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Encyclopedia > Horace Mann School
Horace Mann School
Motto Magna est veritas et prævalet
(Great is the truth and it prevails)
Established 1887
Type Independent, college preparatory school
Head of School Dr. Thomas M. Kelly
Students approx. 1,750
Grades Nursery 3's-12th
Location 231 West 246th St.,
Riverdale, New York, 10471, United States
Campus Urban and Suburban
Colors Maroon and white
Mascot Lions
Yearbook The Mannikin
Newspaper The Record
Website http://www.horacemann.org

The Horace Mann School is an independent college preparatory school in New York City. Founded in 1887, Horace Mann spans from nursery school to the twelfth grade and is a member of the Ivy Preparatory School League. Its Upper, Middle, and Lower Divisions are located in Riverdale, a neighborhood of the Bronx, and the Nursery School is located in Manhattan. In addition, the school has the John Dorr Nature Laboratory, a 265-acre (1.07 km²) campus in Washington Depot, Connecticut, that serves as the school's outdoor education and environmental education center; it is visited by students throughout the year. Image File history File links Hmlogo. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Year 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Educational institutions are often categorised along several dimensions. ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually shortened to preparatory school, or prep school) is a private secondary school (or high school) designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... Riverdale Riverdale (population approximately 45,000, according to the 2000 U.S. Census) is a middle- and upper-class residential neighborhood in the northwest Bronx, New York City. ... This article is about the state. ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Maroon is a color related to dark red. ... This article is about the color. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Yearbook (disambiguation). ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually shortened to preparatory school, or prep school) is a private secondary school (or high school) designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Ivy Preparatory School League, like the Ivy League for universities, was originally an athletic conference, not a scholastic one, for preparatory schools. ... Riverdale (population approximately 46,000, according to the 2000 Census) is a middle- and upper-middle class residential neighborhood in the northwest Bronx in New York City. ... For other uses, see Bronx (disambiguation). ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Washington is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. ...

Contents

History

The school was founded in 1887 by Nicholas Murray Butler as a co-educational experimental and developmental unit of Teachers College at Columbia University.[1] Its first location was a building at 9 University Place in Manhattan, but it moved in 1901 to 120th Street in Morningside Heights.[1] Columbia University followed suit soon afterwards, moving northwards to its present campus. The name of the school can still be seen on the western-most building at the Columbia campus, named Horace Mann Hall. However, Horace Mann was becoming a school in its own right instead of a teaching laboratory, and it became more independent of the University and Teachers College. The Teachers College therefore created the Lincoln School to continue its experiments in teaching. Nicholas Murray Butler Nicholas Murray Butler (April 2, 1862 – December 7, 1947) was an American philosopher, diplomat, and educator. ... Teachers College, Columbia University (sometimes referred to simply as Teachers College; also referred to as Teachers College of Columbia University or the Columbia University Graduate School of Education) is a top ranked graduate school of education in the United States. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Morningside Heights is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City and is bound by the Upper West Side, Morningside Park, Harlem, and Riverside Park (some now consider it part of the Upper West Side). ...


Shedding its co-educational roots, the school split into separate all-male and all-female schools. In 1912, the Boys' School moved to 246th Street in the Riverdale section of the Bronx, and during the 1940s it severed formal ties with Columbia University and became Horace Mann School.[1] The Horace Mann School for Girls remained at Teachers College, and then merged with the Lincoln School in 1940, and finally closed in 1946.[1] Riverdale (population approximately 46,000, according to the 2000 Census) is a middle- and upper-middle class residential neighborhood in the northwest Bronx in New York City. ... For other uses, see Bronx (disambiguation). ...


The New York School for Nursery Years (founded in 1954 on 90th Street in Manhattan) became the Horace Mann School for Nursery Years in 1968, and was co-ed.[1] In 1972, Horace Mann merged with the Barnard School, also in Riverdale, to form the Horace Mann-Barnard Lower School for kindergarten through grade six, located on the former Barnard School campus. At that point, only the lower school was co-ed.[1] That changed in 1975, when HM returned to its roots as a co-educational learning environment and began admitting females to the Upper School.[1] In 1999, the sixth grade moved from the Horace Mann-Barnard campus to the main 246th Street campus and formed a distinct Middle School along with the seventh and eighth grades. For other uses, see Kindergarten (disambiguation). ... Sixth grade (called Grade 6 in some regions) is a year of education in America and many other nations. ... Seventh grade (called Grade 7 in some regions) is a year of education in America and many other nations. ... Eighth grade is a year of primary education in the United States and Canada (in Canada its often referred to as Grade 8). ...


