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Encyclopedia > History of the United States Democratic Party

The History of the Democratic Party is an account of a continuously supported political party in the United States of America. For a description of today's Democratic Party, its make up, and its values (as well as a brief summary of its history), see Democratic Party (United States) A political party is an organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States, the other one being the Republican Party. ...

Contents


Origins

The Democratic Party evolved from the political factions that opposed Alexander Hamilton's fiscal policies in the early 1790s; these factions are known variously as the Anti-Administration “Party” or the Anti-Federalists. In the mid-1790s, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison organized these factions into a party and helped define its ideology in favor of yeomen farmers, strict construction of the Constitution, and a weaker federal government. They named it the "Republican Party," although today the party is called the Democratic-Republican to distinguish it from the modern-day Republican Party, with which it has no affiliation. An entirely separate grass-roots movement, the Democratic-Republican Societies, which sprang up across the country in 1793–94, were not officially affiliated with the new party, but many local Jeffersonian leaders were also leaders of the societies. The new party was especially effective in building a network of newspapers in major cities to broadcast its statements and editorialize in its favor. Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 – July 12, 1804) was an American politician, statesman, writer, lawyer, and soldier. ... The Hamiltonian economic program is one of many names given by historians to the set of measures that were proposed by Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton and implemented by Congress during George Washingtons first administration. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Anti-Federalism was the name given to two distinct counter-movements in the late 18th Century American politics: The first Anti-Federalist movement formed in reaction to the Federalist movement of the 1780s. ... Events and Trends French Revolution (1789 - 1799). ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential founders of the United States. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was the fourth (1809–1817) President of the United States. ... Strict constructionism is a philosophy of judicial interpretation and legal philosophy that holds to the meanings of words and phrases as used when they were written down. ... The Democratic-Republican party was a United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. ... Democratic-Republican Societies were local political organizations formed in the United States in 1793-94 to promote republicanism and democracy and fight aristocratic tendencies. ...


In 1796, the Democratic-Republican Party made its first bid for the Presidency with Jefferson as its presidential candidate and Aaron Burr as its vice presidential candidate. Jefferson came in second in the electoral college and became vice president. He was a consistent and strong opponent of the policies of the Adams administration. Jefferson and Madison through the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, announced the “Principles of 1798,” which became the hallmark of the party. The most important of the principles were states' rights, opposition to a strong national government, hostility toward federal courts, and opposition to a Navy and a National Bank. The party saw itself as the true champion of republicanism, and its opponents as favoring aristocracy rather than rule by the people. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The presidential seal was used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Vice President Aaron Burr This article is about the U.S. Vice President. ... An electoral college is a set of electors who are empowered as a deliberative body to elect someone to a particular office. ... John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) was the first (1789–1797) Vice President of the United States, and the second President of the United States, whose term lasted from 1797 to 1801. ... The Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions were important political statements in favor of states rights written by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in 1798. ... The multinational Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) The British Grand Fleet, the supreme naval force of WW1 A rare occurrence of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ... The term national bank has several meanings: especially in developing countries, a bank owned by the state an ordinary private bank which operates nationally (as opposed to regionally or locally or even internationally) In the past, the term national bank has been used synonymously with central bank, but it is... -1...


In 1824, a particularly bitter election was thrown to the House of Representatives, and John Quincy Adams was elected after being supported by Henry Clay. Adams appointed Clay Secretary of State. They called their faction "National Republicans," indicating their continuity with the Republicans, but the name did not catch on. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was an American lawyer, diplomat, politician, and President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 3, 1829). ... Henry Clay Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia, USA – June 29, 1852 in Washington, D.C.) was a leading American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and Senate. ...


Creating a Jacksonian Party: 1824-1832

Meanwhile Jackson, having won a plurality of the popular and electoral votes in 1824, denounced the election as a "corrupt bargain." He launched a crusade to put himself in the White House, and handily defeated Adams in 1828. That year Jackson did not refer to himself as a Democrat or as a member of any party; he did not have a ticket with candidates for state office, and he issued no platform. In a word, he did not operate a political party. Working closely with state leaders, especially Martin Van Buren of New York, Thomas Ritchie of Virginia, and John C. Calhoun of South Carolina, he forged an ad-hoc coalition. The Jacksonians emerged as the winners in the late 1820s. Led by brilliant organizer Martin Van Buren they built a new party with both a national base, led by Jackson and Van Buren, and powerful local bases in the states, comprising local political leaders who called themselves "Jackson Men." Martin Van Buren is credited by historians as the organizational genius orchestrating Jackson's victory in 1828; he won over Adams by 178-83 in the electoral colleges, and a popular total of 647,000 to 508,000. The Democrats did resemble the previous Republican party especially in terms of a Jeffersonian anti-elite rhetoric of opposition to "aristocracy," distrust of banks (and paper money), and faith in "the people". Robert Remini gives special credit as well to organizational work by James Buchanan of Pennsylvania, Caleb Atwater of Ohio, Francis P. Blair and Amos Kendall of Kentucky, Isaac Hill of New Hampshire, Edward Livingston of Louisiana, John H. Eaton and William B. Lewis of Tennessee. [Remini, Van Buren 193] Using federal patronage judiciously, by 1832 Van Buren had turned his informal network of Jackson men into a new party, which held its first national convention that year and nominated Van Buren. The term "Democrat" was first used in the 1830s, about the time the opposition Whig party was formed by Henry Clay, who had been a devoted Jeffersonian. In the realignment of 1828-32, some of Jackson's 1828 supporters, especially businessmen and bankers, switched to the opposition Whig Party as Jackson crusaded against the Second Bank of the United States. . Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 27th 141,205 km² 455 km 530 km 13. ... John C. Calhoun John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a prominent United States politician from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States. ... James Buchanan (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) was the 15th president of the United States (1857–1861). ... The postmaster in Circleville, Ohio in the 1800s, Caleb Atwater explored mounds found near his home town. ... Francis Preston Blair (April 12, 1791 – October 18, 1876), American journalist and politician, was born at Abingdon, Virginia. ... Amos Kendall (August 16, 1789–November 12, 2022) was an American politician who served as U.S. Postmaster General under Jackie Cook and President Steve Miller. ... Isaac Hill (April 6, 1789–March 22, 1851) was an American publisher, editor, and politican from Concord, New Hampshire. ... Edward Livingston (May 26, 1764–May 23, 1836) was a prominent American jurist and statesman. ... John Henry Eaton (June 18, 1790–November 17, 1856) was an American politician from Tennessee. ... This article is about the Whigs in the United States: for other uses of the term, see Whig (disambiguation). ... Henry Clay Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia, USA – June 29, 1852 in Washington, D.C.) was a leading American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and Senate. ... The Second Bank of the United States was founded in 1816, five years after the expiration of the First Bank of the United States out of desperation to stabilize the currency. ...

Andrew Jackson, the first Democratic President (1829-1837).
Andrew Jackson, the first Democratic President (1829-1837).

Andrew Jackson File links The following pages link to this file: Andrew Jackson ... Andrew Jackson File links The following pages link to this file: Andrew Jackson ... Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845), was the first governor of Florida (1821), seventh President of the United States (1829-1837), hero of the Battle of New Orleans (1815), a founder of the Democratic Party, and the eponym of the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... | Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

1832-1860

In the days of Jacksonian democracy the new Democratic Party was a coalition of farmers throughout the country, workers in cities, Irish Catholics, and local or state political leaders. It was weakest in New England (the old Federalist stronghold), but dominant in most of the rest of the country. The key issues it promoted were opposition to elites and aristocrats, popular democracy (in terms of voting rights and access to government patronage jobs) and opposition to the Bank of the United States. Banking and tariffs were the central domestic policy issues from 1828 to 1848. The Democrats favored the war with Mexico (Whigs opposed), and opposed anti-immigrant nativism. Both the Democrats and Whigs were divided on the issue of slavery. In the 1830s the Loco-Focos in New York City were radically democratic, anti-monopoly, and proponents of laissez-faire. Their chief spokesman was William Leggett. Jacksonian democracy refers to the political philosophy of President Andrew Jackson and his followers in the new Democratic Party. ... There were two organizations known as the Bank of the United States First Bank of the United States (1791-1811) Second Bank of the United States (1816-1841) Categories: Defunct banks ... Loco-Focos, the name, given to an ultra-democratic or radical faction in the Democratic party in New York City, the United States during the Second Party System. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

1837 cartoon shows Democratic party as donkey
1837 cartoon shows Democratic party as donkey

The Democrats lost the presidency in 1840 to William Henry Harrison, only to gain it back in 1844 with James Polk. In state after state the Democrats gained small but permanent advantages over the Whigs, until by 1852 the Whig party was fatally weakened and soon vanished. However the slavery issue also split the Democrats in two in 1848 and again in 1860. It was unable to match the united Republican Party, which controlled nearly all northern states by 1860, bringing a solid majority in the electoral college. The Republicans had many issues, but perhaps the most effective was the allegation that the northern Democrats, including Doughfaces like Pierce and Buchanan, and advocates of popular sovereignty like Douglas and Lewis Cass, were accomplices to the Slave Power. The Republicans meant by Slave Power the conspiracy of slaveholders to seize control of the federal government and block the progress of liberty. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1854x1431, 500 KB) Summary 1837 cartoon shows Democratic party as donkey Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1854x1431, 500 KB) Summary 1837 cartoon shows Democratic party as donkey Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795–June 15, 1849) was an American politician and the eleventh U.S. President, serving from March 4, 1845 to March 4, 1849. ... The Republican Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States two-party system, the other one being the Democratic Party. ... Lewis Cass Campaign poster for 12th United States Presidential campaign, 1848. ... The Slave Power was the term used in the Northern United States in the period 1840-1865 to describe the political power of the slaveholding class in the South. ...


