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Encyclopedia > Honus Wagner
Honus Wagner
Honus Wagner
Shortstop
Born: February 24, 1874(1874-02-24)
Chartiers, Pennsylvania
Died: December 6, 1955 (aged 81)
Carnegie, Pennsylvania
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 19, 1897
for the Louisville Colonels
Final game
September 17, 1917
for the Pittsburgh Pirates
Career statistics
Batting average     .327
Hits     3415
Runs batted in     1732
Teams
Career highlights and awards
  • World Series champion (1909)
  • 8x NL leader in batting average
  • 5x NL leader in RBIs
  • 2x NL leader in hits
  • 7x NL leader in doubles
  • 3x NL leader in triples
  • 4x NL leader in stolen bases
Member of the National
Baseball Hall of Fame
Elected     1936
Vote     95.13% (first ballot)

Johannes Peter "Honus" Wagner (February 24, 1874 - December 6, 1955), nicknamed "The Flying Dutchman" due to his superb speed and German heritage, was an American Major League Baseball shortstop who played in the NL from 1897 to 1917. In 1936, the Baseball Hall of Fame inducted Wagner as one of the first five members, receiving the second-highest vote total behind Ty Cobb and ahead of Babe Ruth. Although Cobb is frequently cited as the greatest player of the dead-ball era, some contemporaries regarded Wagner as the better all-around player, and most baseball historians consider Wagner to be the greatest shortstop ever. Cobb himself called Wagner "maybe the greatest star ever to take the diamond."[1] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Carnegie is a borough located in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Louisville Colonels were a Major League Baseball team that played in the American Association throughout that leagues ten-year existence from 1882 until 1891, first as the Louisville Eclipse (1882- 1884) and later as the Louisville Colonels (1885 -1891). ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... This article is about the baseball team. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In Major League Baseball history, Ty Cobb had a record 4,191 hits (later revised to 4,189) by 1928; Pete Rose would surpass it 57 years later, and finish with 4,256 career hits. ... In baseball statistics, a run batted in (RBI) is given to a batter for each run scored as the result of a batters plate appearance. ... The Louisville Colonels were a Major League Baseball team that played in the American Association throughout that leagues ten-year existence from 1882 until 1891, first as the Louisville Eclipse (1882- 1884) and later as the Louisville Colonels (1885 -1891). ... This article is about the baseball team. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... Ebbets Field in 1913 The dead-ball era is a baseball term used to describe the period between 1900 (though some date it to the beginning of baseball) and the emergence of Babe Ruth as a power hitter in 1920. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Contents

Early life and Family

Honus Wagner was born on February 24, 1874 to German immigrants Peter and Katheryn Wagner, in the Pittsburgh neighborhood of Chartiers.[1], which is now a part of the borough of Carnegie, Pennsylvania. He was one of nine children, although only five lived past childhood. As a child, he was called Hans by his mother, which would later evolve into Honus. "Hans" was also an alternate nickname during his major league career. Wagner dropped out of school at age 12 to help his father and brothers in the coal mines. In their free time, he and his brothers played sandlot baseball and developed their skills to such an extent that three of his brothers would go on to be professionals as well. Wagner's older brother Albert "Butts" Wagner, who had a brief major league career himself, is often credited for getting Honus his first tryout. Following after his brother, Honus trained to be a barber before becoming successful in baseball. In 1916, Wagner married Bessie Baine Smith and the couple went on to have three daughters, Elva Katrina (born 1918), Betty Baine (born 1919), and Virginia Mae (born 1922). Pittsburgh redirects here. ... Carnegie is a borough located in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. ... Wyoming coal mine Coal mining is the mining of coal. ... Albert Butts Wagner (September 17, 1871 - November 26, 1928) played one year of Major League Baseball. ...


