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Encyclopedia > Horace
Horace, as imagined by Anton von Werner
Horace, as imagined by Anton von Werner

Quintus Horatius Flaccus, (December 8, 65 BC - November 27, 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus. Many persons have been named Horace, typically after the original poet of ancient Rome: Horace - Roman poet Horace Alexander - ornithologist Horace Donisthorpe - British entomologist Horace Fletcher - American dietitian Horace Furness - Shakespearean scholar Horace Grant - basketball player Horace Gray - American jurist Horace Greeley - author and newspaper editor Horace Mann - American lawyer... ImageMetadata File history File links Quintus_Horatius_Flaccus. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Quintus_Horatius_Flaccus. ... Selbstbildnis - self portrait, 1885 Anton Alexander von Werner (May 9, 1843 – January 4, 1915)[1], Prussian painter, was born at Frankfurt (Oder), on May 9, 1843. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC - 60s BC - 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC Years: 70 BC 69 BC 68 BC 67 BC 66 BC 65 BC 64 BC 63 BC 62... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC - 0s BC - 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 13 BC 12 BC 11 BC 10 BC 9 BC - 8 BC - 7 BC 6 BC 5 BC 4 BC 3 BC Births... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... // Lyric poetry refers to either poetry that has the form and musical quality of a song, or a usually short poem that expresses personal feelings, which may or may not be set to music. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Life

Born in Venosa or Venusia, as it was called in his day, a small town in the border region between Apulia and Lucania, Horace was the son of a freedman, but he himself was born free. His father owned a small farm at Venusia, and later moved to Rome and worked as a coactor, a kind of middleman at auctions who would pay the purchase price to the seller and collect it later from the buyer and receive 1% of the purchase price from each of them for his services. The elder Horace was able to spend considerable money on his son's education, accompanying him first to Rome for his primary education, and then sending him to Athens to study Greek and philosophy. The poet later expressed his gratitude in a tribute to his father; in his own words: Venosa is a town in the Potenza in the Basilicata region in southern Italy, with a population of around 12,500. ... This article is bad because of the Italian region. ... For the mountain in Canada named after Lucania, see Mount Lucania. ... poop. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ...

If my character is flawed by a few minor faults, but is otherwise decent and moral, if you can point out only a few scattered blemishes on an otherwise immaculate surface, if no one can accuse me of greed, or of prurience, or of profligacy, if I live a virtuous life, free of defilement (pardon, for a moment, my self-praise), and if I am to my friends a good friend, my father deserves all the credit... As it is now, he deserves from me unstinting gratitude and praise. I could never be ashamed of such a father, nor do I feel any need, as many people do, to apologize for being a freedman's son. Satires 1.6.65-92 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ...

After the assassination of Julius Caesar, Horace joined the army, serving under the generalship of Brutus. He fought as a staff officer (tribunus militum) in the Battle of Philippi. Alluding to famous literary models, he later claimed that he saved himself by throwing away his shield and fleeing. When an amnesty was declared for those who had fought against the victorious Octavian (later Augustus), Horace returned to Italy, only to find his estate confiscated; his father had probably died by then. Horace claims that he was reduced to poverty. Nevertheless, he had the means to purchase a profitable life-time appointment as a scriba quaestorius, an official of the Treasury, which allowed him to get by comfortably and practice his poetic art. For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... Marcus Junius Brutus (85–42 BC), or Quintus Servilius Caepio Brutus, was a Roman senator of the late Roman Republic. ... Belligerents Triumvirs Liberators Commanders Octavian and Mark Antony Brutus† and Cassius† Strength 19 legions, allied cavalry 33,000; total over 100,000 men 17 legions, allied cavalry 17,000; total about 100,000 men Casualties and losses  ? Surrender of entire army The Battle of Philippi was the final battle in... Look up Amnesty in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... May refer to the persons: Augustus, Roman Emperor Pope John XIII nigger Category: ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ...