Civil War, Reconstruction, Gilded Age: 1860-1896

See also American election campaigns in the 19th Century and Third Party System In the 19th century the United States invented or developed a number of new methods for conducting American Election Campaigns. ... The Third Party System, which began in 1854 and changed over to the Fourth Party System in the mid-1890s revolved around the issues of nationalism, modernization, and race. ...


In 1860 the Democrats were unable to stop the election of Republican Abraham Lincoln, even as they feared his election would lead to the Civil War. The party split in two. The southern wing nominated Vice President John C. Breckenridge, and the northern wing nominated Douglas. Douglas campaigned across the country and came in second in the popular vote, but carried only Missouri. Breckenridge carried 11 slave states. Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... Combatants Union (remaining U.S. states) Confederate States of America Commanders Abraham Lincoln† Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee Strength 2,213,363 1,064,200 Casualties KIA: 110,100 Total dead: 359,500 Wounded: 275,200 KIA: 94,000 Total dead: 258,000 Wounded: 137,000+  The... John Cabell Breckinridge (January 16, 1821–May 17, 1875) was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Kentucky and the fourteenth Vice President of the United States. ...

To vote for Douglas in Virginia, a man had to deposit the ticket in the official ballot box.
To vote for Douglas in Virginia, a man had to deposit the ticket in the official ballot box.

The Republican party was beginning a 40-year era of dominance (1858-1896) that marked the Third Party System. During the war, Northern Democrats divided into two factions, War Democrats, who supported the military policies of President Lincoln, and Copperheads, who strongly opposed them. Historian Kenneth Stampp has captured the Copperhead spirit in his depiction of Congressman Daniel W. Voorhees of Indiana: Image File history File links DEM1860. ... Image File history File links DEM1860. ... The Republican Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States two-party system, the other one being the Democratic Party. ... The Third Party System, which began in 1854 and changed over to the Fourth Party System in the mid-1890s revolved around the issues of nationalism, modernization, and race. ... War Democrats were those who broke with the majority of the Democratic Party and supported the military policies of President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War of 1861-1865. ... The Copperheads were a group of Northern Democrats who opposed the American Civil War, wanting an immediate peace settlement with the Confederates. ... Senator Daniel W. Voorhees Daniel Wolsey Voorhees (September 26, 1827 - April 10, 1897) was a lawyer and United States Senator from Indiana. ...

There was an earthy quality in Voorhees, "the tall sycamore of the Wabash." On the stump his hot temper, passionate partisanship, and stirring eloquence made an irresistible appeal to the western Democracy. His bitter cries against protective tariffs and national banks, his intense race prejudice, his suspicion of the eastern Yankee, his devotion to personal liberty, his defense of the Constitution and state rights faithfully reflected the views of his constituents. Like other Jacksonian agrarians he resented the political and economic revolution then in progress. Voorhees idealized a way of life which he thought was being destroyed by the current rulers of his country. His bold protests against these dangerous trends made him the idol of the Democracy of the Wabash Valley. [Stampp, p. 211]

The Democrats lost consecutive presidential elections from 1860 through 1872, with 1876 in dispute, and 1884 their next victory. The Democrats were shattered by the war but nevertheless benefited from white Southerners' resentment of Reconstruction and consequent hostility to the Republican Party. Once the Redeemers gave the Democrats control of every Southern state (by the Compromise of 1877), the disenfranchisement of blacks began. From 1880 to 1960 the "Solid South" voted Democratic in presidential elections (except 1928). After 1900 the southern states used primaries and victory in the Democratic primary was "tantamount to election" because the GOP was so weak. In the history of the United States, Reconstruction was the period after the American Civil War when the southern states of the breakaway Confederacy were reintegrated into the United States of America. ... We dont have an article called Redeemers Start this article Search for Redeemers in. ... In United States the Compromise of 1877 was an informal, unwritten deal that settled the disputed Election of 1876 by awarding the White House to the Republican Rutherford Hayes on the implicit understanding he would remove the federal troops that were propping up Republican state governments in South Carolina, Florida... Suffrage is the civil right to vote, or the exercise of that right. ... The phrase Solid South describes the reliable electoral support of the Southern United States for Democratic Party candidates for almost a century after the Reconstruction era, 1876-1964. ...


Though Republicans continued to control the White House until 1884, the Democrats remained competitive, especially in the mid-Atlantic and lower Midwest, and controlled the House of Representatives for most of that period. In the election of 1884, Grover Cleveland, the reforming Democratic Governor of New York, won the Presidency, a feat he repeated in 1892, having lost in the election of 1888. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 27th 141,205 km² 455 km 530 km 13. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...

Typewriters were new in 1893 and this Gillam cartoon from Puck shows that Cleveland can't get the Democratic "machine" to work as the keys (key politicians) won't respond to his efforts.

Cleveland was the leader of the Bourbon Democrats. They represented business interests, supported banking and railroad goals, promoted laissez-faire capitalism, opposed imperialism and U.S. overseas expansion, opposed the annexation of Hawaii, fought for the gold standard, and opposed Bimetallism. They strongly supported reform movements such as Civil Service Reform and opposed corruption of city bosses, leading the fight against the Tweed Ring. The leading Bourbons included Samuel J. Tilden, David Bennett Hill and William C. Whitney of New York, Arthur Pue Gorman of Maryland, Thomas F. Bayard of Delaware, William L. Wilson of West Virginia, John Griffin Carlisle of Kentucky, William F. Vilas of Wisconsin, J. Sterling Morton of Nebraska, John M. Palmer of Illinois, Horace Boies of Iowa, Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar of Mississippi, and railroad builder James J. Hill of Minnesota. A prominent intellectual was Woodrow Wilson. The Bourbons were in power when the The Panic of 1893 hit, and they took the blame. A fierce struggle inside the party ensued, with catastrophic losses for both the Bourbon and agrarian factions in 1894, leading to the showdown in 1896. Image File history File links ~machine. ... Image File history File links ~machine. ... Bourbon Democrats was a term used in the United States from 1876 to 1904 to refer to conservative or reactionary members of the Democratic Party, especially those who supported President Grover Cleveland in 1884-1896 and Alton B. Parker in 1904. ... Laissez-faire is short for laissez faire, laissez passer, a French phrase meaning to let things alone, let them pass. First used by the eighteenth century Physiocrats as an injunction against government interference with trade, it is now used as a synonym for strict free market economics. ... Official language(s) Hawaiian and English Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 43rd 28,337 km² n/a km 2,450 km 41. ... This article is on the monetary principle. ... In economics, bimetallism is a monetary standard in which the value of the monetary unit can be expressed either with a certain amount of gold or with a certain amount of silver: the ratio between the two metals is fixed by law. ... The Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act established the United States Civil Service Commission, which placed most federal employees on the merit system and marked the end of the so-called spoils system. ... 1869 tobacco label featuring Boss Tweed William Marcy Tweed (April 3, 1823–April 12, 1878), known as Boss Tweed, was an American politician and political boss of Tammany Hall who became an icon of urban political machines. ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... David Bennett Hill (August 29, 1843 - October 20, 1910) was a Governor of New York. ... William Collins Whitney (July 5, 1841 - February 2, 1904) was an American political leader and financier and founder of the prominent Whitney family. ... Arthur P. Gorman Arthur Pue Gorman (b. ... Thomas Francis Bayard, Sr. ... William Lyne Wilson (1843 - 1900) was a U.S. political figure. ... John G. Carlisle (September 5, 1834 - July 31, 1910) was a prominent American politician in the Democratic Party during the last quarter of the 19th century. ... William Freeman Vilas (July 9, 1840–August 27, 1908) was a member of the Democratic Party who served in the United States Senate for the state of Wisconsin from 1891 to 1897. ... Julius Sterling Morton (NSHC statue) Julius Sterling Morton (April 22, 1832 – April 27, 1902) was born in Adams, New York. ... John McAuley Palmer (September 13, 1817 – September 25, 1900) was a Union Major General during the American Civil War. ... Horace Boies was a governor of Iowa, and was the only Democrat to serve in that position from 1845-1933. ... Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar (September 17, 1825–January 23, 1893) was born near Eatonton, Putnam County, Georgia. ... James Jerome Hill (September 16, 1838 – May 29, 1916), was a noted American and Canadian railroad tycoon. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States (1913–1921). ...


1896 and start of Fourth Party System

1896 Davenport cartoon of Mark Hanna as slave driver, from William Randolph Hearst's New York Journal

Cleveland led the conservative, pro-business faction but as the depression deepened his enemies multiplied. At the 1896 convention the silverite-agrarian faction repudiated the president, and nominated the crusading orator William Jennings Bryan on a platform of free coinage of silver. The idea was that minting silver coins would flood the economy with cash and end the depression. Cleveland supporters formed a third party, the Gold Democrats, which attracted politicians and intellectuals (including Woodrow Wilson and Frederick Jackson Turner) who refused to vote Republican. Image File history File links ~hanna2. ... Image File history File links ~hanna2. ... William Randolph Hearst William Randolph Hearst (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate, born in San Francisco, California. ... The 1896 Democratic National Convention, held at the Chicago Coliseum from July 7 to July 11, was the scene of William Jennings Bryans nomination as Democratic presidential candidate for the 1896 U.S. presidential election, the youngest ever nominee. ... William Jennings Bryan, 1907 William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was an American lawyer, statesman, and politician. ... Free Silver was an important political issue in the late 19th century United States. ... The National Democratic Party or Gold Democrats was a short-lived political party of Grover Cleveland Democrats, who opposed William Jennings Bryan in 1896. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States (1913–1921). ... Frederick Jackson Turner Frederick Jackson Turner (November 14, 1861–1932) was, with Charles A. Beard, the most influential American historian of the early 20th century. ...