Playing career

Honus Wagner began his career with the Louisville Colonels in 1897. Legend has it that he was discovered by Ed Barrow who had watched him throw rocks across a creek. Soon afterwards, Barrow signed and sent him to play for the Paterson, New Jersey minor league team. He also played a short stint for the Steubenville, Ohio team before making it to Louisville. Honus was a solid hitter from the very beginning of his major league career, hitting .338 in 61 games in his rookie year, 1897. By his second season, Wagner was already one of the best hitters in the National League although he would come up short a percentage point from finishing the season at .300. After the 1899 season, the NL contracted from twelve to eight teams, with the Colonels one of four teams eliminated. Along with Wagner, owner Barney Dreyfuss took many of his other top players with him to Pittsburgh. Accompanying Wagner were stalwart stars; pitchers Deacon Phillippe and Rube Waddell, catcher Chief Zimmer, infielder Tommy Leach, and outfielders Fred Clarke and Dummy Hoy. Wagner would play the remainder of his career for his hometown Pittsburgh Pirates, 21 seasons in all. The Louisville Colonels were a Major League Baseball team that played in the American Association throughout that leagues ten-year existence from 1882 until 1891, first as the Louisville Eclipse (1882- 1884) and later as the Louisville Colonels (1885 -1891). ... Edward Grant Barrow (May 10, 1868 - December 15, 1953) was an American manager and executive in Major League Baseball who guided the Boston Red Sox to the 1918 World Series title, then built the New York Yankees into baseballs premier franchise and greatest dynasty as their top executive from... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see National League (disambiguation). ... Bernhard Barney Dreyfuss (February 23, 1865 – February 5, 1932) was a German-American executive in Major League Baseball who owned the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise from 1900 to 1932. ... City nickname: The Steel City Location in the state of Pennsylvania Founded 1758 Mayor Tom Murphy (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 151. ... Charles Louis Deacon Phillippe (originally Phillippi) (May 23, 1872-March 30, 1952) was a turn-of-the-century pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates. ... George Edward Waddell (October 13, 1876 - April 1, 1914) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Charles Louis Zimmer (November 23, 1860 in Marietta, Ohio – August 22, 1949 in Cleveland, Ohio) was a Major League Baseball Catcher from 1884 to 1903. ... Thomas Tommy William Leach (November 4, 1877 - September 29, 1969) was a Major League Baseball player in the late 19th and early 20th century. ... Fred Clarke of the Pittsburgh Pirates at the West Side Grounds in 1903. ... William Ellsworth Dummy Hoy (May 23, 1862 - December 15, 1961) was an American center fielder in Major League Baseball. ... This article is about the baseball team. ...

Honus Wagner in 1911
Honus Wagner in 1911

In 1900, Wagner won his first batting championship with a .381 mark and also led the league in doubles (45), triples (22), and slugging (.573), all of which were career highs. In the early stage of his career, Wagner played several different positions, just to keep his potent bat and speed in the lineup. It was in 1901 that he finally got a chance fielding at shortstop. His first day at the position, replacing incumbent Bones Ely, Wagner committed 3 errors in one inning. "The Dutchman" would eventually be hailed as the best-fielding shortstop of his era, although he played in the outfield for over 300 games and played over 200 games at both first base and third base. He would eventually play every position except catcher, even making two appearances as a pitcher. William Frederick Bones Ely (June 7, 1863 - January 10, 1952) was a shortstop in Major League Baseball. ...


