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Encyclopedia > Honourable Artillery Company
The Honourable Artillery Company
Image:Badge HAC OR ShortArms.gif
Cap Badge of The Honourable Artillery Company
Active 1296; Chartered 25 August 1537-
Country United Kingdom
Branch Territorial Army
Role Surveillance and Target Acquisition
Size One regiment
Part of London District
Garrison/HQ London
Motto Arma pacis fulcra
Latin: "Armed Strength for Peace"[1]
March Quick - The British Grenadiers
Slow - The Duke of York
Canter - Bonnie Dundee
Trot - The Keel Row
Walk - The Duchess of Kent
Commanders
Captain-General HM The Queen
Insignia
Tactical Recognition Flash

Only worn by Corps of Drums Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Events March 30 - Edward I stormed Berwick-upon-Tweed, sacking the then Scottish border town with much bloodshed. ... August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (238th in leap years), with 128 days remaining. ... Events January 6 - Alessandro de Medici assassinated August 25 - The Honourable Artillery Company, the oldest surviving regiment in the British Army, and the second most senior, was formed. ... London District is the name given by the British Army to the area of operations encompassing the Greater London area. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The British Grenadiers was a marching song for the grenadier units of the British military from the 17th Century to the 19th Century. ... Captain General (and its literal equivalent in several languages) is or was a high military rank and a gubernatorial title. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Image File history File links Guards_TRF.PNG Summary TRF of the regiments of Foot Guards of the British Army Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...

Armorial bearings of the HAC, granted in 1821

The Honourable Artillery Company (HAC) is the oldest surviving regiment in the British Army, and the second most senior[2] in the Territorial Army [3] . Image File history File links British_HAC_01. ... Image File history File links British_HAC_01. ... The coronation banquet for George IV 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... British regiment A regiment is a military unit, consisting of a variable number of battalions - commanded by a colonel. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The Territorial Army (TA) is a part of the British Army, the land armed forces of the United Kingdom, and composed mostly of part-time soldiers paid at the same rate, while engaged on military activities, as their Regular equivalents. ...

Contents

History

The HAC can trace its history as far back as 1296, but it received a Royal Charter from Henry VIII on 25 August 1537, when Letters Patent were received by the Overseers of the Fraternity or Guild of St George authorising them to establish a perpetual corporation for the defence of the realm to be known as the Fraternity or Guild of Artillery of Longbows, Crossbows and Handgonnes. This body was known by a variety of names until 1656, when it was first referred to as the Artillery Company. It was first referred to as the Honourable Artillery Company in 1685 and officially received the name from Queen Victoria in 1860. Events March 30 - Edward I stormed Berwick-upon-Tweed, sacking the then Scottish border town with much bloodshed. ... A Royal Charter is a charter given by a monarch to legitimize an incorporated body, such as a city, company, university or such. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 - 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland, later King of Ireland, from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (238th in leap years), with 128 days remaining. ... Events January 6 - Alessandro de Medici assassinated August 25 - The Honourable Artillery Company, the oldest surviving regiment in the British Army, and the second most senior, was formed. ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... The longbow (or English longbow, or Welsh longbow, see below) was a type of bow about 2. ... A crossbow is a type of weapon that fires projectiles called quarrels. ... Hand gonnes from the Historisches Museum, Bern Hand gonne being fired from a stand, Belli Fortis, manuscript, by Konrad Kyeser, 1400 The gonne, hand gonne or hand cannon, as it was called, was the first handheld, portable firearm. ... // Events Mehmed Köprülü becomes Grand Vizier of the Ottoman Empire. ... Events February 6 - James Stuart, Duke of York becomes King James II of England and Ireland and King James VII of Scotland. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ...


The regiment has the rare distinction of having fought on the side of both Parliament and the Royalists during the English Civil War 1642 to 1649. English parliament in front of the king c. ... Prince Rupert of the Rhine Cavalier was the name used by Parliamentarians for a Royalist supporter of King Charles I during the English Civil War (1642–1651). ... The English Civil War consisted of a series of armed conflicts and political machinations that took place between Parliamentarians (known as Roundheads) and Royalists (known as Cavaliers) between 1642 and 1651. ...