Institution

Divisions

There are four divisions of the school, all co-educational: a Nursery Division (three year olds through kindergarten) located on 90th Street in Manhattan, a Lower Division (kindergarten through fifth grades) on the Horace Mann campus on Tibbett Avenue in Riverdale, a Middle Division (sixth through eighth grades) on the 246th Street campus in Riverdale, and an Upper Division (ninth through twelfth grades) also on the 246th Street campus. There is also the John Dorr Nature Laboratory, located on 244 acres (0.99 km²) of land in Washington Depot, Connecticut, used for extended field trips for classes of students starting in second grade and an orientation program for new students entering the Middle or Upper Divisions.


Current tuition for students in the Lower Division through the Upper Division is approximately $32,000 a year.[2] Financial aid at the school is based on need; no merit scholarships are awarded. For the 2005-2006 academic year, 18% of the students received more than $6,000,000 in aid.[3]


Each division of the school has its own Division Head. The Middle and Upper Divisions have separate student government organizations. The entire school is overseen by a Head of School. The ninth and current Head is Dr. Thomas M. Kelly, who previously served as Superintendent of Schools in Valhalla, New York. Kelly succeeded Dr. Eileen Mullady (who is currently the head of the Pacific Ridge School in Carlsbad, CA), on July 1, 2005. Formerly of Princeton University and the Lawrenceville School,[4] Dr. Mullady was the namesake of one of the new buildings erected under her term. Prior to Dr. Mullady, the long-standing Head was the late R. Inslee Clark, Jr., previously Dean of Admissions at Yale University. In education, a superintendent is an individual that has executive oversight and administration rights, usually within an educational entity or organization. ... Valhalla is a hamlet and census-designated place (CDP) located in the town of Mount Pleasant in Westchester County, New York, USA. The population was 5,379 at the 2000 census. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... The Lawrenceville School is a coeducational, independent preparatory boarding school for grades 9-12 located on 700 acres in the historic community of Lawrenceville, in Lawrence Township, New Jersey, U.S. five miles southwest of Princeton. ... As Director of Admissions, Yale University, oversaw the schools transition to a coeducational admission policy. ... Yale redirects here. ...


The current Horace Mann Nursery Division Head is Patricia Zuroski. The current Lower Division Head is Wendy Steinthal, replacing Dr. Steven B. Tobolsky, who departed in June 2007 to run the Chestnut Hill School, an elite N-6 prep school outside Boston. The current Middle Division Head is Robin Ann Ingram, and the current Upper Division head is Dr. David Schiller. Glenn Sherratt is the current Director of the John Dorr Nature Laboratory.[1] Boston College and the Chestnut Hill Reservoir Located 6 miles west of Boston, Chestnut Hill is a wealthy suburb notable for its stately old houses, scenic landscape and the historic campus of Boston College. ...


Academics

Horace Mann is known for its academic rigor.[who?] The school offers 20 Advanced Placement courses and 10 foreign languages. Its 220 faculty members hold 210 master's degrees and 25 doctoral degrees.


Students in the Upper Division are required to study English, Atlantic World History, United States History, Biology, Chemistry and/or Physics, Geometry, Algebra II and Trigonometry, and also meet various requirements in the Arts, Computer Science, Health & Counseling, and Physical Education. Students must go beyond these basic requirements in at least some, if not all, subjects. They are also required to take at least three years of either French, German, Japanese, Latin, or Spanish. Additional classes in Greek, Italian, Mandarin, and Russian are offered. Mandarin may mean: Mandarin (linguistics), a group of dialects of spoken Chinese, or more specifically, its standardized version, Standard Mandarin Mandarin (bureaucrat), a bureaucrat of Imperial China, Vietnam and Korea, and in the United Kingdom and Canada, by analogy, any government bureaucrat Mandarin Airlines, a subsidiary of China Airlines Mandarin...


Starting in eleventh grade, students have more flexibility with their requirements and can choose from courses in Economics, Psychology, Classical History, Political Philosophy, United States Legal History, Calculus, Statistics, Science and Public Policy, and many other elective classes.


Independent Study and Senior Projects, where students create their own coursework and present their findings in weekly meetings, are also common. Additionally, many students develop original research projects with faculty at Columbia University, Cornell University Medical Center, NYU, and Rockefeller University.


Arts

Horace Mann has an extensive arts program, offering a variety of courses in the fields of Performing and Visual arts. At least 1.5 arts credits are required for graduation, with at least one half-credit course in performance/studio arts and one half-credit course in art history/appreciation.


