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Encyclopedia > History of video game consoles (fourth generation)
History of…
Video games
Console, handheld, and personal computer games

First generation (1972–1977)
Second generation (1976–1984)
Video game crash of 1983
Third generation (1983–1992)
Fourth generation (1987–1996)
Fifth generation (1993–2002)
Sixth generation (1998–2006)
Seventh generation (2004–)
Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Video games were introduced as a commercial entertainment medium in 1971, becoming the basis for an important entertainment industry in the late 1970s/early 1980s in the United States, Japan, and Europe. ... This article is about games played on consoles. ... A handheld video game is a video game designed primarily for handheld game consoles such as Nintendos Game Boy line. ... The first generation of video game consoles lasted from 1972 until 1977. ... The second generation of video game consoles lasted from 1976 until 1984. ... E.T. for the Atari 2600 is considered by many to be emblematic of the crash along with the Atari 2600 version of Pac-Man. ... In the history of video games, the 8-bit era was the third generation of video game consoles, but the first after the video game crash of 1983 and considered by some to be the first modern era of console gaming. ... In the history of computer and video games, the 32-bit / 64-bit /3D era was the fifth generation of video game consoles. ... The sixth-generation era (sometimes referred to as the 128-bit era; see Number of bits below) refers to the computer and video games, video game consoles, and video game handhelds available at the turn of the 21st century. ... In the history of computer and video games, the seventh generation began on November 21, 2004 with the North American release of the Nintendo DS, followed by the PlayStation Portable on December 12, 2004. ...

Arcade games

Golden Age of Arcade Games
This article contains a timeline of notable events in the history of video arcade gaming: // 1971 The Galaxy Game, the earliest known coin-operated arcade video game, makes its debut on the campus of Stanford University. ... The Golden Age of Arcade Games was a peak era of arcade game popularity and innovation, lasting from January 18, 1982 to January 5, 1986. ...

In the history of video games, the 16-bit era was the fourth generation of video game consoles. Starting in 1987 with the Japanese launch of the PC Engine, this era was dominated by commercial rivalry between Nintendo and Sega with their machines, the Super Nintendo Entertainment System and the Sega Mega Drive (named the Sega Genesis in North America due to trademark issues). The machines introduced in this generation retained the majority market share until 1996. Video games were introduced as a commercial entertainment medium in 1971, becoming the basis for an important entertainment industry in the late 1970s/early 1980s in the United States, Japan, and Europe. ... Game console redirects here. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... This article is about the video game company. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...

Contents

Home systems

Launches

The PC Engine, or TurboGrafx-16 in North America, a collaboration between Hudson Soft and NEC, was launched in Japan on October 30, 1987 and was followed by the Sega Mega Drive on October 29, 1988. Both machines were launched in North America during August 1989 and the Mega Drive was launched in Europe and Australia on November 30, 1990. For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... Hudson Soft is a Japanese publisher and developer, founded on May 18, 1973. ... NEC Corporation (Japanese: Nippon Denki Kabushiki Gaisha; TYO: 6701 , NASDAQ: NIPNY) is a Japanese multinational IT company headquartered in Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... For other uses, see August (disambiguation). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ...


As the market quickly transitioned to the newer hardware, Nintendo saw erosion of the commanding market share it had built up with the Famicom (called Nintendo Entertainment System in North America) and responded with its own fourth generation machine, the Super Famicom on November 21, 1990. The machine reached North America on the 1st of September 1991 and in Europe and Australia in April 1992. “NES” redirects here. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see September (disambiguation). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ...


Although initially popular in Japan, the PC Engine failed to maintain its initial sales momentum or to make a strong impact in North America, where it became unavailable by 1994. As a result the market was largely divided between Sega and Nintendo, who acted as direct competitors. Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ...


Marketing

NEC

The PC-Engine was quite successful in Japan, partly due to titles available on the then-new CD-ROM format. NEC released a CD add-on in 1990 and by 1992 had released a combination TurboGrafx and CD-ROM system known as the TurboDuo. Image File history File links Bonk's_Adventure_PCE.png Summary Source: http://screenmania. ... Image File history File links Bonk's_Adventure_PCE.png Summary Source: http://screenmania. ... Bonks Adventure is a 2D platform video game developed by Red Company and released in 1990 for the TurboGrafx-16. ... For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ... The TurboDuo (also called Turbo Duo) is a video game console released in the United States on October 10, 1992 by Turbo Technologies Incorporated (a Los Angeles-based corporation consisting of NEC and Hudson Soft employees, established to market NEC consoles in North America after NEC Home Electronics USA failed...