Wagner would lead the National League in batting average eight times. Only Ty Cobb, with eleven, and Tony Gwynn, with eight, have ever led a league in batting average that often. He also led the league in slugging percentage six times, on-base percentage four times, total bases six times, doubles seven times, triples three times, runs batted in five times and stolen bases five times. He was an outstanding runner despite being bow-legged to the point where a contemporary sportswriter described his running as "resembling the gambols of a caracoling elephant." His career totals include a .327 lifetime batting average, 640 doubles, 722 stolen bases, and a career total of 3,415 hits, a major league record until it was surpassed by Cobb in the 1920s and a National League record until it was surpassed by Stan Musial in 1961. He was the second player (since Major League Baseball officially began in 1876) to reach 3000 hits, joining Cap Anson as the only members of this exclusive offensive club. His career home run total of 101 is considered a good total for a player whose entire career was played in the "dead ball era" when home runs were relatively few.[citation needed] For other uses, see National League (disambiguation). ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... Anthony Keith Gwynn (born May 9, 1960 in Los Angeles, California) is a former right fielder in Major League Baseball, statistically one of the best and most consistent hitters in baseball history. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In baseball statistics, slugging average (SLG) is a measure of the power of a hitter. ... In baseball statistics, on base percentage (OBP) (sometimes referred to as on base average (OBA)) is a measure of how often a batter gets to first base for any reason other than a fielding error or a fielders choice. ... In baseball statistics, total bases refers to the number of bases a player has gained with hits, i. ... In baseball, a double is the act of a batter safely reaching second base by striking the ball and getting to second before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... In baseball, a triple is the act of a batter safely reaching third base by striking the ball and getting to third before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... In baseball statistics, a run batted in (RBI) is given to a batter for each run scored as the result of a batters plate appearance. ... The all-time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1985 In baseball statistics, stolen bases (denoted by SB) is a count of the number of bases successfully stolen by a player. ... Stan Musials number 6 was retired by the St. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Adrian Constantine Anson (April 17, 1852 – April 14, 1922), known by the nicknames Cap (for Captain) and Pop, was a professional baseball player in the National Association and Major League Baseball. ... Ebbets Field in 1913 The dead-ball era is a baseball term used to describe the period between 1900 (though some date it to the beginning of baseball) and the emergence of Babe Ruth as a power hitter in 1920. ...


Honus Wagner has been considered one of the very best all-around players to ever play baseball since the day he retired in 1917. Famed "sabermatician" Bill James rates him as the second best player of all-time, right behind Babe Ruth.[2] Statisticians John Thorn and Pete Palmer rate Wagner as ninth all-time in their "Total Player Ranking". [3] Many of the greats who played or managed against Wagner, including Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Rogers Hornsby, and Walter Johnson, list him at shortstop on their All-Time teams.[4] George William “Bill” James (born October 5, 1949 in Holton, Kansas) is a baseball writer, historian and statistician whose work has been widely influential. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... Rogers Hornsby (April 27, 1896 in Winters, Texas - January 5, 1963 in Chicago, Illinois), nicknamed The Rajah, was a Major League Baseball second baseman and manager. ... Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887-December 10, 1946), American professional baseball pitcher. ...


World Series Play

In 1903 the Pirates played the Boston Americans (later renamed the Red Sox) in Major League Baseball's inaugural World Series. The Pirates were considered heavy favorites, as the American League had only completed its third season as a "major" league and was considered to have slightly lesser talent. Wagner, by this point, was an established star and much was expected of him, especially since the Pirates' starting rotation was decimated by injury. Wagner himself was not at full strength and hit only .222 for the series. The Americans, meanwhile, had some particularily rowdy fans, called the "Royal Rooters" who, whenever Wagner came to bat, would sing "Honus, Honus, why do you hit so badly?" to the tune of "Tessie", a popular song of the day. Pittsburgh lost in a best-of-nine series, five games to three, to a team led by pitchers Cy Young and Bill Dinneen and third baseman-manager Jimmy Collins. Christy Mathewson, in his book "Pitching in a Pinch" wrote, "For some time after "Hans" Wagner's poor showing in the world's series of 1903... it was reported that he was "yellow" (poor in the clutch). This grieved the Dutchman deeply, for I don't know a ball player in either league who would assay less quit to the ton than Wagner... This was the real tragedy in Wagner's career. Notwithstanding his stolid appearance, he is a sensitive player, and this has hurt him more than anything else in his life ever has."."[5] Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Major Leagues redirects here. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... For the Disney animator, see Cy Young (animator). ... William Henry Dineen (born April 5, 1876 Syracuse, NY - died January 13, 1955 Syracuse, NY) was a pitcher with a 12 year career from 1898 to 1909. ... James Joseph Collins (January 16, 1870 - March 6, 1943) was a Major League Baseball player at the turn of the 20th century who was widely regarded as being the American Leagues best third baseman prior to Brooks Robinson. ... Christopher Christy Mathewson (August 12, 1880 - October 7, 1925), nicknamed Big Six, The Christian Gentleman, or Matty, was a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ...


