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Encyclopedia > Hook (film)
Hook
Directed by Steven Spielberg
Produced by Frank Marshall
Gerald R. Molen
Written by J.M. Barrie (book)
James V. Hart
Nick Castle
Starring Robin Williams
Dustin Hoffman
Julia Roberts
Bob Hoskins
Maggie Smith
Music by John Williams
Distributed by TriStar Pictures
Release date(s) December 13, 1991
Running time 144 minutes
Language English
Budget $70 million
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

Hook is a 1991 family action/adventure film directed by Steven Spielberg, starring Robin Williams, Dustin Hoffman, Julia Roberts, Bob Hoskins and Maggie Smith. The film is based on J.M. Barrie's Peter Pan and acts as a sequel to the events in the novel, focusing on a grown-up Peter Pan who has forgotten his childhood. Image File history File links This is a copyrighted poster. ... Steven Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... Frank Marshall (born September 13, 1946) is an American movie producer and director, often working in collaboration with Kathleen Kennedy. ... Gerald R. Molen (b. ... Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet, Scottish author Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet (May 9, 1860 - June 19, 1937), more commonly known as J. M. Barrie, was a Scottish novelist and dramatist. ... James V. Jim Hart is a screenwriter and author. ... Nick Castle (born September 21, 1947) is an American actor,screenwriter and film director. ... For other persons named Robin Williams, see Robin Williams (disambiguation). ... Dustin Lee Hoffman (born August 8, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning, BAFTA-winning, and five-time Golden Globe-winning American method actor. ... Julia Fiona Roberts (born October 28, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress and former fashion model. ... Robert William Bob Hoskins Jr. ... Dame Margaret Natalie Smith, DBE (born 28 December 1934), better known as Dame Maggie Smith, is a two-time Academy Award, and Emmy-winning English film, stage, and television actress. ... For other persons named John Williams, see John Williams (disambiguation). ... The TriStar Pictures logo from 1993 to the present TriStar redirects here. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The year 1991 in film involved many significant films. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Steven Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... For other persons named Robin Williams, see Robin Williams (disambiguation). ... Dustin Lee Hoffman (born August 8, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning, BAFTA-winning, and five-time Golden Globe-winning American method actor. ... Julia Fiona Roberts (born October 28, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress and former fashion model. ... Robert William Bob Hoskins Jr. ... Dame Margaret Natalie Smith, DBE (born 28 December 1934), better known as Dame Maggie Smith, is a two-time Academy Award, and Emmy-winning English film, stage, and television actress. ... Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet, Scottish author Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet (May 9, 1860 - June 19, 1937), more commonly known as J. M. Barrie, was a Scottish novelist and dramatist. ... This article is about the play by J.M. Barrie. ...

Contents

Plot

Successful lawyer Peter Banning (Williams) has become so engrossed in his work that he has lost touch with his wife Moira (Caroline Goodall) and his children Jack (Charlie Korsmo) and Maggie (Amber Scott). The family travels to London to visit Granny Wendy Darling (Smith), Moira's grandmother, who also raised Peter and other orphans. While the adults are at a dinner banquet honoring Wendy and her work, Jack and Maggie are kidnapped, with the only clue being a dagger-bearing note signed "JAS Hook, Captain", informing Peter that his presence is necessary to retrieve his children. Peter does not accept Wendy's assertions that this is caused by the real Captain Hook (Dustin Hoffman) and that he himself is the real Peter Pan. He instead gets drunk that night, and is dragged to Neverland by the fairy Tinkerbell (Roberts) after an argument. For other persons named Robin Williams, see Robin Williams (disambiguation). ... Caroline Goodall (born on 13 November 1959 in London, England) is an English actress. ... Charles Randolph Korsmo (born July 20, 1978) is an American former child actor who starred in several major Hollywood films during the early-1990s. ... Amber Scott (b. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Wendy Moira Angela Darling is a fictional heroine and main female protagonist in the Peter Pan stories by J.M. Barrie, in all their theatrical, literary, and motion picture adaptations. ... Dame Margaret Natalie Smith, DBE (born 28 December 1934), better known as Dame Maggie Smith, is a two-time Academy Award, and Emmy-winning English film, stage, and television actress. ... Gerald du Maurier as Captain Hook Captain James Hook is the villain of J. M. Barries play and novel Peter Pan. ... Dustin Lee Hoffman (born August 8, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning, BAFTA-winning, and five-time Golden Globe-winning American method actor. ... This article is about the play by J.M. Barrie. ... Å› This article is about a fictional character. ... Julia Fiona Roberts (born October 28, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress and former fashion model. ...