Horace Mann has two major instrumental ensembles: The Horace Mann Orchestra and the Horace Mann Jazz Band. The Jazz Band program is also split into two ensembles: the Contemporary Directions Ensemble and the Creative Arts Philharmonic. Each ensemble performs at least three to four concerts per year, culminating in trip abroad. Recent trips have taken the Glee Club and Orchestra to Prague, Germany, France and Spain. Horace Mann also has an established Glee Club, which performs several concerts each year, including past performances at Carnegie Hall, Symphony Space, and Alice Tully Hall of Lincoln Center. In 2006, the Jazz Bands performed at the world-famous BB King's jazz club. On February 25 2007, the Horace Mann Jazz Band and Concert Band performed at Jazz at Lincoln Center in the world-famous Allen Room. The next month the middle school concert band and chamber orchestra went to compete in a heritage festival and each won gold medals with scores above 95. Additionally, the Jazz Band has most recently performed at a couple of the world's most famous jazz clubs, Birdland and, again, B.B. King's. Currently the Middle School Concert Band and Chamber orchestra are planning a trip to Chicago to play in a festival of gold. For other uses, see Orchestra (disambiguation). ... A jazz band (or jazz ensemble) is a musical ensemble that plays jazz music usually without a conductor. ... A Glee Club is a chorus, historically of men but also of just women or mixed voices, which traditionally specializes in singing short songs. ... Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ... The Alice Tully Hall is a concert hall that is part of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York City. ... The Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. ... A jazz band (or jazz ensemble) is a musical ensemble that plays jazz music usually without a conductor. ... A concert band, also called wind band, symphonic band, symphonic winds, wind orchestra, wind symphony, or wind ensemble, is a performing ensemble consisting of several members of the woodwind instrument family, brass instrument family and percussion instrument family. ... Jazz at Lincoln Center is a new addition to the Lincoln Center performing arts complex, located at 60th Street and Broadway in New York City, slightly south of the main Lincoln Center campus and directly adjacent to Columbus Circle. ... Middle school (also known as intermediate school or junior high school) covers a period of education that straddles primary/elementary education and secondary education, serving as a bridge between the two. ... A concert band, also called wind band, symphonic band, symphonic winds, wind orchestra, wind symphony, or wind ensemble, is a performing ensemble consisting of several members of the woodwind instrument family, brass instrument family and percussion instrument family. ... An orchestra is a musical ensemble used most often in classical music. ... Middle school (also known as intermediate school or junior high school) covers a period of education that straddles primary/elementary education and secondary education, serving as a bridge between the two. ... A concert band, also called wind band, symphonic band, symphonic winds, wind orchestra, wind symphony, or wind ensemble, is a performing ensemble consisting of several members of the woodwind instrument family, brass instrument family and percussion instrument family. ... An orchestra is a musical ensemble used most often in classical music. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ...


Admission

Admission to Horace Mann is highly selective. Decisions are based on an applicant's recent grades, an interview, and the candidate's score on either the ISEE or SSAT test. The Independent School Entrance Examination, or ISEE, is an admissions test administered by the Educational Records Bureau for placement in independent schools for grades 5-12. ... The SSAT logo The Secondary School Admission Test, or SSAT, is an admissions test administered to students in grades 5-11 to help determine placement into independent or private junior high and high schools. ...


Sixth grade is Horace Mann's largest entry point, with between 50 and 55 places available each year. In the ninth grade, Horace Mann traditionally enrolls between 35 and 45 new students. A smaller number of students are accepted in other grades, although there are no admissions to the twelfth grade.


Rankings

The Wall Street Journal ranks Horace Mann as the fourth best high school in the United States, as measured by student admission rates to exclusive colleges. Each year almost all Horace Mann graduates attend nationally-ranked universities.[5] Worth Magazine ranked Horace Mann seventh out of all the nation's high schools based on the proportion of graduates attending Harvard, Yale and Princeton Universities.[6] The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... Harvard redirects here. ... Yale redirects here. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ...


Student life

Co-curricular activities are an integral part of Horace Mann. Clubs give students the opportunity to produce publications, hone their debating skills, participate in activism and much more.


Clubs and organizations

The school has a considerable number of clubs, especially in the Upper Division. Prominent clubs include:

This article is about the Western board game. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... The pride flag, news articles, and flyers for social events on this high school bulletin board represent the diverse support and advocacy purposes that GSAs serve. ... This article is about the vocal technique. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Knowledge Masters is an extracurricular activity in which students from teams from many schools in both America and world wide solve tests composed of questions drawn from ecletic sources. ... Manualism: Squeezing air through the hands to play musical notes Manualism is the little-known art of playing music by squeezing air through the hands. ... A mock trial is a contrived or imitation trial. ... Model Congress gives students a chance to engage in a role-playing simulation of the United States Congress. ... A Model United Nations Conference in Stuttgart, Germany in action. ... Private equity is a broad term that refers to any type of equity investment in an asset in which the equity is not freely tradable on a public stock market. ... Venture capital is a general term to describe financing for startup and early stage businesses as well as businesses in turn around situations. ... Variations of Rubiks Cubes (from left to right: Rubiks Revenge, Rubiks Cube, Professors Cube, & Pocket Cube (also known as Mini-Cube)). Rubiks Cube is a mechanical puzzle invented in 1974[1] by Hungarian sculptor and professor of architecture Ernő Rubik. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... Ping Pong redirects here. ...