Wagner and the Pirates were given a chance to prove that they were not "yellow" in 1909. The Pirates faced off against Ty Cobb's Detroit Tigers, which would be the only meeting of the two superior batsmen of the day. Wagner was by this time 35 years old, while Cobb a mere 22. This time Wagner would not be stifled as he would outhit Cobb, .333 to .231, and steal 6 bases, which established a new Series record. The speed demon Cobb not only managed two steals, but one of which Cobb himself admitted was a botched call. Wagner recounted, "We had him out at second. We put up a squawk, but Silk O'Loughlin, the umpire, overruled it. We kept the squawk going for a minute or so, making no headway of course, and then Cobb spoke up. He turned to O'Loughlin, an American League umpire, by the way, and said, 'Of course I was out. They had me by a foot. You just booted the play, so come on, let's play ball." ."[6]There is also a story made famous in Lawrence Ritter's "The Glory of Their Times" in which Cobb bragged to Wagner that he was going to steal second and Wagner placed an especially rough tag to Cobb's mouth and the two exchanged choice words, although this story's accuracy has been debated. The Pirates won the series 4 games to 3 behind the pitching of Babe Adams, thereby vindicating Wagner and the Pittsburgh team. Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42, Cobb Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Motor City Kitties, The Bengals, The Tigs, The Bless You Boys Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999... Charles Benjamin Babe Adams (May 18, 1882 _ July 27, 1968) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball from 1906 to 1926, almost entirely with the Pittsburgh Pirates. ...


Later life

Wagner served as the Pirates' manager briefly in 1917, but resigned the position after only 5 games. He returned to the Pirates as a coach, most notably as a hitting instructor from 1933 to 1952. Arky Vaughan, Kiki Cuyler, Ralph Kiner and player/manager from 1934-1939, Pie Traynor, all future Hall of Famers were notable "pupils" of Wagner. During this time, he wore uniform number 14, but later changed it to his more famous 33, which was later retired for him. (His entire playing career was in the days before uniform numbers were worn.) His appearances at National League stadiums during his coaching years were always well received and Hans remained a beloved ambassador of baseball. Joseph Floyd Arky Vaughan (March 9, 1912 _ August 30, 1952) was a Major League Baseball shortstop. ... Hazen Shirley Kiki Cuyler (b. ... Ralph McPherran Kiner (born October 27, 1922) is an American former Major League Baseball player and current announcer. ... Harold Joseph Pie Traynor (November 11, 1899 - March 16, 1972) was a Major League Baseball third baseman who played his entire career with the Pittsburgh Pirates (1920-37). ...


In 1928, Wagner ran for sheriff of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania but lost. He was made deputy county sheriff in 1942. He also ran a well-known sporting goods company. In fact, a sporting goods store bearing the name "Honus Wagner" still operates in downtown Pittsburgh.


Wagner lived out the remainder of his life in Pittsburgh, where he was well-known as a friendly figure around town. He died on December 6, 1955 at the age of 81, and is buried at Jefferson Memorial Cemetery in the South Hills area of Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh redirects here. ...


Honors

Wagner statue at PNC Park
  • When the Baseball Hall of Fame held its first election in 1936, Wagner tied for second in the voting with Babe Ruth, trailing Cobb. In 1969, on the 100th anniversary of professional baseball, a vote was taken to honor the greatest players ever, and Wagner was selected as the all-time shortstop. In 1999, despite 82 years having passed since his last game and 44 years since his death, Wagner was voted Number 13 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Players, making him still the highest-ranking shortstop. That same year, he was selected to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team by the oversight committee, after losing out in the popular vote to Cal Ripken, Jr. and Ernie Banks.
  • "A stirring march and two step," titled "Husky Hans", and "respectfully dedicated to Hans Wagner, Three time Champion Batsman of The National League" was written by William J. Hartz in 1904.
  • A life-size statue of Wagner swinging a bat, atop a marble pedestal featuring admiring children, was forged by a local sculptor named Frank Vittor, and placed outside the left field corner gate at Forbes Field. It was dedicated on April 30, 1955, and the then-frail Wagner was well enough to attend and wave to his many fans. The Pirates have relocated twice since then, and the statue has come along with them. It now stands outside the main gate of PNC Park. As that park is near the site of the Pirates' original home, Exposition Park, in a sense Wagner has come full circle.
  • Wagner is also honored in the form of a small stadium residing behind Carnegie Elementary School on Washington Avenue in Carnegie, Pennsylvania. The stadium serves as the home field for Carlynton High School varsity sports.
  • In 2000, Honus Wagner was honored with a U.S. postage stamp. The stamp was issued as part of a "Legends of Baseball" series that honored twenty all-time greats in conjunction with MLB's All Century team.
 