In 1658 the Company moved from the site it had occupied at the Old Artillery Ground in Spitalfields to the current site south of Bunhill Fields Burial Ground on City Road. The Old Artillery Ground is an area of land in Spitalfields, London formerly designated one of the Liberties of the Tower of London and Crown Land. ... Christ Church, Spitalfields Spitalfields, an area in Tower Hamlets, east London near to Liverpool Street station and Brick Lane which gets its name from a contraction of hospital fields, as there used to be a major hospital in the area. ... Blake Memorial in Bunhill Fields Bunhill Fields is a cemetery located in the London Borough of Islington, north of the City of London, and managed by the Corporation of London. ...


Until 1780 captains of the HAC trained the officers of the London Trained Bands. 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


The Company served with distinction in Broadgate during the Gordon Riots of 1780, and in gratitude for its role in restoring order to the City, the Corporation of London presented "two brass field-pieces", which led to the creation of an HAC Artillery Division. (These guns are on display in the entrance hall of Armoury House.) The Gordon Riots is a term used to refer to a number of events in a predominantly Protestant religious uprising in London aimed against the Roman Catholic Relief Act, 1778, relieving his Majestys subjects, of the Catholic Religion, from certain penalties and disabilities imposed upon them during the reign... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Corporation of London is the municipal governing body of the City of London. ...


In 1860, control of the Company moved from the Home Office to the War Office and in 1889 a Royal Warrant gave the Secretary of State for War control of the Company’s military affairs. The modern concept of Small Office and Home Office or SoHo , or Small or Home Office deals with the category of business which can be from 1 to 10 workers. ... Old War Office Building, seen from Whitehall, London - the former location of the War Office The War Office was a former department of the British Government, responsible for the administration of the British Army between the 17th century and 1963, when its functions were transferred to the Ministry of Defence. ... The secretary of war in cabinet position was Henry Knox. ...


South Africa 1900-02

Members of the Company first served as a formed unit overseas in the South African War (1899–1902). Almost two hundred members served; the majority in the City Imperial Volunteers (CIV) as infantry, mounted infantry and in a Field Battery that was officered, and for the most part manned, by members of the Company. Boer guerrillas during the Second Boer War There were two Boer wars, one in 1880-81 and the second from October 11, 1899-1902 both between the British and the settlers of Dutch origin (called Boere, Afrikaners or Voortrekkers) in South Africa that put an end to the two independent...


Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907

In 1907, the Company became part of the newly formed Territorial Force with the passing of the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act. The HAC Infantry was due to become part of the newly formed London Regiment as the "26th (County of London) Battalion"[4], but instead managed to retain its own identity as the Honourable Artillery Company Infantry Battalion. The HAC also had its property and privileges protected by the Honourable Artillery Company Act 1908. The Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907 (7 Edw. ... Battalions of the London Regiment early 1900s by Richard Caton Woodville (1856-1927) The London Regiment is a Territorial Army regiment in the British Army. ...


First World War

Three infantry battalions and seven artillery batteries were raised for service during the First World War. Two officers serving with the HAC were awarded Victoria Crosses at Gavrelle in 1917. The Company suffered 1,600 killed. Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I. Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot with small arms in organized military units, though they may be transported to the battlefield by horses, ships, automobiles, skis, or other means. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols A battalion is a military unit usually consisting of between two and six companies and typically commanded by a Lieutenant Colonel. ... Artillery with Gabion fortification Cannons on display at Fort Point Continental Artillery crew from the American Revolution Firing of an 18-pound gun, Louis-Philippe Crepin, (1772 – 1851) A forge-welded Iron Cannon in Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu. ... Remains of a battery of English cannon from Youghal, County Cork. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Victoria Cross medal, ribbon, and bar. ...