Student publications

Horace Mann also has a significant number of student publications. Many of them have won national awards. Prominent publications include:


The Record, established in 1903, is the weekly, student-run newspaper of the Horace Mann School. Throughout its history, The Record has won national journalism awards and has been staffed by students who went on to become distinguished journalists and authors, including Pulitzer Prize winners Anthony Lewis (class of 1944), Richard Kluger (class of 1952) and Robert Caro (class of 1953). In 1954, Horace Mann made national headlines for translating a copy of The Record into Russian and distributing it in the USSR. The purpose of the exercise was to show Russian schoolchildren what life in America was like. The staff purposely kept in an article about the Horace Mann soccer team's losing one of its games to demonstrate the operation of an independent free press.[7][8] The American Scholastic Press Association twice honored The Record as the "Best High School Weekly Newspaper" for 2001-2002 (Volume 99) and 2003-2004 (Volume 101). It was also named a National Pacemaker in 2004 (Volume 101) and in 2006 was a Columbia Scholastic Press Association Gold Medalist (Volume 103). The Record is published every Friday during the academic year[9] and can be found online here. Anthony Lewis (born March 27, 1927, New York City) is a prominent liberal intellectual, writing for the New York Times op-ed page and the New York Review of Books, among other publications. ... Richard Kluger worked as a journalist before becoming an accomplished Pulitzer Prize-winning author and book publisher. ... Robert Allan Caro (born October 30, 1935) is a biographer most noted for his studies of United States political figures Robert Moses and Lyndon B. Johnson. ... Russian (русский язык ) is the most widely spoken of the Slavic languages. ... State motto (Russian): Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! (Transliterated: Proletarii vsekh stran, soedinyaytes!) (Translated: Workers of the world, unite!) Capital Moscow Official language None; Russian (de facto) Government Federation of Soviet republics Area  - Total  - % water 1st before collapse 22,402,200 km² Approx. ... In the modern age, the free press has taken on multiple meanings. ... Logo of the Columbia Scholastic Press Association. ...


The Horace Mann Review, now in its sixteenth volume, is a quarterly journal of opinion on current events, politics, public policy, and culture. The Review strives to cover issues from unique and otherwise unexamined perspectives. The publication has paying subscribers throughout the nation and abroad and has been the recipient of numerous awards for excellence in journalism. In April 2001, the American Scholastic Press Association honored the Review with its award for Best Magazine. The Review's 2005-2006 volume was honored with a first place finish in the American Scholastic Press Awards critique. The Review is a finalist for the National Scholastic Press Association's Magazine Pacemaker of the Year award for 2007, the highest honor in high school journalism.[10]


The Mannikin is the yearbook of the Horace Mann School. Traditional sections include Student Life, Underclassmen, Seniors (each graduate receives a half-page to design as they wish), Athletics, Faculty, and Advertisements. At 560 pages, the Mannikin is one of the largest high school yearbooks in New York State. In addition, the Mannikin has won numerous awards from the American Scholastic Press Association. State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ...


The HM Voyager is Horace Mann's first magazine dedicated to travel. In 2007, the American Scholastic Press Association honored the Voyager with its Best New Magazine award. In addition, the Voyager received First Place with Special Merit in the American Scholastic Press Awards critique. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Other school publications include: The MannHattan Review, a publication about New York City, La Plume, a French review and HM's only magazine in a foreign language,The Manuscript, the school's poetry magazine, Mental Boom, the creative writing magazine, The Score, a sports newspaper, The HM Business Report, a business magazine, Amplified, a music publication, Folio 51, a magazine produced by the Women's Issues Club, Images, an art magazine, the Thespian, a theatre publication, Lola's Kitchen, a one-page periodical published by the Gay Straight Alliance, Insight, a photography magazine, and InsideOut, a health publication. In addition, a literary-arts magazine called Muse, featuring the work of Middle School students, is published each year. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Categories: LGBT | Stub ...


Student government

The main body of student government is the Governing Council (GC), made up of students and teachers. There are five full time 12th grade representatives, and one alternate, while in grades 9-11, there are five full time representatives and two alternates for each grade. Because there are significantly fewer faculty members, each voting faculty representative is granted two votes.[11] Over the years the Council has removed the once-strict dress code (this was accomplished in 1969, when the structure was known as the Community Council), instituted an honor code, begun a debit card system to pay for items at the cafeteria and bookstore, and revised the school's constitution.


There is also a student body president (SBP) and a student body vice-president (SBVP), the two top positions in the Horace Mann student government apparatus. These two students are elected to office by grades 8-12. The winning ticket must collect 25 signatures in each grade and then garner at least 50% of the vote. The first SBP was Dr. Jeremy Leeds, a current Horace Mann teacher, who was elected when the Governing Council replaced the former Community Council in the school year 1971-72.


