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Encyclopedia > Horace Greeley
Horace Greeley
Horace Greeley

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 6th district
In office
December 4, 1848March 3, 1849
Preceded by David S. Jackson
Succeeded by James Brooks

Born February 3, 1811(1811-02-03)
Amherst, New Hampshire, U.S.
Died November 29, 1872 (aged 61)
Pleasantville, New York, U.S.
Political party Whig, Democrat, Republican
Spouse Mary Cheney Greeley
Profession Editor, Politician
Signature Horace Greeley's signature

Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811November 29, 1872) was an American editor of a leading newspaper, a founder of the Liberal Republican Party, reformer and politician. His New York Tribune was America's most influential newspaper from the 1840s to the 1870s and "established Greeley's reputation as the greatest editor of his day."[1] Greeley used it to promote the Whig and Republican parties, as well as antislavery and a host of reforms. Crusading against the corruption of Ulysses S. Grant's Republican administration, he was the presidential candidate in 1872 of the new Liberal Republican Party. Despite having the additional support of the Democratic Party, he lost in a landslide. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 432 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (632 × 877 pixel, file size: 176 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... This article is about the state. ... New Yorks Sixth Congressional District is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives in New York City. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other persons of the same name, see David Jackson. ... James Brooks (November 10, 1810 - April 30, 1873) was a U.S. Representative from New York. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the US Federal Agent designation, see Special agent. ... Location in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country State County Hillsborough Incorporated 1760 Government  - Board of Selectmen Bruce Bowler, Chairman John Dinkel, Jr. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Pleasantville is a village in Westchester County, New York, United States. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... GOP redirects here. ... Mary Cheney Greeley - wife of Horace Greeley 1811-1872 - the American newspaper editor. ... A managing editor is a senior member of a publications management team. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the US Federal Agent designation, see Special agent. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Liberal Republican Party of the United States was a political party formed in 1872 to oppose the administration of then-President Ulysses S. Grant. ... The New York Tribune building - today the site of Pace Universitys building complex of One Pace Plaza in New York City The New York Tribune was established by Horace Greeley in 1841 and was long considered one of the leading newspapers in the United States. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... The Republican Party was born in 1854 and is one of the two dominant parties today. ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The History of the Democratic Party is an account of a continuously supported political party in the United States of America. ...

Contents

Early life

He was born in Amherst, New Hampshire, the son of poor farmers Zaccheus and Mary Greeley. He declined a scholarship to Phillips Exeter Academy and left school at the age of 14; he apprenticed as a printer in Poultney, Vermont at The Northern Star, moving to New York City in 1831. In 1834 he founded the weekly the New Yorker, which was mostly comprised of clippings from other magazines. Location in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country State County Hillsborough Incorporated 1760 Government  - Board of Selectmen Bruce Bowler, Chairman John Dinkel, Jr. ... , Phillips Exeter Academy (most commonly called Exeter, Phillips Exeter or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school for grades 9–12, located on 619 acres in Exeter, New Hampshire, U.S., fifty miles north of Boston [1]. In over two centuries of its existence, Phillips Exeter Academy has played... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


In 1836 Greeley married Mary Cheney Greeley, an intermittent suffragette. Horace Greeley spent as little time as possible with his wife and would sleep in a boarding house when in New York City rather than be with her. Only two of their seven children survived into adulthood. Mary Cheney Greeley - wife of Horace Greeley 1811-1872 - the American newspaper editor. ... Suffragette with banner, Washington DC, 1918 The title of suffragette (also occasionally spelled suffraget) was given to members of the womens suffrage movement, originally in the United Kingdom. ...


The New York Tribune

New York Tribune editorial staff. Greeley is third from the left in the front row.
New York Tribune editorial staff. Greeley is third from the left in the front row.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3356x2342, 1556 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New York Tribune Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3356x2342, 1556 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New York Tribune Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... The New York Tribune building - today the site of Pace Universitys building complex of One Pace Plaza in New York City The New York Tribune was established by Horace Greeley in 1841 and was long considered one of the leading newspapers in the United States. ...