Second World War

In 1939 the Infantry Battalion became an Officer Cadet Training Unit, leading to 3,800 commissions, while four regiments of artillery were provided. The 11th and 12th HAC Regiments of the Royal Horse Artillery served in North Africa and in Italy and in 1942 were re-equipped with M7 Priest self-propelled guns. The 13th HAC Regiment of Royal Horse Artillery (equipped with Sexton self propelled guns) fought in Normandy and the Netherlands and across the Rhine into Germany as part of 11th Armoured Division. The Company also provided a Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment and two Heavy Anti-Aircraft Batteries. Over seven hundred members of the Company lost their lives during the Second World War. The Royal Horse Artillery (RHA) is a corps in the British Army. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic North Africa, including the UN subregion North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, generally divided politically from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... The Howitzer Motor Carriage M7 was an American self-propelled artillery vehicle produced during World War II. It was given the official nickname Priest in British service, due to the pulpit like machine gun ring and following on from the Bishop self propelled gun. ... A self-propelled gun is an armored fighting vehicle which primarily based on and serves to transport the gun with which its equipped. ... General characteristics Length 20 ft 1 in/ 6. ... Flag of Normandy Normandy (in French: Normandie, and in Norman: Normaundie) is a geographical region in northern France. ... During World War II, Operation Plunder was the crossing of the Rhine river at Rees, Wesel and south of the Lippe Canal by the British Second Army, under Lieutenant-General Miles C Dempsey, and the US Ninth Army, under Lieutenant-General William H Simpson. ... The British 11th Armoured Division, known as The Black Bull, was a British Army division formed in 1941, during World War II. It was one of the most famous British armoured Divisions of the war, known mainly for its role in the battles of North-western Europe in 1944-45. ...


Post War

In 1947 the Company was reorganised into:

  • an Infantry Battalion
  • a Royal Horse Artillery Regiment of self-propelled Artillery
  • a regiment of mobile heavy Anti-Aircraft Artillery (disbanded 1955)
  • a Locating Battery (disbanded 1961)

In 1973 the Regiment was again reorganised and given the role of providing 'Stay Behind' Observation Posts (OPs) for the British Army of the Rhine as one of the three TA units making up the Corps Patrol Unit (with 21 and 23 SAS), the new structure was: There have been two formations named British Army on the Rhine (BAOR). ... Look up sas, SAS in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

  • Three patrol squadrons (1, 2 & 3), a fourth patrol squadron was formed for a short period in the 1980s
  • HQ Squadron, including Training Wing
  • The Gun Troop (a battery of 6 25 pounder guns and not part of the OP role)
  • Band
  • Corps of Drums

In 1992 the signals troops that had been integrated into the patrol squadrons were brought together to form the Signals Squadron. The Ordnance QF 25 pounder (or just 25-pounder or 25-pdr) was the major British field gun/howitzer that was introduced into service just before World War II and was the British Armys primary artillery system into the 1950s. ...


Also in 1992, on Salisbury Plain, the HAC was the last British Army unit to fire the 25 pounder in the field, as the Gun Troop retrained onto the 105mm Light Gun. The 25 pounder continued to be fired ceremonially until replaced by the Light Gun. This article is about the plateau in southern England; Salisbury Plain is also an area on South Georgia Island. ... Arguably the most famous L118 Light Gun, in use as the One OClock Gun at Edinburgh Castle The L118 Light Gun is a 105 mm towed howitzer, originally produced for the British Army in the 1970s and widely exported since, including to the United States, where a modified version...


In 1996 the first formed unit of the Regiment to be mobilised for active service since the second world war was called up for service on Op Resolute with the NATO IFOR in Bosnia. Since this time the Regiment has always had soldiers on operational service overseas. NATO 2002 Summit in Prague. ... The acronym IFOR may also refer to the International Fellowship of Reconciliation. ... Bosnia or Bosnian may refer to: Places: Bosnia and Herzegovina, a country in southeastern Europe The Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, as defined by the Dayton Agreement Bosnia (region), a historical region in southeastern Europe Bosnia Province, Ottoman Empire, from the 15th to 20th centuries Bosna, Bulgaria, a village in...


In 2005 the guns were withdrawn from Gun Troop and the Troop was renamed Liaison Troop (L Tp) with the role of providing liason officer parties. The majority of L Tp deployed to Iraq over winter 2006/7. The ceremonial Light Guns were retained by the Regiment to fire salutes at the Tower of London.


In 2006 the HAC was the first major unit of the Territorial Army to convert to the Bowman communications system. Bowman is the name of the new tactical communications system being deployed by the British Armed Forces. ...


In 2007 one of the patrol squadrons (3 Sqn) was redesignated as the Training Squadron and took on the role of Regiment's Training Wing.