In the USA, NEC used Bonk, a head-banging caveman, as their mascot and featured him in most of the TurboGrafx advertising from 1990 to 1994. The platform was well received initially, especially in larger markets, but failed to make inroads into the smaller metropolitan areas where NEC did not have as many store representatives or as focused in-store promotion. Bonk in the first level of Bonks Adventure, for the TurboGrafx-16 Bonk is a video game character from NECs TurboGrafx-16 console. ...


By 1994, the TurboGrafx-16 and its CD combination system the Turbo Duo were out of manufacture in North America, though a small amount of software continued to trickle out for the platform. NEC released the 32-bit PC-FX console the same year in Japan. Plans were underway for a U.S. release of the PC-FX but an already flooded market of platforms including the more powerful 3DO and Atari Jaguar systems caused TTI, who by then had the US rights to the TurboGrafx platform, to halt its North American release plans. NEC Corporation (Jp. ... The PC-FX console The PC-FX was NECs 32-bit sequel to its PC Engine (US:TurboGrafx 16). ... 3DO Interactive Multiplayer (most commonly referred to as the 3DO) is a line of video game consoles which were released in 1993 and 1994 by Panasonic, Sanyo and Goldstar, among other companies. ... The Atari Jaguar is a video game console that was released in November 1993 to rival the Mega Drive/Genesis and the Super Nintendo Entertainment System as a powerful next generation platform. ...


In Japan, a number of more adult titles were also available for the PC-Engine, such as a variety of strip mahjong games (such as the Super Real Mahjong series), which set it apart from its competitors.


Sega

Sonic The Hedgehog

Starting in 1991, Sega built their marketing campaign in all regions around their mascot Sonic The Hedgehog, pushing him as the "cooler" alternative to Nintendo's mascot Mario and using his games as demonstrations of the technical capabilities of the system. Sonic The Hedgehog (first) ingame screenshot Template:Game-acreenshot File links The following pages link to this file: Sonic the Hedgehog (Genesis) ... Sonic The Hedgehog (first) ingame screenshot Template:Game-acreenshot File links The following pages link to this file: Sonic the Hedgehog (Genesis) ... Sonic the Hedgehog is the platform game that launched the career of Sonic the Hedgehog and Sonic Team. ... Sonic the Hedgehog ), trademarked Sonic The Hedgehog,[4] is a video game character and the hero of a video game series released by Sega, as well as numerous spin-off comics, cartoons and books. ... Mario ) is a video game character created by Japanese game designer Shigeru Miyamoto and the official mascot of Nintendo. ...


In the USA, their advertising was often directly adversarial, leading to commercials such as "Genesis does what Nintendon't" and the "'SEGA!' scream". Television Commercial Genesis Does What Nintendont was the catch phrase used to promote the Sega Genesis in a commercial showing the games Super Monaco GP, Michael Jacksons Moonwalker, Joe Montana Football, Pat Riley Basketball, James Buster Douglas Knockout Boxing, and Columns. ...


When Mortal Kombat was ported for home release on the Mega Drive/Genesis and Super NES, Nintendo decided to censor the game's gore, but Sega kept the content in the game, hoping to position their console as the more "mature" product. Sega's gamble paid off, and its version of Mortal Kombat received generally higher and more favorable reviews in the gaming press. As a result of this, Nintendo reconsidered its position, and when Mortal Kombat II was ported to the console, all of the violence was intact. Mortal Kombat was the first entry in the famous and highly controversial Mortal Kombat fighting game series by Midway, released in arcades in 1992. ... Mortal Kombat II (also referred to as MKII) is an arcade game and the second title in the Mortal Kombat fighting game series. ...


Nintendo

Mario riding on Yoshi in Super Mario World for the SNES
Mario riding on Yoshi in Super Mario World for the SNES

Nintendo's market position was defined by their machine's increased video and sound capabilities, as well as by the quality of their most popular franchises, including games such as the Mario series, The Legend of Zelda, Star Fox, Super Metroid, and later Donkey Kong Country. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Mario ) is a video game character created by Japanese game designer Shigeru Miyamoto and the official mascot of Nintendo. ... This article is about the Nintendo character Yoshi. ... Super Mario World , commonly abbreviated SMW) is a platform game developed and published by Nintendo Co. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... The Legend of Zelda ) is a high fantasy action-adventure video game series developed and published by Nintendo, and created by the celebrated game designer Shigeru Miyamoto. ... The Star Fox series ) is a video game franchise published by Nintendo. ... “Metroid 3” redirects here. ... For the television series, see Donkey Kong Country (TV series). ...


