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) Events January-February January 1 -The first successful blood transfusion using blood that had been stored and cooled. Impressionist Monet paints Water Lilies. January 8 - Allied forces withdraw from Gallipoli January 17 - The Professional Golfers Association... 1916, while en route to the Russian port of Murmansk, Archangelsk, Dikson, Tiksi, on the Arctic Ocean The city of Arkhangelsk (Арха́нгельск, formerly in English Archangel) lies on the Northern Dvina River (Се́верная Двина́) near... Arkhangelsk, HMS Hampshire struck a mine during a The Beaufort scale is an empirical measure for the intensity of the wind based mainly on sea-state or wave conditions. Its full name is the Beaufort wind force scale. It should be noted that the wave heights given pertain to the conditions found at open sea. The scale was... Force 9 A gale is a wind of at least 28 knots, 32 MPH, or 51km/h; and up to 55 knots, 63 MPH, or 102km/h. It is divided into three or four categories: A moderate gale or near gale is up to 33 kt., 38 MPH, or 61km/h, and... gale and sank west of the The Orkney Islands form one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, and are a Lieutenancy Area. Orkney consists of about 200 small islands 16 kilometers north of Caithness in northern Scotland. The largest island in the group is known as The Mainland; about 20 are inhabited in total. Orkney... Orkney Islands. Kitchener, his staff, and 643 of the crew of 655, were drowned or died of exposure. His body was never found. The same day, the last Division of Kitchener's Following the outbreak of hostilities in the Great War the then British Secretary of State for War Horatio Kitchener, Lord Kitchener of Khartoum, advised forming a volunteer army of a million men. Officially called the New Army it was often referred to as Kitcheners Army. Kitcheners Army represented... New Army crossed the channel to take up its positions in This article is in need of attention. Please improve it in any way you see fit. Definitions Flanders ( Dutch: Vlaanderen, French: Flandre or Flandres) has two main designations: as a historical region (the County of Flanders), and as a administrative region of Belgium (the Flemish Region and the Flemish Community... Flanders and France where, eventually, and despite numerous setbacks, they helped to defeat Germany in 1918 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). Events January-February January 8 - President Woodrow Wilson announces his Fourteen Points for the aftermath of World War I. January 24 - a decree of the Council of Peoples Commissars, introducing the Gregorian calendar in Russia since February... 1918.


Following his death the town of Berlin, Ontario, was renamed For other uses of the word Kitchener please see Kitchener (disambiguation) Map of Waterloo Regional Municipality, Ontario with Kitchener in red. The City of Kitchener, in southwestern Ontario, has a population of 190,399 (as of 2001 census). It is the seat of Waterloo Regional Municipality and is adjacent to... Kitchener in his honour. Mount Kitchener is located within the Columbia Icefield of Jasper National Park, which is part of the Canadian Rockies. The mountain can be seen from the Icefields Parkway (#93) near Sunwapta Pass. Mt. Kitchener was originally named Mount Douglas by J. Norman Collie after David Douglas. In 1916, the mountain... Mount Kitchener in the Wilcox Pass The Canadian Rockies comprise the Canadian segment of the North American Rocky Mountains range. The southern end in Alberta and British Columbia borders Idaho and Montana of the USA. The northern end is at the Liard Plain in British Columbia. Contrary to popular misconception, the Rockies do not... Canadian Rockies was also named in his honour.


A month after his death the Lord Kitchener National Memorial Fund was set up by the Lord Mayor of London to honour his memory. It was used to aid casualties of the war, both practically and financially; following the war's end, the fund was used to enable university educations for soldiers, ex-soldiers and their sons, a function it continues to perform today.