Grounds

Site

From 1538 to 1658 the HAC occupied and trained at the Old Artillery Ground in Spitalfields on the site of the outer precinct of the dissolved Priory and Hospital of St Mary Spital. In 1658, following disputes over use of the Ground with the Gunners of the Tower, it moved to its current site south of the Bunhill Fields Burial Ground continuing to the south as far as Chiswell St. This area is described in a map of the area of 1677 as the 'New Artillery Garden' and has variously been referred to as the Artillery Ground and the Artillery Garden. This current site now falls in the London Borough of Islington, and is just north of the City of London, the main entrance being in City Road. The Old Artillery Ground is an area of land in Spitalfields, London formerly designated one of the Liberties of the Tower of London and Crown Land. ... Christ Church, Spitalfields Spitalfields, an area in Tower Hamlets, east London near to Liverpool Street station and Brick Lane which gets its name from a contraction of hospital fields, as there used to be a major hospital in the area. ... Blake Memorial in Bunhill Fields Bunhill Fields is a cemetery located in the London Borough of Islington, north of the City of London, and managed by the Corporation of London. ... The earliest definite cricket match at the Artillery Ground took place on 31 August 1730 between teams styled London and Surrey. ... Arms of Islington London Borough Council Islington Town Hall Islington is a borough of London to the north of the City of London, west of Hackney, east of Camden, and south of Haringey. ... The City of London is a geographically-small city within Greater London, England. ... City Road is a road in central London, usually referred to by Londoners as the City Road. At its western extremity it starts at the Angel, Islington, as the continuation of Pentonville Road and continues roughly south-east till it passes Moorfields Eye Hospital, when it bears closer to south...


In the 1990s an underground garage was build beneath the Artillery Garden playing fields.


During the aftermath of the 7 July 2005 London bombings on the London transport system the Artillery Garden was used as the site for a temporary mortuary. This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...


Armoury House

Armoury House stands at the north of these grounds, and is the home of the HAC. It was built to replace a smaller 17th century armoury, the central portion being completed in 1735 to designs by Thomas Stibbs financed in part by a gift of £500 from King George I. Subscriptions were also received from members of the Company and from the Court of Lieutenancy for the City of London. The building cost £1,690, which included the price of the furniture.


In 1802 a distinctive flag tower was added to the roof. The East and West Wings were built in 1828, replacing much smaller buildings on either side of Armoury House. A cottage, originally for the Sergeant Major, was built against the West Wing in 1850.


1862 saw the completion of a Victorian drill hall attached to the rear. The Albert Room, as it was called, featured an iron trussed roof and was named in honour of the then recently deceased Prince Albert.


In 1901 a third storey was added to each of the two wings.


In 2006/7 the Albert Room, Sergeant's Cottage and assosciated buildings next to the West Wing were redeveloped. The work included the excavation of a new basement underneath. This new facility (named The Prince Consort Rooms to continue the reference to Prince Albert) were opened by the Captain General on 18 May 2007 shortly after she had presented new colours to the Regiment.


Finsbury Barracks

Finsbury Barracks is the TA Regiment's Headquarters and is leased by London RFCA from the HAC itself. Completed in 1857, it was designed by the architect Joseph Jennings and built in Kentish Ragstone. An extension, faced in striped stone and granite, linking Finsbury Barracks to Armoury House was designed by Arnold & Boston and added in 1994. Finsbury Barracks was also refurbished in the same year and was re-opened by the Captain General in 1996.


Virgin Active

Virgin Active (formerly Holmes Place) lease part of the grounds for a fitness club and gym, as part of the lease Active Unit members of the HAC are entitled to free membership of this club.


Pencelli Estate

In 1999 the Company acquired the Welsh Pencelli Estate as an area that could be used by the Regiment for military and adventurous training. The historic estate lies in the heart of the Brecon Beacons National Park and comprises approximately 14,000 acres of hill land that is subject to common rights of grazing.


Current role

Special Observer Badge, worn by Soldiers that have passed STA Patrol Training and sucessfully completed a probationary period in a Squadron

The HAC is currently a unit of the Territorial Army based just north of the City of London and has an important historical and ceremonial relationship with the City. It provides the British Army with its only dedicated Surveillance and Target Acquisition patrol regiment—operating small covert reconnaissance patrols gathering intelligence and target information. The regiment includes a dedicated long-range communications capability. In recent years its role has expanded to include liaison tasks. It is assigned to Commander Allied Command Europe Rapid Reaction Corps. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Territorial Army (TA) is a part of the British Army, the land armed forces of the United Kingdom, and composed mostly of part-time soldiers paid at the same rate, while engaged on military activities, as their Regular equivalents. ... The City of London is a geographically-small city within Greater London, England. ... Artillery Surveillance and Target Acquisition is a military role assigned to units and/or their equipment. ... The Headquarters Allied Command Europe Rapid Reaction Corps, (HQ ARRC or ARRC) was created in 1992 based on the former British I Corps. ...