Whig

In 1838 leading Whig politicians selected him to edit a major national campaign newspaper, the Jeffersonian, which reached 15,000 circulation. Whig leader William Seward found him, "rather unmindful of social usages, yet singularly clear, original, and decided, in his political views and theories." In 1840 he edited a major campaign newspaper, the Log Cabin which reached 90,000 subscribers nationwide, and helped elect William Henry Harrison president on the Whig ticket. In 1841 he merged his papers into the New York Tribune. It soon was a success as the leading Whig paper in the metropolis; its weekly edition reached tens of thousands of subscribers across the country. Greeley was editor of the Tribune for the rest of his life, using it as a platform for advocacy of all his causes. As historian Allan Nevins explains: William Henry Seward, Sr. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... The New York Tribune building - today the site of Pace Universitys building complex of One Pace Plaza in New York City The New York Tribune was established by Horace Greeley in 1841 and was long considered one of the leading newspapers in the United States. ... Joseph Allan Nevins (May 20, 1890 - March 5, 1971) was an educator, historian, and author and journalist. ...

The Tribune set a new standard in American journalism by its combination of energy in news gathering with good taste, high moral standards, and intellectual appeal. Police reports, scandals, dubious medical advertisements, and flippant personalities were barred from its pages; the editorials were vigorous but usually temperate; the political news was the most exact in the city; book reviews and book-extracts were numerous; and as an inveterate lecturer Greeley gave generous space to lectures. The paper appealed to substantial and thoughtful people. [Nevins in Dictionary of American Biography (1931)]

Greeley prided himself in taking radical positions on all sorts of social issues; few readers followed his suggestions. Utopia fascinated him; influenced by Albert Brisbane he promoted Fourierism. His journal had Karl Marx (and Friedrich Engels too) as European correspondent in the early 1850s.[1] He promoted all sorts of agrarian reforms, including homestead laws. He was elected as a Whig to the Thirtieth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the unseating of David S. Jackson and served from December 4, 1848, to March 3, 1849. For other uses, see Utopia (disambiguation). ... Albert Brisbane (1809-1890) was the chief popularizer of the theories of Charles Fourier in the United States in several books, notably Social Destiny of Man (1840), and in his Fourierist journal The Phalanx. ... This article is about the French utopian socialist philosopher. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Engels redirects here. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... For other persons of the same name, see David Jackson. ...


Greeley supported liberal policies towards settlers; he memorably advised the ambitious to "Go West, young man." Though the phrase was originally written by John Soule in the Terre Haute Express in 1851, it is most often attributed to Greeley. Historian Walter A. McDougall quotes Josiah Grinnell, the founder of Iowa's Grinnell College, as saying, "I was the young man to whom Greeley first said it, and I went." For its first use in popular culture, see Go West. This article is about the history and influence of the concept. ... Go West (1925) was a silent movie starring Buster Keaton. ...


A champion of the working man, he attacked monopolies of all sorts and rejected land grants to railroads. Industry would make everyone rich, he insisted, as he promoted high tariffs. He supported vegetarianism, opposed liquor and paid serious attention to any "-ism" anyone proposed. What made the ‘’Tribune’‘ such a success was the extensive news stories, very well written by brilliant reporters, together with feature articles by fine writers. He was an excellent judge of newsworthiness and quality of reporting.

Horace Greeley

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Republican

When the new Republican Party was founded in 1854, Greeley made the Tribune its unofficial national organ, and fought slavery extension and the slave power on many pages. On the eve of the Civil War circulation nationwide approached 300,000. GOP redirects here. ...


His editorials and news reports explaining the policies and candidates of the Whig Party were reprinted and discussed throughout the country. Many small newspapers relied heavily on the reporting and editorials of the Tribune. He served as Congressman for three months, 1848--1849, but failed in numerous other attempts to win elective office. In 1860 he supported the ex-Whig Edward Bates of Missouri for president, an action that weakened Greeley's old ally Seward.[Van Dusen 241-44] The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... The United States presidential election of 1860 set the stage for the American Civil War. ... Note: This article is about the American lawyer. ...


