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Encyclopedia > Horace Walpole

Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, more commonly known as Horace Walpole, (September 24, 1717March 2, 1797), was a politician, writer and forerunner of the Gothic revival. September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years). ... // Events January 4 — The Netherlands, Britain & France sign Triple Alliance February 26-March 6 What is now the northeastern United States was paralyzed by a series of blizzards that buried the region. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... 1797 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ...


He was born in London, the youngest son of British Prime Minister Robert Walpole. He was educated at Eton College and King's College, Cambridge. His homosexual preference revealed itself early, and he is believed to have had affairs with the poet Thomas Gray, and with Henry Fiennes Clinton, 9th Earl of Lincoln (later 2nd Duke of Newcastle). Gray accompanied Walpole on the Grand Tour, but they quarrelled, and Walpole returned to England in 1741 and entered parliament. He was never politically ambitious, but remained an MP even after the death of his father in 1745 left him a man of independent means. The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... The Rt. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (that is, an independent, fee-charging secondary school) for boys. ... Full name The Kings College of Our Lady and St Nicholas Motto Veritas Et Utilitas Truth and usefulness Named after Henry VI Previous names - Established 1441 Sister College New College Acting Provost Dr Tess Adkins Location Kings Parade Undergraduates 397 Graduates 239 Homepage Boatclub Kings College, Cambridge... For the recipient of the Victoria Cross, see Thomas Gray (VC) For the co-inventor of the Seismometer, see Thomas Lomar Gray Thomas Gray (December 26, 1716 – July 30, 1771), English poet, classical scholar, and professor of history at Cambridge University. ... Duke of Newcastle is a title which has been created several times in the peerages of England and Great Britain. ... In the 18th century, the Grand Tour was a kind of education for wealthy British noblemen. ... // Events April 10 – Austrian army attack troops of Frederick the Great at Mollwitz December 19 – Vitus Bering dies in his expedition east of Siberia December 25 – Anders Celsius develops his own thermometer scale Celsius William Browning invents mineral water Elizabeth of Russia became czarina. ... // Events May 11 - War of Austrian Succession: Battle of Fontenoy - At Fontenoy, French forces defeat an Anglo-Dutch-Hanoverian army including the Black Watch June 4 – Frederick the Great destroys Austrian army at Hohenfriedberg August 19 - Beginning of the 45 Jacobite Rising at Glenfinnan September 12 - Francis I is elected...


Following his father's politics, he was a devotee of King George II and Queen Caroline, siding with them against their son, Frederick, Prince of Wales, about whom Walpole wrote spitefully in his memoirs. Walpole's home, Strawberry Hill, near Twickenham, was a fanciful concoction of neo-Gothic which began a new architectural trend. In 1764, he published his Gothic novel, The Castle of Otranto, setting a literary trend to go with the architecture. From 1762 on, he published his Anecdotes of Painting in England, based on George Vertue's manuscript notes. His memoirs of the Georgian social and political scene, though heavily biased, are a useful primary source for historians. He also coined the term Serendipity. George II (George Augustus) (10 November 1683–25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... Her Serene Highness Margravine Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach (or Anspach) (1 March 1683 – 20 November 1737) was the queen consort of King George II of Great Britain 1727-1737. ... His Royal Highness The Prince Frederick, Prince of Wales (Frederick Louis) (February 1, 1707 - March 31, 1751) was the only man of that name ever to hold the title Prince of Wales, and is best remembered as the father of King George III of the United Kingdom and as the... Strawberry Hill is a place in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames near Twickenham. ... Twickenham is a town in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames in the south-west of London It is best known as the home of Twickenham Stadium - the headquarters of the Rugby Football Union. ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole The gothic novel is an English literary genre, which can be said to have been born with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole. ... The Castle of Otranto is a 1764 novel by Horace Walpole. ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... George Vertue (1684-1756) was a British engraver and antiquary, whose notebooks on British art of the first half of the 18th century are a valuable source for the period. ... Serendipity is finding something unexpected and useful while searching for something else entirely. ...


His father was created Earl of Orford in 1742. Horace's elder brother, Robert Walpole, 2nd Earl of Orford (c.1701-1751), passed the title on to his son George Walpole, 3rd Earl of Orford (1730-1791). When George died unmarried, Horace Walpole became the 4th Earl of Orford. When Horace Walpole died in 1797 the title became extinct. It was recreated in 1806 for Horace's cousin Horatio Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford (1723-1809). The great-grandson of the first earl of this creation, Horatio William Walpole (1813-1894), became the 4th Earl of Orford of the 1806 creation. The 1806 creation became extinct on the death of Robert Horace Walpole, 5th Earl of Orford (1854-1931). Descendants of a younger brother of the 1st Earl of the 1806 creation have inherited older baronies, including one once held by Horace. The title of Earl of Orford was created several times in British history - in the Peerage of England in 1697, in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1742 for former prime minister Robert Walpole, and in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1806 for Lord Walpole, Walpoles distant...



Preceded by:
George Walpole
Earl of Orford Succeeded by:
Extinct

The title of Earl of Orford was created several times in British history - in the Peerage of England in 1697, in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1742 for former prime minister Robert Walpole, and in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1806 for Lord Walpole, Walpoles distant...

External links

  • Horace Walpole Study Resources
  • Project Gutenberg E-texts by the author (up-to-date list)
    • The Letters of Horace Walpole, Volume 1
    • The Letters of Horace Walpole, Volume 2
    • The Letters of Horace Walpole, Volume 3
    • The Letters of Horace Walpole, Volume 4
    • Letters of Horace Walpole, Volume I
    • Letters of Horace Walpole, Volume II
    • The Castle of Otranto
    • The Friends of Strawberry Hill
  • The Twickenham Museum - Horace Walpole

  Results from FactBites:
 
Horace Walpole - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (413 words)
Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, more commonly known as Horace Walpole, (September 24, 1717 March 2, 1797), was a politician, writer and forerunner of the Gothic revival.
Horace's elder brother, Robert Walpole, 2nd Earl of Orford (c.1701-1751), passed the title on to his son George Walpole, 3rd Earl of Orford (1730-1791).
It was recreated in 1806 for Horace's cousin Horatio Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford (1723-1809).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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