See also

  • Following the outbreak of hostilities in the Great War the then British Secretary of State for War Horatio Kitchener, Lord Kitchener of Khartoum, advised forming a volunteer army of a million men. Officially called the New Army it was often referred to as Kitcheners Army. Kitcheners Army represented... Kitchener's Army
  • Lord Kitchener National Memorial Fund

External links

  • http://www.kitchenerscholars.org/pages/fund.htm


Preceded by:
Sir Arthur Power Palmer
This article is in need of attention. Please see its listing on Pages needing attention and improve it in any way you see fit. When the issues regarding this page have been resolved, remove this notice and the listing, but please do not remove this notice until the article has... Commander-in-Chief, India
1902–1909
Succeeded by:
Sir O'Moore Creagh
Preceded by:
Sir John Eldon Gorst, (1835-1916), was a British lawyer and politician. He served as Solicitor-General from 1885 to 1886 and as Vice-President of the Committee of the Council on Education between 1895 and 1902. He was born at Preston, the son of Edward Chaddock Gorst, who took... Sir John Eldon Gorst
Monarchs Wālīs (Governors) of Egypt, 1805-1867 Muḩammad ‘Alī 1805-1848 Ibrāhīm 1848 Muḩammad ‘Alī (restored) 1848-1849 ‘Abbās I 1849-1854 Sa‘īd 1854-1863 Ismā‘... British Consul-General in Egypt
1911-1914
Succeeded by:
Sir Milne Cheetham
Preceded by:
Herbert Henry Asquith, 1st Earl of Oxford and Asquith (September 12, 1852 - February 15, 1928) served as the Liberal Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1908 to 1916. Born in Morley, Yorkshire and educated at the City of London School, he won a scholarship to Balliol College, Oxford. After... Herbert Henry Asquith
The position of Secretary of State for War, commonly called War Secretary, a British cabinet-level position, first applied to Henry Dundas (appointed in 1794). In 1801 the post became that of Secretary of State for War and the Colonies. The position was re-instated in 1854 and remained until... Secretary of State for War
1914–1916
Succeeded by:
David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd George of Dwyfor, OM (January 17, 1863–March 26, 1945) was a British statesman and the last Liberal to be Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Upbringing Although born in Manchester in 1863, David Lloyd George was a Welsh-speaking Welshman, the only... David Lloyd George





Preceded by:
New Creation
Earl Kitchener, of Khartoum and of Broome in the County of Kent, is a peerage title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was bestowed in 1914 upon Field Marshal Horatio Kitchener, who had previously been created Baron Kitchener, of Khartoum and of Aspall in the County of Suffolk... Earl Kitchener
Succeeded by:
Henry Kitchener
Earl Kitchener, of Khartoum and of Broome in the County of Kent, is a peerage title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was bestowed in 1914 upon Field Marshal Horatio Kitchener, who had previously been created Baron Kitchener, of Khartoum and of Aspall in the County of Suffolk... Baron Kitchener
Succeeded by:
Extinct


File links The following pages link to this file: Abu Dhabi Abraham Lincoln Australia Adolf Hitler Andorra Anatomy Asia Albert Einstein Asterales Automobile Aircraft Alexander Graham Bell Apple Computer American Civil War Ancient Egypt Asteraceae Alps Arches National Park Aarhus Almond Caesar Augustus Acropolis Acupuncture Amaranth Alexander III of Russia...
The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free images, sound and other multimedia files. It is a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. Files uploaded to this repository can be used as local files by other projects on the Wikimedia servers, including Wikipedia, Wikibooks and Wikinews... Wikimedia Commons has more media related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
Horatio Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1582 words)
Kitchener was born in Ballylongford, County Kerry in Ireland.
Kitchener rescued a substantial charitable fund which had been diverted into the pockets of the Khedive of Egypt, and put it to use improving the lives of the ordinary Sudanese.
Kitchener was promoted to Field Marshal in 1910; however, largely due to a Curzon-inspired whispering campaign, he was turned down for the post of Viceroy of India in 1911.
Encyclopedia: Horatio Kitchener (7142 words)
Kitchener was born in County Kerry (Irish: Ciarraí) is a county in the southwest of Ireland, in the Munster province of the Republic of Ireland, the county is informally referred to as The Kingdom.
Kitchener rescued a substantial charitable fund which had been diverted into the pockets of the Khedive (from Persian for lord) was a title created in 1867 by the Ottoman Sultan Abd-ul-Aziz for the then-governor of Egypt, Ismail Pasha.
Earl Kitchener, of Khartoum and of Broome in the County of Kent, is a peerage title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m