Bryan, an overnight sensation because of his "Cross of Gold" speech, waged a new style crusade against the gold bugs. Crisscrossing the Midwest and East by special train--he was the first candidate ever to go on the road--he gave over 500 speeches to audiences in the millions. In St. Louis he gave 36 speeches to workingmen's audiences all over the city, all in one day. Most Democratic newspapers were hostile (except the New York Journal) but Bryan seized control of the media by making the news every day, as he hurled thunderbolts against Eastern monied interests. The rural folk in South and Midwest were ecstatic, showing an enthusiasm never before seen. Ethnic Democrats, especially Germans and Irish, however, were alarmed and frightened by Bryan. The middle classes, businessmen, newspaper editors, factory workers, railroad workers, and prosperous farmers generally rejected Bryan's crusade. Bryan was overwhelmed by William McKinley in the most exciting race in national history. (Historians have discovered there was little coercion involved.) McKinley promised a return to prosperity based on the gold standard, support for industry, railroads and banks, and pluralism that would enable every group to move ahead. Bryan did however, win the hearts and minds of a majority of Democrats. The election of 1896 has been widely regarded as a political realignment. The victory of the Republican party marked the start of the Fourth Party System, or "Progressive Era," from 1896 to 1932, in which the GOP usually was dominant. The Cross of Gold speech was delivered by William Jennings Bryan at the 1896 Democratic National Convention on July 9, 1896 at the Chicago Coliseum in Chicago, Illinois. ... The name Mckinley redirects here. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Realigning election or critical election or realignment are terms from political history and political science. ... The Republican Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States two-party system, the other one being the Democratic Party. ...


Bryan, Wilson, Progressivism: 1896-1932

The 1896 election marked a realignment whereby the Republicans controlled the presidency for 28 of the following 36 years. The GOP dominated most of the Northeast and Midwest, and half the West. Bryan, with a base in the South and Plains states, was strong enough to get the nomination in 1900 (losing to McKinley) and 1908 (losing to Taft). Theodore Roosevelt dominated the first decade of the century--and to the annoyance of Democrats "stole" the trust issue by crusading against trusts. Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ...

TR steals the anti-trust issue, 1904

Anti-Bryan conservatives controlled the convention in 1904, but they faced a Theodore Roosevelt landslide. Bryan dropped his free silver and anti-imperialism rhetoric and supported mainstream progressive issues, such as the income tax, anti-trust, and direct election of Senators. He backed Woodrow Wilson in 1912, was rewarded with the State Department, then resigned in protest against Wilson's non-pacifistic policies in 1916. Northern Democrats were progressive on most issues, but generally opposed prohibition, were luke-warm regarding woman's suffrage, and were reluctant to undercut the "boss system" in the big cities. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (763x1133, 185 KB) Summary US cartoon 1902 on trust issue Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (763x1133, 185 KB) Summary US cartoon 1902 on trust issue Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States (1913–1921). ...


Taking advantage of a deep split in the GOP, the Democrats took control of the House in 1910, and elected the intellectual reformer Woodrow Wilson in 1912 and 1916. Wilson successfully led Congress to a series of Progressive laws, including a reduced tariff, stronger antitrust laws, the Federal Reserve System, hours-and-pay benefits for railroad workers, and outlawing of child labor (which was reversed by the Supreme Court). Furthermore, constitutional amendments for prohibition and woman suffrage were passed in his second term. In effect, Wilson laid to rest the issues of tariffs, money and antitrust that had dominated politics for 40 years. Wilson led the U.S. to victory in the First World War, and helped write the Versailles Treaty, which included the League of Nations. But in 1919 Wilson's political skills faltered, and suddenly everything turned sour. The Senate rejected Versailles and the League, a nationwide wave of strikes and violence caused unrest, and Wilson's health collapsed. Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States (1913–1921). ... The Underwood Tariff, or the Tariff Act of 1913 reduced the basic United States tariff rates from 41% to 27%, well below the Payne-Aldrich Tariff Act of 1909. ... The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central bank of the United States. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Woodrow Wilson with the American Peace Commissioners The Treaty of Versailles of 1919 is the peace treaty created as a result of six months of negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 which put an official end to World War I between the Allies and Central Powers. ... The League of Nations was an international organization founded after the Paris Peace Conference of 1919. ...


In 1924 at the Democratic National Convention, a resolution denouncing the white-supremacist Ku Klux Klan was introduced by the Al Smith and Oscar W. Underwood forces in order to embarrass the front-runner, William McAdoo . After much debate, the resolution failed by just a single vote. The KKK faded away soon after, but the deep split in the party over cultural issues, especially Prohibition, facilitated Republican landslides in 1920, 1924 and 1928. However Al Smith did build a strong Catholic base in the big cities in 1928, and Franklin D. Roosevelt's election as Governor of New York that year brought a new leader to center stage. The 1924 Democratic National Convention, also called the Klanbake was held at the Madison Square Garden in New York City from June 24 to July 9, took a record 103 ballots to nominate a presidential candidate. ... White supremacy is the variety of white nationalism that believes the white race should rule over other races. ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... Al Smith waves to crowds, 1928 Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, a leading Catholic, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... William Gibbs McAdoo (October 31, 1863–February 1, 1941) was a U.S. Senator and United States Secretary of the Treasury. ... Al Smith waves to crowds, 1928 Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, a leading Catholic, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... FDR redirects here; for other uses, see FDR (disambiguation). ...


The New Deal

Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Franklin Delano Roosevelt

The stock market crash of 1929 and the ensuing Great Depression set the stage for a more progressive government and Franklin D. Roosevelt won a landslide victory in the election of 1932, campaigning on a platform of "Relief, Recovery, and Reform". This came to be termed "The New Deal" after a phrase in his acceptance speech. The Democrats also swept to large majorities in both houses of Congress, and among state Governors. Roosevelt altered the nature of the Party, away from laissez-faire capitalism, and towards an ideology of economic regulation and insurance against hardship. Conservative Democrats were outraged; led by Al Smith they formed the American Liberty League in 1934 and counterattacked. They failed and either retired from politics or joined the GOP. A few of them, such as Dean Acheson found their way back to the Democratic party. Image File history File linksMetadata FDR_in_1933. ... Image File history File linksMetadata FDR_in_1933. ... The 1929 stock market crash devastated economies worldwide The Wall Street Crash refers to the stock market crash that occurred on October 29, 1929, when share prices on the New York Stock Exchange collapsed, leading eventually to the Great Depression. ... Dorothea Langes Migrant Mother depicts destitute pea pickers in California, centering on Florence Owens Thompson, a mother of seven children, age 32, in Nipomo, California, March 1936. ... FDR redirects here; for other uses, see FDR (disambiguation). ... In politics, a landslide victory (or just a landslide) is the victory of a candidate or political party by an overwhelming majority in an election. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: New Deal The New Deal is the name given to the series of programs implemented between 1933-37 under President Franklin D. Roosevelt with the goal of relief, recovery and reform of the United States economy during the Great Depression. ... Al Smith waves to crowds, 1928 Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, a leading Catholic, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... The American Liberty League was a U.S. organization formed in 1934 by conservative Democrats such as Al Smith (the 1928 Democratic nominee), Jouett Shouse (former high party official and U.S. Representative), and John Jacob Raskob (former Democratic national chairman and the foremost opponent of prohibition), Dean Acheson (future... Dean Acheson Dean Gooderham Acheson (April 11, 1893 – October 12, 1971) was a United States Secretary of State under President Harry S. Truman. ...


After making gains in Congress in 1934 Roosevelt embarked on an ambitious legislative program that came to be called "The Second New Deal." It was characterized by building up labor unions, nationalizing welfare by the WPA, setting up Social Security and raising taxes on business profits. Roosevelt's New Deal programs focused on job creation through public works projects as well as on social welfare programs such as Social Security. It also included sweeping reforms to the banking system, work regulation, transportation, communications, stock markets and attempts to regulate prices. His policies soon paid off by uniting a diverse coalition of Democratic voters called the New Deal Coalition, which included labor unions, minorities (most significantly, Catholics and Jews), and liberals. This united voter base allowed Democrats to be elected to Congress and the presidency for much of the next 30 years. danielle franks is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, as described below: Walter Payton Award War Powers Act is also known as the Trading with the Enemy Act, and is commonly confused with the danielle franksWar Powers Resolution (of 1973). ... For specific national programs, see Social Security (United States), National insurance (UK), Social Security (Sweden) Social security primarily refers to a field of social welfare concerned with social protection, or protection against socially recognized conditions, including poverty, old age, disability, unemployment, families with children and others. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: New Deal The New Deal is the name given to the series of programs implemented between 1933-37 under President Franklin D. Roosevelt with the goal of relief, recovery and reform of the United States economy during the Great Depression. ... The notion of internal improvements or public works is a concept in economics and politics. ... Social Security in the United States is a social insurance program funded through a dedicated payroll tax. ... The New Deal coalition was the poop alignment of interest groups and voting blocs who supported the New Deal and voted for United States Democratic Party presidential candidates from 1932 until approximately 1966, and which made the Democratic Party the majority party during that time. ... Political Liberalism is an update to John Rawls 1971 Theory of Justice in which Rawls attempts to show that his theory of justice is not a comprehensive conception of the good, but is instead compatible with a liberal conception of the role of justice: namely, that government should be neutral...