Athletics

Interscholastic leagues

Horace Mann School is a part of the Ivy Preparatory School League, a division of the greater New York State Association of Independent Schools (NYSAIS), which comprises all the private schools in the New York State. Fieldston, Riverdale, and Horace Mann together are known as the "hill schools," as all three are located within two miles (3 km) of each other in the Riverdale section of the Bronx, on a hilly area above Van Cortlandt Park. The three also share perhaps the greatest amount of inter-school sports rivalry; Horace Mann's annual charity basketball game, the Buzzell Game, is almost always against either Fieldston or Riverdale. The Ivy Preparatory School League, like the Ivy League for universities, was originally an athletic conference, not a scholastic one, for preparatory schools. ... The Fieldston School, is the high school division of the Ethical Culture Fieldston School which was founded by Felix Adler. ... The Lower Campus of Riverdale Country School Riverdale Country School is a co-educational college preparatory day school in New York City. ... Riverdale (population approximately 46,000, according to the 2000 Census) is a middle- and upper-middle class residential neighborhood in the northwest Bronx in New York City. ... Van Cortlandt Park is a large urban park in the Bronx, NY. It has an area of 1,146 acres (4. ...


Sports teams

Interscholastic Athletic Teams
Sport Level Season Gender
Baseball V, JV, MD Spring Boys'
Basketball V, JV, MD Winter Boys', Girls'
Crew V, JV Spring Boys', Girls', Coed
Cross-Country V, JV, MD Fall Girls', Coed (MD Only)
Field Hockey V, JV, MD Fall Girls'
Fencing V, JV Winter Boys', Girls'
Football V, JV, MD Fall Boys'
Golf V Spring Coed
Gymnastics V, JV Winter Girls'
Lacrosse V, JV, MD Spring Boys', Girls'
Soccer V, JV, MD Fall Boys', Girls'
Sailing V Spring Boys', Girls'
Skiing V Winter Boys', Girls'
Softball V, JV, MD Spring Girls'
Squash V Winter Coed
Swimming V, JV, MD Winter Boys', Girls'
Tennis V, JV, MD Fall (Girls'), Spring (Boys') Boys', Girls'
Track (indoor) V, JV Winter Boys', Girls'
Track (outdoor) V, JV, MD Spring Boys', Girls', Coed (MD Only)
Ultimate (Frisbee) V, JV Spring Coed
Volleyball V, JV, MD Fall Girls'
Water Polo V, JV, MD Fall Coed
Wrestling V, JV, MD Winter Coed

This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men, women and children in many countries around the world. ... Fencing advertisement for the 1900 Summer Olympic Games This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... This article is about the game. ... Gymnastics is a sport involving the performance of sequences of movements requiring physical strength, flexibility, balance, endurance, gracefulness, and kinesthetic awareness, and includes such skills as handsprings, handstands, split leaps, aerials and cartwheels. ... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... Soccer redirects here. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. ... Softball is a team sport popular especially in the United States. ... Squash racquet and ball Players in a glass-backed squash court International Squash Singles Court, as specified by the World Squash Federation Squash is an indoor racquet sport that was formerly called Squash racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball... Swimmer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ... A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ... Ultimate (sometimes called ultimate Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name) is a non-contact competitive team game played with a 175 gram flying disc. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... Water polo is a team water sport. ... This article is about scholastic wrestling. ... In the United States and Canada, varsity sports teams are the principal athletic teams representing a college, university, or high school or other secondary school. ... In sports, usually at the high school and college levels, members of a team who are not the main players in a competition (such as a football or basketball game) are called junior varsity players. ...

Athletic accomplishments

Horace Mann's Boys Varsity Tennis team has won the New York City Mayor's Cup Team Competition four times since 1994; its most recent victory was in 2007, where they defeated Cardozo 3-2.[12] In 2006, the Boys Varsity Tennis team placed 5th in the All-American Invitational Boys Team Tennis Tournament beating the defending champions Santa Barbara High School. In 2007, the Boys Varsity Tennis team placed 9th in the tournament, winning the consolation round. They also won the sportsmanship award. In 2008, the Boys Varsity Tennis team placed 6th in the tournament.[13]


Pedro Alvarez (class of 2005) was drafted as the 438th overall pick of the 2005 Major League Baseball draft by the Boston Red Sox.[14] He currently attends Vanderbilt University, where he was named a First Team All-American and National Freshman of the Year in 2006. Pedro Alvarez (born February 6th, 1987 in New York City) is a baseball player for the Vanderbilt University Commodores. ... The Major League Baseball First-Year Player Draft is held every year in June by conference call among the 30 Major League clubs. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds...


Charles Altchek (class of 2003), of the Harvard Varsity Men's Soccer Team, was named Ivy League Player of the Year in 2005 and 2006. Harvard redirects here. ...


The Girls' Varsity Gymnastics Team has won the AAIS Championships 7 times since its first win in 1999. In 2000, the team placed second by a margin on 0.025 points. The following year, the girls regained their title and have had 6 consecutive wins since then.


