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Encyclopedia > Horace Kallen

Horace Meyer Kallen (August 11, 1882-February 16, 1974) was a Jewish-American philosopher. is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ...


Born in the then German Bernstadt, Silesia (now Bierutów) to Jacob David Kallen and Esther Rebecca (Glazier), an Orthodox rabbi and his wife, Kallen came to the United States as a child in 1887. He studied philosophy at Harvard University where he was a student of George Santayana, earning his B.A. (magna cum laude) in 1903. After two years of study at Princeton University, he returned to Harvard for graduate study and worked as Santayana's assistant.[1] Kallen received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1908 and was awarded a Sheldon Travelling Fellowship. He was also a lifetime friend of Alain Locke, whom he met at Harvard and who was the first African American Rhodes Scholar -- and the only one until the 1960s. Silesia (English pronunciation [], Czech: ; German: ; Latin: ; Polish: ; Silesian: Åšlůnsk) is a historical region in central Europe, located along the upper and middle Oder River, upper Vistula River, and along the Sudetes, Carpathian (Silesian Beskids) mountain range. ... Bierutów (German: ) is a town in OleÅ›nica County, Lower Silesian Voivodeship, Poland, with 5,110 inhabitants (2004). ... George Santayana George Santayana (December 16, 1863, Madrid – September 26, 1952, Rome), was a philosopher, essayist, poet, and novelist. ... Alain LeRoy Locke (1886-1954) was born on September 13, 1886, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania He was an American educator, writer, and philosopher, and is best remembered as a leader and chief interpreter of the Harlem Renaissance. ...


He lectured in philosophy at Harvard from his graduation until 1911, occasionally working as a logic instructor at Clark College in Worcester, Massachusetts. In 1911, he moved to instruct philosophy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison until 1918, when he was named a professor at the New School for Social Research in New York City as a founding member where he remained for the rest of his career.[2] For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Logic (from Classical Greek λόγος logos; meaning word, thought, idea, argument, account, reason, or principle) is the study of the principles and criteria of valid inference and demonstration. ... Clark College may mean: Clark Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia (which merged Clark College with Atlanta University) Clark College, a community college in the state of Washington This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see Worcester (disambiguation). ... University of Wisconsin redirects here. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... New School University is an institute of higher learning in New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


A Pluralist, Kallen opposed any over-simplification of philosophical and vital problems. According to Kallen, denying complications and difficulties is to multiply them, as much as to deny reality to evil would aggravate evil. Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Pluralism (political philosophy) This article is about pluralism in politics. ...


He and others argued that cultural diversity and national pride were compatible with each other, and that ethnic diversity and a respect for ethnic and racial differences strengthened America. Kallen is credited with coining the term cultural pluralism. Main articles: Pluralism and Multiculturalism Cultural pluralism exists when all groups within a larger society maintain their unique cultural identities. ...


He was acquainted with William James, whose last unfinished book he edited. He married Rachel Oatman van Arsdale in 1926. In 1939 he became acquainted with Immanuel Velikovsky and became a life-long friend, informal literary advisor, mentor, and advocate.[3] He was a member of the American Philosophical Society, the Western Philosophical Society, the Society for Psychical Research, the Zionist Organization of America, the Palestine Development Council, and the National Council of the League of Nations Association. He served on congressional committees on international peace and was a part of many think tanks and study groups on questions ranging from philosophy and law to labor relations. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Immanuel Velikovsky photographed by Fima Noveck, ca. ... The American Philosophical Society is a discussion group founded as the Junto in 1743 by Benjamin Franklin. ... The Society for Psychical Research (SPR) is a non-profit organization which started in the United Kingdom and later acquired branches in other countries. ... The Zionist Organization of America (ZOA), founded in 1897, was one of the first official Zionist organizations in the United States, and, especially early in the 20th century, the primary representative of the Jews of the United States to the World Zionist Organization, espousing primarily Political Zionism. ...


Selected works

Some of his works:

  • Indecency and the Seven Arts:And Other Adventures of a Pragmatist in Aesthe (1930)
  • Decline and Rise of the Consumer (1936)
  • Art and Freedom (1942)
  • Modernity and Liberty (1947)
  • The Liberal Spirit (1948)
  • Ideals and Experience (1948)
  • The Education of Free Men (1950)
  • Patterns of Progress (1950)
  • Cultural Pluralism and the American Idea (1956)
  • Utopians at Bay (1958)
  • Liberty, Laughter, and Tears (1968)
  • Creativity, Imagination, Logic: Meditations for the Eleventh Hour (1973)

Bibliography: see also a special Symposium on Horace M. Kallen in Modern Judaism, Vol. 4, No. 2. (May, 1984)


References

  1. ^ Lamont, C., ed. Dialogue on George Santayana. New York: Horizon Press (1959) 13-17.
  2. ^ Gilbert, James (1997). Redeeming Culture: American Religion in an Age of Science, University of Chicago Press. ISBN 0-226-29320-3. Chap. 8, Two Men of Science, p. 175, namely Harlow Shapley and Kallen.
  3. ^ Gilbert, James (1997). Redeeming Culture: American Religion in an Age of Science, University of Chicago Press. ISBN 0-226-29320-3. Chap. 8, Two Men of Science, pp. 177-181, namely Harlow Shapley and Kallen.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Horace Kallen at AllExperts (190 words)
Horace Meyer Kallen (1882-1974) was a Jewish-American philosopher.
According to Kallen, denying complications and difficulties is to multiply them, as much as to deny reality to evil would aggravate evil.
Kallen is credited with coining the term cultural pluralism.
Genetics, Disability, and Deafness (652 words)
Kallen’s essay was written as a response to the eugenicist Edward Ross, who had just published a collection of essays opposing immigration.
Kallen was a recovered Jew—that is, he had lapsed from the faith of his father, a German immigrant who had become a Boston rabbi, but had rediscovered his Jewishness as a student at Harvard, under the influence of a professor who persuaded him that the Puritans had Hebrew blood.
This reconversion inspired Kallen to his core belief: fulfillment in life is a function of cultural identity; cultural identity is a function of ethnicity; and ethnicity is immutable.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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