The rise of franchises

While their seeds were sown in the 8-bit era, many of the major franchise titles came of age and solidified in the 16-bit era. Metroid, Zelda, Star Fox, F-Zero, Dragon Quest, Final Fantasy, Seiken Densetsu (Secret of Mana), Sonic the Hedgehog, Front Mission, Donkey Kong, Street Fighter, Mortal Kombat, Mega Man X and many others had either their first releases or some of their most popular titles during the 16-bit era. Box art of the first Metroid game The Metroid ) games are a series of video games produced by Nintendo. ... A Legend of Zelda series logo The Legend of Zelda series (often shortened to Zelda, TLoZ, or LoZ), by Nintendo, is a series of video games created by celebrated game designer Shigeru Miyamoto. ... The Star Fox series ) is a video game franchise published by Nintendo. ... This article is about the first game in the series. ... Dragon Quest logo Dragon Quest ), published as Dragon Warrior in North America until the 2005 release of Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King, is a series of role-playing games produced by Enix (now Square Enix). ... This article is about the Final Fantasy franchise. ... Seiken Densetsu lit. ... Secret of Mana, known in Japan as Seiken Densetsu 2 , lit. ... Sonic the Hedgehog is the platform game that launched the career of Sonic the Hedgehog and Sonic Team. ... Front Mission (Japanese: フロントミッション) is a series of turn-based tactical strategy video games produced by Squaresoft, now Square Enix. ... Donkey Kong is a video game series created by Shigeru Miyamoto, featuring a gorilla called Donkey Kong. ... “Street Fighter” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Mortal Kombat. ... Mega Man X may refer to: Mega Man X (video game), a video game first released by Capcom in 1993 for the SNES. Mega Man X (series), a series of sequels and spin-offs based on the original game. ...