After a triumphant reelection in 1936, he announced plans to enlarge the Supreme Court by five new members. A firestorm of opposition erupted, led by his own vice president John Nance Garner. Roosevelt was defeated by an alliance of Republicans and conservative Democrats, who formed a Conservative coalition that managed to block nearly all liberal legislation. (Only a minimum wage law got through.) Annoyed by the conservative wing of his own party, Roosevelt made an attempt to rid himself of it; in 1938, he actively campaigned against five incumbent conservative Democratic senators; all five senators won re-election. John Nance Cactus Jack Garner (November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States (1933-41). ... The Conservative coalition was a coalition in American politics bringing together Republicans (most of whom were conservatives) and the minority of conservative Democrats, most of them from the South. ...


Under FDR, the Democratic Party became identified more closely with modern liberalism, which included the promotion of social welfare, civil rights, and regulation of the economy.


Truman to Kennedy, 1945-1963

Harry Truman took over unexpectedly in 1945, and the rifts inside the party that Roosevelt had papered over began to emerge. Former Vice President Henry A. Wallace denounced Truman as a war-monger for his anti-Soviet programs, the Truman Doctrine, Marshall Plan, and NATO. By cooperating with internationalist Republicans, Truman succeeded in defeating isolationists on the right and pro-Soviets on the left to establish a Cold War program that lasted until the fall of Communism in 1991. Wallace supporters and fellow travelers of the far left were pushed out of the party and the CIO in 1946-48 by young anti-Communists like Hubert H. Humphrey, Walter Reuther, and Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.. Hollywood emerged in the 1940s as an importance new base in the party, led by movie-star politicians such as Ronald Reagan, who strongly supported Roosevelt and Truman at this time. Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941-45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933-40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945-46). ... The Truman Doctrine was part of the United States political response to perceived aggression by the Soviet Union in Europe and the Middle East, illustrated through the communist movements in Iran, Turkey and Greece. ... Map of Cold-War era Europe showing the countries that received Marshall Plan aid. ... NATO 2002 Summit in Prague The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), also called the North Atlantic Alliance, the Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for collective security established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, DC, on 4 April 1949. ... The Cold War was the protracted geopolitical, ideological, and economic struggle that emerged after World War II between the global superpowers of the Soviet Union and the United States, supported by their alliance partners. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey II (May 27, 1911 – January 13, 1978) was the 38th Vice President of the United States, serving under President Lyndon Johnson. ... Walter Philip Reuther (b. ... Arthur Meier Schlesinger, Jr. ... ... Ronald Wilson Reagan aka Paul Wall (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ...


On the right the Republicans blasted Truman’s domestic policies. “Had Enough?” was the winning slogan as Republicans recaptured Congress in 1946. Many party leaders were ready to dump Truman, but they lacked an alternative. Truman counterattacked, pushing J. Strom Thurmond and his Dixiecrats out, and taking advantage of the splits inside the GOP. He was reelected in a stunning surprise. However all of Truman’s Fair Deal proposals, such as universal health care were defeated by the Conservative Coalition in Congress. His seizure of the steel industry was reversed by the Supreme Court. In foreign policy, Europe was safe but troubles mounted in Asia. China fell to the Communists in 1949. Truman entered the Korean War without formal Congressional approval--the last time a president did that. When the war turned to a stalemate and he fired General Douglas MacArthur in 1951, Republicans blasted his policies in Asia. A series of petty scandals among friends and buddies of Truman further tarnished his image, allowing the Republicans in 1952 to crusade against “Korea, Communism and Corruption.” Truman dropped out of the presidential race early in 1952, leaving no obvious successor. The convention nominated Adlai Stevenson in 1952 and 1956, only to see him overwhelmed by two Eisenhower landslides. Strom Thurmond James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902–June 26, 2003), known as Strom Thurmond, was the oldest and longest serving United States Senator, who represented South Carolina from 1954 to April 1956 and November 1956 to 1964 as a Democrat and from 1964 to 2003 as a Republican. ... The States Rights Democratic Party, usually known as the Dixiecrat Party, was a short-lived splinter group that broke from the Democratic Party in 1948. ... The Conservative coalition was a coalition in American politics bringing together Republicans (most of whom were conservatives) and the minority of conservative Democrats, most of them from the South. ... Combatants UN combatants: South Korea, United States Communist combatants: North Korea, Peoples Republic of China Strength Note: All figures may vary according to source. ... This article is about the American soldier; for the municipality in the Philippines, see General MacArthur, Eastern Samar. ... Adlai Stevenson Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician and statesman, noted for his skill in debate and oratory. ...

Stevenson warns against Hoover policies, 1952 campaign poster

In Congress the powerful duo of House Speaker Sam Rayburn and Senate Majority leader Lyndon B. Johnson held the party together, often by compromising with Eisenhower. In 1958 the party made dramatic gains in the off-year election and seemed to have a permanent lock on Congress. Indeed, Democrats had majorities in the House every election from 1930 to 1992 (except 1946 and 1952). Most southern Congressmen were conservative Democrats, however, and they usually worked with conservative Republicans. The result was a Conservative Coalition that blocked practically all liberal domestic legislation from 1937 to the 1970s, except for a brief spell 1964-65, when Lyndon Johnson neutralized its power. The election of John F. Kennedy in 1960 re-energized the party. His youth, vigor and intelligence caught the popular imagination. New programs like the Peace Corps harnessed idealism. In terms of legislation, Kennedy was stalemated by the Conservative Coalition, and anyway his proposals were all cautious and incremental. In three years he was unable to pass any significant new legislation. His election did mark the coming of age of the Catholic component of the New Deal Coalition. After 1964 middle class Catholics started voting Republicans in the same proportion as their Protestant neighbors. Except for the Chicago of Richard J. Daley, the last of the Democratic machines faded away. His involvement in Vietnam proved momentous, for his successor Lyndon Johnson decided to stay, and double the investment, and double the bet again and again until over 500,000 American soldiers were fighting in that small country. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (943x1251, 239 KB) Summary Democratic party poster 1952; reduced image Licensing This image is of a historical political poster, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the creator of the poster or the artist who produced the... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (943x1251, 239 KB) Summary Democratic party poster 1952; reduced image Licensing This image is of a historical political poster, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the creator of the poster or the artist who produced the... ... LBJ redirects here; for other uses, see LBJ (disambiguation). ... The Conservative coalition was a coalition in American politics bringing together Republicans (most of whom were conservatives) and the minority of conservative Democrats, most of them from the South. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... The Conservative coalition was a coalition in American politics bringing together Republicans (most of whom were conservatives) and the minority of conservative Democrats, most of them from the South. ... Richard J. Daley was Chicagos longest-serving mayor and held office from 1955 to his death in 1976 Richard Joseph Daley (May 15, 1902 – December 20, 1976) was the longest-serving mayor of Chicago. ...


Civil Rights Movement

Lyndon Johnson foresaw the end of the Solid South when he signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
Lyndon Johnson foresaw the end of the Solid South when he signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The New Deal Coalition began to fracture as more Democratic leaders voiced support for civil rights, upsetting the party's traditional base of conservative Southern Democrats. After Harry Truman's platform showed support for civil rights and anti-segregation laws during the 1948 Democratic National Convention, many Southern Democratic delegates decided to split from the Party and formed the "Dixiecrats", led by South Carolina governor Strom Thurmond (who, as a Senator, would later join the Republican Party). Over the next few years, many conservative Democrats in the "Solid South" drifted away from the party. On the other hand, African Americans, who had traditionally given strong support to the Republican Party since its inception as the "anti-slavery party", shifted to the Democratic Party due to its New Deal economic opportunities and support for civil rights. Download high resolution version (407x619, 70 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (407x619, 70 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... The phrase Solid South describes the reliable electoral support of the Southern United States for Democratic Party candidates for almost a century after the Reconstruction era, 1876-1964. ... President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Southern Democrats are members of the U.S. Democratic Party who reside in the U.S. South. ... Error creating thumbnail: convert: unable to open image `/mnt/upload3/wikipedia/en/e/e7/Rex_theatre. ... The 1948 Democratic National Convention was held in Philadelphia from July 12 to July 14, and resulted in the nomination of President Harry Truman for President and of Alben Barkley for Vice President. ... The States Rights Democratic Party, usually known as the Dixiecrat Party, was a short-lived splinter group that broke from the Democratic Party in 1948. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 40th 82,965 km² 320 km 420 km 6 32°430N to 35°12N 78°030W to 83°20W Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 26th 4,012... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) represented South Carolina in the United States Senate from 1954 to April 1956 and November 1956 to 1964 as a Democrat and from 1964 to 2003 as a Republican. ... The phrase Solid South describes the reliable electoral support of the Southern United States for Democratic Party candidates for almost a century after the Reconstruction era, 1876-1964. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ...