The HAC has a ceremonial role in providing guards of honour at the Guildhall in the City of London during state visits, and since 1924 (when the Royal Artillery ceased to be stationed at the Tower) has provided the saluting battery at the Tower of London for state occasions. The Guildhall The Guildhall complex in c. ... State visits usually involve a military review. ... Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is a historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ...


In peacetime, the HAC is under the operational command of London District , however it would form part of 1 Artillery Brigade on mobilisation as a Regiment. It is a rarity in that it is required to train at a regimental level unlike most TA units who are only required to train at up to sub-unit (company or squadron) level. The London District was a historic district in Upper Canada. ...


Although the HAC is operationally an Artillery regiment, it is not part of the Royal Regiment of Artillery; being a separate Regiment with its own uniform, insignia and colours[5]. The HAC's regular Army counterparts are 4/73 (Sphinx) Special OP Battery from 5th Regiment Royal Artillery. This battery would, in the event of full mobilisation of the HAC, form the Regiment's fourth patrol squadron. The HAC's Permanent Staff Instructors are drawn from across the British Army. Artillery with Gabion fortification Cannons on display at Fort Point Continental Artillery crew from the American Revolution Firing of an 18-pound gun, Louis-Philippe Crepin, (1772 – 1851) A forge-welded Iron Cannon in Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu. ... 5th Regiment Royal Artillery is a regiment of the Royal Artillery in the British Army. ... A Permanent Staff Instructor is a senior member of the full time British Army, selected to teach the Reserve and Territorial Army soldiers. ...


Due to the demanding requirements of their role the HAC is priveliged to be one of only a small number of TA units with responsibility for the carrying out the Phase 1 and 2 training of its own recruits 'in house' rather than sending them to Regional Training Centres and Army Training Regiments. An Army Training Regiment (ATR) is a unit of the British Army which conducts basic training for new recruits. ...


Recent operational service

The Regiment has had individuals or sub-units on active service at all times since 1996 in a wide variety of roles in Northern Ireland, Bosnia, Kosovo, Iraq and Afganistan. Commitments included the depoyment of patrols to Bosnia and Kosovo and independant sub-units to Operation Telic 4 and 5 in Iraq and L Troop to Operation Telic 9 in addition to individual and group reinforcments to other infantry and artillery units. Telic, i. ... Telic, i. ...


Soldier ranks

The non commissioned ranks of the HAC are as follows

  • Trooper
  • Lance Corporal
  • Lance Sergeant
  • Sergeant
  • Colour Sergeant
  • Warrant Officer Class 2
  • Warrant Officer Class 1 (there are no TA WO1 posts in the HAC, however HAC soldiers can achieve this rank on Extra Regimental Employment)

Dress

In 1830, King William IV ordered that the uniform of the HAC should be based on that of the Grenadier Guards, except that where the Grenadiers wear gold, the HAC were to wear silver. This tradition is continued today by the wearing of the silver coloured grenade in the forage cap similar to the brass one of the Grenadiers, and the buttons and lace on HAC dress uniforms being silver coloured instead of gold. The Corps of Drums wear the Household Division's blue red blue TRF. William IV King of the United Kingdom William IV (William Henry) (21 August 1765–20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom and of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death. ... The Grenadier Guards is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division of the British Army, and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry. ...


Berets

The HAC wear the Footguards' khaki beret, with the HAC's own cap badge ("short arms") in white metal on a black backing. Officers and Warrant Officers wear an embroidered cloth version of the same badge. The Corps of Drums and Regimental Band wear the HAC infantry grenade on a blue red blue backing which is superficially identical to that of the Grenadier Guards. Khaki is a common material in military uniforms Khaki is a type of fabric or the colour of such fabric. ... Basque style Beret Black beret with military emblem A beret (pronounced in English, except in American English in which it is pronounced ) is a soft round cap, usually of wool felt, with a flat crown, which is worn by both men and women. ... A cap badge, also known as head badge or hat badge, is a badge worn on uniform headgear and distinguishes the wearers organisation. ... The Grenadier Guards is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division of the British Army, and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry. ...