Peter then wakes up in a pirate port. He walks around and is stopped by a group of pirates trying to steal his shoes, but Tinkerbell saves him and helps him acquire a disguise. He observes a speech by Hook, revealing his plan of having Peter's children as bait, and Peter reveals himself. Hook is disgusted at his nemesis' physical condition, but Tinkerbell convinces Hook to allow Peter three days to re-train him. Peter eventually ends up in the Lost Boys' treetop village, where at first none of the Boys think that he is the real Peter Pan, especially Rufio, the current leader. Eventually, the Lost Boys do believe, and help re-train Peter, especially hampered by his inability to fly. This article is about the play by J.M. Barrie. ...


Back on the Jolly Roger, Hook and Smee attempt to convince Peter's children that their parents never loved them. Although Maggie does not fall for the ploy, the oft-scorned Jack listens, and with the added effect of a pirate baseball game, comes to take Hook somewhat as an adoptive father. Peter is hit in the head by a home run Jack hit, and as a result, eventually finds a tree house where Wendy and her brothers once lived. He soon finds himself flying with his new-found "happy thought": being a father, the reason he left Neverland.


Peter returns to give Hook the battle he demanded; the Lost Boys eventually join in the melee. Rufio unwisely challenges Hook to a duel, where he is killed, but not before telling Peter that he wishes he had a father like Peter. Peter, having rescued his children, wants to leave without a fight, but realizing that Hook will not stop, consents again to the duel, which ends when the crocodile tower seemingly comes back to life and swallows Hook, and shortly after it belches loudly. When it is time for the Bannings to return home, Peter passes on his sword and the leadership to one of the Lost Boys, and flies back to London with his children. When he awakes he is back in London in his regular clothes outside the house, and sees Tinkerbell one last time. She asks him if he believes in fairies and replies that he still does, she then leaves. Peter then comes back to the house proving to his family that they are more important than his work. Peter then gives Tootles his missing marbles he got from one of the Lost Boys. Upon receiving them, Tootles remembers his "happy thought" and flies away into the distance. Å› This article is about a fictional character. ...


Cast

Dustin Lee Hoffman (born August 8, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning, BAFTA-winning, and five-time Golden Globe-winning American method actor. ... For other persons named Robin Williams, see Robin Williams (disambiguation). ... Julia Fiona Roberts (born October 28, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress and former fashion model. ... Robert William Bob Hoskins Jr. ... Dame Margaret Natalie Smith, DBE (born 28 December 1934), better known as Dame Maggie Smith, is a two-time Academy Award, and Emmy-winning English film, stage, and television actress. ... Caroline Goodall (born on 13 November 1959 in London, England) is an English actress. ... Charles Randolph Korsmo (born July 20, 1978) is an American former child actor who starred in several major Hollywood films during the early-1990s. ... Amber Scott (b. ... For other uses, see Phil Collins (disambiguation). ... Arthur Malet (born 24 September 1927, Lee-on-Solent, England) is an actor. ... Dante Basco (sometimes Danté Basco) (born August 29, 1975) is an American actor. ... Jasen Fisher (born 1980) was an American child actor, who made his first movie appearance in Parenthood as Kevin Buckman. ... James Madio (born November 22, 1975 in The Bronx, New York City) is an American actor. ... Gwyneth Kate Paltrow (born September 27, 1972[1]) is an Academy Award-winning American actress and singer. ... Jimmy Buffett (born James William Buffett on December 25, 1946, in Pascagoula, Mississippi) is a singer, songwriter, author, businessman, and recently a film producer best known for his island escapism lifestyle and music including hits such as Margaritaville (No. ... Glenn Close (born March 19, 1947) is a five-time Academy Award-nominated American film and stage actress. ... Regina Russell is a former actress. ...