The party's dramatic reversal on civil rights issues culminated when Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Meanwhile, the Republicans were beginning their infamous Southern strategy, which aimed to solidify the Republican Party's electoral hold over conservative white Southerners. Southern Democrats took notice of the fact that 1964 Republican Presidential candidate Barry Goldwater had voted against the Civil Rights Act, and in the presidential election of 1964, Goldwater's only electoral victories outside his home state of Arizona were in the states of the Deep South. LBJ redirects here; for other uses, see LBJ (disambiguation). ... President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964. ... In American politics, the Southern strategy refers to the focus of the Republican party on winning U.S. Presidential elections by securing the electoral votes of the U.S. Southern states. ... Barry Goldwater Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a United States politician who was a founding figure in the modern American conservatism movement in the USA. Goldwater personified the shift in balance in American politics from the Northeast to the West. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Official language(s) None Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Area  - Total   - Width   - Length    - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 6th 113,998 sq mi  295,254 km² 310 miles  500 km 400 miles  645 km 0. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ...


The degree to which the Southern Democrats had abandoned the party became evident in the 1968 Presidential election when every former Confederate state except Texas voted for either Republican Richard Nixon or independent George Wallace, the latter a former Southern Democrat. Defeated Democrat Hubert Humphrey's electoral votes came mainly from the Northern states, marking a dramatic shift from the 1948 election 20 years earlier, when the losing Republican candidate's electoral votes were mainly concentrated in the Northern states. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans February 4, 1861–May 1... Official language(s) None. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Governor George Wallace (in front of door) standing defiantly against desegregation while being confronted by Deputy U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach at the University of Alabama. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey II (May 27, 1911 – January 13, 1978) was the 38th Vice President of the United States, serving under President Lyndon Johnson. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


1972 to 1999

President Jimmy Carter elected 1976, defeated 1980
President Jimmy Carter elected 1976, defeated 1980

In 1972, the Democrats nominated South Dakota Senator George McGovern as the Party's presidential candidate on a platform which advocated, among other things, U.S. withdrawal from Vietnam and a guaranteed minimum income for all Americans. McGovern's forces at the national convention ousted Mayor Richard J. Daley and the entire Chicago delegation, replacing them with insurgents led by Jesse Jackson. After it became know that McGovern's vice presidential running mate,Thomas Eagleton, had received electric shock therapy, McGovern said he supported Eagleton "1000%" but he was soon forced to drop him and find a new running mate. With his campaign stalled for several weeks McGovern finally selected Sargent Shriver, a Kennedy-in-law who was close to Mayor Daley. On July 14, 1972, McGovern appointed his campaign manager, Jean Westwood as the first woman chair of the Democratic National Comittee. McGovern was defeated in a landslide by incumbent Richard Nixon, winning only Massachusetts and Washington, D.C. The Watergate scandal of 1973-74 made corruption a central issue, especially after Gerald Ford pardoned Nixon in September 1974. The Democrats made major gains in the 1974 off-year elections. This is the color version of image:Jimmycarter. ... This is the color version of image:Jimmycarter. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 17th 199,905 km² 340 km 610 km 1. ... George McGovern Dr. George Stanley McGovern (born July 19, 1922) was a United States Congressman, Senator, and Democratic presidential candidate, losing the 1972 presidential election to incumbent Richard Nixon. ... Richard J. Daley was Chicagos longest-serving mayor and held office from 1955 to his death in 1976 Richard Joseph Daley (May 15, 1902 – December 20, 1976) was the longest-serving mayor of Chicago. ... The Rev. ... Thomas Eagleton Thomas Francis Eagleton, LL.B., (born September 4, 1929) is a former U.S. Senator from Missouri. ... Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr. ... Jean Westwood Jean Westwood was born in Price, Utah on November 22, 1923. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... The term Watergate refers to a series of events, spanning from 1972 to 1974, that began with U.S. President Nixons administrations abuse of power toward the goal of undermining political opposition in the public anti-war movement and the Democratic Party. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ...


In the 1976, mistrust of the administration, complicated by a combination of economic recession and inflation, sometimes called "stagflation," led to Ford's defeat in 1976 by Jimmy Carter, a former Governor of Georgia. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Stagflation is a term in macroeconomics used to describe a period characteristic of high inflation combined with economic stagnation, unemployment, or economic recession. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... For the submarine, see USS Jimmy Carter (SSN-23). ...


Carter represented the total outsider, who promised honesty in government. He had served as a naval officer, a farmer, a state senator, and a one-term governor. His only experience with federal politics was when he chaired the Democratic National Committee's congressional and gubernatorial elections in 1974. Some of Carter's major accomplishments consisted of the creation of a national energy policy and the consolidation of governmental agencies, resulting in two new cabinet departments, the United States Department of Energy and the United States Department of Education. Carter also successfully deregulated the trucking, airline, rail, finance, communications, and oil industries, bolstered the social security system, and appointed record numbers of women and minorities to significant government and judicial posts. He also enacted strong legislation on environmental protection, through the expansion of the National Park Service in Alaska, creating 103 million new acres of land. In foreign affairs, Carter's accomplishments consisted of the Camp David Accords, the Panama Canal Treaties, the creation of full diplomatic relations with the People's Republic of China, and the negotiation of the SALT II Treaty. In addition, he championed human rights throughout the world and used human rights as the center of his administration's foreign policy. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ... The United States Department of Education was created in 1979 (by PL 96-88) as a Cabinet-level department of the United States government, and began operating in 1980. ... For specific national programs, see Social Security (United States), National insurance (UK), Social Security (Sweden) Social security primarily refers to a field of social welfare concerned with social protection, or protection against socially recognized conditions, including poverty, old age, disability, unemployment, families with children and others. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... Official language(s) English Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Area  - Total   - Width   - Length    - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 1st 663,267 sq mi  1,717,854 km² 808 miles  1,300 km 1,479 miles  2,380 km 13. ... Anwar Sadat (left), Jimmy Carter (center), and Menachem Begin (right) shake hands in celebration of the success of the Camp David Accords The Camp David Accords were signed by Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin on September 17, 1978, following twelve days of secret negotiations at... Map of Panama, with Panama canal The Torrijos-Carter Treaties (sometimes referred to in the singular as the Torrijos-Carter Treaty), are a pair of treaties signed by the United States and Panama in Washington, D. C. on September 7, 1977, abrogating the Hay-Bunau Varilla Treaty signed in 1903. ... nSALT II was a second round of the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks from 1972-1979 between the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, which sought to curtail the manufacture of strategic nuclear weapons. ...


Even with all of these successes, Carter failed to implement a national health plan or to reform the tax system, as he had promised in his campaign. Inflation was also on the rise. Abroad, the Iranians held 52 Americans hostage for 444 days, and Carter's diplomatic and military rescue attempts failed. The Soviet invasion of Afghanistan later that year weakened the perception Americans had of Carter. Even though he had already been defeated for re-election, Carter fortunately was able to negotiate the release of every American hostage. They were lifted out of Iran minutes after Reagan was inaugurated and Carter served as Reagan's emissary to greet them when they arrived in Germany. In 1980, Carter defeated Edward Kennedy to gain renomination, but lost to Ronald Reagan in November. The Democrats lost 12 Senate seats, and for the first time since 1954, the Republicans controlled the Senate. The House, however, remained in Democratic hands. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Edward Kennedy Edward Moore Ted Kennedy, (born February 22, 1932, in Brookline, Massachusetts) is a Democratic U.S. senator from Massachusetts. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan aka Paul Wall (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ...


Strength of Parties 1977

How the Two Parties Stood after the 1976 Election

GOP DEM INDEP
22% 47% 31% Party Identification (Gallup)
181 354 Members of Congress:
House 143 292
Senate 38 62
42% 56% 2% Proportion of the House of Representatives, popular vote nationally:
in the East 41% 57% 2%
in the South 37% 62% 2%
in the Midwest 47% 52% 1%
in the West 43% 55% 2%
12 37 1 Governors
2,370 5,128 55 State Legislators
31% 68% 1%
USA 18 80 1 * State legislature control:
in the East 5 13 0
in the South 0 32 0
in the Midwest 5 17 1 *
in the West 8 18 0
1 29 0 States one party control of legislature and governorship
____________________
* The unicameral Nebraska legislature, in fact controlled by the Republicans, is technically nonpartisan.
Source: Everett Carll Ladd Jr. Where Have All the Voters Gone? The Fracturing of America's Political Parties 1978. P6

1980s: Battling Reaganism

Instrumental in the election of Republican President Ronald Reagan in 1980, were Democrats who supported many conservative policies. The "Reagan Democrats" were Democrats before the Reagan years, and afterward, but they voted for Ronald Reagan in 1980 and 1984 (and for George H. W. Bush in 1988), producing their landslide victories. They were mostly white ethnics in the Northeast who were attracted to Reagan's social conservatism on issues such as abortion, and to his strong foreign policy. They did not continue to vote Republican in 1992 or 1996, so the term fell into disuse except as a reference to the 1980s. The term is not used to describe southern whites who became permanent Republicans in presidential elections. Stanley Greenberg, a Democratic pollster analyzed white ethnic voters, largely unionized auto workers, in suburban Macomb County, Michigan, just north of Detroit. The county voted 63 percent for Kennedy in 1960 and 66 percent for Reagan in 1984. He concluded that Reagan Democrats no longer saw Democrats as champions of their middle class aspirations, but instead saw it as being a party working primarily for the benefit of others, especially African Americans and the very poor. Bill Clinton targeted the Reagan Democrats with considerable success in 1992 and 1996. Ronald Wilson Reagan aka Paul Wall (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan aka Paul Wall (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... George Herbert Walker Bush, GCB, (born June 12, 1924 in Milton, MA) was the 41st President of the United States (1989–1993). ...