Horace was a member of a literary circle that included Virgil and Lucius Varius Rufus, who introduced him to Maecenas, friend and confidant of Augustus. Maecenas became his patron and close friend, and presented Horace with an estate near Tibur in the Sabine Hills, contemporary Tivoli. He died in Rome a few months after the death of Maecenas, in 8 BC. Upon his death bed, having no heirs, Horace relinquished his farm to his friend and Emperor Augustus, to be used for Imperial needs. His farm is there today and is a spot of pilgrimage for the literary elite. For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Lucius Varius Rufus (c 74 - 14 BC), Roman poet of the Augustan age. ... Gaius or Cilnius Maecenas (70 - 8 BC) was a confidant and political advisor to Augustus Caesar, as well as an important sponsor of young poets. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... Tivoli (population 55,000), the classical Tibur, is an ancient Italian town some 20 km from Rome (Latium), at the falls of the Aniene, where it issues from the Sabine hills. ... Tivoli, the classical Tibur, is an ancient Italian town in Lazio, about 30 km from Rome, at the falls of the Aniene river, where it issues from the Sabine hills. ...


Works

Horace is generally considered by classicists to be one of the greatest Latin poets. Classicism, in the arts, refers generally to a high regard for classical antiquity as setting standards for taste which the classicist seeks to emulate. ...


He wrote many Latin phrases that remain in use (in Latin or in translation) including carpe diem, "seize the day"; Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori; and aurea mediocritas, the "golden mean." This page lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. ... For other uses, see Carpe diem (disambiguation). ... Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori is a line from the Roman lyrical poet Horaces Odes (iii 2. ... In philosophy (especially that of Aristotle), the golden mean is the felicitous middle between two extremes, one of excess and the other of deficiency; for this meaning, see golden mean (philosophy). ...


His works (like those of all but the earliest Latin poets) are written in Greek metres, from the hexameter, which was relatively easy to adapt to Latin, to the more complex measures used in the Odes, like alcaics and sapphics, which were sometimes a difficult fit for Latin structure and syntax. Chronologically, they are: In poetry, the meter or metre is the basic rhythmic structure of a verse. ... Hexameter is a literary and poetic form, consisting of six metrical feet per line as in the Iliad. ... A Greek lyrical meter, said to be invented by Alcaeus, a lyric poet from about 600 BC. It is distinguished by a complicated variation of a dominant iambic pattern. ... The Sapphic stanza is a poetic form spanning 4 lines. ... For other uses, see Syntax (disambiguation). ...

Some highlights from his surviving work include: Sermonum Liber primus (also known as Satires I), is a collection of ten satirical poems, written in dactylic hexameters, that explore the secrets of human happiness and literary perfection. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC - 30s BC - 20s BC 10s BC 0s 10s 20s Years: 40 BC 39 BC 38 BC 37 BC 36 BC 35 BC 34 BC 33 BC 32 BC 31 BC... Epode, in verse, the third part in an ode, which followed the strophe and the antistrophe, and completed the movement. ... Octavian becomes Roman Consul for the fourth time. ... Sermonum liber secundus (also known as Satires II), is a collection of eight satirical poems that the Roman poet Horace published in 30 BCE as a sequel to his successful first book of satirical poems, Satires I, published five years previous. ... Carminum Liber primus, secundus et tertius (also known as Odes I, II and III) was a collection of poems published in 23BC by Horace. ... Events Imperator Caesar Augustus becomes Roman Consul for the eleventh time. ... Carminum Liber primus, secundus et tertius (also known as Odes I, II and III) was a collection of poems published in 23 BC by Horace. ... Horace Translation: The Necessity For Reform The sins of your fathers although guiltless you will expiate, Roman Youth, until the temples are remade from the fallen buildings (temples) of the gods and defiled from the blackness with images of smoke. ... Epistularum liber primus is the seventh work by Horace, published in the year 20BC. A latin copy of the text can be found here ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC - 20s BC - 10s BC 0s 10s 20s 30s Years: 25 BC 24 BC 23 BC 22 BC 21 BC 20 BC 19 BC 18 BC 17 BC 16 BC 15... Ars Poetica is a term meaning The Art of Poetry or On the Nature of Poetry. Early examples of Ars Poetica by Aristotle and Horace have survived and have since spawned many other poems that bear the same name. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s Years: 23 BC 22 BC 21 BC 20 BC 19 BC 18 BC 17 BC 16 BC 15 BC 14 BC 13 BC... The Carmen Saeculare (Latin for Secular Hymn), sometimes known as the Carmen for short, is a hymn written by the poet Horace. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s Years: 22 BC 21 BC 20 BC 19 BC 18 BC 17 BC 16 BC 15 BC 14 BC 13 BC 12 BC... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s Years: 19 BC 18 BC 17 BC 16 BC 15 BC 14 BC 13 BC 12 BC 11 BC 10 BC 9 BC... Carminum Liber primus, secundus et tertius (also known as Odes I, II and III) was a collection of poems published in 23 BC by Horace. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s Years: 18 BC 17 BC 16 BC 15 BC 14 BC 13 BC 12 BC 11 BC 10 BC 9 BC 8 BC...