Greeley made the Tribune the leading newspaper opposing the Slave Power, that is, what he considered the conspiracy by slave owners to seize control of the federal government and block the progress of liberty. In the secession crisis of 1861 he took a hard line against the Confederacy. Theoretically, he agreed, the South could declare independence; but in reality he said there was "a violent, unscrupulous, desperate minority, who have conspired to clutch power" –secession was an illegitimate conspiracy that had to be crushed by federal power. He took a Radical Republican position during the war, in opposition to Lincoln’s moderation. In the summer of 1862, he wrote a famous editorial entitled "The Prayer of Twenty Millions" demanding a more aggressive attack on the Confederacy and faster emancipation of the slaves. A month later he hailed Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation. The Slave Power was the term used in the Northern United States in the period 1840-1865 to describe the political power of the slaveholding class in the South. ... Frémont (left), 1856 Republican parade banner The Radical Republicans were the remaining faction of American politicians within the Republican party during the American Civil War and Reconstruction following an 1864 exodus of pro-Lincoln Republicans into the creation of the National Union Party. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Emancipation Proclamation Reproduction of the Emancipation Proclamation at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio The Emancipation Proclamation consists of two executive orders issued by United States President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War. ...


Although after 1860 he increasingly lost control of the Tribune’s operations, and wrote fewer editorials, in 1864 he expressed defeatism regarding Lincoln’s chances of reelection, an attitude that was echoed across the country when his editorials were reprinted. Oddly he also pursued a peace policy in 1863-64 that involved discussions with Copperheads and opened the possibility of a compromise with the Confederacy. Lincoln was aghast, but outsmarted Greeley by appointing him to a peace commission he knew the Confederates would repudiate. The Copperheads were a group of Northern Democrats who opposed the American Civil War, wanting an immediate peace settlement with the Confederates. ...


Reconstruction

In Reconstruction he took an erratic course, mostly favoring the Radicals and opposing president Andrew Johnson in 1865-66. His personal guarantee of bail for Jefferson Davis in 1867 stunned many of his long-time readers, half of whom canceled their subscriptions. For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... Frémont (left), 1856 Republican parade banner The Radical Republicans were the remaining faction of American politicians within the Republican party during the American Civil War and Reconstruction following an 1864 exodus of pro-Lincoln Republicans into the creation of the National Union Party. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jefferson Davis (disambiguation). ...


Election of 1872

Greeley/Brown campaign poster
Greeley/Brown campaign poster
Greeley helps murder blacks in an 1872 Thomas Nast cartoon
Greeley helps murder blacks in an 1872 Thomas Nast cartoon

After supporting Ulysses Grant in the 1868 election, Greeley broke with Grant and the Radicals. Opposing Grant's re-election bid, he joined the Liberal Republican Party in 1872. To everyone’s astonishment, that new party nominated Greeley as their presidential candidate. Even more surprisingly, he was officially endorsed by the Democrats, whose party he had denounced for decades. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1120x749, 276 KB) Summary 1872 US cartoon Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1120x749, 276 KB) Summary 1872 US cartoon Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Thomas Nast (September 27, 1840 – December 7, 1902) was a famous German-American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist in the 19th century and is considered to be the father of American political cartooning. ... Ulysses Simpson Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American Civil War General and the 18th (1869–1877) President of the United States. ... The Liberal Republican Party of the United States was a political party formed in 1872 to oppose the administration of then-President Ulysses S. Grant. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


As a candidate, Greeley argued that the war was over, the Confederacy was destroyed, and slavery was dead — and that Reconstruction was a success, so it was time to pull Federal troops out of the South and let the people there run their own affairs. A weak campaigner, he was mercilessly ridiculed by the Republicans as a fool, an extremist, a turncoat, and a crazy man who could not be trusted. The most vicious attacks came in cartoons by Thomas Nast in Harper's Weekly. Greeley ultimately ran far behind Grant, winning only 43% of the vote. For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... Thomas Nast (September 27, 1840 – December 7, 1902) was a famous German-American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist in the 19th century and is considered to be the father of American political cartooning. ... Teresa Bagioli Sickles confession, 1859 Harpers Weekly (A Journal of Civilization) was an American political magazine based in New York City. ...