Sonic the Hedgehog: In order to compete toe-to-toe with Nintendo, Sega came with the idea of a character that they hoped would surpass Mario in many ways and the character ended being Sonic the Hedgehog. Debuting in 1991, Sega's marketing of the Sonic franchise was key to Sega's success in the video game market during the early years of this generation.
Metroid: Released in 1986, the original Metroid established itself as one of Nintendo's premiere titles. Super Metroid, released in 1994 on a whopping (at the time) 24 megabit cartridge for the SNES, was the third game in the series, after the original was released on the NES in 1986 and the Game Boy version came out in 1991. Super Metroid cemented this series' status as one of Nintendo's top franchises, and Metroid Prime for the Gamecube only strengthened that position. Super Metroid still is regarded by many gaming organizations as one of the "best games of all time."[1]
Zelda: The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past courted popularity larger than that of its predecessors on the NES. It was one of the few action-adventures to be released early in the SNES's lifecycle. Zelda II on the NES had been mostly action-based and was side-scrolling, whilst A Link to the Past drew more inspiration from the original with its top-down adventure format. Zelda's mixture of action and adventure elements continues to this day. The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past is still well-known to this day.
Dragon Quest: Although none of the Dragon Quest franchise was published during this era outside of Japan, it remained the best-selling RPG franchise there. Two main installments came out for the SFC, as well as the remakes of the first three games originally released for FC and a dungeon crawler spin-off: Torneko's Great Adventure, which started Chun Soft's popular Fushigi no Dungeon series.
Star Fox: Star Fox was the first SNES game to feature the Super FX chip. It is a spacecraft-flying game featuring Fox McCloud and his teammates Slippy Toad, Peppy Hare and Falco Lombardi. This marked the first quest at stopping the evil Andross from taking over the Lylat System (which would later be reprised on its sequel Star Fox 64 for Nintendo 64 in 1997). There had been a Star Fox 2 with new characters in development for Super Nintendo, but this game was cancelled in the beta stages because of the approaching release of the N64. There were three more releases; Star Fox Adventures in 2003 and Star Fox Assault in 2005, both for the Nintendo GameCube, and Star Fox Command in 2006 for the Nintendo DS.
F-Zero: F-Zero, which was an early release in 1991, is a futuristic racing game of hover-cars at speeds up to 475 Km (with boost, up to 900) per hour. F-zero used the pioneering "Mode 7" technology which made the game appear to be 3-d. This game was an incredibly fast racing game that influenced the PlayStation racing series Wipeout. The original four racers (Captain Falcon, Dr. Stewart, Pico and Samurai Goroh) are still featured in most of the games, although the series now features over 30 different racers. This successful series was also featured in 1998 (F-Zero X for N64), 2001 (F-Zero: Maximum Velocity for Game Boy Advance), 2003 (both F-Zero GX for the GameCube and F-Zero AX, the arcade version), and 2005 (F-Zero: GP Legend for GBA, which was based on the animated series that same year.)
Final Fantasy: Only two of the three FF games produced for the SNES was published in North America, and both with their original numeration shifted (which still generates some confusion to this day). Not until Final Fantasy VII on the PlayStation did it reach blockbuster status outside Japan, but the market for the 16-bit titles has been strong enough that all three have been translated and re-released for handheld systems.
Seiken Densetsu: Originally conceived as a "spin off" action adventure for the Game Boy ("Seiken Densetsu: Final Fantasy Gaiden" in Japan, and "Final Fantasy Adventure" in the US), the series was reintroduced to Europe and North America in the form of Secret of Mana. The series has continued with Sword of Mana on the Game Boy Advance, Legend of Mana for the PlayStation, and Children of Mana for the Nintendo DS, showing that the series has been successful enough to warrant progressive installments. There is a common misconception that Secret of Evermore for the SNES was meant to be a follow up to Secret of Mana, or a replacement for an english translation of Seiken Densetsu 3. The "Secret of" was added on at a point late in development, presumably to cause consumers to compare it to the other, more successful franchise. Seiken Densetsu 3 was held back from a North American release due to elements of the story perceived to be "too mature".[citation needed]
Street Fighter: An arcade smash hit, Street Fighter II made it to the 16-bit consoles without significant loss of quality or features. Sprites were decreased in size and the backdrops lost a bit of their flashiness, but for the most part it was a faithful recreation that sold voluminous copies. The series is still being produced today. It is worth noting that, whilst the original Street Fighter was deemed innovative and fairly popular, it was the second on the series that produced a lasting fanbase and set many of the trends seen in fighting games today, most notably its colorful selection of playable fighters from different countries across the globe.
Phantasy Star: Phantasy Star was Sega's RPG franchise that was established 1987 on the Sega Master System. It was the first console RPG to reach Europe, almost a decade before Final Fantasy VII. Three sequels were released to the Mega Drive. With its sci-fi theme, the franchise was unique from fantasy-themed Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy.
Thunder Force: Thunder Force was released on several computers in Japan in the mid-80s, but it was on the Mega Drive the series got famous for its intense and innovative gameplay, detailed graphics and great techno-rock soundtracks. Thunder Force II, III and IV were all released for the Mega Drive, but the third game never reached Europe and the fourth was called Lightening Force (sic) in the US.
Shining Force: Starting with dungeon-crawler Shining in the Darkness in early 90s, this Sega franchise became a strategy RPG series with Shining Force a few years after. With 12 characters of different classes and races, you must be tactical to defeat the hordes of enemies coming at you. The franchise still lives with new games coming out to the PS2, though these games shifted from the Strategy RPG genre to the Action RPG.
Ecco the Dolphin: An underwater adventure game starring a bottlenose dolphin named Ecco. Ecco searched for his pod through famously difficult underwater levels. Ecco the Dolphin had three sequels; the direct sequel Ecco: The Tides of Time (Genesis/Mega Drive), an edutainment game called Ecco Jr. (Genesis/Mega Drive), and, years later, Ecco the Dolphin: Defender of the Future (Dreamcast), which took place outside of the reality established in the original games.