Wagner statue,
Three Rivers Stadium

Wagner is mentioned in the poem "Lineup for Yesterday" by Ogden Nash: Image File history File links I took this photo on May 21, 2001, on a rainy day in Pittsburgh. ... Image File history File links I took this photo on May 21, 2001, on a rainy day in Pittsburgh. ... PNC Park is a baseball stadium located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... This article is about the baseball player. ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ... In 1999, MasterCard sponsored the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. ... Cal Ripken redirects here. ... Ernest Ernie Banks (born January 31, 1931 in Dallas, Texas) is an American former Major League baseball player who played his entire career with the Chicago Cubs (1953-1971). ... For other uses, see Forbes Field (disambiguation). ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... PNC Park is a baseball stadium located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... Exposition Park was a baseball park that formerly stood in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... USPS and Usps redirect here. ... Image File history File links Wagner_statue_930606. ... Image File history File links Wagner_statue_930606. ... Three Rivers Stadium was a multi-purpose sports stadium and event facility located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania from 1970 through 2000. ... Frederic Ogden Nash (August 19, 1902 – May 19, 1971) was an American poet best known for writing pithy and funny light verse. ...

Lineup for Yesterday
W is for Wagner,
The bowlegged beauty;
Short was closed to all traffic
With Honus on duty.
Ogden Nash, Sport magazine (January 1949)[7]


Frederic Ogden Nash (August 19, 1902 – May 19, 1971) was an American poet best known for writing pithy and funny light verse. ... The inaugural issue of SPORT magazine, September, 1946, depicting New York Yankees centrefielder Joe DiMaggio together with his son Joe Jr. ...


Popular Culture

  • A young person's book, titled "Honus and Me" was written by Dan Gutman and published in 1997. It tells the story of a baseball card-collecting kid who magically meets Honus Wagner through the power of one of the famous T-206 Wagner cards. A made-for-TV movie based on this book, called "The Winning Season" and starring Matthew Modine, was produced in 2004 and aired on the TNT cable network.
  • In 1919, Wagner appeared in a movie titled "Spring Fever" with two members of the Three Stooges, Moe and Shemp Howard, and Harold Lloyd. [2][3]

Matthew Avery Modine (born March 22, 1959) is an American actor. ... The Three Stooges were an American vaudeville and comedy act of the mid 20th century best known for their numerous short subject films. ... Harold Clayton Lloyd (April 20, 1893 – March 8, 1971) was an American film actor and director, most famous for his silent comedies. ...

T206 Baseball card

Main article: T206 Honus Wagner
Honus Wagner card
Honus Wagner card

The T206 Honus Wagner card has long been the most famous baseball card in existence. Known as the "Holy Grail" and the "Mona Lisa of baseball cards", an example of this card was the first baseball card to be sold for over a million dollars.[8] Only 50 to 60 of these cards are believed to exist.[9] One theory for the card's scarcity is that Wagner, a non-smoker, requested the production of this card be halted since it was being sold as a marketing vehicle for tobacco products.[10] The problem with this theory is that Wagner appears on a tobacco piece produced by Recius in the late 1800s. Another theory postulates that Wagner was not offered any compensation for the use of his likeness. Consequently, he supposedly withdrew his permission to print any more copies.[11] At the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY, it is stated that while Wagner was a smoker, he did not want children to have to buy tobacco products to get his card. Therefore, he requested it to be pulled from production. Image File history File links HonusWagnerCard. ... Image File history File links HonusWagnerCard. ... 1909-11 T-206 baseball card set The baseball card set known as T-206 was issued from 1909 to 1911 in cigarette packs through 16 different brands owned by the American Tobacco Co. ... A baseball card is one type of trading card, relating to baseball, usually printed on some type of paper stock or card stock. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... Cooperstown, New York, as depicted on an 1890 panoramic map. ...