Reception

The film is among the worst received films of Steven Spielberg's career. Rotten Tomatoes scores the movie a 22% certified "rotten" rating among 36 critics,[1] although users give it a "fresh" rating of 71%. IGN's Steven Spielberg Featured Filmmaker article notes: [2]


"This is the one Spielberg film that I simply cannot watch. To do so pains me. Literally, I feel sick. It's a meandering, emotionless, wretched mess of a film containing a whole gaggle of characters that are in no way made appealing throughout the entirety of the film."


Despite being critically panned, the film was financially successful and managed to gross $119,654,900 in the U.S.A. (subtotal) [3] At the end of the year the film stood as the 4th highest grossing movie of 1991.


References to Peter Pan

  • An elderly Tootles is one of the characters in the film, and is referred to as Wendy's "first orphan". Tootles was one of the original Lost Boys. In the book, all the original Lost Boys had been adopted by Mr. Darling (Wendy's father), though none of the others have roles in the film besides Tootles.
  • In both the book and film, Wendy greets Peter by calling him "Boy".
  • Granny Wendy recites a prayer-like speech as she leaves Maggie and Jack in the nursery, asking the lights to guard the sleeping babes. This is a reference to the book, in which Mrs. Darling says, "Night-lights are the eyes a mother leaves behind her to guard her children." (Chapter 2: The Shadow)
  • When Tinkerbell is first trying to get Peter to remember her, she says, "I drank poison for you!" This is a direct reference to the events in the book. (Chapter 13: Do You Believe in Fairies?)
  • The invisible dinner sequence is inspired by the lines in the book: "The difference between (Peter) and the other boys at such a time was that they knew it was make-believe, while to him make-believe and true were exactly the same thing. This sometimes troubled them, as when they had to make-believe that they had had their dinners." (Chapter 6: The Little House)
  • After human-sized Tinkerbell kisses Peter, and he remembers he has to save his children, Tink says to him, "You silly ass, Go!" In the book, Tinkerbell repeatedly calls Peter a "silly ass".
  • A number of lines in the film's dialogue are directly lifted from the book. Among them are:
    • "When the first baby laughed for the first time, the laugh broke into a thousands pieces and they went skipping about. That was the beginning of fairies." In the film this is recited by Granny Wendy and Maggie Banning. In the book it is spoken by Peter to Wendy. (Chapter 3: Come Away, Come Away!)
    • "I can’t come with you. I have forgotten how to fly. I’m old, Peter. Ever so much more than twenty. I grew up a long time ago." Spoken by an aged Wendy to Peter in both the film and book.
    • "Strike, Peter. Strike true" In the film this is spoken by a defeated Hook to Peter. In the book it is spoken by a guilty Tootles to Peter. (Chapter 6: The Little House)
  • Some of the dialogue are modifications of lines in the novel, such as:
    • When Peter confronts Hook for the final battle at the end of the film, they say: "Peter Pan, prepare to meet thy doom." "Dark and sinister man, have at thee." This exchange is almost directly lifted from the book, Chapter 15: Hook or Me This Time, the original line being: "Proud and insolent youth, prepare to meet thy doom." "Dark and sinister man, have at thee."
    • During the duel between Peter and Hook, Hook says "Thus perished Peter Pan". This is a flip of the original line "Thus perished Jas. Hook", which is from Chapter 15: Hook or Me This Time.
    • Peter's quote in the movie "to die will be an awfully big adventure" refers to a line in the book. (Chapter 8: the Mermaid's Lagoon). Though the original line is spoken by Hook when he attempts suicide.
  • In the movie, when Hook listens to Maggie singing, he is holding a strange cigar holder which branches out into two cigars. Hook has such a device in the book.
  • In the movie, Hook repeatedly talks about "Good Form" and "Bad Form!". In the book, Hook thinks about this after he has captured the lost boys.
  • Toward the end of the movie, Tootles says "I've missed the adventure again, haven't I, Peter?" This is in reference to the book, as it is mentioned that the reason Tootles was so humble was because, by some misfortune, he missed most of the adventures the Lost Boys participated in.