Seeking to follow the example of the above titles, several more franchises were born during this era, many of which have not survived to the present day. While game sequels were far from uncommon during the 8-bit era and even before, it was at this time that the potential for continuing series games was realized. “Metroid 3” redirects here. ... The Megabit is a unit of information storage, abbreviated Mbit or sometimes Mb. ... “NES” redirects here. ... This article is about the game. ... The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, released in Japan on November 21, 1991, as ゼルダの伝説 神々のトライフォース (Zeruda no Densetsu: Kamigami no Toraifōsu, literally The Legend of Zelda: Triforce of the Gods... Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is a video game for the Nintendo Entertainment System, and the second in the Legend of Zelda series of games. ... Dragon Quest logo Dragon Quest ), published as Dragon Warrior in North America until the 2005 release of Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King, is a series of role-playing games produced by Enix (now Square Enix). ... Chunsoft is a Japanese video game developer specializing in console RPGs. ... Fushigi no Dungeon (which roughly translates to Mysterious Dungeon) is a series of random dungeon video games developed by Chunsoft. ... Star Fox ) (also known as Star Wing in Europe due to trademark issues) is the first game in the Star Fox series of video games. ... Super FX-rendered 3D polygon graphics in the SNES game Star Fox The Super FX is probably the most widely recognized coprocessor chip used in select Super Nintendo (SNES) video game cartridges. ... Star Fox 64 ), known in Australia and Europe as Lylat Wars due to trademark issues, is a scrolling shooter video game for the Nintendo 64 video game console. ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... Star Fox 2 is an unreleased video game for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. ... Star Fox Adventures is an action-adventure game developed by Rare and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo GameCube and part of the Star Fox series. ... Star Fox: Assault is the newest entry in the long-running Star Fox series of video games for Nintendo consoles. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... Star Fox Command ) is the fifth game in Nintendos Star Fox game series which was published by Nintendo for the Nintendo DS in 2006. ... NDS redirects here. ... This article is about the first game in the series. ... The term Mode 7 originated on the Super NES video game console, on which it describes a simple texture mapping graphics mode that allows a background layer to be rotated and scaled. ... Wipeout is the title of a series of futuristic anti-gravity racing games, originally produced by Psygnosis for the PlayStation video game console, with other versions of the game produced for the Sega Saturn, DOS, Nintendo 64, PlayStation 2, and PlayStation Portable formats. ... F-Zero X ), is a video game for the Nintendo 64 console. ... “GBA” redirects here. ... F-Zero GX , F-ZERO GX) is a futuristic racing video game for the Nintendo GameCube console. ... F-Zero AX is an arcade racing game and the latest addition of the F-Zero franchise established on the Super Nintendo, released alongside of its Nintendo GameCube counterpart, F-Zero GX, and so far the only arcade title in the series. ... F-Zero GP Legend (F-ZERO ファルコン伝説 F-ZERO Furrukon Densetsu) is an anime series based off of Nintendos F-Zero franchise. ... Final Fantasy VII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Secret of Mana, known in Japan as Seiken Densetsu 2 , lit. ... Sword of Mana. ... Legend of Mana ) is the fourth game in the Mana series. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... Children of Mana, known in Japan as Seiken Densetsu DS: Children of Mana , lit. ... NDS redirects here. ... Secret of Evermore, released in North America on September 18, 1995, is a role playing video game for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System video game console. ... Seiken Densetsu 3 , lit. ... Street Fighter II ) is a 1991 competitive fighting game by Capcom. ... Phantasy Star game. ... Sega Master System The Sega Master System (SMS for short) (Japanese: マスターシステム), was an 8-bit cartridge-based gaming console manufactured by Sega. ... Final Fantasy VII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Sega MegaDrive 2 European version with joypad, game cart + box Sega Mega Drive (Japanese: メガドライブ Mega Doraibu) was a 16-bit video game console released by Sega. ... Dragon Quest logo Dragon Quest ), published as Dragon Warrior in North America until the 2005 release of Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King, is a series of role-playing games produced by Enix (now Square Enix). ... This article is about the Final Fantasy franchise. ... Thunder Force (also spelled Thunderforce) is a series of scrolling shooter type video games developed by the Japanese software company Technosoft (a. ... Sega MegaDrive 2 European version with joypad, game cart + box Sega Mega Drive (Japanese: メガドライブ Mega Doraibu) was a 16-bit video game console released by Sega. ... Sega MegaDrive 2 European version with joypad, game cart + box Sega Mega Drive (Japanese: メガドライブ Mega Doraibu) was a 16-bit video game console released by Sega. ... Shining in the Darkness is a 1991 RPG game for the Sega Genesis video game console. ... Shining Force: The Legacy of Great Intention, more commonly referred to as Shining Force, is a 1992 turn-based strategy role-playing video game for the Mega Drive/Genesis console. ... Binomial name Montagu, 1821 Bottlenose Dolphin range (in blue) The Bottlenose Dolphin is the most common and well-known dolphin. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... Edutainment (also educational entertainment or entertainment-education) is a form of entertainment designed to educate as well as to amuse. ...


