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Encyclopedia > Horatio Hornblower

Horatio Hornblower is a fictional character, an officer in the British Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars, originally the protagonist of a series of novels by C. S. Forester, and later the subject of films and television programs. Alice, a fictional character based on a real character from the work of Lewis Carroll. ... An officer is a member of a military, naval, or if applicable, other uniformed services who holds a position of responsibility. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... Combatants Austria[a] Portugal Prussia[a] Russia[b] Sicily[c] Sardinia  Spain[d]  Sweden[e] United Kingdom French Empire Holland[f] Italy Etruria[g] Naples[h] Duchy of Warsaw[i] Confederation of the Rhine[j] Bavaria Saxony Westphalia Württemberg Denmark-Norway[k] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack... This article is about the literary concept. ... The cover of the 1974 paperback edition of one of Foresters non-fiction titles: Hunting The Bismarck Cecil Scott Forester was the pen name of Cecil Louis Troughton Smith (August 27, 1899 – April 2, 1966), an English novelist who rose to fame with tales of adventure with military themes. ... This article is about motion pictures. ...

The character is iconic in Age of Sail traditional naval fiction, and any writer in the genre must deal with comparisons to Forester. There are many parallels between Hornblower and real naval officers of the period, especially Thomas Cochrane and Horatio Nelson. The name "Horatio" was inspired by the character in William Shakespeare's Hamlet and chosen also because of its association with contemporary figures such as Nelson.[1] At the same time, Forester wrote the body of the works carefully to avoid entanglements with real world history, so Hornblower is always off on another mission when a great naval victory occurs during the Napoleonic Wars; concurrently, whatever he has Hornblower about, is usually important too, if less heralded. The age of sail is the period in which international trade and naval warfare were both dominated by sailing ships. ... For other uses, see Fiction (disambiguation). ... Rear Admiral Thomas Alexander Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald, Marquês do Maranhão GCB RN (14 December 1775 – 31 October 1860), styled Lord Cochrane between 1778 and 1831[1], was a radical politician and naval officer. ... Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson, KB (29 September 1758 – 21 October 1805) was a British admiral famous for his participation in the Napoleonic Wars, most notably in the Battle of Trafalgar, a decisive British victory in the war, during which he lost his life. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... Lord Nelson Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson (September 29, 1758 – October 21, 1805) was a British admiral who won fame as a leading naval commander. ... Combatants Austria[a] Portugal Prussia[a] Russia[b] Sicily[c] Sardinia  Spain[d]  Sweden[e] United Kingdom French Empire Holland[f] Italy Etruria[g] Naples[h] Duchy of Warsaw[i] Confederation of the Rhine[j] Bavaria Saxony Westphalia Württemberg Denmark-Norway[k] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack...


The original Hornblower tales, which began with the appearance of a reserved-to-the-point-of-withdrawn Captain on independent duty on a secret mission to the Pacific coast of South America, struck a chord with the public, and subsequent stories were eagerly serialized. The several short story collections date from this appetite by the pre-television public for more about the heroic captain. As counterpoint to hardcore naval discussions, the novel featured a love interest with Lady Barbara Wellesley, who gradually teases Hornblower into a less stiff and reserved character. Subsequent sequels explore the relationship they develop; Forester conveniently has Hornblower's wife Maria die of disease to continue the scandalous courtship even when Lady Barbara becomes the spouse of his immediate superior. As the series matured, the two were able to marry and live together comfortably. Hornblower ages gracefully and with a touch of humor now and again performs acts of human kindness against what duty would dictate, in a manner that would have bothered the young Hornblower's conscience to the point of nervous breakdown. Such fine splitting of moral hairs in the end creates a triumphant figure who has risen above and surpasses his early training.


As in the novels of Frederick Marryat and Patrick O'Brian, many of Hornblower's exploits are based upon those of Horatio Nelson and Thomas Cochrane. Brian Perett has written a book The Real Hornblower: The Life and Times of Admiral Sir James Gordon, GCB, ISBN 1-55750-968-9, that presents the case for a different inspiration, James Alexander Gordon. Captain Frederick Marryat (July 10, 1792 – August 9, 1848) was an English novelist, a contemporary and acquaintance of Charles Dickens, noted today as an early pioneer of the sea story. ... Patrick OBrian (12 December 1914 – 2 January 2000; born as Richard Patrick Russ) was an English novelist and translator, best known for his Aubrey–Maturin series of novels set in the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars and centered on the friendship of Captain Jack Aubrey and the Irish... Rear Admiral Thomas Alexander Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald, Marquês do Maranhão GCB RN (14 December 1775 – 31 October 1860), styled Lord Cochrane between 1778 and 1831[1], was a radical politician and naval officer. ... James Alexander Gordon, born 6 October 1782, died 8 January 1869, was a distinguished British naval officer of the Napoleonic Wars whose 75 years in the service, from Midshipman to Admiral of the Fleet, was unprecedented in its duration. ...


A "biography" of Hornblower, called The Life and Times of Horatio Hornblower, was published in 1970 by C. Northcote Parkinson. Cyril Northcote Parkinson (born July 30, 1909 in Barnard Castle, Durham County- died March 9, 1993 in Canterbury, Kent) was a naval historian and author of some sixty books, the most famous of which was his best seller Parkinsons Laws, which led him to be also considered as an...


Life

According to Forester, Hornblower, the son of a doctor, was born on July 4, 1776 (the date of the adoption of the United States Declaration of Independence) in Kent. He was given a classical education, and by the time he joined the Royal Navy at age seventeen, he was well-versed in Greek and Latin. He was tutored in French by a penniless French emigré and had an aptitude for mathematics, which served him well as a navigator. is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... A navigator is the person onboard a ship responsible for the navigation of the vessel. ...