Other headdress

On the forage cap, the HAC infantry grenade (white metal) is worn by junior ranks of all subunits of the regiment. Sergeants and Warrant Officers wear a different version of the grenade which has the letters HAC in brass on the ball of the grenade.


Officers wear an embroidered silver grenade on their forage caps in No 1 Dress (Infantry) and on the Servce Dress forage cap but when in No 1 Dress (Gunner) they wear the HAC Artillery cap badge. The latter is similar to that of the Royal Artillery but with "HAC" and "Arma Pacis Fulcra" replacing "Ubique" and "Quo Fas et Gloria Ducant".


In Full Dress (normally only worn by the Band and Corps of Drums) the Bearskin is worn without a plume.


Badges of rank

HAC officer's rank stars. Combat, Service and Mess Dress
HAC officer's rank stars. Combat, Service and Mess Dress

In No 2 dress Soldiers wear the larger Foot Guards badges of rank and qualification. Lance Corporals wear two chevrons and Lance Sergeants three. In Number 1 dress WO2 wear a large colour badge of the same pattern as the Grenadier Guards but in silver rather than gold. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 449 pixels Full resolution (809 × 454 pixel, file size: 29 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) HAC Officers Rank Stars I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 449 pixels Full resolution (809 × 454 pixel, file size: 29 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) HAC Officers Rank Stars I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...


Officers' crowns and stars are of the same pattern as those of the Grenadiers (Order of the Garter), woven for combat uniforms but in silver for Service and Barrack Dress.


Stable belts

Each Squadron wears a different stable belt: Clip art of a Stable Belt of the Royal Air Force A stable belt is an item of uniform used in the armed forces of the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth countries. ...

  • HQ Sqn and Band - red and blue edged with narrow yellow stripes
  • 1 Sqn - red
  • 2 Sqn - green (Identical to that worn by the Light Infantry)
  • 3 Sqn - blue
  • Signals Squadron - black
  • L troop - blue with a narrow yellow stripe (Identical to that worn by the Royal Horse Artillery)
  • Corps of Drums - blue red blue (Identical to that worn by the Foot Guards)

Traditionally light infantry (or skirmishers) were soldiers whose job was to provide a skirmishing screen ahead of the main body of infantry, harassing and delaying the enemy advance. ... The Royal Horse Artillery (RHA) is a corps in the British Army. ...

Other distinctions

In 1906 King Edward VII gave the HAC the distinction of a special ribbon for the Volunteer Decoration and Volunteer Long Service Medal. The ribbon, based on the King's racing colours, is red and blue edged with narrow yellow stripes. This ribbon has been carried forwrd to subsequent Territorial long service medals awarded to HAC members. The Volunteer Decoration was created in July, 1892 to reward efficient and capable officers of the Volunteer Force who had served for twenty years. ...


Each year the Captain General awards a prize to the member of the Regiment who is deemed to have made an outstanding contribution to the Regiment. Holders of this prize, known as the King's or Queen's Prize wear a badge incorporating the Captain General's cypher and the year of award on Numbers 1, 2 and 10 (Mess) Dress.


B Battery HAC supported the 10th Hussars during the Second World War and in 1972 the Captain General approved the Battery wearing a 10th Hussar button as the top button on Numbers 1,2 and 10 dress. This privilege is carried on by 2 Sqn following the 1973 re-organisation.


Battle honours

Emblazoning on a sidedrum of the HAC showing the regiment's battle honours and coat of arms
Emblazoning on a sidedrum of the HAC showing the regiment's battle honours and coat of arms
  • South Africa 1900–02.
  • The Great War (3 Bns and 7 Btys): Ypres 1915 '17, Somme 1916 '18, Ancre Heights, Ancre 1916, Arras 1917 '18, Scarpe 1917 '18, Arleux, Bullecourt, Pilckem, Polygon Wood, Broodseinde, Poelcappelle, Passchendaele, Amiens, Albert 1918, Bapaume 1918, Drocourt-Quéant, Hindenburg Line, Épèhy, St. Quentin Canal, Cambrai 1918, Selle, Sambre, France and Flanders 1914-18, Piave, Vittorio Veneto, Italy 1917-18, Rafah, Egypt 1915-17, Gaza, El Mughar, Jerusalem, Jordan, Megiddo, Sharon, Damascus, Palestine 1917-18, Aden.
  • The Second World War: Bourguébus Ridge, Antwerp, Le Havre, Rhine, North-West Europe 1944-45, Knightsbridge, El Alamein, El Hamma, Sbiba, Thala, Tunis, North Africa 1941-43, Sicily 1943, Cassino II, Coriano, Senio, Italy 1944-45.