Add-ons

Nintendo, NEC and Sega also competed with hardware peripherals for their consoles. NEC was first out the door with the release of the TurboGrafx CD system in 1990. Retailing for $499.88 (Wal-Mart) at release the add-on CD was not a popular purchase but was in large part responsible for the platform's success in Japan. Sega made two attempts: the Sega Mega-CD(renamed Sega-CD in North America) and the Sega 32X, neither of which were very successful. The Sega CD was plagued by a high price tag ($300 at its release) and a limited library of games. The 32X faced a number of problems, primarily technical and commercial. (The peripheral would occasionally not work with some consoles. Additionally, some retailers were not able to meet the initial demand for the add on, leading to shortages.) It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Computer hardware. ... The Sega Mega-CD ) is an add-on device for the Sega Mega Drive released in Europe, Australia, New Zealand and Japan. ... The Sega 32X (Japanese: セガ スーパー32X) is an add-on for the Sega Mega Drive video game console by Sega. ...


A unique add-on for the Sega console was Sega Channel. Sega Channel was a subscription based service hosted by local television providers. It required hardware that plugged into a cable line and the Sega. Sega Channel logo and mascot Sega Pat Sega Channel was a project developed by Sega for the 16-bit Sega Genesis console. ...


Nintendo made an attempt with their successful Satellaview and Super Game Boy. The former was a satellite service released only on the Japanese market and the latter an adapter for the Super Nintendo that allowed Game Boy games to be displayed on a TV in color. The BS-X logo. ... Super Game Boy Box art. ...


Interestingly, Nintendo, working along with Sony, also had plans to create a CD-ROM drive for the Super NES, similar to the Sega CD, but eventually decided not to go through with that project, opting to team with Philips in the development of the add-on instead. However, the Super NES CD-ROM project was cancelled, and Sony used the name ("PlayStation") for their own stand-alone CD-based console, overseen by former SNES sound-chip engineer, Ken Kutaragi. PlayStation went on to badly hurt CD-i sales, and Philips dropped the product line in 1998. Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $66. ... The CD-ROM drive can also be called a CD-ROM player. ... Philips HQ in Amsterdam Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. (Royal Philips Electronics N.V.), usually known as Philips, (Euronext: PHIA, NYSE: PHG) is one of the largest electronics companies in the world, founded and headquartered in the Netherlands. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System, also known as Super Nintendo, Super NES or SNES, is a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Brazil, Europe, and Australia. ... Ken Kutaragi (久夛良木 健 Kutaragi Ken, born August 8, 1950) former Chairman and chief executive officer of Sony Computer Entertainment (SCEI), the video game division of Sony Corporation until his retirement. ... CD-i or Compact Disc Interactive is the name of an interactive multimedia CD player developed and marketed by Royal Philips Electronics N.V. CD-i also refers to the multimedia Compact Disc standard utilized by the CD-i console, also known as Green Book, which was co-developed by... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...


Gallery of add-ons

European and Australian importing

bright green - NTSC, yellow - PAL, or switching to PAL, orange - SECAM, olive - no information
bright green - NTSC, yellow - PAL, or switching to PAL, orange - SECAM, olive - no information

The 16-bit era was also the era when the act of buying imported US games became more established in Europe, and regular stores began to carry them. This was especially popular with SNES games, due to several reasons: Image File history File links NTSC-PAL-SECAM.svg‎ NTSC-PAL-SECAM distribution. ... Image File history File links NTSC-PAL-SECAM.svg‎ NTSC-PAL-SECAM distribution. ...

  • Because PAL has a refresh rate of 50Hz (compared with 60Hz for NTSC) and a vertical resolution of 625 interlaced lines (576 effective), compared with 525/480 for NTSC, a game designed for the NTSC standard without any modification will run 17% slower and have black bars at the top and bottom. Developers often had a hard time converting games designed for the American and Japanese NTSC standard to the European and Australian PAL standard. Companies such as Konami, with large budgets and a healthy following in Europe and Australia, readily optimised several games (such as the International Superstar Soccer series) for this audience, while smaller developers did not.
  • Few RPGs were released in Europe because they would have needed to been translated into many different languages. RPGs tend to contain much more text than other genres, so one of the biggest problems was simply fitting all of the full translations into one cartridge. The cost of creating multiple full translations was also prohibitive. Only the UK and Australia saw any number of RPG releases, and even then the number was a fraction of what was being released in Japan.

Popular US games imported at this time: For other uses, see PAL (disambiguation). ... NTSC is the analog television system in use in Canada, Japan, Mexico, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan, the United States, and some other countries, mostly in the Americas (see map). ... 576i is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... Konami Corporation ) (TYO: 9766 NYSE: KNM SGX: K20) is a leading developer and publisher of numerous popular and strong-selling toys, trading cards, anime, tokusatsu, slot machines and video games. ... International Superstar Soccer is the name of a series of football (soccer) video games developed by Japanese company Konami, mostly by their Osaka branch, KCEO. It should not be confused with KCETs Pro Evolution Soccer series, which was originally developed for the PlayStation, while ISS was mostly aimed for...