Described as "unhappy and lonely", Hornblower is chiefly characterised by his reserve, introspection, and self-doubt—at least until a particularly difficult feat of seamanship, organisation, or navigation are called for under pressing circumstances, things which few other could do, and fewer still in such combination. He belittles such feats by numerous rationalizations, remembering only his fears—and forgetting he overcame them; diminishing amazing feats of seamanship—apparently unaware of the admiration in which they are regarded by his fellow seamen, while they stand amazed instead— believing that no one could have pulled that off.


He regards himself as cowardly, dishonest, and, at times, disloyal—never crediting his ability to persevere, think rapidly, organize, or cut to the nub of a matter and put such things aside while staying focused on the priority of the moment. His sense of duty, hard work, and a drive to succeed make these imagined negative characteristics undetectable by everyone but him, and being introspective, he blows up petty things beyond reasonable measure to reinforce his poor self image. His introverted nature continually isolates him from the people around him, including his closest friend, William Bush, and his wives never fully understand him. He is guarded with nearly everyone and reticent to the point of giving offense, unless the matter is the business of discharging his duty as a Kings' officer, in which case he is clear, decisive, and almost loquacious while giving orders and instructions, as the needs of the exigency demand. His introspection makes him a very self-conscious and lonely man, a characteristic which is displayed even in the short fiction about his career as a midshipman and lieutenant; through most of the books, the enforced isolation of being "The captain" (and later, as Admiral) in the Royal Navy makes him lonelier still. William Bush is a fictional character in C.S. Foresters Horatio Hornblower series. ...


He suffers from severe chronic seasickness (like Horatio Nelson), especially occurring at the beginning of his voyages and for a time, was known derisively as the midshipman who was sick (in the excellent sheltered harbour at) Spithead. He has a immense reading appetite and can discourse on the works of various contemporary figures of literature and the classics, has mastered the difficult art of celestial navigation and its arcane mathematics to the point that in Lydia he made a perfect landfall while voyaging five months out of sight of land or contact with other ships (an interpretation of his orders to maintain secrecy) and furthermore, plays excellent whist, essentially professionally—a talent which he uses to maintain himself financially from time to time, as when a “not confirmed” field promotion to commander was never confirmed. This left him in an unfortunate position of debt to his government, having to pay back the difference in the two salaries; a job he was quite capable of undertaking with the help of his card playing abilities. Seasickness is hazardous for scuba divers Seasickness is the feeling of nausea and, in extreme cases, vertigo experienced after spending time on a craft on water. ... Lord Nelson Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson (September 29, 1758 – October 21, 1805) was a British admiral who won fame as a leading naval commander. ... Whist is a classic trick-taking card game which was played widely in the 18th and 19th centuries. ...


He is tone-deaf and finds music an incomprehensible irritant (in a scene in Hotspur he is unable to tell the British and French national anthems from each other), and when Lady Barbara played guitar when long balmy Pacific airs had Lydia becalmed, he kept away from the gaggle of off-duty officers despite longing to mix in. He is philosophically opposed to flogging and capital punishment, in many cases when called for by the Articles of war, yet as Captain and Lieutenant had to call men to account knowing such harshness would be the result. While possessing a superb sense of duty—one might say hyper-developed—on occasion he is able to set it aside for his more human and humane component parts underlying the facade of the strict officer—to the extent that in Hornblower and the Hotspur he contrives an escape for his personal steward who would otherwise have been hanged for striking a superior. A person who is tone deaf lacks relative pitch, the ability to discriminate between musical notes. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that is evoking and eulogising the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognised either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... Whipping on a post Flagellation is the act of whipping (Latin flagellum, whip) the human body. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ...


Early career

Hornblower's early exploits are many and varied. Joining the Royal Navy as a midshipman, he fends off fire ships which interrupt his first (disastrous) examination for promotion to lieutenant. Still only an acting lieutenant, he is given command of the sloop Le Rêve, which blunders into a Spanish fleet in the fog, resulting in Hornblower's capture and imprisonment in Ferrol [1]. He is finally confirmed as a commissioned lieutenant while still a prisoner of war, a state he will endure again later in his career at the end of Ship of the Line and detailed in Flying Colours—along with his daring escape from the heart of France, which earns him a sentence of death from a trial held in absentia from Napoleon—and a rather flattering reward offer for his capture. In the first captivity, his self-sacrificing, difficult and daring rescue of surviving sailors from a shipwreck hanging on a harbor entrance and rocky breakwater under extremely hazardous storm conditions, and his honourable adherence to the parole he had given, is rewarded by his Spanish captors by his release. His captivity leaves him with a fluent knowledge of Spanish, which proves highly useful in several further adventures. A midshipman is a subordinate officer, or alternatively a commissioned officer of the lowest rank, in the navies of several English-speaking countries. ... This article is not about the fireboats that fight fire Defeat of the Spanish Armada, 1588-08-08 by Philippe-Jacques de Loutherbourg, painted 1796, depicts Drakes fire ship attack on the Spanish Armada. ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... Ferrol can refer to: EUROPE Ferrol, Spain City and Naval Station in North Western Spain, European Union Note: Place of birth of both Francisco Franco (1892) the Spanish dictator and Pablo Iglesias (1850) founder of PSOE and UGT. ASIA Ferrol, Romblon Small Town in the Philippines Note: The Philippines got... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ...


As a junior lieutenant, he serves under Captain Sawyer, who suffers from paranoid schizophrenia on a trip to the Caribbean, during which he begins his long friendship with William Bush. Returning to England, Hornblower is demobilised after the peace of Amiens, causing him great financial distress -- he resorts to making a living as a professional gambler, playing whist with admirals and other senior figures for a modest income. Schizophrenia is a psychiatric diagnosis denoting a persistent, often chronic, mental illness variously affecting behavior, thinking, and emotion. ... West Indies redirects here. ... William Bush is a fictional character in C.S. Foresters Horatio Hornblower series. ... The Treaty of Amiens was signed on March 25, 1802 (Germinal 4, year X in the French Revolutionary Calendar) by Joseph Bonaparte and the Marquis Cornwallis as a Definitive Treaty of Peace between France and Britain. ... Whist is a classic trick-taking card game which was played widely in the 18th and 19th centuries. ...