Odes (or Carmina)

4 books The Odes (Latin Carmina) are a collection in four books of Latin lyric poems by Horace. ...

Carminum Liber primus, secundus et tertius (also known as Odes I, II and III) was a collection of poems published in 23BC by Horace. ... Events Imperator Caesar Augustus becomes Roman Consul for the eleventh time. ... Carminum Liber primus, secundus et tertius (also known as Odes I, II and III) was a collection of poems published in 23 BC by Horace. ... Horace Translation: The Necessity For Reform The sins of your fathers although guiltless you will expiate, Roman Youth, until the temples are remade from the fallen buildings (temples) of the gods and defiled from the blackness with images of smoke. ... Carminum Liber primus, secundus et tertius (also known as Odes I, II and III) was a collection of poems published in 23 BC by Horace. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s Years: 18 BC 17 BC 16 BC 15 BC 14 BC 13 BC 12 BC 11 BC 10 BC 9 BC 8 BC...

Epodes

1 book Epode, in verse, the third part in an ode, which followed the strophe and the antistrophe, and completed the movement. ...

Epode, in verse, the third part in an ode, which followed the strophe and the antistrophe, and completed the movement. ... Octavian becomes Roman Consul for the fourth time. ...

Satires

2 books 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ...


With the Epistles, these are his most personal works and perhaps the most accessible to contemporary readers since much of his social satire is just as applicable today.

Sermonum Liber primus (also known as Satires I), is a collection of ten satirical poems, written in dactylic hexameters, that explore the secrets of human happiness and literary perfection. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC - 30s BC - 20s BC 10s BC 0s 10s 20s Years: 40 BC 39 BC 38 BC 37 BC 36 BC 35 BC 34 BC 33 BC 32 BC 31 BC... Sermonum liber secundus (also known as Satires II), is a collection of eight satirical poems that the Roman poet Horace published in 30 BCE as a sequel to his successful first book of satirical poems, Satires I, published five years previous. ...

Letters or Epistles

2 books For other uses, see Letter (disambiguation). ... An epistle (Greek επιστολη, epistolē, letter) is a writing directed or sent to a person or group of persons, usually a letter and a very formal, often didactic and elegant one. ...


With the Satires, these are his most personal works, and perhaps the most accessible to contemporary readers.

One of the Epistles is often referred to as a separate work in itself, the Ars Poetica. In this work, Horace forwards a theory of poetry. His most important tenets are that poetry must be carefully and skillfully worked out on the semantic and formal levels, and that poetry should be wholesome as well as pleasant. This latter issue is often referred to as the dulce et utile, which is Latin for the sweet and useful. (This work was first translated into English by Queen Elizabeth I). Epistularum liber primus is the seventh work by Horace, published in the year 20BC. A latin copy of the text can be found here ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC - 20s BC - 10s BC 0s 10s 20s 30s Years: 25 BC 24 BC 23 BC 22 BC 21 BC 20 BC 19 BC 18 BC 17 BC 16 BC 15... Ars Poetica is a term meaning The Art of Poetry or On the Nature of Poetry. Early examples of Ars Poetica by Aristotle and Horace have survived and have since spawned many other poems that bear the same name. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s Years: 23 BC 22 BC 21 BC 20 BC 19 BC 18 BC 17 BC 16 BC 15 BC 14 BC 13 BC... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s Years: 19 BC 18 BC 17 BC 16 BC 15 BC 14 BC 13 BC 12 BC 11 BC 10 BC 9 BC... Ars Poetica is a term meaning The Art of Poetry or On the Nature of Poetry. Early examples of Ars Poetica by Aristotle and Horace have survived and have since spawned many other poems that bear the same name. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ...