Of these handful of existing cards, the single most famous, a nm-mt PSA graded 8 (which also was the first card graded by PSA serially numbered 00000001) card which initially broke the US $1 million barrier, sold again on February 26, 2007 at auction for US $2.35 million to an anonymous buyer in Orange County, California.[12][9] SCP Auctions, which had purchased minority ownership of the card, sold it again in September of 2007, this time to a private collector for $2.8 million, establishing yet another new record price for the card.[13] Cities in Orange County Orange County is a county in Southern California, United States. ...


This particular card is in the best condition compared to the rest of the existing cards, having been encased in a protective Lucite sheeting for decades. Considered the ultimate pinnacle of baseball card collecting, the card has changed hands four times in the last 10 years, doubling in value on three of those occasions while having such ownership as hockey great Wayne Gretzky, Los Angeles Kings owner Bruce McNall and later Wal-Mart.[9] Wal-Mart had purchased the card in the mid-1990s to give away as part of a marketing campaign for a line of baseball cards. The winner of the give-away could not afford the taxes associated with it, and it ended up being sold at auction in the mid-1990s to a Chicago businessman and collector for $640,000.[9] In mid-2000 it was sold again for $1,265,000 to a Las Vegas-based businessman who regularly had it placed on public display at baseball games and the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library before selling the card for double his purchase price in February 2007.[9] In 2007 NY Daily News writer Michael O'Keefe authored a book relating to the card. In the work he makes a case that the card had been deceptively trimmed by a well known mid west dealer. Currently there are 4 Wagner cards that have been professionally graded between Very Good and Excellent. Sportscard Guaranty of NJ has graded two examples VG 40 and PSA of California has graded one example VG-EX 4 and one Example Excellent 5. Scott D Ireland of Vermont has the highest graded copy that has not been rumored to be altered. Structure of PMMA: (C5O2H8)n Structure of methyl methacrylate Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) or polymethyl-2-methylpropanoate is the synthetic polymer of methyl methacrylate. ... Wayne Douglas Gretzky, OC (born 26 January 1961 in Brantford, Ontario) is a retired Canadian-American professional ice hockey player who is currently part-owner and head coach of the Phoenix Coyotes. ... The Los Angeles Kings are a professional ice hockey team based in Los Angeles, California. ... Bruce Patrick McNall (b. ... Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... GMs Aerotrain, in service as the City of Las Vegas, makes a station stop on its way to Los Angeles in 1957. ... The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library is the presidential library of Ronald Wilson Reagan, the 40th President of the United States. ...


Quotes About Honus Wagner

  • In discussing his all-time team Babe Ruth said, "At short stop there is only one candidate, the immortal Honus Wagner. He was just head and shoulders above anyone else in that position. Fellows like Marion, Bancroft, Peck and Billy Jurges were all great fielders. But Honus could more than out-field all of them. He was perhaps the greatest right-handed hitter of all time. He had remarkably long arms, hams for hands, and just drew the ball to him. Ed Barrow once told me he could have been as good in any position but he made his greatest name as shortstop. He led the National League seven times at bat and he was always up with the leaders when he was in his forties." .[14]
  • "When I was a boy growing up in Kansas, a friend of mine and I went fishing and as we sat there on the warmth of a summer afternoon we talked about what we wanted to do when we grew up. I told him I wanted to be a major league baseball player, a genuine professional like Honus Wagner. My friend said that he'd like to be president of the United States. Neither of us got our wish."- Dwight D. Eisenhower.[15]