Note: The battle honours listed were awarded for services of both infantry and artillery units of the HAC. Those in bold are borne on the Colours. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 415 pixelsFull resolution (1318 × 683 pixel, file size: 132 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Picture taken of emblazoning on sidedrum of the Honourable Artillery Company showing coat of arms of the HAC and battle honours I, the creator of this... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 415 pixelsFull resolution (1318 × 683 pixel, file size: 132 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Picture taken of emblazoning on sidedrum of the Honourable Artillery Company showing coat of arms of the HAC and battle honours I, the creator of this...


Colours

The HAC is unique within the British Army in having two sets of Colours. The HAC has its ceremonial Guns (which are considered Colours in Artillery regiments) but also carries a stand of traditional Colours of the Infantry. These Colours follow the pattern of line infantry regiments: the Queen's Colour being a version of the Union Flag, the Regimental Colour being blue with the HAC Coat of Arms in the centre. In the days when battle was conducted at close quarters, it was necessary for soldiers to be able to determine where, during the heat of battle, their regiment was. ... In the days when battle was conducted at close quarters, it was necessary for soldiers to be able to determine where, during the heat of battle, their regiment was. ...


The last 4 occasions that new Colours have been presented to the Regiment were in 1928 by Edward, Prince of Wales (later Edward VIII), and in 1955, 1980 and 2007 by HM Queen Elizabeth II, the regiment's Captain-General.


The 1928 Colours are now on display in the Medal Room at Armoury House.


"The Company"

Another distinction of the HAC is that, as well as the Territorial Army Regiment (the "Active Unit"), it exists as a separate charitable organisation[6] - often colloquially referred to as "The Company" or "The House". The Company owns Armoury House and the Regiment's current grounds and in addition to supporting the Active Unit it provides the basis for a very active social calendar.


Since 1633 the company has been governed by a Court of Assistants, like many of the City Livery Companies. The first Annual General Court for which a record can be found was held in 1660. In the early part of the 17th Century the Court of Aldermen of the City of London appointed the chief officers and paid the professional soldiers who trained members of the Company. The Lord Mayor and Aldermen are honorary members of the Court of Assistants. Arms of the City of London The Great Twelve City Livery Companies are the oldest and most important Livery Companies in the City of London. ...


There are a number of organisations other than the TA Regiment that are part of the HAC.


City of London Police Special Constabulary

The HAC Detachment of Special Constabulary (volunteer police officers), established in 1919 and containing Officers who are City of London Police Special Constables, retains the Detachment's unique identity by wearing the HAC Regimental Titles in addition to their Divisional identification. They are considered an 'Active' unit of the HAC as is the Regiment and continue the HAC's tradition of keeping order within the City of London. The Special Constabulary is the auxiliary wing of the British police. ... City Police Mounted Section officer The City of London Police is the Home Office police force responsible for the City of London, including the Middle and Inner Temple. ...


Pikemen and Musketeers

The Pikemen and Musketeers (formed 1925, given a Royal Warrant 1955) are made up of veteran members of the Active Unit they are the personal bodyguard of the Lord Mayor of London and form his Guard on ceremonial occasions. Current Lord Mayor of London John Stuttard during the parade on November 11th, 2006 Michael Berry Savory, Previous Lord Mayor (2004–2005) The Right Honourable Lord Mayor of London is the Mayor of the City of London and head of the Corporation of London. ...


Light Cavalry

The Light Cavalry Troop (formed 1979, given Royal Warrant 2004) is made up of members of the HAC 'Company' who are not necessarily veterans of the HAC Regiment.