This crushing defeat was not Greeley's only misfortune in 1872. Greeley was among several high-profile investors who were defrauded by Philip Arnold in a famous diamond and gemstone hoax. Meanwhile, as Greeley had been pursuing his political career, Whitelaw Reid, owner of the New York Herald, had gained control of the Tribune. Philip Arnold (1829 - 1878) was a con man from Elizabethtown, Kentucky, who was the brains behind a legendary 1872 scam to fool people into investing in western diamond mining operations. ... The diamond hoax of 1872 triggered a brief diamond craze along the borders of Wyoming and Colorado, USA. In 1871, would-be-prospectors and cousins Philip Arnold and John Slack traveled to San Francisco. ... Whitelaw Reid Whitelaw Reid (October 27, 1837 - December 15, 1912) was a U.S. politician and newspaper editor, as well as the author of a popular history of Ohio in the Civil War. ... The New York Herald was a large distribution newspaper based in New York City that existed between May 6, 1835 and 1924. ...


Death

Not long after the election, Greeley's wife died. He descended into madness and died before the electoral votes could be cast. In his final illness, allegedly Greeley spotted Reid and cried out, "You son of a bitch, you stole my newspaper." Greeley died at 6:50 p.m. on Friday, November 29, 1872, in Pleasantville, New York at Dr. George C. S. Choate’s private hospital. Greeley received no electoral votes, with the ones he was to have received being scattered among others. However, three of Georgia's electoral votes were left blank in honor of him. (Other sources have Greeley receiving 3 electoral votes posthumously, with those votes being disallowed by Congress.) is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Pleasantville is a village in Westchester County, New York, United States. ... George Cheyne Shattuck Choate, was born on March 30, 1827 at Ipswich, Massachusetts, the descendant of a family which settled in Massachusetts in 1667. ...


Greeley had requested a simple funeral, but his daughters ignored this request and arranged a grand affair. He is buried in New York's Green-Wood Cemetery. Green-Wood Cemetery was founded in 1838 as a rural cemetery in Kings County, New York, now in Brooklyn. ...


The Greeley home in Chappaqua, New York now houses the New Castle Historical Society. The local high school is named for him, and the name of one of the school newspapers pays homage to the 19th-century paper owned by Greeley. This article is about the hamlet; for the film, see Chappaqua (film). ... Horace Greeley High School is a public, four-year secondary school located in Chappaqua, New York that serves the Chappaqua Central School District. ...


Legacy & cultural references

  • The New York Tribune building was the first home of Pace University. Today, the site where the building stood is now the One Pace Plaza complex of Pace's New York City campus. Dr. Choate’s residence and private hospital, where Horace Greeley died, today is part of Pace's campus in Pleasantville.
  • There is a bas-relief of Greeley in the lobby of the Columbia Journalism School.
  • The full name of Nazi economist Hjalmar Schacht was "Hjalmar Horace Greeley Schacht".
  • Several places are named after him, including: Greeley, Pennsylvania, Greeley, Colorado, Greeley, Texas, Greeley County, Kansas (where there is also a town of Horace, and the county seat is Tribune), and Greeley County, Nebraska (which also has a town named Horace).
  • Horace Greeley Square is a small park in the Herald Square area of Manhattan featuring a statue of Greeley. The park is next to the site of the former New York Herald building.
  • Horace Greeley High School in Westchester, New York is named for him.
  • Greeley Park in Nashua, New Hampshire is named for him.
  • Mount Horace Greeley is one of the highest points in the Keweenaw Peninsula of Michigan.
  • Horace Greeley is mentioned by Archie Bunker in an episode of All in the Family, where Bunker says, "Go west, go west like Horace Greeley says."
  • Greeley's endorsement of frontier economics was satirized in the environmentalist cartoon series Captain Planet and the Planeteers, which featured the antagonist and polluter Hoggish Greedly.
  • Horace Greeley is depicted in Gangs of New York, where he is shown in a montage of the three layers of society at prayer. As the representative of the aristocracy, his notion of God is a God of mercy, as opposed to the God of Vengeance, prayed to by Bill Cutting and Amsterdam Vallon. He is portrayed by Michael Byrne.
  • Greeley Avenue in the Grant City of the NY City Borough of Staten Island is named for Horace Greeley