Musical score

The score for Hook was composed and conducted by John Williams. As in many of his fantasy-adventure scores, Williams makes extensive use of leitmotifs (musical themes related to characters, emotions and actions), using one or more themes in each song to describe on-screen story and interaction. In fact, Hook may have one of the most leitmotivically-dense scores of all time, with some 20 odd autonomous melodic ideas recurring through the movie. [citation needed] An incomplete sample, just from the officially released soundtrack, which omits about half of the written score: For other persons named John Williams, see John Williams (disambiguation). ... A leitmotif (IPA pronunciation: ) (also leitmotiv; lit. ...

  1. "Prologue" (Hook/Pan confrontation theme/Peter Pan theme #1)
  2. "We Don't Want To Grow Up" (Tinkerbell theme) *
  3. "Banning Back Home"
  4. "Granny Wendy" (Childhood theme, Wendy's theme)
  5. "Hook-Napped" (Prologue Theme, James T. Hook theme)
  6. "The Arrival of Tink and the Flight to Neverland" (Tinkerbell, Childhood)
  7. "Presenting the Hook" (Pirate theme, Captain Hook theme)
  8. "From Mermaids to Lost Boys" (Mermaid theme, Neverland Theme, Lost Boys)
  9. "The Lost Boy Chase" (Lost Boys theme #1)
  10. "Smee's Plan" (Smee and Hook theme)
  11. "The Banquet" (Lost Boys theme #2)
  12. "The Never-Feast" (Lost Boys #2, Childhood, When You're Alone)
  13. "Remembering Childhood" (Children, Childhood, Neverland, Prologue)
  14. "You are the Pan" (Pan Theme)
  15. "When You're Alone* (When You're Alone)
  16. "The Ultimate War" (Prologue, Captain Hook, Tinkerbell, Hook & Smee, Childhood, Lost Boys 1+2)
  17. "Farewell Neverland" (Neverland, Lost Boys, Wendy, and Tinkerbell themes)

*Tracks 2 and 15: Music composed by John Williams/lyrics written by Leslie Bricusse. "When You're Alone" was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song in 1992. Leslie Bricusse (born 29 January 1931) is a British lyricist. ... See also: 1992 in music (UK) Musical groups established in 1992 Record labels established in 1992 // 1992 was a pivotal year in the development of music. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Hook (film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5936 words)
Hook, the first live-action movie treatment of the Peter Pan stories by J.M. Barrie, was directed by Steven Spielberg in 1991 and starred Robin Williams, Dustin Hoffman, Julia Roberts, Bob Hoskins and Maggie Smith.
Peter amazes Hook and the pirates with the weapons he and the Boys use, including shooting paint, eggs, blinding mirrors, and Thudbutt rolling himself into a ball and becoming the "Thud Ball." Rufio comes face-to-face with Hook, and though Hook is eager to fight Rufio, Peter stops the fight.
The highly-accaimed score for "Hook" was composed and conducted by John Williams.
Captain Hook - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1084 words)
He wears an iron hook in place of his right hand (though in the Disney version it's the left hand to allow greater mobility) which was cut off by Peter Pan and eaten by a crocodile; the crocodile liked the taste of him so much that it follows him around constantly, hoping for more.
When Hook is bested and must choose between surrender and death, he commits suicide by throwing himself into the waiting jaws of the crocodile.
Hook also appeared frequently on House of Mouse, and was one of the main villains of Mickey's House of Villains.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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