In 1803, he is reactivated and confirmed as commander of HMS Hotspur when hostilities resume against Napoleon. After gruelling service during the blockade of Brest, he finally is promoted to captain and recalled to England. Once there, he meets the secretary of the Admiralty and post rank is conferred immediately when Hornblower agrees to take part in a clandestine operation that eventually leads to the resounding English victory at the Battle of Trafalgar that cost Nelson his life. 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Commander is a military rank which is also sometimes used as a military title depending on the individual customs of a given military service. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Hotspur after the nickname of Sir Henry Percy: The first Hotspur was a 36-gun fifth-rate in service from 1810 to 1821. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Brest is a city in Brittany, or the Bretagne région, north-west France, sous-préfecture of the Finistère département. ... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... Post-Captain is an obsolete alternative form of the rank of Captain in the Royal Navy. ... Combatants United Kingdom First French Empire Kingdom of Spain Commanders Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson † Pierre Charles Silvestre de Villeneuve Strength 27 ships of the line and 6 others. ... Lord Nelson Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson (September 29, 1758 – October 21, 1805) was a British admiral who won fame as a leading naval commander. ...


Hornblower then organises Nelson's funeral procession along the River Thames and has to deal with the near-sinking of the barge conveying the hero's coffin. Later, he secretly recovers sunken gold and silver from a sunken ship on the bottom of Marmorice Bay within the Ottoman Empire with the aid of pearl divers from Ceylon, narrowly escaping a Turkish warship at the end. Upon unloading the treasure and refitting, his ship, HMS Atropos, is taken away from him to be given to the King of the Two Sicilies for diplomatic reasons. On his return to England, he finds his two young children dying of smallpox. This article is about the River Thames in southern England. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... Pearl diver in Japan Pearl hunting or pearl diving refers to a now largely obsolete method of retrieving pearls from oysters. ... The Two Sicilies The Kingdom of the Two Sicilies was the new name that the Bourbon king Ferdinand IV of Naples gave to his domain (including Southern Italy and Sicily) after the end of the Napoleonic Era and the full restoration of his power in 1816. ... Smallpox (also known by the Latin names Variola or Variola vera) is a contagious disease unique to humans. ...


He later (in the time line, but presented in first novel written) makes a long, difficult voyage in command of the frigate HMS Lydia, round the Horn to the Pacific, where he supports a madman, El Supremo, in his rebellion against the Spanish. He captures the Natividad, a much more powerful Spanish ship of the line, then has to reluctantly cede it to El Supremo to placate him. When he finds that the Spanish have switched sides in the interim, he is forced to find and sink the ship he had captured—adding insult to injury, as he'd given up a fortune in prize money to maintain an uneasy alliance with the insane revolutionary. On his return voyage, he and his well-connected passenger, Lady Barbara Wellesley, the fictional younger sister of Arthur Wellesley (later to become the Duke of Wellington) become dangerously attracted to each other, resulting in a kiss that is interrupted by Lady Barbara's maid Hebe—when she is sent away, Hornblower is reluctant to re-enter the moment, and perceiving herself rejected, Barbara's temper flares. She leaves the Lydia two days later, and Hornblower fears the worst for his career having offended the daughter of an earl and sister of a Marquis. For the bird, see Frigatebird. ... Cape Horn from the South. ... El Supremo is a fictional character in C.S. Foresters novels about Horatio Hornblower. ... Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... The Dukedom of Wellington, derived from Wellington in Somerset, is a hereditary title and the senior Dukedom in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ...


Later career

After these exploits, he is given command of HMS Sutherland, a seventy four gun ship of the line. While waiting at his Mediterranean rendezvous point for the rest of his squadron - and its commander - to arrive, he carries out a series of raids against the French along the south coast of Spain. He learns that a French squadron of four ships of the line is loose, having slipped the blockade. He decides that his duty requires that he fight at one-to-four odds to prevent them from entering a well-protected harbour. In the process, his ship is crippled and, with two-thirds of the crew incapacitated, he surrenders to the French. The Redoutable being fired upon by the Temeraire at Trafalgar, on the 21th of October 1805, after having fought for more than two hours against Nelsons Victory The Seventy-four was a two-decked sailing ship of the line nominally carrying 74 guns. ... Ships of the line were 1st, 2nd, or 3rd-rated ships in the rating system of the Royal Navy. ...


He is sent with his coxswain, Brown, and his injured first lieutenant, Bush, to Paris for a show trial and execution. During the journey, Hornblower and his companions escape, and after a winter sojourn at the chateau of the Comte de Graçay, navigate down the Loire river to the coastal city of Nantes. There, he recaptures a Royal Navy cutter, the Witch of Endor, mans the vessel with a gang of slave labourers and escapes to the Channel Fleet. The Loire River (pronounced in French), the longest river in France with a length of just over 1000 km, drains an area of 117,000 km², more than a fifth of France. ... Traditional city flag City coat of arms Motto: Favet Neptunus eunti (Latin: Shall Neptune favour the traveller) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Pays de la Loire Department Loire-Atlantique (44) Mayor Jean-Marc Ayrault  (PS) (since 1989) City Statistics Land area¹ 65. ... For other uses see cutter (disambiguation) An American-looking gaff cutter with a genoa jib set This French yawl has a gaff topsail set. ... The Witch of Endor: from the frontispiece to Sadducismus Triumphatus by Joseph Glanvill In the Hebrew Bible, the Witch of Endor of the First book of Samuel, chapter 28:4–25, was a witch, a woman who possesses a talisman, through which she called up the ghost of the recently... The Channel Fleet is the historical name used for the group of Royal Navy warships that defended the waters of the English Channel. ...