The New York Tribune building - today the site of Pace Universitys building complex of One Pace Plaza in New York City The New York Tribune was established by Horace Greeley in 1841 and was long considered one of the leading newspapers in the United States. ... Pace redirects here. ... One Pace Plaza, completed in 1969, is the flagship building of Pace University in New York City, specifically designed for Pace. ... The Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism is one of the most prestigious schools of journalism in the United States. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... Dr. Hjalmar Horace Greeley Schacht Dr. Hjalmar Horace Greeley Schacht (22 January 1877 – 3 June 1970) was a German financial expert and Minister of Economics from 1935 until 1937. ... The City of Greeley is a Home Rule Municipality located in Weld County, Colorado, United States. ... Greeley County (standard abbreviation: GL) is a county located in the state of Kansas. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Greeley County is a county located in the state of Nebraska. ... Categories: Stub | Manhattan ... The New York Herald was a large distribution newspaper based in New York City that existed between May 6, 1835 and 1924. ... Horace Greeley High School is a public, four-year secondary school located in Chappaqua, New York that serves the Chappaqua Central School District. ... Westchester County is a suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Nickname: Gate City Location in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Hillsborough Incorporated 1746 Government  - Mayor Bernard A. Streeter Area  - City  31. ... The Keweenaw Peninsula is the most northern part of Michigans Upper Peninsula. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Information Gender Male Age 50 (in 1974) Date of birth 1924 Date of death Unknown (still alive as of 1983) Occupation Blue Collar (19??-1978) Bar Owner (1979-????) Family Michael Stivic (son-in-law) Joey Stivic (grandson) Alfred Bunker (brother) Barbara Lee Billie Bunker (niece) Katherine Bunker (sister-in-law... All in the Family is an acclaimed American situation comedy that was originally broadcast on the CBS television network from January 12, 1971 to April 8, 1979. ... Captain Planet and the Planeteers is an American animated environmentalist television program, based on an idea by Ted Turner and produced by Andy Heyward, Robby London, Barbara Pyle and Nicholas Boxer. ... Hoggish Greedly Hoggish Greedly is a villain in the animation series Captain Planet and the Planeteers. ... Gangs of New York is a 2002 film set in the middle 19th century in the Five Points district of New York City. ... Michael Byrne (born 7 November 1943 in London, England) is an actor noted for his roles on film and television. ... This article is about the borough in New York City. ...

Trivia

  • Horace Greeley is the one who misquoted President Andrew Jackson as saying, after the Supreme Court ruling in Worcester v. Georgia, "John Marshall has made his decision; now let him enforce it!" (H. W. Brands, Andrew Jackson: His Life and Times, pg 492)
  • Greeley considered the word 'news' a plural word and would always correct his staff when they - in his view - mistakenly said, "Is there any news?" He once cabled a Tribune reporter: “ARE THERE ANY NEWS?” The employee cabled back: "NOT A NEW."

For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... Holding States were not permitted to redraw the boundaries of Indian lands or forbid residence in those territories, because the Constitution granted sole authority to Congress to regulate relations with sovereign Indian tribes. ... For other persons named John Marshall, see John Marshall (disambiguation). ...

References

Primary sources

Secondary sources

  • Cross, Coy F., II. Go West Young Man! Horace Greeley's Vision for America. U. of Mexico Press, 1995. 165 pp. online edition
  • Downey, Matthew T. "Horace Greeley and the Politicians: The Liberal Republican Convention in 1872," The Journal of American History, Vol. 53, No. 4. (Mar., 1967), pp. 727-750. in JSTOR
  • Durante, Dianne, Outdoor Monuments of Manhattan: A Historical Guide (New York University Press, 2007): discussion of Greeley and the 2 memorials to him in New York.
  • Lunde, Erik S. Horace Greeley (Twayne's United States Authors Series, no. 413.) Twayne, 1981. 138 pp.
  • Lunde, Erik S. "The Ambiguity of the National Idea: the Presidential Campaign of 1872" Canadian Review of Studies in Nationalism 1978 5(1): 1-23. ISSN 0317-7904
  • McDougall, Walter A. Throes of Democracy: The American Civil War Era, 1829-1877 (Harper Collins, 2008)
  • Nevins, Allan. "Horace Greeley" in Dictionary of American Biography (1931).
  • Parrington, Vernon L. Main Currents in American Thought (1927), II, pp. 247-57. online edition
  • Robbins, Roy M., "Horace Greeley: Land Reform and Unemployment, 1837-1862," Agricultural History, VII, 18 (January, 1933).
  • Rourke, Constance Mayfield ; Trumpets of Jubilee: Henry Ward Beecher, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Lyman Beecher, Horace Greeley, P.T. Barnum (1927). online edition
  • Schulze, Suzanne. Horace Greeley: A Bio-Bibliography. Greenwood, 1992. 240 pp.
  • Seitz, Don C. Horace Greeley: Founder of the New York Tribune (1926) online edition
  • Van Deusen, Glyndon G. Horace Greeley, Nineteenth-Century Crusader (1953), standard biography online edition
  • Weisberger, Bernard A. "Horace Greeley: Reformer as Republican" . Civil War History 1977 23(1): 5-25. ISSN 0009-8078
  • Robert C. Williams. Horace Greeley: Champion of American Freedom (2006)