Final Fantasy IV ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1991 as a part of the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Final Fantasy VI ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1994 as a part of the Final Fantasy series. ... Seiken Densetsu (聖剣伝説) is a computer role-playing game series from Square Enix (formerly Square Co. ... Secret of Mana, known in Japan as Seiken Densetsu 2 , lit. ... Street Fighter II ) is a 1991 competitive fighting game by Capcom. ... Chrono Trigger ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System video game console. ... Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (スーパーマリオRPG) was the last Mario game made and released for the Super Famicom/Super Nintendo Entertainment System, and was the last Square-produced game for a Nintendo video game console until 2003, with the debut of Final Fantasy: Crystal Chronicles for the...

Comparison

Name TurboGrafx-16/PC-Engine Sega Mega Drive/Genesis Neo Geo Super Nintendo Entertainment System/Super Famicom
Console
Launch prices (USD) US$249.99 US$190.00 US$649.99 US$199.99
Release date Flag of Japan October 30, 1987
Flag of the United States September 1, 1989
Flag of Europe 1990
Flag of Japan October 29, 1988
Flag of the United States September 15, 1989
Flag of Europe November 30, 1990
Flag of Japan 1990
Flag of the United States 1991
Flag of Japan November 21, 1990
Flag of the United States August 13, 1991
Flag of Europe April 11, 1992
Media Data Card & CD-ROM (add-on) Cartridge & CD-ROM (Sega CD add-on), Data Card (Master-Gear and Power Base Add-ons) Cartridge Cartridge
Top-selling games Bonk's Adventure[citation needed] Sonic the Hedgehog 2, 6 million (as of June 2006)[2] The King of Fighters '95[citation needed] Super Mario World, 20 million (as of June 25, 2007)[3]
Backward compatibility None Sega Master System (using Power Base Converter) None None
Accessories (retail)
  • TurboGrafx-CD
  • TurboTap
  • TurboStick
  • Super System Card
  • TurboBooster
  • TurboBooster Plus
  • Neo Geo Controller Pro
  • Neo Geo Memory Card
Memory 8 KB work RAM
64 KB video RAM
64 KB main RAM
64 KB video RAM
64 KB main RAM
64 KB video RAM
128 KB main RAM
64 KB video RAM
64 KB audio RAM

For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... Neo-Geo is the name of a cartridge-based arcade and home video game system released in 1990 by Japanese game company SNK. The system offered comparatively colorful 2D graphics and high-quality sound. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Download high resolution version (1024x632, 128 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Neogeoaes. ... Download high resolution version (800x685, 85 KB)SNES 800 pixels Source: me File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Super_Nintendo_Entertainment_System-USA.jpg From ja-wiki, GNU FDL. Taken by User:Muband en: Super Nintendo Entertainment System, North American version. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... The Sega Mega-CD (Japanese: メガCD) is an add-on device for the Sega Mega Drive released in Europe, Australia, and Japan. ... This is a list of video games that have sold one million copies or more. ... Bonks Adventure is a 2D platform video game developed by Red Company and released in 1990 for the TurboGrafx-16. ... Sonic the Hedgehog 2, or simply Sonic 2, is a platform game developed by Sonic Team in collaboration with Sega Technical Institute, and published by Sega for the Mega Drive/Genesis. ... The King of Fighters 95 is the second game in the King of Fighters series. ... Super Mario World , commonly abbreviated SMW) is a platform game developed and published by Nintendo Co. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Sega Master System ) or SMS for short (1986 - 2000), is an 8-bit cartridge-based video game console that was manufactured by Sega. ... The Power Base Converter was an accessory made by Sega for their Genesis and Mega Drive console video game systems. ... TurboGrafx CD The TurboGrafx 16 was the first video game console in North America to have a CD-ROM peripheral (following the pioneering spirit of the PC-Engine CD-ROM add-on in Japan, although the FM Towns Marty was the first console to have a built-in CD-ROM). ... The Sega Mega-CD ) is an add-on device for the Sega Mega Drive released in Europe, Australia, New Zealand and Japan. ... The Sega 32X (Japanese: セガ スーパー32X) is an add-on for the Sega Mega Drive video game console by Sega. ... A contemporary computer mouse, with the most common standard features: two buttons and a scroll wheel. ... The Power Base Converter was an accessory made by Sega for their Genesis and Mega Drive console video game systems. ... The Sega Activator was an octagonal game controller for the Sega Genesis that used infrared beams to interpret movements. ... The Super Scope, or Nintendo Scope in Europe , is the official Super Nintendo light gun. ... PlayStation 2 Multitap Hudson Soft released a Super Famicom Multitap in the shape of Bombermans face. ... Super Game Boy Box art. ... The SNES Mouse The Super NES Mouse is a peripheral released in 1992 for Nintendos Super Nintendo video game system (a. ...