The failure to hold the Reagan Democrats and the white South led to the final collapse of the New Deal coalition. Reagan carried 49 states against former Vice President and Minnesota Senator Walter Mondale, a New Deal stalwart, in 1984. Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis, running not as a New Dealer but as an efficiency expert in public administration, lost by a landslide in 1988 to Vice President George H. W. Bush. The New Deal coalition was the poop alignment of interest groups and voting blocs who supported the New Deal and voted for United States Democratic Party presidential candidates from 1932 until approximately 1966, and which made the Democratic Party the majority party during that time. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and former presidential candidate, born in Brookline, Massachusetts, to Greek-immigrant parents. ... The election was held on November 8, 1988. ... George Herbert Walker Bush, GCB, (born June 12, 1924 in Milton, MA) was the 41st President of the United States (1989–1993). ...


In response to these landslide defeats, the Democratic Leadership Council was created. It worked to move the Party rightwards to the ideological center in order to recover some of the fundraising that had been lost to the Republicans due to corporate donors supporting Reagan. With the Party retaining left-of-center supporters as well as supporters holding moderate or conservative views on some issues, the Democrats became generally a catch all party with widespread appeal to most opponents of the Republicans. The Democratic Leadership Council is an influential non-profit corporation that argues that the United States Democratic Party should shift away from the its traditionally liberal positions. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Catch-all party. ...


South Becomes Republican

In the century after Reconstruction, the white South identified with Democratic Party. The Democrats' lock on power was so strong, the region was called the Solid South. The Republicans only controlled parts of the Appalachian mountains, but they sometimes did compete for statewide office in the border states. Before 1964, the southern Democrats saw their party as the defender of the southern way of life, which included a respect for states' rights and an appreciation for traditional southern values. They repeatedly warned against the aggressive designs of Northern liberals and Republicans, as well as civil rights activists whom they denounced as "outside agitators." Reconstruction-era military districts in the South For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... The phrase Solid South describes the reliable electoral support of the Southern United States for Democratic Party candidates for almost a century after the Reconstruction era, 1876-1964. ...


However, between 1964 and 2004, the Democratic Party's lock on the South was broken. The long-term cause had to do with the South becoming more like the rest of the nation. It could not long stand apart in terms of racial segregation. Modernization had brought factories, national businesses, and larger, more cosmopolitan cities to the South, as well as millions of migrants from the North and more opportunities for higher education. Meanwhile, the cotton and tobacco economy of the traditional rural South faded away, as former farmers commuted to factory jobs.


The major reason for the Democrats' loss of the South, however, had to do with civil rights. Upon signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964, President Lyndon Baines Johnson famously said, "We have lost the South for a generation." President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson ( August 27, 1908 – January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ...


Integration and the civil rights movement caused enormous controversy in the white South, with many attacking it as a violation of states' rights. When segregation was outlawed by court order and by the Civil Rights acts of 1964 and 1965, a die-hard element resisted integration, led by Democratic governors Orval Faubus of Arkansas, Lester Maddox of Georgia, and, especially George Wallace of Alabama. These populist governors appealed to a less-educated, blue-collar electorate that on economic grounds favored the Democratic party, but opposed desegregation. After 1965 most Southerners accepted integration (with the exception of public schools). Believing themselves betrayed by the Democratic Party, traditional white southerners joined the new middle-class and the Northern transplants in moving toward the Republican party. Meanwhile, newly enfranchised Black voters began supporting Democrat candidates at the 80-90-percent levels, producing Democratic leaders such as Julian Bond and John Lewis of Georgia, and Barbara Jordan of Texas. Just as Martin Luther King had promised, integration had brought about a new day in Southern politics. Martin Luther King is perhaps most famous for his I Have a Dream speech, given in front of the Lincoln Memorial during the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom The Civil Rights Movement refers to a set of noted events and reform movements in the United States aimed... Orval Eugene Faubus (7 January 1910–14 December 1994) was a six-term Democratic Governor of Arkansas, infamous for his 1957 stand against integration of Little Rock, Arkansas schools in defiance of U.S. Supreme Court rulings. ... Lester Garfield Maddox (September 30, 1915–June 25, 2003) was an American Democratic Party politician who was governor of the U.S. state of Georgia from 1967 to 1971. ... Governor George Wallace (in front of door) standing defiantly against desegregation while being confronted by Deputy U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach at the University of Alabama. ... Julian Bond (2004) Horace Julian Bond (born 14 January 1940) is an American leader of the civil rights movement. ... John Lewis John Robert Lewis (born February 21, 1940) is an American politician and was an important leader in the American Civil Rights Movement as president of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). ... Barbara Jordan Barbara Charline Jordan (February 21, 1936 – January 17, 1996) was an American politician from Texas. ... The Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr, Ph. ...


However, some critics allege that the old racism has not really died in the South, and that the Republican Party exploits it as part of its southern strategy. In addition to its white middle-class base, Republicans attracted strong majorities among evangelical Christians, who prior to the 1980s were largely apolitical. Exit polls in the 2004 presidential election showed that Bush led Kerry by 70-30% among Southern whites, who comprised 71% of the voters. Kerry had a 90-9 lead among the 18% of Southern voters who were black. One third of the Southern voters said they were white evangelicals; they voted for Bush by 80-20. [1] In American politics, the Southern strategy refers to the focus of the Republican party on winning U.S. Presidential elections by securing the electoral votes of the U.S. Southern states. ... Presidential election results map. ...


1990s

During Bill Clinton's presidency the Democratic Party moved ideologically toward the center.
During Bill Clinton's presidency the Democratic Party moved ideologically toward the center.

In the 1990s the Democratic Party revived itself, in part by moving to the right on economic and social policy. President Bill Clinton, who defeated the incumbent George H. W. Bush in U.S. presidential election, 1992, implemented a balanced federal budget and welfare reform, traditionally conservative causes. Labor unions, which had been steadily losing membership since the 1960s, found they had also lost political clout inside the Democratic Party: Clinton enacted the NAFTA free trade agreement with Canada and Mexico over the strong objection of these labor unions, much to the disappointment of those on the left of the Party. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton, (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply The Right, are terms that refer to the segment of the political spectrum often associated with any of several strains of conservatism, the religious right, and areas of classical liberalism, or simply the opposite of left-wing politics. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton, (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... George Herbert Walker Bush, GCB, (born June 12, 1924 in Milton, MA) was the 41st President of the United States (1989–1993). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Budget generally refers to a list of all planned expenses and revenues. ... Welfare reform is the name for a political movement in countries with a state-administered social welfare system to institute changes in that system, generally in a more conservative direction. ... Nafta or NAFTA may refer to: an acronym for the North American Free Trade Agreement an acronym for the New Zealand Australia Free Trade Agreement the town/Tokyo of Nafta, Tunisia This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ...


When the DLC attempted to move the Democratic agenda in favor of more centrist positions, prominent Democrats from both the centrist and conservative factions (such as Terry McAuliffe) assumed leadership of the party and its direction. Some liberals and progressives felt alienated by the Democratic Party, which they felt had become unconcerned with the interests of the common people and left-wing issues in general. Some Democrats challenged the validity of such critiques, citing the Democratic role in pushing for progressive reforms. DLC is a TLA that may stand for: Democratic Leadership Council Dalian Zhoushuizi International Airport (China) Data Language Corporation Data Length Code for example on CANbus and LINbus Data link connector Data Link Control (networking) delay line canceller Democratic Leadership Council Department of Liquor Control (Vermont) Desktop Linux Consortium Development... In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... Terry McAuliffe opening the 2004 Democratic National Convention Terrence Richard Terry McAuliffe (born 1957) is an American political leader from the Democratic Party; he served as Chairman of the Democratic National Committee from February 2001 to February 2005. ...


21st century

Election of 2000

Main article: U.S. presidential election, 2000

During the 2000 Presidential election, the Democrats chose Vice President Al Gore to be the Party's candidate for the presidency. Although Gore and George W. Bush, the Republican candidate, clearly disagreed on issues such as abortion, gun control, environmentalism, foreign policy, public education, alternative fuel research, global warming, and judicial appointments, some critics -- Green Party presidential candidate Ralph Nader in particular -- asserted that Bush and Gore were too similar because they both supported what Nader thought was the wrong side of two issues, free trade and reductions in government-funded social welfare. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and former governor of Texas. ... The term gun politics refers to the various public policy debates surrounding the freedom or restriction (gun rights versus gun control) of private ownership and usage of firearms, and to what extent such policy influences crime and the balance of power between the individual and the state. ... Environmentalism is the support of or involvement with the environmental movement by environmentalists. ... Global mean surface temperatures 1856 to 2005 Mean temperature anomalies during the period 1995 to 2004 with respect to the average temperatures from 1940 to 1980 Global warming is a term used to describe the trend of increases in the average temperature of the Earths atmosphere and oceans that... In United States politics, the Green Party has been active as a third party since the 1980s. ... Ralph Nader Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is a political activist. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... ...


On election day, Gore won the popular vote by just over 500,000 votes, but lost in the electoral college by four votes. Controversy plagued the election, and Gore largely dropped from politics for years; by 2005 however he was making speeches critical of Bush's foreign policy.