In 2005-2006, the Boys' Varsity Swimming Team completed their first undefeated season in the history of the Ivy League with a 6-0 league record (6-1 overall, including a loss to St Benedict's). They have now won the league championship three consecutive years (04-06), also for the first time in the history of the league.


The Horace Mann Wrestling team won the Mayor's Cup each of the first three years of the tournaments existence. The team has also won the New York State Association of Independent Schools (NYSAIS) Championships seven of the last eight years.


The Horace Mann Girls' Cross Country Team has had an exceptional record since the appointment of Coach Kevin Nicholas. In their first year under his guidance, the girls were Ivy League champions and New York State Federation qualifiers. In 2003, they won the NYSAISAA Championships. Last year, they took 2nd at the Ivy League Championships, 3rd at NYSAIS, and qualified for Federation yet again. In the 2007 season, the team took 3rd at the Ivy League Championships, and 6th at NYSAIS. The Ivy Preparatory School League, like the Ivy League for universities, was originally an athletic conference, not a scholastic one, for preparatory schools. ...


Horace Mann Girls' Indoor Track won the Ivy League Championships for 2006. Horace Mann Girls' Outdoor Track and Field won Ivy Championships as well as NYSAIS Championships for 2006. They also placed 2nd at Croton Harmon relays. The Girls' Outdoor Track Team won the Ivy League Championship in 2007, dominating the league for the fourth straight year. They went on to win the 2007 NYSAIS Championship as well. The Boys' Outdoor Track & Field Team also had an exceptional season in 2007, placing second to nationally-ranked Collegiate in both the Ivy and NYSAIS Championships. The Collegiate School was also the name under which Yale University was founded in 1701 The Collegiate School is an all-boys private school in New York City. ...


In 2007, the 4x200 meter relay team of Girls' Indoor Track dominated the Ivy League as well as the entire New York State Association of Independent Schools (NYSAIS). They advanced to the New York State Indoor Track & Field Championships, a remarkable feat for a private school, where they placed third overall in the state. The girls then qualified for the 2007 National Scholastic Indoor Championships, where they placed fifth in the United States.[15][16] In June 2007, the 4x200 meter relay team once again proved they were a national-caliber team, placing ninth at Nike Outdoor Nationals. In addition, the girls earned fifteenth in the country in the 4x100 meter relay and twelfth in the Sprint Medley Relay.


Notable alumni

Category:Horace Mann School alumni


Famous graduates of Horace Mann include:

Writer Jack Kerouac attended Horace Mann for one year of high school as part of the class of 1940 and played on the football team. Hollywood agent and Broadway producer Leland Hayward also attended the school for a time. William P. Barr William Pelham Barr (born May 23, 1950) is an American attorney who served as the 77th Attorney General of the United States. ... Josh Bernstein (b. ... For the Canadian equivalent of this channel, see History Television. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France, Shanghai, China, and Singapore. ... Robert Allan Caro (born October 30, 1935) is a biographer most noted for his studies of United States political figures Robert Moses and Lyndon B. Johnson. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Elliott Cook Carter, Jr. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Peter Cincotti (born July 11, 1983 in New York City) is an American contemporary jazzsinger, songwriter, and pianist. ... Roy Marcus Cohn (February 20, 1927 – August 2, 1986) was an American lawyer who came to prominence during the investigations by Senator Joseph McCarthy into Communism in the government and especially during the Army-McCarthy Hearings. ... Julius Rosenberg (May 12, 1918 – June 19, 1953) and Ethel Greenglass Rosenberg (September 28, 1915 – June 19, 1953) were American Communists who received international attention when they were executed for passing nuclear weapons secrets to the Soviet Union. ... This article deals with politician Peter R. Deutsch. ... Martin Bauml Duberman (b. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... Alan Furst (born February 20, 1941) is an American author of historical spy novels set just prior to and during the Second World War. ... Henry Geldzahler (1935-1994) was a well-known curator of contemporary art in the late 20th century. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Alison Gertz (1966 - August 8, 1992) was a prominent AIDS activist in the late 1980s and early 1990s, who died from the disease in 1992. ... Ely Jacques Kahn, Jr. ... For other uses, see New Yorker. ... Richard Kluger worked as a journalist before becoming an accomplished Pulitzer Prize-winning author and book publisher. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Thomas Andrew Tom Lehrer (born April 9, 1928) is an American singer-songwriter, satirist, pianist, and mathematician. ... Ira Levin (born August 27, 1929 in New York) is an American novelist, playwright and songwriter. ... For the film based on the novel, see Rosemarys Baby (film). ... For the 1975 film see The Stepford Wives (1975 film), for the 2004 remake see The Stepford Wives (2004 film). ... Anthony Lewis (born March 27, 1927, New York City) is a prominent liberal intellectual, writing for the New York Times op-ed page and the New York Review of Books, among other publications. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Al Lowenstein Allard Kenneth Lowenstein, (January 16, 1929 – March 14, 1980[1][2]), was a liberal Democratic politician, a one-term congressman representing the 5th District in Nassau County, New York from 1969 until 1971. ... Joshua Charles Malina (born 17 January 1966) is an American film and stage actor. ... This article is about a TV show. ... James Murdoch (born December 1972) is the CEO of British Sky Broadcasting and younger son of billionaire media tycoon Rupert Murdoch. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... Samuel Irving Newhouse, Jr. ... Ilario Pantano (b. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Mark J. Penn is worldwide CEO of the public relations firm Burson-Marsteller and president of the polling firm Penn, Schoen and Berland Associates. ... Generoso Paul (Gene) Pope, Jr. ... The National Enquirer is a national American supermarket tabloid. ... American Media, Inc. ... Robert (Bob) Rafelson (born February 21, 1933 in New York City) is an American film director, writer and producer. ... The Monkees were a pop-rock quartet created and based in Los Angeles in 1965 for an NBC American television series of the same name. ... The New York City LGBT Community Center is a nonprofit organization serving the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender population of New York City and nearby communities. ... The Gay Mens Health Crisis (GMHC) is a non-profit, volunteer-supported and community-based AIDS service organization that has lead the United States in the fight against AIDS. It was founded by seven gay men - Arthur Bell, Nathan Fain, Larry Kramer, Larry Mass, Paul Popham, Paul Rapaport and... Gideon Rose is the Managing Editor of Foreign Affairs, and served on the National Security Council during the Clinton Administration. ... This article is about a journal. ... Evan Rosen is an American author, speaker, business strategist, blogger, and journalist. ... The Culture of Collaboration is a business book by Evan Rosen. ... James Salter (born 1925) is an American short story writer and novelist. ... Barry C. Scheck (b. ... Orenthal James Simpson (born July 9, 1947), commonly known as O. J. Simpson and also just by his initials O.J. and his nickname The Juice, is a retired American football player who achieved stardom at the collegiate and professional levels. ... The Innocence Project refers to a number of non-profit legal clinics in the United States. ... James Rodney Schlesinger (born 15 February 1929) was United States Secretary of Defense from 1973 to 1974 under presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford. ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... The United States Secretary of Energy is the head of the United States Department of Energy, concerned as the name suggests, with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Schwarz is the founder and ceo of Animation Collective, the New York City-based producer of childrens programming for television, the Internet and home video. ... Kappa Mikey is an American Animated Sitcom geared toward families and is created by Larry Schwarz. ... Gil Shaham Gil Shaham (born February 19, 1971) is an award-winning Israeli violinist. ... A violinist is an instrumentalist who plays the violin (eg Diana Yukawa). ... Orli Shaham is a pianist, who performs recitals and appears with major orchestras throughout the world. ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... Eliot Laurence Spitzer (born June 10, 1959 ) is an American lawyer, politician and the current Governor of New York. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Arthur Hays-Sulzberger (1891 - 1968) was the publisher of the New York Times (1935-61). ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Paul Francis Webster (December 20, 1907-March 18, 1984) was an American lyricist. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... William Carlos Williams Dr. William Carlos Williams (sometimes known as WCW) (September 17, 1883 – March 4, 1963), was an American poet closely associated with modernism and Imagism. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Ben Yagoda (born 22 February 1954 in New York City) is a professor of journalism at the University of Delaware. ... Paul Zimmerman (b. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... Jack Kerouac (pronounced ) (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, and artist from Lowell, Massachusetts. ... Leland Hayward (September 13, 1902 - March 18, 1971) was a popular, powerful and wealthy Hollywood and Broadway agent and theatrical producer. ...


Miscellaneous

The school's motto is "Magna est veritas et prævalet," meaning "Great is the truth, and it prevails." It comes from the King James version of the Old Testament, which is usually translated today as "Magna est veritas et prævalebit," or will prevail. The school mascot is a lion, possibly a holdover from the days when the school was associated with Columbia University, whose mascot is also a lion. The Swim and Water Polo Teams have adopted the Sea Lion as their unofficial mascots, as has the Varsity Ski Team, with the Mountain Lion. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Genera Eumetopias <marquee> Zalophus Otaria Neophoca Phocarctos A resting Sea Lion in Galapagos National Park, Ecuador. ... Binomial name Puma concolor (Linnaeus, 1771) The puma (Puma concolor) is a type of large cat found in North, Central and South America. ...