Carmen Saeculare

The Carmen Saeculare (Latin for Secular Hymn), sometimes known as the Carmen for short, is a hymn written by the poet Horace. ...

In later culture

  • Dante, in Inferno ranks him side by side with Lucan, Homer, Ovid and Virgil (Inferno, IV,88).
  • Is the main character of the Oxford Latin Course portrayed by Brian Vassallo.
  • A fifth book of Odes was published in 1921, written by Rudyard Kipling and Charles Graves.
  • In the film Red Dragon, Hannibal Lecter quotes him.
  • In the Harvey Birdman, Attorney at Law episode entitled "Gone Efficien...t", Harvey's frenetic attempt at efficiency is stymied by having to wait for the closing arguments of a drawling defence attorney who, in summation of his arguments, insists on quoting Horace at length.

DANTE is also a digital audio network. ... Dante shown holding a copy of the Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, with the spheres of Heaven above, in Michelinos fresco. ... Marcus Annaeus Lucanus (November 3, AD 39-April 30, 65), better known in English as Lucan, was a Roman poet, and is one of the outstanding figures of the Silver Latin period. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation) Publius Ovidius Naso (March 20, 43 BC – 17 AD) was a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid who wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... This article is about the British author. ... Charles Graves may refer to: Charles H. Graves, politician Charles Graves (bishop) (1812-1899), Bishop of Limerick and mathematician Charles Patrick Graves, writer, grandson of the bishop Category: ... Red Dragon is a 2002 thriller film, based on the novel of the same name written by Thomas Harris featuring the brilliant psychiatrist and serial killer Dr. Hannibal Lecter. ... Hannibal Lecter is a fictional character in a series of novels by author Thomas Harris. ... Harvey Birdman, Attorney at Law is a comedic American animated television series created by Williams Street that airs on Cartoon Network during its Adult Swim late night programming block. ...

English translators

  • Perhaps the finest English translator of Horace was John Dryden, who successfully adapted most of the Odes into verse for readers of his own age. These translations are favored by many scholars despite some textual variations. Others favor unrhymed translations.
  • In 1964 James Michie published a translation of the Odes—many of them fully rhymed—including a dozen of the poems in the original Sapphic and Alcaic metres.
  • Ars Poetica was first translated into English by Queen Elizabeth I.

John Dryden John Dryden (August 19 {August 9 O.S.}, 1631 - May 12 {May 1 O.S.}, 1700) was an influential English poet, literary critic, translator and playwright, who dominated the literary life of Restoration England to such a point that the period came to be known in literary circles... The Sapphic stanza is a poetic form spanning 4 lines. ... Alcaic verse (sometimes called Anacreontic verse) is a Greek lyrical meter, traditionally believed to have been invented by Alcaeus, a lyric poet from Mytilene on the island of Lesbos, about 600 BC. The Alcaic verse and the Sapphic stanza named for Alcaeus contemporary, Sappho, are considered the two most important... Ars Poetica is a term meaning The Art of Poetry or On the Nature of Poetry. Early examples of Ars Poetica by Aristotle and Horace have survived and have since spawned many other poems that bear the same name. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ...

References

Michie, James (1964). The Odes of Horace. Rupert Hart-Davis. ASIN B000K7DG0Y.  Asin is a Pinoy rock and folk rock band from the Philippines. ...


External links

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Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... The Latin Library is a website that collects public domain Latin texts. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Horace - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (902 words)
Horace never took his father's care and sacrifice for granted; his relationship with his father remains one of the most endearing personal episodes to survive from the classical period.
Horace was a member of a literary circle that included Virgil and Lucius Varius Rufus; they introduced him to Maecenas, friend and confidant of Augustus.
Horace is generally considered by classicists to be, along with Virgil, the greatest of the Latin poets.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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