Hornblower faces a mandatory court-martial for the loss of the Sutherland, but is "most honourably acquitted." A national hero in the eyes of the public, he is awarded a knighthood and made a Colonel of Marines. When he arrives home, he discovers that his first wife Maria had died in childbirth and that his infant son has been adopted and cared for by Lady Barbara. As she has been widowed by the death of her husband, Hornblower's former commander, Admiral Leighton, they are free (after a decent interval) to marry. Barbara is more beautiful, cleverer and far richer than the poor Maria (whom Hornblower had more pitied than loved). Thereafter, he lives (uncomfortably) as a country squire in Kent. A court-martial (plural courts-martial) is a military court that determines punishments for members of the military subject to military law. ... A statue of an armoured knight of the Middle Ages For the chess piece, see knight (chess). ...


Freedom from this purgatory comes when he is promoted to commodore and sent on a mission to the Baltic Sea, where he must be a diplomat as much as an officer. He foils an assassination attempt on the Russian Czar and is influential in the ruler's decision to resist the French invasion of his vast country. He provides invaluable assistance in the defence of Riga against the French army, where he meets Carl von Clausewitz. British Commodore Sleeve Rank Command flag Commodore is a rank of the Royal Navy that dates to the mid-17th century: it was first used in the time of William III. There was a need for officers to command squadrons, but it was not deemed desirable to create new admirals. ... The Baltic Sea is located in Northern Europe, from 53°N to 66°N latitude and from 20°E to 26°E longitude. ... Tsar, (Bulgarian цар�, Russian царь; often spelled Czar or Tzar in English), was the title used for the autocratic rulers of the First and Second Bulgarian Empires since 913, in Serbia in the middle of the 14th century, and in Russia from 1547 to 1917. ... Combatants First French Empire Kingdom of Italy Kingdom of Naples Duchy of Warsaw Confederation of the Rhine Kingdom of Bavaria Kingdom of Saxony Kingdom of Westphalia Swiss Confederation Austrian Empire Kingdom of Prussia Russian Empire Commanders Napoleon Eugène de Beauharnais Jérôme Bonaparte Jaques MacDonald Prince Schwarzenberg Alexander... For other uses, see Riga (disambiguation). ... Carl Philipp Gottfried von Clausewitz (IPA: ) (June 1, 1780[1] – November 16, 1831) was a Prussian soldier, military historian and influential military theorist. ...


He returns ill with typhus to England, yet soon after his recovery goes off to deal with mutineers off the coast of France. After taking the mutinous ship by trickery, he sets up the return of the Bourbons to France, and is created a peer as Baron Hornblower, of Smallbridge in the County of Kent. For the unrelated disease caused by Salmonella typhi, see Typhoid fever. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-06-08, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ...


When Napoleon returns from exile at the start of the Hundred Days, Hornblower is staying at the estate of the Comte de Graçay. He leads a Royalist Guerrilla movement; after capture by the French, he is about to be shot under an earlier warrant for his execution when he is saved by news of Napoleon's defeat at the Battle of Waterloo. The Hundred Days (French Cent-Jours) or the Waterloo Campaign commonly refers to the period between 20 March 1815, the date on which Napoleon Bonaparte arrived in Paris after his return from Elba, and 8 July 1815, the date of the restoration of King Louis XVIII. The phrase Cent jours... “Guerrilla” redirects here. ... Combatants French Empire Seventh Coalition: United Kingdom Prussia United Netherlands Hanover Nassau Brunswick Commanders Napoleon Bonaparte, Michel Ney Duke of Wellington, Gebhard von Blücher Strength 73,000 67,000 Anglo-Allies 60,000 Prussian (48,000 engaged by about 18:00) Casualties 25,000 killed or wounded 7,000...


After several years ashore, he is promoted to Admiral and appointed Commander-in-Chief of the West Indies. He foils an attempt by veterans of Napoleon's Imperial Guard to free Napoleon from his captivity on Saint Helena, captures a slave ship, and encounters Simón Bolívar's army. He retires to Kent and eventually becomes Admiral of the Fleet. Slave ships were cargo boats specially converted for the purpose of transporting slaves, especially newly captured African slaves. ... This article is about the South American independence leader. ...


His final, improbable achievement occurs at his home, when he assists a seemingly-mad man claiming to be Napoleon to travel to France. That person turns out to be Napoleon III, the nephew of Hornblower's great nemesis and the future president (and later emperor in his own right) of France. For his assistance, Lord Hornblower is created a Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. At the end of his long and heroic career, he is wealthy, famous, and contented; a loving and indulgent husband and father; and finally free of the insecurities and self-loathing that had driven him throughout his life. [citation needed] Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte (April 20, 1808 - January 9, 1873) was the son of King Louis Bonaparte and Queen Hortense de Beauharnais; both monarchs of the French puppet state, the Kingdom of Holland. ... French Legion of Honor The Légion dhonneur (in Legion of Honor (AmE) or Legion of Honour (ComE)) is an Order of Chivalry awarded by the President of France. ...


Forester provides two different brief summaries of Hornblower's career. The first was in the first chapter of The Happy Return, which was the first Hornblower novel written. The second occurs mid-way through The Commodore, when Czar Alexander asks him to describe his career. The two accounts are incompatible. The first account would have made Hornblower about five years older than the second. The second account is more nearly compatible with the rest of Hornblower's career, but it omits the time he spent as a commander in Hornblower and the Hotspur. There are other discrepancies as well, such as the account of his role in the defeat of a Spanish frigate in the Mediterranean, and the relations he explains at one point with his first lieutenant (and Executive officer) such that he was too forthcoming with the person—yet in the story background, the loyal Lt. Bush is that same second in command almost without exception—as inseparable as siamese twins. In one account, he distinguished himself as lieutenant and in another he is a post-captain with less than three years seniority. It appears that these discrepancies arose as the series matured and accounts needed to be modified to coincide with his age and career. While Executive officer literally refers to a person responsible for the performance of duties involved in running an organization, the exact meaning of the role is highly variable, depending on the organization. ...