Worldwide sales standings

See also: List of best-selling game consoles
Console Units sold Date
Super Nintendo Entertainment System 49 million[4] N/A
Sega Mega Drive/Sega Genesis 29 million[5][6] May 15, 2007
TurboGrafx-16 10 million[7] May 4, 2007

This is a list of video game console and handheld game console sales. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Other

Handheld systems

See also: Comparison of handheld game consoles

This is a comparison of the features of various handheld game consoles. ...

Comparison

Console Game Boy Atari Lynx Sega Game Gear
Image
Launch price ¥13,300
US$109.99
US$189.99 ¥14,500
US$119.99
AUD $155
Release date Flag of Japan April 21, 1989
Flag of the United States August, 1989
Flag of Europe 1990
Flag of the United States September 1989
Flag of Europe 1990
Flag of Japan October 6, 1990
Flag of Europe Flag of the United States 1991
Flag of Australia 1992
Media Cartridge Cartridge Cartridge
Top-selling games Tetris, 33 million (pack-in / separately).[8]

Pokémon Red, Blue, and Green, approximately 20.08 million combined (in Japan and the US) (details).[9][10] For the entire Game Boy series of handheld consoles, see Game Boy line. ... The Lynx was a handheld game console released by Atari in 1989. ... The Sega Game Gear is a handheld game console which was Segas response to Nintendos Game Boy. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (480x800, 26 KB)Nintendo Gameboy, picture by me fdgsf File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1600x784, 79 KB)Picture of an Atari Lynx 1 (made myself) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Image File history File links Sega_GameGear. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see August (disambiguation). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see September (disambiguation). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... This is a list of video games that have sold one million copies or more. ... Tetris was a pack-in title included with the Nintendo Game Boy at the handhelds release in 1989. ... Pack-in games are those games that have been included with home video game systems, as gratuity. ... Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue are the first two installments of the Pokémon series of role-playing video games, first released for the Game Boy in Japan in 1996, later released to the rest of the world in 1998 (North America) and 1999 (Europe and Australia), and... This is a list of video games that have sold one million copies or more. ...

Road Blasters[citation needed] Sonic The Hedgehog[citation needed]

RoadBlasters is an arcade game released by Atari. ... Sonic the Hedgehog is a video game in the Sonic the Hedgehog series developed by Ancient and published by Sega for its Master System and Game Gear systems. ...

Other handhelds

Software

This is a list of console video game franchises organized by the generations in which they first appeared. ...

References

  1. ^ 100 Games Of All Time. gamers.com. Retrieved on 2006-09-03.
  2. ^ Daniel Boutros (2006-08-04). Sonic the Hedgehog 2. A Detailed Cross-Examination of Yesterday and Today's Best-Selling Platform Games. Gamasutra. Retrieved on 2007-11-26.
  3. ^ Edge (2007-06-25). 1990. The Nintendo Years 2. Next-Gen.biz. Retrieved on 2007-11-26.
  4. ^ Super Nintendo Entertainment System. Classic Systems. Nintendo of America. Retrieved on 2006-02-11.
  5. ^ Greg Orlando (2007-05-15). Console Portraits: A 40-Year Pictorial History of Gaming 21. Wired News. Retrieved on 2007-09-08.
  6. ^ Ken Polsson. Chronology of Sega Video Games. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
  7. ^ Blake Snow (2007-05-04). The 10 Worst-Selling Consoles of All Time. GamePro.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-28.
  8. ^ Did you know?. Nintendo. Retrieved on 2007-11-26.
  9. ^ Japan Platinum Game Chart. The Magic Box. Retrieved on 2007-11-26.
  10. ^ US Platinum Videogame Chart. The Magic Box. Retrieved on 2007-11-26.


Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Founded in 1997, Gamasutra is a web site for those interested in video games including video game developers. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Edge is a multi-format computer and video game magazine published by Future Publishing in the United Kingdom. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The cover of the January 95 issue of Next Generation. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GamePro is an American video game magazine published monthly. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


 
 

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