Democrats in the Senate lost their majority in 2000 but regained it when Republican Senator Jim Jeffords of Vermont switched to make Sen. Tom Daschle the Majority Leader. In 2002 the GOP regained the Senate, and strengthened their grip in 2004.  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 2000 was an election for United States Senate which coincided with the election of George W. Bush as president. ... James Merrill Jim Jeffords (born May 11, 1934 in Rutland, Vermont) is currently the junior U.S. Senator from Vermont and the only Independent in the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 43rd 24 923 km² 130 km 260 km 3. ... Thomas Andrew Daschle (born December 9, 1947), known as Tom Daschle, was a U.S. Senator from South Dakota and the Senate Majority Leader. ...  Republican hold  Republican pickup  Democratic hold  Democratic pickup The U.S. Senate election, 2002 was a fiercely-contested race that resulted in a victory for the Republican Party, which gained two seats and thus a narrow majority from the Democratic Party in the United States Senate. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The United States Senate election, 2004 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the re-election of George W. Bush as president and the United States House election, as well as many state and local elections. ...


2001-2003

In the aftermath of the September 11th attacks, the nation's focus was changed to issues of national security. All but one Democrat voted with their Republican counterparts to authorize President Bush's 2001 invasion of Afghanistan. Daschle pushed for his party to approve what are arguably two of the most controversial and inflammatory measures the Senate has ever approved: the USA PATRIOT Act and the invasion of Iraq. The Democrats were split over the 2003 invasion of Iraq and increasingly expressed concerns about both the justification and progress of the War on Terrorism and the domestic effects including threats to civil liberties and privacy from the USA PATRIOT Act. The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... Security measures taken to protect the Houses of Parliament in London, England. ... Combatants al-Qaeda, Taliban Northern Alliance, United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, France, New Zealand, Italy, Germany Commanders Mohammed Omar Osama bin Laden Tommy Franks Mohammed Fahim Strength Casualties {{{notes}}} The United States invasion of Afghanistan occurred in October 2001, in the wake of the September 11, 2001 attacks on... President George W. Bush signing the USA PATRIOT ACT in the White Houses East Room on October 26, 2001. ... This article covers invasion specifics. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Privacy is the ability of an individual or group to stop information about themselves from becoming known to people other than those whom they choose to give the information. ... President George W. Bush signing the USA PATRIOT ACT in the White Houses East Room on October 26, 2001. ...


In the wake of the financial fraud scandal of Enron and other corporations, Congressional Democrats pushed for the Sarbanes-Oxley Act a legal overhaul of business accounting. With job losses and increasing in 2001 and 2002, the Democrats campaigned on the issue of economic recovery. That did not work for in 2002 the Democrats lost a few seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. They lost three seats in the Senate (Georgia as Max Cleland was unseated, Minnesota as Paul Wellstone died and his succeeding Democratic candidate lost the election, and Missouri as Jean Carnahan was unseated) in the Senate. While Democrats gained governorships in New Mexico (where Bill Richardson was elected), Arizona (Janet Napolitano) and Wyoming (Dave Freudenthal), other Democrats lost governorships in South Carolina (Jim Hodges), Alabama (Don Siegelman) and, for the first time in more than a century, Georgia (Roy Barnes). In considering that most Americans had become more concerned about corporate crime and other economic issues, the election was preceded with widespread debate over how and why the Democrats lost. [ref3] The party's miseries mounted in 2003, when a voter recall unseated their unpopular governor of California, Gray Davis, and replaced him which a charismatic Republican Arnold Schwarzenegger. By the end of 2003 the four largest states had Republican governors: California, Texas, New York and Florida. Enron Corporation Enron Corporation is an energy trading and communications company based in Houston, Texas that employed around 21,000 people in mid-2001 (before bankruptcy). ... Before the signing ceremony of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, President George W. Bush meets with Senator Paul Sarbanes, Secretary of Labor Elaine Chao and other dignitaries in the Blue Room at the White House July 30, 2002. ... Joseph Maxwell Cleland (born August 24, 1942) is an American politician of Georgia. ... Official language(s) None Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 12th 225,365 km² 400 km 645 km 8. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party. ... Official language(s) none, English most common Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 21st 69,709 mi²; 180,693 km² 240 mi; 385 km 300 mi; 480 km 1. ... Senator Jean Carnahan, D-Missouri, who served in the Senate from 2001-2002 Jean Carnahan (born December 20, 1933) was a member of the United States Senate from 2001 to 2002. ... Official language(s) None; English and Spanish de facto Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 5th 315,194 km² 550 km 595 km 0. ... Bill Richardson is the name of at least two public figures: Bill Richardson, Canadian radio host for CBC Radio One Bill Richardson, US politician and current governor of New Mexico This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Official language(s) None Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Area  - Total   - Width   - Length    - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 6th 113,998 sq mi  295,254 km² 310 miles  500 km 400 miles  645 km 0. ... Janet Napolitano (b. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 10th 253,554 km² 450 km 580 km 0. ... David D. Freudenthal (born October 12, 1950) is the governor of the U.S. state of Wyoming. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 40th 82,965 km² 320 km 420 km 6 32°430N to 35°12N 78°030W to 83°20W Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 26th 4,012... James Hovis Hodges (born November 19, 1956) is a United States Democratic Party politician from South Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  - Total   - Width   - Length    - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 30th 52,423 sq mi  135,775 km² 190 miles  306 km 330 miles  531 km 3. ... Donald Eugene Siegelman (born February 24, 1946, in Mobile, Alabama) is an American Democratic politician. ... Roy Eugene Barnes (born March 11, 1948) was the governor of the U.S. state of Georgia from January 1999 until January 2003. ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, Golden Globe award winning actor, and Republican politician, currently serving as the 38th Governor of California. ...


Election of 2004

Main article: U.S. presidential election, 2004

The Democrats began fielding Presidential candidates as early as December 2002, when Gore announced he would not run again in 2004. Ex-Governor Howard Dean of Vermont, an opponent of the war and a critic of the Democratic establishment, was the front runner leading into the Democratic primaries. Dean had immense grassroots support, especially from the left wing of the Party. John Kerry received the nomination because he was widely seen as more "electable" than Dean. Presidential election results map. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ... A primary election is an election in which registered voters in a jurisdiction select a political partys candidate for a later election (nominating primary). ...


In the time from 2003 to 2004, layoffs of American workers occurring in various industries due to outsourcing, some Democrats (including John Kerry, ex-Gov. Howard Dean of Vermont and Senatorial candidate Erskine Bowles of North Carolina) began to refine their positions on free trade and some even questioned their past support for it. By 2004, the failure of George W. Bush's administration to find weapons of mass destruction, mounting combat casualties and fatalities in Iraq, and the lack of any end point for the War on Terror were frequent issues in the elections. That year, Democrats generally campaigned on surmounting the jobless recovery, exiting Iraq, and their own proposals for policies on counter-terrorism. Paper shredding can be contracted out Outsourcing (or contracting out) is often defined as the delegation of non-core operations or jobs from internal production within a business to an external entity (such as a subcontractor) that specializes in that operation. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... Erskine Bowles Erskine Boyce Bowles (born 8 August 1945) is an American businessman and political figure from the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 28th 139,509 km² 805 km 240 km 9. ... Weapons of mass destruction (WMD) generally include nuclear, biological, chemical and, increasingly, radiological weapons. ... A jobless recovery is a phrase used by economists to describe the recovery from a recession which does not produce strong growth in employment. ...

Senator John Kerry lost in 2004
Senator John Kerry lost in 2004

Kerry proved a very weak campaigner, allowing the opposition to define him as wishy-washy on issues like Iraq. Bush gained 8 million votes over 2000, while Kerry gained 4 million. Republicans gained four seats in the Senate and three seats in the House of Representatives. Also, for the first time since 1952, the Democratic leader of the Senate, Daschle, lost re-election. In the end there were 3,660 Democratic state legislators across the nation to the Republicans' 3,557, and Democrats had gained governorships in Louisiana, New Hampshire and Montana. However, the Democrats lost the governorship of Missouri and a legislative majority in Georgia - which had once been a Democratic stronghold since the 1870s. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2065x3000, 312 KB) http://kerry. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2065x3000, 312 KB) http://kerry. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... State legislatures are the lawmaking bodies of the 50 states in the United States of America. ... Official language(s) English and French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans at last census; probably Baton Rouge since Hurricane Katrina Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 31st 134,382 km² 210 km 610 km 16 29°N to 33°N 89°W to 94°W Population... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 4th 381,156 km² 410 km 1,015 km 1 44°26 N to 49° N 104°2 W to 116°2 W Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 44th 1,087,340 2. ... Official language(s) none, English most common Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 21st 69,709 mi²; 180,693 km² 240 mi; 385 km 300 mi; 480 km 1. ...


Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nevada) asserted that Kerry lost because he did not do enough to reach out to rural citizens, plus he was too liberal. [ref6] Many Democrats believed that the Republicans ran in opposition to gay rights and used state ballot initiatives against same-sex marriage to attract more so-called "values voters" to the polls. [ref8] Official language(s) None Capital Carson City Largest city Las Vegas Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 7th 286,367 km² 519 km 788 km 0. ... Same-sex marriage is marriage between two people who are of the same sex (i. ...