The Hornblower novels

The novels, in the order they were written:

  1. The Happy Return (1937, called Beat to Quarters in the US)
  2. A Ship of the Line (1938, called simply Ship of the Line in the US)
  3. Flying Colours (1938, spelled Flying Colors in some US editions)
  4. The Commodore (1945, called Commodore Hornblower in the US)
  5. Lord Hornblower (1946)
  6. Mr. Midshipman Hornblower (1950, collected short stories)
  7. Lieutenant Hornblower (1952)
  8. Hornblower and the Atropos (1953)
  9. Hornblower in the West Indies (1958, Admiral Hornblower in the West Indies in some US editions)
  10. Hornblower and the Hotspur (1962)
  11. Hornblower and the Crisis (1967, unfinished novel and short stories, Hornblower During the Crisis in some US editions)

In chronological order: The Happy Return (Beat to Quarters in the US) was the first of the Horatio Hornblower novels published by C. S. Forester. ... The Happy Return (Beat to Quarters in the US) was the first of the Horatio Hornblower novels published by C. S. Forester. ... This novel follows Horatio Hornblower on his tour during his first tour as captain of a Ship of the Line. ... Following his surrender of the Sutherland, Horatio Hornblower endeavers to escape prison and execution at the hands of Napoleon. ... The Commodore (published 1945) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester. ... Lord Hornblower (published 1946) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester. ... Mr. ... Lieutenant Hornblower (published 1952) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester, ISBN 1859989764. ... Hornblower and the Atropos is a 1953 historical novel by C.S. Forester. ... Hornblower in the West Indies, or alternately Admiral Hornblower in the West Indies is one of the novels in the series CS Forester wrote about fictional Royal Navy officer Horatio Hornblower. ... Hornblower and the Hotspur (published 1962) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester. ... Hornblower and the Crisis is a 1967 historical novel by C. S. Forester. ...

  1. Mr. Midshipman Hornblower (collected short stories)
  2. Lieutenant Hornblower
  3. Hornblower and the Hotspur
  4. Hornblower and the Crisis (unfinished novel and short stories, Hornblower During the Crisis in some US editions)
  5. Hornblower and the Atropos
  6. The Happy Return (called Beat to Quarters in the US)
  7. A Ship of the Line (called simply Ship of the Line in the US)
  8. Flying Colours (spelled Flying Colors in some US editions)
  9. The Commodore (called Commodore Hornblower in the US)
  10. Lord Hornblower
  11. Hornblower in the West Indies (Admiral Hornblower in the West Indies in some US editions)

Mr. Midshipman Hornblower, Lieutenant Hornblower and Hornblower and the Atropos were compiled in one book, variously titled Hornblower's Early Years, Horatio Hornblower Goes to Sea, or The Young Hornblower. There are also simplified "cadet" collections of the Hornblower books for children. Mr. ... Lieutenant Hornblower (published 1952) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester, ISBN 1859989764. ... Hornblower and the Hotspur (published 1962) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester. ... Hornblower and the Crisis is a 1967 historical novel by C. S. Forester. ... Hornblower and the Atropos is a 1953 historical novel by C.S. Forester. ... The Happy Return (Beat to Quarters in the US) was the first of the Horatio Hornblower novels published by C. S. Forester. ... The Happy Return (Beat to Quarters in the US) was the first of the Horatio Hornblower novels published by C. S. Forester. ... This novel follows Horatio Hornblower on his tour during his first tour as captain of a Ship of the Line. ... Following his surrender of the Sutherland, Horatio Hornblower endeavers to escape prison and execution at the hands of Napoleon. ... The Commodore (published 1945) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester. ... Lord Hornblower (published 1946) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester. ... Hornblower in the West Indies, or alternately Admiral Hornblower in the West Indies is one of the novels in the series CS Forester wrote about fictional Royal Navy officer Horatio Hornblower. ... Mr. ... Lieutenant Hornblower (published 1952) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester, ISBN 1859989764. ... Hornblower and the Atropos is a 1953 historical novel by C.S. Forester. ...


Hornblower and the Atropos, The Happy Return and A Ship of the Line were also compiled into one omnibus edition, called Captain Hornblower. Hornblower and the Atropos is a 1953 historical novel by C.S. Forester. ... The Happy Return (Beat to Quarters in the US) was the first of the Horatio Hornblower novels published by C. S. Forester. ... This novel follows Horatio Hornblower on his tour during his first tour as captain of a Ship of the Line. ...


In the US Beat to Quarters, Ship of the Line, and Flying Colours were also compiled into one book, called Captain Horatio Hornblower. The Happy Return (Beat to Quarters in the US) was the first of the Horatio Hornblower novels published by C. S. Forester. ... Ships of the line were 1st, 2nd, or 3rd-rated ships in the rating system of the Royal Navy. ... Following his surrender of the Sutherland, Horatio Hornblower endeavers to escape prison and execution at the hands of Napoleon. ...


Flying Colours, The Commodore, Lord Hornblower, and Hornblower in the West Indies make up a third omnibus edition called Admiral Hornblower to fill out the series. Following his surrender of the Sutherland, Horatio Hornblower endeavers to escape prison and execution at the hands of Napoleon. ... The Commodore (published 1945) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester. ... Lord Hornblower (published 1946) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester. ... Hornblower in the West Indies, or alternately Admiral Hornblower in the West Indies is one of the novels in the series CS Forester wrote about fictional Royal Navy officer Horatio Hornblower. ...


The Hornblower short stories

Three short stories by C. S. Forester about Hornblower were also published in 1940 and 1941. The stories are:

  • Hornblower's Charitable Offering (aka The Bad Samaritan), published in Argosy, May 1941, and was originally intended as a chapter for A Ship of the Line.
  • Hornblower and His Majesty, in Collier's, March 1940, and in Argosy, March 1941.
  • The Hand of Destiny, in Collier's, November 1940.