See also

Below is the list of Major League Baseball players who have reached the 2,000 hit milestone. ... Players denoted in boldface are still actively contributing to the record noted. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of Major League Baseball all-time leaders in doubles. ... Below is the list of 158 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 100 triple milestone. ... Below is the list of 295 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 1,000 Runs milestone. ... Below is the list of 252 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 1,000 RBI milestone. ... Below is the list of 36 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 500 stolen base milestone. ... In Major League Baseball, the 3,000 hit club is an informal term applied to the group of players who have made 3,000 or more career base hits. ... Eric Davis hit for the cycle in 1989 In baseball, a player hits for the cycle when he hits a single, a double, a triple and a home run in the same game, though not necessarily in that order. ... Major League Baseball recognizes runs batted in champions in the American League and National League each season. ... The batting championship is awarded to the Major League Baseball player in each the American League and National League who has the highest batting average in a particular season. ... This is a list of Major League Baseball leaders in career stolen bases. ... Major League Baseball recognizes runs scored champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes stolen base champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes doubles champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Below is the list of 65 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 400 stolen base milestone. ... At the end of each Major League Baseball season, the league leaders of various statistical categories are announced. ...

References

  1. ^ (1961) My Life in Baseball: The True Record. Doubleday, 123. 
  2. ^ Bill James (1988). The Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract. Villard, 448. 
  3. ^ (1999) Total Baseball: Sixth Edition. Total Sports, 2403. 
  4. ^ Bill James (1988). The Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract. Villard, 157. 
  5. ^ Christy Mathewson (1912). Pitching In a Pinch. Putnam, 36. 
  6. ^ Joe Williams (1989).
    The Joe Williams Baseball Reader. Algonquin Books, 5. 
  7. ^ Baseball Almanac. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
  8. ^ [? PSA 8 T206 Wagner Sale]. Retrieved on 2006-09-20.
  9. ^ a b c d e Bob Pool, Honus Wagner card sells for $2.35 million, Los Angeles Times, February 28, 2007.
  10. ^ Honus Wagner baseball card nets $2.35M. Retrieved on 2007-02-27.
  11. ^ Compensation Theory. Retrieved on 2006-09-20.
  12. ^ PSA 8 T206 Wagner New Sale Price. Retrieved on 2007-02-27.
  13. ^ Sports Collector Daily, "T206 Honus Wagner Card Sold Again", 6 September 2007, retrieved 12 Sept 2007.
  14. ^ (1948) The Babe Ruth Story. Scholastic, 224. 
  15. ^ (1994) Baseball: An Illustrated History. Alfred A. Knopf, 49. 

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Further reading

  • Honus Wagner: A Biography, by Dennis DeValeria and Jeanne Burke DeValeria, Henry Holt and Company, New York, 1995.
  • Hittner, Arthur D. Honus Wagner: The Life of Baseball's "Flying Dutchman." Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1996 and 2003 (softcover). Winner of the 1996 Seymour Medal, awarded by the Society for American Baseball Research.
  • Honus and Me by Dan Gutman

Dan Gutman (born 19 October 1955 in New York City) is an author from New Jersey. ...

