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Encyclopedia > Hoosiers
This page is about the movie "Hoosiers". Hoosiers is also the nickname of Indiana University athletic teams; see Indiana Hoosiers. For the UK Indie band, see The Hoosiers. For information on the word itself, see Hoosier.
Hoosiers
Directed by David Anspaugh
Produced by Carter DeHaven
Angelo Pizzo
Written by Angelo Pizzo
Starring Gene Hackman,
Barbara Hershey,
Dennis Hopper,
Sheb Wooley
Music by Jerry Goldsmith
Distributed by Orion Pictures
Release date(s) November 14, 1986
Running time 115 min.
Language English
IMDb profile

Hoosiers is a 1986 Academy Award nominated movie about a small-town Indiana high school basketball team that wins the state championship. The film is set during 1951, when all high schools in Indiana, regardless of school size, competed in one state championship tournament. It stars Gene Hackman as a new coach with a spotty past, Barbara Hershey, Sheb Wooley, and Dennis Hopper as the basketball-loving town drunkard, a performance that brought Hopper an Oscar nomination. The movie was written by Angelo Pizzo, who would go on to co-produce the underdog sports movie Rudy, and directed by David Anspaugh, who directed Rudy. The score was composed by Jerry Goldsmith, who was also nominated for an Oscar for Best Music, Original Score. Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... Indiana Universitys athletic teams are called the Hoosiers, and their colors are cream and crimson, though red and white have been used at times in the past. ... The Hoosiers are a rock band from Reading, Berkshire and Sweden. ... A Hoosier is a resident or native of the U.S. state of Indiana, but used as a slang term for redneck in other parts of the country, especially in Missouri, Illinois and Arkansas. ... Image File history File links Hoosiers_movie_poster_copyright_fairuse. ... Eugene Allen Gene Hackman[1] (born January 30, 1930) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Barbara Hershey is an American actress, known for her many film roles. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... Shelby F. Sheb Wooley (April 10, 1921 - September 17, 2003) was a character actor and singer, best known for his 1958 novelty hit Purple People Eater. Wooley was born in Erick, Oklahoma and grew up on a farm. ... Jerrald King Jerry Goldsmith (February 10, 1929 – July 21, 2004) was an American film score composer from Los Angeles, California. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... This article is about the sport. ... Eugene Allen Gene Hackman[1] (born January 30, 1930) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Barbara Hershey is an American actress, known for her many film roles. ... Shelby F. Sheb Wooley (April 10, 1921 - September 17, 2003) was a character actor and singer, best known for his 1958 novelty hit Purple People Eater. Wooley was born in Erick, Oklahoma and grew up on a farm. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Rudy is a 1993 film directed by David Anspaugh. ... David Anspaugh (born on 24 September 1946 in Decatur, Indiana, USA) is an American director. ... Jerrald King Jerry Goldsmith (February 10, 1929 – July 21, 2004) was an American film score composer from Los Angeles, California. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... From Rule Sixteen of the Special Rules for The Music Awards Original Score: An original score is a substantial body of music in the form of dramatic underscoring written specifically for the film by the submitting composer. ...


Hoosiers was ranked number 13th by the American Film Institute on its 100 Years... 100 Cheers.The film was recently the choice of the readers of USA Today newspaper as the best sports movie of all time. In 2001, Hoosiers was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". This article does not cite any references or sources. ... 100 Years. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ...


A museum to commemorate the real life achievements of the 1954 Milan Team has been established — information regarding this project can be viewed here: Milan '54 Museum.


Tagline: They needed a second chance to finish first. A tagline is a variant of a branding slogan typically used in marketing materials and advertising. ...

Contents

Based on a true story

The film is said to be based on the story of the 1954 Indiana state champions, Milan (pronounced /ˈmaɪlən/ MY-lun) High School, though there is little in the movie that coincides at all with Milan's 1953–54 season other than that both were small schools that won the State Championship in the 1950s. In most US states, high school athletic teams are divided into different classes, usually based on the number of enrolled students, with separate state championship tournaments held for each classification. At the time, Indiana conducted a single state basketball championship for all of its high schools, and continued to do so until 1997. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Milan is a town in Ripley County, Indiana, United States. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


Some elements of the film do match closely with those of Milan's real story. Like the movie's Hickory High School, Milan was a very small high school in a rural, southern Indiana town. Both schools had undersized teams. Both Hickory and Milan won the state finals by two points: Hickory won 42–40, and Milan won 32–30. The final seconds of the Hoosiers state final hold fairly closely to the details of Milan's 1954 final; the final shot in the movie was taken from virtually the same spot on the floor as Bobby Plump's actual game-winner. The movie's final game was even shot in the same building that hosted the 1954 Indiana final, Butler University's Hinkle Fieldhouse (called Butler Fieldhouse in 1954) in Indianapolis. Butler University is a private liberal arts university in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Hinkle Fieldhouse is a sports arena in Indianapolis/Indiana. ... The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ...