Two other stories Hornblower and the Widow McCool (aka Hornblower's Temptation) (1967) and The Last Encounter (1967), are often included with the unfinished novel Hornblower and the Crisis. Argosy was an American pulp magazine, considered to be the first pulp magazine, published by Frank Munsey. ... Colliers (May 7, 1932) Colliers Weekly was an American magazine founded by Peter Fenelon Collier and published from 1888 to 1957. ... Hornblower and the Widow McCool is a short story by C. S. Forester, featuring his fictional naval hero, Horatio Hornblower. ...


Another short story The Point And The Edge is included as an outline only in The Hornblower Companion (1964), a book in which Forester describes and illustrates with maps the incidents which his fictional hero experienced, and describes how the novels were written, what inspired them and how they relate to the real world of the Royal Navy.


Historical figures portrayed in the books

Royal Navy figures

  • Vice-Admiral The Honourable Sir Henry Blackwood (Hornblower and the Atropos)
  • Admiral Prince William Henry, Duke of Clarence (later King William IV) (Flying Colours)
  • Admiral Lord Collingwood (Hornblower and the Atropos)
  • Admiral Sir William Cornwallis (Hornblower and the Widow McCool, Hornblower and the Hotspur, Hornblower and the Atropos)
  • Admiral Lord Gambier (Flying Colours)
  • Rear-Admiral Lord Gardner, second in command to Admiral Cornwallis (Hornblower and the Hotspur)
  • Captain Richard Bowen — HMS Terpsichore, but called Captain Sir Richard Bowen, killed at Teneriffe
  • Captain John Gore — HMS Medusa (Hornblower and the Hotspur)
  • Captain Richard Grindall — HMS Prince (Hornblower and the Hotspur)
  • Captain Graham Eden Hammond — HMS Lively (Hornblower and the Hotspur)
  • Captain Sir Thomas Masterman Hardy — HMS Triumph (Flying Colours)
  • Admiral Sir John Jervis, 1st Earl of St Vincent (Hornblower and the Atropos, Lord Hornblower)
  • Captain Charles John Moore Mansfield — HMS Minotaur (Hornblower and the Hotspur)
  • Captain Graham Moore, later Admiral Sir Graham Moore, — HMS Indefatigable (Hornblower and the Hotspur)
  • Admiral of the Fleet Sir Peter Parker (Hornblower and the Atropos)
  • Rear-Admiral Sir William Parker (Hornblower and the Hotspur)
  • Captain Lord Henry Paulet — HMS Terrible (Hornblower and the Hotspur)
  • Captain Sir Edward Pellew (later Admiral Pellew, Viscount Exmouth) — HMS Indefatigable (Mr Midshipman Hornblower, Hornblower and the Hotspur, Lord Hornblower)
  • Admiral Sir James Saumarez, later Lord de Saumarez, — HMS Temeraire (The Happy Return)
  • Captain Samuel Sutton — HMS Amphion (Hornblower and the Hotspur)

This article needs to be wikified. ... William IV King of the United Kingdom William IV (William Henry) (21 August 1765–20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom and of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death. ... Cuthbert Collingwood, 1st Baron Collingwood (26 September 1750 – 7 March 1810) was an admiral of the Royal Navy, notable as a partner with Horatio Nelson in several of the great victories of the Napoleonic Wars. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Admiral John James Gambier (13 October 1756 New Providence, Bahamas- 19 April 1833 Iver,England) Governor of Newfoundland 1802 - 1804 In 1807, he took part in the Battle of Copenhagen (1807). ... Baron Gardner, of Uttoxeter in the County of Stafford, is a dormant title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... Vice-Admiral Sir Thomas Masterman Hardy This article is about the naval officer. ... John Jervis, 1st Earl of St Vincent (9 January 1735-14 March 1823) was an admiral in the British Royal Navy. ... Sir Graham Moore (1764-1843) was a British sailor and a career officer in the Royal Navy. ... Edward Pellew, 1st Viscount Exmouth (April 9, 1757 – January 23, 1833) was a British naval officer. ... James Saumarez, 1st Baron de Saumarez or Sausmarez (11 March 1757–9 October 1836) was an admiral of the British Royal Navy, notable for his victory at the Battle of Algeciras. ...

Other historical figures

Aleksandr I Pavlovich (Russian: Александр I Павлович) (December 23, 1777 – December 1, 1825?), was Emperor of Russia from 23 March 1801-1 December 1825 and Ruler of Poland from 1815–1825, as well as the first Grand Duke of Finland. ... Sir John Barrow, 1st Baronet, FRS , FRGS , LL.D (June 19, 1764 – November 23, 1848) was an English statesman. ... The Lord William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck, known as Lord William Bentinck (14 September 1774 - 17 June 1839) was a British statesman who served as Governor-General of India from 1828 to 1835. ... King Charles XIV of Sweden, Charles III of Norway, or domestically Carl XIV Johan and Carl III Johan respectively, Jean Baptiste Jules Bernadotte (January 26, 1763 - March 8, 1844) was born at Pau, France, the son of Henri Bernadotte (1711-1780), procurator at Pau, and Jeanne St. ... Louis Napoleon Bonaparte, born September 2, 1779, in Ajaccio, Corsica, was one of three younger brothers of the Emperor Napoleon I of France, who made him King of Holland in 1806 and deposed him as King in 1810. ... Pierre Cambronne. ... Carl Philipp Gottfried von Clausewitz (IPA: ) (June 1, 1780[1] – November 16, 1831) was a Prussian soldier, military historian and influential military theorist. ... Henry Conyngham, 1st Marquess Conyngham, was a politician of the Regency period. ... Louis XIX, King of France and of Navarre (Louis-Antoine, duc dAngoulême) (August 6, 1775 – June 3, 1844) was the eldest son of the comte dArtois (later King Charles X of France) and Marie-Thérèse de Savoie. ... Portrait of Marie-Thérèse-Charlotte, Madame Royale Marie-Thérèse-Charlotte, (December 19, 1778 - October 19, 1851), also known as La Princesse Royale or Madame Royale, was the eldest child of King Louis XVI and his Austrian wife, Queen Marie Antoinette. ... Portrait by George Dawe from the Military Gallery Count Hans Karl Friedrich Anton von Diebitsch and Narden (Russian: ) (born 13 May 1785 in Groß Leipe near Obernigk, Lower Silesia - died 10 June 1831 near Pultusk) was a German-born soldier serving as Russian Field Marshal. ... John Hookham Frere (May 21, 1769 - January 7, 1846), was an English diplomat and author. ... “George III” redirects here. ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... William Marsden (16 November 1754-6 October 1836) was an English orientalist. ... Francisco de Miranda Sebastián Francisco de Miranda Rodríguez (commonly known as Francisco de Miranda March 28, 1750 – July 14, 1816) was a South American revolutionary whose own plan for the independence of the Spanish American colonies failed, but who is regarded as a forerunner of Simón Bol... Louis Marie Jacques Amalric, comte de Narbonne-Lara (August 24, 1755 - November 17, 1813), French soldier and diplomatist, was born at Colorno, in the duchy of Parma. ... Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston, KG, GCB, PC (20 October 1784 – 18 October 1865) was a British statesman who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in the mid-19th century. ... Spencer Perceval (1 November 1762 – 11 May 1812) was a British statesman and Prime Minister. ... Richard Wellesley ,1st Marquess Wellesley The Most Honourable Richard Colley Wesley, later Wellesley, 1st Marquess Wellesley (20 June 1760 - 26 September 1842), was the eldest son of Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington, an Irish peer, and brother of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. ... Johann David Ludwig Graf Yorck von Wartenburg (September 26, 1759 - October 4, 1830) was a Prussian Field Marshal of alleged English ancestry. ...