External links

  • Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference
  • baseballhalloffame.org – Hall of Fame biography page
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Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... George Kenneth Griffey, Jr. ... Peter Edward Pete Rose, Sr. ... Stan Musials number 6 was retired by the St. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... The Major League Baseball All-Time Team were chosen in 1997 to comprise the top manager and top player in each of thirteen positional categories across Major League Baseball history. ... Lou Gehrigs number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939 Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ... Rogers Hornsby (April 27, 1896 in Winters, Texas - January 5, 1963 in Chicago, Illinois), nicknamed The Rajah, was a Major League Baseball second baseman and manager. ... Michael Jack Schmidt (born September 27, 1949 in Dayton, Ohio) is a former American professional baseball player who played his entire career for the Philadelphia Phillies. ... An infielder is a baseball player who plays on the infield, the dirt portion of a baseball diamond between first base and third base. ... Johnny Lee Bench (born December 7, 1947) is a former American baseball player for the Cincinnati Reds from 1967 to 1983, and is widely regarded as one of the greatest catchers in Major League Baseball history. ... The position of the catcher Catcher is also a general term for a fielder who catches the ball in cricket. ... Reverse side of a Paul Molitor baseball card Paul Leo Molitor (born August 22, 1956 in St. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ... Willie Howard Mays, Jr. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... Austin Kearns, an outfielder, catches a fly ball. ... Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887-December 10, 1946), American professional baseball pitcher. ... Sanford Koufax (IPA pronunciation: /kofæks/) (born Sanford Braun, on December 30, 1935, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American left-handed former pitcher in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers, from 1955 to 1966. ... Dennis Lee Eckersley (born October 3, 1954 in Oakland, California), nicknamed Eck, was a Major League Baseball player elected to Baseball Hall of Fame in 2004 (his first year of eligibility). ... A baseball pitcher delivers the ball to home plate In baseball, pitching is the act of throwing the baseball from the pitchers mound toward the catcher with the goal of retiring a batter who attempts to make contact with it, or draw a walk. ... Charles Dillon Casey Stengel (July 30, 1890 - September 29, 1975), nicknamed The Old Professor, was an American baseball player and manager from the early 1910s into the 1960s. ... New York Yankees manager Joe Torre returning to the dugout (September 2005) In baseball, the head coach of a team is called the manager (or more formally, the field manager); this individual controls matters of team batting order to more closely communicate with baserunners, but most managers delegate this responsibility... This article is about the baseball team. ... William Adam Meyer (January 14, 1892 - March 31, 1957) was an American baseball player and manager. ... Ralph McPherran Kiner (born October 27, 1922) is an American former Major League Baseball player and current announcer. ... Wilver Dornell Willie Stargell (March 6, 1940 – April 9, 2001), nicknamed Pops in the later years of his career, was a professional baseball player who played his entire Major League career (1962-1982) with the Pittsburgh Pirates as an outfielder and first baseman. ... William Stanley Mazeroski (born September 5, 1936 in Wheeling, West Virginia), nicknamed Maz, and also called simply The Glove by radio broadcaster Bob Prince, is a former Major League Baseball player who spent his entire career (1956-72) with the Pittsburgh Pirates. ... Harold Joseph Pie Traynor (November 11, 1899 - March 16, 1972) was a Major League Baseball third baseman who played his entire career with the Pittsburgh Pirates (1920-37). ... Roberto Clemente Walker(August 18, 1934 – December 31, 1972) was a Major League Baseball right fielder and right-handed batter. ... Daniel Edward Murtaugh ( October 8, 1917 - December 2, 1976) was an American second baseman and manager in Major League Baseball best known for his leadership of the Pittsburgh Pirates from the 1950s to the 1970s. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related... The Bitch ass elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame were held in 1936. ... official logo The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) is a professional association for baseball journalists writing for daily newspapers and magazines. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887-December 10, 1946), American professional baseball pitcher. ... Christopher Christy Mathewson (August 12, 1880 - October 7, 1925), nicknamed Big Six, The Christian Gentleman, or Matty, was a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... The Veterans Committee, officially the Committee on Baseball Veterans, is a committee of the National Baseball Hall of Fame that provides a second chance for Hall of Fame election to players passed over in regular Hall of Fame balloting. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Honus Wagner - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (872 words)
Wagner's speed, both on the basepaths and in the field, combined with his considerable size, earned him the nickname "The Flying Dutchman", a reference to a legendary "ghost ship" of the same name.
A life-size statue of Wagner, swinging the bat, atop a marble pedestal featuring admiring children, was forged by a local sculptor name Frank Vittor, and placed outside the left field corner gate at Forbes Field.
Recently a Honus Wagner Card was sold on eBay for $1.27 million and is the third most valuable item to be sold on the site as of November 2005.
Honus Wagner - definition of Honus Wagner in Encyclopedia (432 words)
Wagner's speed, both on the basepaths and in the field, combined with his considerable size, earned him the nickname "The Flying Dutchman".
After a short stint with the minor league beginning in 1895, Wagner began his major league career with the Louisville Colonels but played 18 of his 21 seasons with the Pittsburgh Pirates, winning a World Series title with them in 1909.
Wagner was on the coaching staff of the Pirates from 1933 to 1952.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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