Differences

  • The rosters
In the movie, Hickory begins its season without tryouts, as only seven players are even concerned with playing basketball for Hickory. Two players quit the team on the first day of practice, though one returns the next day and the other also returns to the team later into the season. Jimmy Chitwood is also added halfway through the season, brining its roster to seven plus Ollie, the manager, who sees some time on account of injuries. At Milan, 58 of the 73 boys enrolled at the school tried out for the team, and had a roster consisting of 10 players.
  • Coaching controversy?
The controversy surrounding the coach and his methods, an important element of the movie's story, was completely absent in Milan — at least by 1954. Milan had fired its previous coach, Herman "Snort" Grinstead, after the 1951–52 season for ordering new uniforms against the superintendent's orders. Years later, Plump would tell an ESPN interviewer that Grinstead had been "the most popular coach in Milan's history." While Grinstead's successor, Marvin Wood, would initially make some waves in Milan, he was never the target of a town meeting to have him fired (unlike the movie). In his first season as coach in 1952–53, he would lead Milan to the state semifinals, defusing any remaining criticism.
  • Town drunk
The town drunk character in the movie, Wilbur "Shooter" Flatch, is the father of one of the members of the team, and becomes one of the assistant coaches. He has no Milan counterpart.
  • The previous coach
In the movie, Hickory's best player initially refuses to play, devastated by the sudden death of his previous coach. This has no parallel in the Milan story; as noted above, Milan's previous coach had been fired two years before their championship.
  • The manager
Hickory's manager, Ollie MacFarlane, plays in one game when the Huskers have no other players left, and sinks two free throws to win a key game. Milan had a manager with a similar name, Oliver Jones, but he never played.
  • Underdog status
Hickory is depicted as a massive underdog throughout the movie. Milan entered the 1953–54 season as one of the favorites to win the state title, as it returned four starters from the state semifinalists of 1952–53.
  • Close tournament finishes
In the movie, Hickory wins each of its tournament games by two points or less. In 1954, Milan won seven of its eight tournament games leading up to the final by double-digit margins, and the other by 8 points.
  • Head coaches
Wood, who died of bone cancer in 1999, could hardly have been more different from Hickory coach Norman Dale (the Gene Hackman character). Dale is a middle-aged former college coach with a shady past and a volatile temper, and had a romantic relationship with a fellow Hickory teacher. Wood was only 26, and married with two children, when Milan won the state title, and had coached the Indians to the 1953 state semifinals. By almost all reports, Wood was a soft-spoken man of high integrity who often practiced alongside his players.
  • The championship game
In the state championship scene, the movie portrays South Bend Central (chosen presumably because Milan had lost to South Bend Central in the 1953 state semifinals) as a predominantly black team. The real team was from Muncie Central High School, which had a predominantly white team with three black members. The movie probably borrowed from the actual history of the 1954 semistate final (state quarterfinals), in which Milan defeated the segregated Crispus Attucks High School in Indianapolis, led by all-time great Oscar Robertson, then a sophomore. In the movie, the South Bend Central coach is played by Ray Crowe, who coached Crispus Attucks in 1954 and would, the next year, lead the team to become the first all-black team in the United States to win a state championship playing against schools with white players. The Attucks team, with Crowe as coach and Robertson as floor leader, would repeat as state champions in 1956, becoming the first undefeated team in Indiana high school history.

This article is about the city in Indiana, US. For other uses of the name South Bend, see South Bend (disambiguation). ... Crispus Attucks High School of Indianapolis Public Schools in Indianapolis, Indiana was named for Crispus Attucks (c. ... The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Oscar Palmer Robertson (born November 24, 1938 in Charlotte, Tennessee), nicknamed The Big O, is a former American NBA player with the Cincinnati Royals and the Milwaukee Bucks. ...

Similarities

There were other connections between the movie and real life. The announcer of the championship game in the movie was Hilliard Gates, whose voice was familiar to Indiana high school basketball fans of the 1950s and 60s. The legendary announcer Tom Carnegie played the role of the public address announcer during the final championship game at Hinkle Fieldhouse. Ray Craft also has a role in the film, welcoming the Huskers to Butler Fieldhouse as they get off the bus for the championship game. The game winning shot for the championship is shot by Matt Melvin. Hilliard Gates (1910- November 21, 1996) was a founding father of Indiana broadcasting and the leading sportscaster in Indiana for decades. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... Tom Carnegie, born in 1919 in Norwalk, Connecticut as Carl Kenagy which is still his legal name, was the public address announcer for the Indianapolis Motor Speedway from 1946 to 2006. ... Hinkle Fieldhouse is a sports arena in Indianapolis/Indiana. ...


Behind the scenes

During filming on location at Hinkle Fieldhouse, directors were unable to secure enough extras for shooting the final scenes even after casting calls through the Indianapolis media. In order to help fill the stands, they invited two local high schools to move a regular season game to the Fieldhouse. Broad Ripple and Chatard high schools obliged, and crowd shots were filmed during the actual game. Fans of both schools came out in period costumes to serve as extras and to supplement the hundreds of locals who had answered the call. At halftime of and following the Broad Ripple-Chatard game, the actors took to the court and some footage was captured of the state championship scenes, including the game-winning shot by Milan. (Note: Look closely at the short stands behind one of the Fieldhouse goals and you'll see a Chatard Letterman's Jacket bearing the year '86 worn by one of the student extras.) Hinkle Fieldhouse is a sports arena in Indianapolis/Indiana. ...


The film's producers chose New Richmond, Indiana to serve as the fictional town of Hickory, and recorded most of the film's location shots in and around the community. Signs on the roads into New Richmond still recall its role in the film. . New Richmond is a town located in Montgomery County, Indiana. ...


See also

Hoosier Hysteria. ...

References

External links

  • The Historical Hoosier Gym (the film's location) — http://www.thehoosiergym.com
The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Hoosier - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1419 words)
Hoosier gave his consent, asking them to return to work for him when this section of the road was done.
Another plausible explanation for "Hoosier" is that it sprang from Kosciusko County in the northern part of the state.
Hoosiers who have moved beyond the usual educational and income criteria yet continue to demonstrate Hoosier behavior are sometimes referred to as Hoogeoisie.
What is a Hoosier? (746 words)
Before its use in America, hoosier was used in England to refer to someone who lived in the hills or mountains.
Hoosier was predominant in the mountains of Virginia, West Virginia, and North
Hoosier is believed by some to come from the family name of one of the contractors for the Louisville and Portland canal, under construction from 1826 to 1831.
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