Hornblower's ships

HMS Lydia from the 1951 film Captain Horatio Hornblower
HMS Lydia from the 1951 film Captain Horatio Hornblower

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... (released in the US without the R.N.) is a naval adventure movie of 1951 based upon the Horatio Hornblower novels of C. S. Forester, specifically (in order of publication) The Happy Return, A Ship of the Line, and Flying Colours. ... Ships of the line were 1st, 2nd, or 3rd-rated ships in the rating system of the Royal Navy. ... Mr. ... A midshipman is a subordinate officer, or alternatively a commissioned officer of the lowest rank, in the navies of several English-speaking countries. ... HMS Indefatigable was originally built as a 64-gun two-decked ship of the line for the British Royal Navy. ... A razee is a sailing ship that has been cut down (razeed) to one with fewer decks. ... Mr. ... A midshipman is a subordinate officer, or alternatively a commissioned officer of the lowest rank, in the navies of several English-speaking countries. ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... HMS Renown was a sailing ship of the line in the late 1700s later renamed the Royal Oak. ... Lieutenant Hornblower (published 1952) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester, ISBN 1859989764. ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... USS Constellation, a United States Navy sloop-of-war. ... Lieutenant Hornblower (published 1952) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester, ISBN 1859989764. ... Commander is a military rank which is also sometimes used as a military title depending on the individual customs of a given military service. ... Four ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Hotspur after the nickname of Sir Henry Percy: The first Hotspur was a 36-gun fifth-rate in service from 1810 to 1821. ... USS Constellation, a United States Navy sloop-of-war. ... Hornblower and the Hotspur (published 1962) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester. ... Commander is a military rank which is also sometimes used as a military title depending on the individual customs of a given military service. ... HMS Atropos is a fictional 22-gun sloop from C. S. Forester’s novel Hornblower and the Atropos, named after a Greek mythological figure. ... Hornblower and the Atropos is a 1953 historical novel by C.S. Forester. ... For the bird, see Frigatebird. ... The Happy Return (Beat to Quarters in the US) was the first of the Horatio Hornblower novels published by C. S. Forester. ... The Happy Return (Beat to Quarters in the US) was the first of the Horatio Hornblower novels published by C. S. Forester. ... ... This novel follows Horatio Hornblower on his tour during his first tour as captain of a Ship of the Line. ... For other uses see cutter (disambiguation) An American-looking gaff cutter with a genoa jib set This French yawl has a gaff topsail set. ... Following his surrender of the Sutherland, Horatio Hornblower endeavers to escape prison and execution at the hands of Napoleon. ... Nine vessels of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Nonsuch. ... The Commodore (published 1945) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester. ... Lord Hornblower (published 1946) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester. ... The Commodore (published 1945) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester. ... Bomb vessels attacking Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore A bomb ketch, bomb vessel, bomb ship, or simply bomb was a type of wooden sailing naval ship. ... The Commodore (published 1945) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester. ... The Commodore (published 1945) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Brigantine. ... Lord Hornblower (published 1946) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester. ... Lord Hornblower (published 1946) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester. ... In C.S. Foresters Horatio Hornblower novel Admiral Hornblower in the West Indies, Hornblowers squadron consists of three frigates, and a couple of dozen brigs and schooners. ... The Commodore (published 1945) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester. ... Hornblower in the West Indies, or alternately Admiral Hornblower in the West Indies is one of the novels in the series CS Forester wrote about fictional Royal Navy officer Horatio Hornblower. ... Hornblower in the West Indies, or alternately Admiral Hornblower in the West Indies is one of the novels in the series CS Forester wrote about fictional Royal Navy officer Horatio Hornblower. ...