All students are required to take American Red Cross CPR certification in order to graduate. Horace Mann students are also required to complete at least 80 hours of community service, with at least 40 hours in ninth and tenth grades and 40 hours in eleventh and twelfth. In eighth grade, one out-of-school project or three in-school projects are necessary for graduation to the ninth grade; in sixth and seventh grades a homeroom project is done cooperatively. In the Lower and Nursery Divisions, there is no community service requirement, although there is an annual "Caring-in-Action" day dedicated to community service that students and their families can attend. A WWII-era poster encouraged American women to volunteer for the Red Cross as part of the war effort. ... For other meanings of CPR, see CPR (disambiguation). ... Certification, the process of certifying, or a certificate may refer to: Professional certification Product certification and certification marks Management System certification Cyber security certification Digital signatures in Public-key cryptography RIAA certification, RIAA Single certification in music, such as Gold or Platinum Film certification, also known as Motion picture rating...


Several films have been shot on the Horace Mann campus over the years, including Splendor in the Grass and The Incredibly True Adventures of Two Girls in Love. Splendor in the Grass, an American movie from 1961, tells a story of sexual repression. ...


Controversy

The school was featured on the cover of the April 7, 2008 issue of New York magazine in relation to a recent controversy over appropriate disciplinary action in incidences of online misbehavior on Facebook, where students of Horace Mann were implicated in making racist and sexist comments, and derogating specific teachers in those terms. The tenor of the coverage was unfavorable, accusing the school of having poor moral oversight over the student body, and of undermining the authority of its teaching staff by dealing leniently with the students involved, some of whom were the children of wealthy members of its board of trustees. Several teachers involved in the incident have departed the school in the wake of the controversy.[21] This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... Facebook is a social networking website that was launched on February 4, 2004. ...


See also

Education in New York City is provided by a vast number of public and private institutions. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

The Ivy Preparatory School League, like the Ivy League for universities, was originally an athletic conference, not a scholastic one, for preparatory schools. ... The Dalton School, originally called the Childrens University School,[1] is a private university-preparatory school in New York Citys Upper East Side and a member of both the New York Interschool and the Ivy Preparatory School League. ... The Ethical Culture Fieldston School, known as Fieldston, is a private independent school in New York City and a member of the Ivy Preparatory School League. ... Hackley School is a private college preparatory school located in Tarrytown, New York and is a member of the Ivy Preparatory School League. ... Poly Prep is an independent college preparatory school in Brooklyn, New York. ... The Lower Campus of Riverdale Country School Riverdale Country School is a co-educational college preparatory day school in New York City. ... For other institutions named Trinity School, see Trinity School. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h History of Horace Mann School. Horace Mann School. Retrieved on 2007-11-21.
  2. ^ Horace Mann School - About hm / Costs
  3. ^ Horace Mann School - About hm / Financial Aid
  4. ^ Pacific Ridge School - Staff
  5. ^ A break down of which universities HM graduates attend. [1]
  6. ^ Prep School USA. "2003 High School Rankings," citing the Sept. 2002 Worth Magazine article entitled "Getting Inside the Ivy Gates," by Reshma Memon Yaqub. http://www.auap.com/prepschoolclass.html
  7. ^ http://www.horacemann.pvt.k12.ny.us/general/history/history_the_record.html
  8. ^ New York Times. "A Student Paper Savors Its Past, and Its Stars." by Seth Kugel. October 13, 2002. http://www.highschooljournalism.org/Content.cfm?mode=1&newsid=107&id=65
  9. ^ "About Us", The Record
  10. ^ American Scholastic Press Association. American Scholastic Press Association. Retrieved on 2006-12-19.
  11. ^ Horace Mann School Upper Division Governing Council (2005). "The Second Constitution of the Horace Mann School Government". Retrieved on 2006-05-19.
  12. ^ "St. Francis Prep Captures Girls Mayor's Cup Tennis Crown", Queens Ledger, 2005-06-09. Retrieved on 2006-06-24. 
  13. ^ Lee, James. "No Sea King surprises on Saturday", Daily Pilot, 2006-03-26. Retrieved on 2006-06-24. 
  14. ^ Fitt, Aaron. "Sox Try Alvarez", Daily Pilot, 2006-06-07. Retrieved on 2006-06-24. 
  15. ^ "2007 National Scholatic Indoor Championships", Armory HS Sports Foundation, 2007-03-11. Retrieved on 2007-03-15. 
  16. ^ "All-American Relay 5th at Nationals", Horace Mann Record, 2007-03-16. Retrieved on 2007-03-16. 
  17. ^ Lee, Felicia R. "Chatty Host Who Makes Archaeology Glamorous", The New York Times, 2006-02-06. Retrieved on 2006-06-24. 
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Alumni Council
  19. ^ Art of the States: Changes
  20. ^ http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/Fellows/cohn-per-lang.html
  21. ^ [2]
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  Results from FactBites:
 
Horace Mann School - New York, New York/NY - Private School Profile (577 words)
Horace Mann seeks to educate and nurture its students and to help them fulfill their potential.
Horace Mann seeks a diverse student body and fosters a respect for individual and cultural differences.
In its role as a college preparatory school, Horace Mann emphasizes the Liberal Arts and prepares its students for leadership in a variety of fields and endeavors.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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