Joseph Allan Nevins (May 20, 1890 - March 5, 1971) was an educator, historian, and author and journalist. ... Vernon Louis Parrington (1871–1929) was an American historian and football coach. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Michael Emery and Edwin Emery, The Press and America (1988) 124-6.

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Horace Greeley


Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ...

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
David S. Jackson
Member from New York's 6th congressional district
December 4, 1848 – March 3, 1849
Succeeded by
James Brooks
Party political offices
Preceded by
Horatio Seymour
Democratic Party presidential candidate
1872
Succeeded by
Samuel J. Tilden
New political party Liberal Republican Party presidential candidate
1872
Party disbanded
Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... For other persons of the same name, see David Jackson. ... New Yorks Sixth Congressional District is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives in New York City. ... James Brooks (November 10, 1810 - April 30, 1873) was a U.S. Representative from New York. ... Governor Horatio Seymour Horatio Seymour (May 31, 1810 - February 12, 1886) was an American politician. ... This is a list of the candidates for the offices of President of the United States and Vice President of the United States that the U.S. Democratic Party has nominated since its founding. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... The Liberal Republican Party of the United States was a political party formed in 1872 to oppose the administration of then-President Ulysses S. Grant. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... This is a list of the candidates for the offices of President of the United States and Vice President of the United States that the U.S. Democratic Party has nominated since its founding. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... For other persons named James Buchanan, see James Buchanan (disambiguation). ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (nicknamed the Little Giant because he was short but was considered by many a giant in politics) was an American politician from the western state of Illinois, and was the Democratic Party nominee for President in 1860. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Southern Democrats are members of the U.S. Democratic Party who reside in the U.S. South. ... For the 1960s commissioner of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, see George McClellan (police commissioner). ... Governor Horatio Seymour Horatio Seymour (May 31, 1810 - February 12, 1886) was an American politician. ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... Winfield Scott Hancock (February 14, 1824 – February 9, 1886) was a career U.S. Army officer and the Democratic nominee for President of the United States in 1880. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908), the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States, was the only President to serve non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... Alton Brooks Parker (May 14, 1852 – May 10, 1926) was an American lawyer and judge and a U.S. presidential candidate in the 1904 elections. ... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... James Middleton Cox (March 31, 1870 – July 15, 1957) was a Governor of Ohio, U.S. Representative from Ohio and Democratic candidate for President of the United States in the election of 1920. ... John W. Davis John William Davis (April 13, 1873 — March 24, 1955) was an American politician and lawyer. ... Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... FDR redirects here. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician, noted for intellectual demeanor and advocacy of liberal causes in the Democratic party. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... LBJ redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, (born July 19, 1922) is a former United States Representative, Senator, and Democratic presidential nominee. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ...

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Horace Greeley - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1517 words)
Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811–November 29, 1872) was an American editor of a leading newspaper, a founder of the Republican party, reformer and politician.
Greeley was editor of the Tribune for the rest of his life, using it as a platform for advocacy of all his causes.
Greeley married in 1836, Mary Cheney Greeley, a sometime suffragette.
SPECTRUM Biographies - Horace Greeley (497 words)
Horace Greeley was born February 3, 1811 on a farm near Amherst, New Hampshire.
Greeley was considered the outstanding newspaper editor of the day, and he edited the Tribune until his death.
Greeley had a life-long ambition to be elected to a high public office, and he felt that the Whig party was not supporting those ambitions.
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