Hornblower in other media

Gregory Peck as Captain Horatio Hornblower from the 1951 film Captain Horatio Hornblower
Gregory Peck as Captain Horatio Hornblower from the 1951 film Captain Horatio Hornblower

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916 – June 12, 2003) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... (released in the US without the R.N.) is a naval adventure movie of 1951 based upon the Horatio Hornblower novels of C. S. Forester, specifically (in order of publication) The Happy Return, A Ship of the Line, and Flying Colours. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... (released in the US without the R.N.) is a naval adventure movie of 1951 based upon the Horatio Hornblower novels of C. S. Forester, specifically (in order of publication) The Happy Return, A Ship of the Line, and Flying Colours. ... Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916 – June 12, 2003) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... The Happy Return (Beat to Quarters in the US) was the first of the Horatio Hornblower novels published by C. S. Forester. ... This novel follows Horatio Hornblower on his tour during his first tour as captain of a Ship of the Line. ... Following his surrender of the Sutherland, Horatio Hornblower endeavers to escape prison and execution at the hands of Napoleon. ... Cecil Scott Forester is the pen name of Cecil Smith (August 27, 1899 - April 2, 1966), an English novelist whose rose to fame with tales of adventure with military themes, notably the 11-book Horatio Hornblower series (being filmed with Ioan Gruffudd as Horatio Hornblower) about naval warfare during the... Virginia Mayo (November 30, 1920 – January 17, 2005) was an American film actress. ... Lux Radio Theater, one of the genuine classic radio anthology series (NBC Blue Network (1934-1935); CBS (1935-1954); NBC (1954-1955)) adapted first Broadway stage works, and then (especially) films to hour-long live radio presentations. ... ITV1 is the name, in England, Wales and the Scottish borders, for a terrestrial, free-to-air television channel, broadcast in the United Kingdom by the ITV network. ... A&E Television Networks is a media company that owns several TV networks on cable and satellite. ... Hornblower is the umbrella title of an acclaimed series of television drama programmes loosely based on C. S. Foresters novels about the fictional character Horatio Hornblower, a British naval officer during the Napoleonic Wars. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ioan Gruffudd (pronounced , yoe-an gri-fidh) (born October 6, 1973) is a British actor from Wales. ... Mr. ... Hornblower and the Hotspur (published 1962) is a Horatio Hornblower novel written by C. S. Forester. ...

Influence on other fiction

  • The Star Trek character James T. Kirk was originally also supposedly modelled after Hornblower. Nicholas Meyer, director of some of the most well regarded Star Trek films, frequently cites Horatio Hornblower as one of his primary influences, although Kirk's trademark emotional impulsiveness is a far cry from Hornblower's almost masochistic reserve, and Kirk's populism contrasts with Hornblower's aloofness.
  • Gene Roddenberry based the Star Trek character of Jean-Luc Picard on Hornblower [2].
  • The science fiction space ship captain John Grimes is acknowledged by his author A. Bertram Chandler to be not only based upon Horatio Hornblower, but has Hornblower himself as a distant relative.
  • The Hope science fiction series by David Feintuch is heavily influenced by the Hornblower series.
  • The popular Sharpe novels by Bernard Cornwell were inspired by C.S. Forester's Hornblower series.[citation needed]
  • Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin novels are also inspired by Hornblower, and retell some of the same episodes of naval history.[citation needed]
  • David Weber's character Honor Harrington closely parallels Hornblower and he deliberately gave her the same initials.[3] In one of the novels the character is described reading a Hornblower novel. The first Honor novel is dedicated to C.S. Forester.
  • Captain Honario Harpplayer, R.N. is a short story parody written by the science fiction author Harry Harrison. While Hornblower is tone-deaf, Harpplayer is one of the rare people who are completely colour-blind, with the result that he cannot recognize a little green man as an alien from outer space. Harpplayer reflects on the "imaginary colors" that other people claim to see, and refers to the alien as "Mr. Greene".
  • In the Warhammer 40,000 universe a frigate captain by the name of "Horatio Bugler" appears in one of the historical notes found in the Ciaphas Cain novel The Traitor's Hand.

This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... James Tiberius Kirk, played by William Shatner, is the main character in the original Star Trek television series and the films based on it. ... Nicholas Meyer at the Paramount Pictures lot in 2002. ... Eugene Wesley Roddenberry (August 19, 1921 – October 24, 1991) was an American scriptwriter and producer. ... Jean-Luc Picard is a fictional human Star Trek character portrayed by actor Patrick Stewart. ... Arthur Bertram Chandler (March 28, 1912 _ June 6, 1984) was an Australian science fiction author most well-known for his John Grimes novels and the Rim World series. ... David Feintuch (July 7, 1944-March 16, 2006) was a science fiction and fantasy author and attorney. ... Richard Sharpe is the central character in Bernard Cornwells Sharpe which also formed the basis for the Sharpe television series, where the eponymous character was played by Sean Bean. ... Patrick OBrian (12 December 1914 – 2 January 2000; born as Richard Patrick Russ) was an English novelist and translator, best known for his Aubrey–Maturin series of novels set in the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars and centered on the friendship of Captain Jack Aubrey and the Irish... The Aubrey–Maturin series, also known as the Aubreyad,[1] consists of a sequence of 20 completed and one unfinished historical novels by Patrick OBrian, set during the Napoleonic Wars and centering on the friendship between Captain Jack Aubrey of the Royal Navy and his ships surgeon Stephen... Honor Harrington from Honor Among Enemies cover, by David Mattingly. ... Honor Stephanie Harrington is a fictional character, the eponymous heroine of a series of science fiction books set in the Honorverse, written by David Weber and published by Baen Books. ... At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Harry Harrison (born Henry Maxwell Dempsey, March 12, 1925 in Stamford, Connecticut) is an American science fiction author who has lived in many parts of the world including Mexico, England, Denmark and Italy. ... Warhammer 40,000 (informally known as Warhammer 40K, WH40K, W40K or just 40K) is a science fantasy game produced by Games Workshop. ... Ciaphas Cain is a character in the fictional Warhammer 40,000 universe; a Commissar of the Imperial Guard. ...

References

  1. ^ C. S. Forester, The Hornblower Companion, NY, 1964, p. 87
  2. ^ Review @ Classic Film Guide. Retrieved on 2006-08-17.
  3. ^ David Weber Interview discussing comparison between Honour Harrington and Hornblower http://www.wildviolet.net/live_steel/david_weber.html

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Scaryfangirl.com - the most comprehensive Hornblower page on the net
  • The HornBlog - Horatio Hornblower news and discussion
  • Horatio Hornblower television series 2001
  • Naval Chronicle - in depth discussion of the Hornblower novels

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