Famous members of the HAC

Captain-Generals of the HAC
Date

Appointed

Incumbent
1657 Major General Philip Skippon
1660 James II
1690 William III
1702 Prince George of Denmark and Norway, Duke of Cumberland
1715 George II
1760  ???
1766 George IV
1830 William IV
1837 Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex
1843 Prince Albert, the Prince Consort
24th Jul 1863 Edward VII
7th May 1910 George V
1st Feb 1936 Edward VIII
10th Dec 1936 George VI
6th Feb 1952 Elizabeth II

Philip Skippon (died 1660) was an English soldier in the English Civil War. ... James II of England/VII of Scotland (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701) became King of Scots, King of England, and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685, and Duke of Normandy on 31 December 1660. ... William III of England (The Hague, 14 November 1650 – Kensington Palace, 8 March 1702; also known as William II of Scotland and William III of Orange) was a Dutch aristocrat and a Protestant Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28... Prince George of Denmark Prince George of Denmark (April 2, 1653 - October 28, 1708) was the Prince consort of Queen Anne of Great Britain. ... George II (George Augustus; 10 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... William IV (William Henry; 21 August 1765 – 20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom and of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death. ... Portrait of Prince Augustus Frederick by Louis Gauffier Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex (27 January 1773 – 21 April 1843), was the sixth son of King George III of the United Kingdom and his consort, Queen Charlotte. ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Francis Augustus Charles Albert Emanuel, later HRH The Prince Consort) (26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 - 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, as a result of his creating it from the British branch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of Great Britain, Ireland, the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36), on 20... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Orde Charles Wingate Major General Orde Charles Wingate, DSO (February 26, 1903 – March 24, 1944), was a British major general and creator of two special military units during World War II. // Orde Wingate was born 23 February 1903 in Naini Tal, India to a military family. ... James Whiteside Gray (born November 7, 1954) is a British politician. ... Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, OBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... Major Robert Henry Cain OKW, VC (2 January 1909 - 2 May 1978) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... Lord Alanbrookes War Diaries, published 2001 Field Marshal Alan Francis Brooke, 1st Viscount Alanbrooke, KG, GCB, OM, GCVO, DSO (July 23, 1883 - June 17, 1963) was a career soldier, Chief of the Imperial General Staff during the Second World War and promoted to Field Marshal in 1944. ... Sir Richard Nugent OConnor (21 August 1889 – 17 June 1981) was a British Army general who commanded the Western Desert Force in the early years of World War II. He was the field commander for Operation Compass, in which his forces completely destroyed a much larger Italian army—a... Alfred Oliver Pollard (VC, MC & Bar, DCM) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... Reginald Leonard Haine (VC, MC & Bar) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... John Laurie (25 March 1897 - 23 June 1980) was an actor born in Dumfries, Scotland. ... Erskine Childers was the name of two Irish leaders of British birth who were key players in 20th century Ireland. ... Samuel Pepys, FRS (23 February 1633 – 26 May 1703) was an English naval administrator and Member of Parliament, famous chiefly for his comprehensive diary. ... Andrew Edmund Armstrong Selous (born 27 April 1962) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... Gregory Leonard George Barker (born March 8, 1966) is a British politician, Conservative Member of Parliament for Bexhill and Battle. ... Vincenzo Lunardi, an Italian diploment, piloted the first balloon flight in England in 1783 at Moorfields in London. ...

Affiliations

Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Africa. ... The Transvaal Horse Artillery (usually abbreviated to THA) is an artillery regiment of the South African Army. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts is a military parade and ceremony group in Massachusetts. ...

References

  1. ^ A loose translation, more literally "Arms (hold the) balance of peace"
  2. ^ after the Royal Monmouthshire Royal Engineers
  3. ^ TA units take precedence after regular units
  4. ^ List of units of the British Army Territorial Force 1908
  5. ^ Royal Artillery Units (Territorial Army)
  6. ^ http://www.charity-commission.gov.uk/welsh/registeredcharities/ShowCharity.asp?RegNo=208443

The Royal Monmouthshire Royal Engineers (Militia) (R MON RE(M)) is the most senior regiment in the British Territorial Army, having given continuous loyal service to the crown since 1539. ... The following is a list of units transferred to the Territorial Force on April 1, 1908, or raised in that year under the terms of the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act 1907, and the associations by which they were administered. ...

External links

  • The Active Unit website
  • The "Company" website
  • The Light Cavalry HAC website
  • The HAC Special Constabulary website
  • Pathe newsreel of the pikemen and musketeers circa 1958 (click the first photo to view the film)
  • Pathe newsreel of the Queen presenting new colours in 1955. The final part of the clip demonstrates the unique regimental custom of toasting or cheering a member of the Company with "Regimental Fire".

See also


 
 

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