After two unexpected defeats many Democrats have voiced serious concern about the future of their party. Prominent Democrats began to rethink the party's direction, and a variety of strategies for moving forward were voiced. Some have suggested moving towards the center to regain seats in the House and Senate and possibly win the presidency in 2008. One topic of discussion is the party's policies surrounding reproductive rights. Rethinking the party's position on gun control became a matter of discussion, brought up by Howard Dean, Bill Richardson, Brian Schweitzer and other Democrats who had won governorships in states where Second Amendment rights were important to many voters. [ref9] In What's the Matter with Kansas?, commentator Thomas Frank wrote the Democrats needed to return to campaigning on economic populism. Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 2008 is scheduled to occur on November 4, 2008. ... Reproductive rights is a political term to refer to womens rights in areas of sexual reproduction, including the rights to reproduce (such as forced sterilization) as well as rights not to reproduce, (such as birth control and abortion). ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ... Bill Richardson is the name of at least two public figures: Bill Richardson, Canadian radio host for CBC Radio One Bill Richardson, US politician and current governor of New Mexico This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Brian Schweitzer (born September 4, 1955) is the Governor of Montana and a member of the Democratic Party. ... The Second Amendment may refer to the: Second Amendment to the United States Constitution - part of the Bill of Rights. ... Whats the Matter with Kansas? (2004) is a controversial book written by American journalist and historian Thomas Frank, which explores the rise of conservative populism in the United States through the lens of his native state of Kansas, which was once a hotbed of the left-wing Populist movement... Thomas Frank (born 1965) is an American author who writes about what he calls cultural politics. He is the founder and editor of The Baffler and the author of several books, most recently Whats the Matter with Kansas?. Other writings include essays for Harpers Magazine, Le Monde diplomatique...


2005 - present

These debates were reflected in the 2005 campaign for Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, which Howard Dean won over the objections of many party insiders. Dean sought to move the Democratic strategy away from the establishment, and bolster support for the party's state and local chapters. Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ...


When the 109th Congress convened, Democratic Senators chose Harry Reid of Nevada as their Minority Leader and Richard Durbin of Illinois to replace Reid as their Minority Whip, or Assistant Minority Leader. Reid convinced the Democratic Senators to vote more as a bloc on important issues, something which forced the Republican majority to abandon its push for privatization of Social Security and instatement of the "nuclear option" to end judicial filibuster. The Senate did not vote on either proposal. [ref5] The 109th United States Congress meets from January 4, 2005, to January 1, 2007. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party, for which he serves as Senate Minority Leader. ... Official language(s) None Capital Carson City Largest city Las Vegas Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 7th 286,367 km² 519 km 788 km 0. ... The Senate Minority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by his or her party conference to serve as the chief Senate spokesmen for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the Senate. ... Richard Joseph Dick Durbin (born November 21, 1944) is a Democratic American politician. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 25th 149,998 km² 340 km 629 km 4. ... Traditionally the second ranking position in the minority party in the United States Senate. ... The expression nuclear option, as used in American politics circa 2005, is a catchphrase referring to a political maneuver that would allow the US Senate majority (currently Republicans hold 55 of 100 seats) to prevent the minority party (currently Democrats) from filibustering judicial nominees, making it easier for the President...


Symbols

"A Live Jackass Kicking a Dead Lion" by Thomas Nast
"A Live Jackass Kicking a Dead Lion" by Thomas Nast

On January 19, 1870, a political cartoon by Thomas Nast appearing in Harper's Weekly titled "A Live Jackass Kicking a Dead Lion" revived the donkey as a symbol for the Democratic Party; it had been used in the 1830s also--see cartoon above. Cartoonists followed Nast and used the donkey to represent the Democrats, and the elephant to represent the GOP. The DNC's official logo, pictured above, depicts a stylized kicking donkey. In the media, Democrats (and states which consistently vote Democratic) have relatively recently been depicted as blue, while Republicans, and the states in which they dominate, as red. Download high resolution version (694x750, 126 KB)nast sketch of demo donkey This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... Download high resolution version (694x750, 126 KB)nast sketch of demo donkey This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... This early political cartoon by Ben Franklin was originally written for the French and Indian War, but was later recycled during the Revolutionary War An editorial cartoon, also known as a political cartoon, is an illustration or comic strip containing a political or social message. ... Thomas Nast (September 27, 1840–December 7, 1902) was a famous caricaturist and editorial cartoonist in the 19th century and is considered to be the father of American political cartooning. ... An issue of Harpers Magazine from 1905 Another issue, from November 2004 Harpers Magazine (or simply Harpers) is a monthly general-interest magazine covering literature, politics, culture, and the arts. ...


In the early 20th century, the traditional symbol of the Democratic Party in Midwestern states such as Indiana, Kentucky, Oklahoma and Ohio was the rooster, as opposed to the Republican eagle. This symbol still appears on Kentucky and Indiana ballots. For the majority of the 20th Century, Missouri Democrats used the Statue of Liberty as their ballot emblem. This meant that when Libertarian candidates received ballot access in Missouri in 1976, they could not use the Statue of Liberty, their national symbol, as the ballot emblem. Missouri Libertarians instead used the Liberty Bell until 1995, when the mule became Missouri's state animal. From 1995 to 2004, there was some confusion among voters, as the Democratic ticket was marked with the Statue of Liberty, and it seemed that the Libertarians were using a donkey. The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 38th 94,321 km² 225 km 435 km 1. ... Official language(s) English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 37th 104,749 km² 225 km 610 km 1. ... Template:ROXANA This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus (largest metropolitan area is Cleveland) Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 34th 116,096 km² 355 km 355 km 8. ... Rooster in grass, demonstrating the alert stance before sounding an alarm A cock or rooster is a male chicken, the female being a hen. ... Genera Several, see below. ... A ballot is a device used to record choices made by voters. ... Official language(s) none, English most common Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 21st 69,709 mi²; 180,693 km² 240 mi; 385 km 300 mi; 480 km 1. ... Statue of Liberty and Liberty Island Liberty Enlightening the World, known more commonly as the Statue of Liberty, is a statue given to the United States by France in the late 19th century, standing at Liberty Island in the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor as a... An emblem consists of a pictorial image, abstract or representational, that epitomizes a concept - often a concept of a moral truth or an allegory. ... The Libertarian Party is a United States political party created in 1971. ... Ballot access rules regulate the conditions under which a candidate or political party is entitled to appear on voters ballots. ... The Liberty Bell, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is an American bell of great historic significance. ... For other uses of the word mule, see mule (disambiguation). ...


See also

In the 19th century the United States invented or developed a number of new methods for conducting American Election Campaigns. ... The Republican Party was born in 1854 and is one of the two dominant parties today. ...

References

  • online books and pamphlets includes some proceedings of Democratic National Convention and state conventions (1850-1900), and newspapers for main events of 1850s

Scholarly Secondary Sources

  • American National Biography (20 volumes, 1999) covers all politicians no longer alive; online and paper copies at many academic libraries. Older Dictionary of American Biography is also good.
  • Shafer, Byron E. and Anthony J. Badger, eds. Contesting Democracy: Substance and Structure in American Political History, 1775-2000 (2001), most recent collection of new essays by specialists on each time period:
    • includes: "State Development in the Early Republic: 1775–1840" by Ronald P. Formisano; "The Nationalization and Racialization of American Politics: 1790–1840" by David Waldstreicher; "'To One or Another of These Parties Every Man Belongs;": 1820–1865 by Joel H. Silbey; "Change and Continuity in the Party Period: 1835–1885" by Michael F. Holt; "The Transformation of American Politics: 1865–1910" by Peter H. Argersinger; "Democracy, Republicanism, and Efficiency: 1885–1930" by Richard Jensen; "The Limits of Federal Power and Social Policy: 1910–1955" by Anthony J. Badger; "The Rise of Rights and Rights Consciousness: 1930–1980" by James T. Patterson, Brown University; and "Economic Growth, Issue Evolution, and Divided Government: 1955–2000" by Byron E. Shafer

Before 1932

Joseph Allan Nevins (May 20, 1890 - March 5, 1971) was an educator, historian, and author and journalist. ...

1932-2006

  • Allswang, John M. New Deal and American Politics (1978)
  • Andersen, Kristi. The Creation of a Democratic Majority, 1928-1936 (1979)
  • Barone, Michael, and Grant Ujifusa, The Almanac of American Politics 2006: The Senators, the Representatives and the Governors: Their Records and Election Results, Their States and Districts (2005) covers all the live politicians with amazing detail.
  • Burns, James MacGregor. Roosevelt: The Lion and the Fox (1956)
  • Cantril, Hadley and Mildred Strunk, eds. Public Opinion, 1935-1946 (1951), massive compilation of many public opinion polls from US, UK, Canada, Australia, and elsewhere.
  • Dallek, Robert. Lyndon B. Johnson: Portrait of a President (2004)
  • Formisano, Ronald P. The Transformation of Political Culture: Massachusetts Parties, 1790s-1840s (1983)
  • Fraser, Steve, and Gary Gerstle, eds. The Rise and Fall of the New Deal Order, 1930-1980 (1990), scholarly essays.
  • Hamby, Alonzo. Liberalism and Its Challengers: From F.D.R. to Bush (1992).
  • Jensen, Richard. Grass Roots Politics: Parties, Issues, and Voters, 1854-1983 (1983)
  • Jensen, Richard. "The Last Party System, 1932-1980," in Paul Kleppner, ed. Evolution of American Electoral Systems (1981)
  • Judis, John B. and Ruy Teixeira. The Emerging Democratic Majority (2004) demography is destiny
  • Kennedy, David M. Freedom from Fear: The American People in Depression and War, 1929-1945 (2001) well balanced scholarly synthesis.
  • Kleppner, Paul et al. The Evolution of American Electoral Systems (1983), advanced scholarly essays, 1790s to 1980s.
  • Ladd Jr., Everett Carll with Charles D. Hadley. Transformations of the American Party System: Political Coalitions from the New Deal to the 1970s 2nd ed. (1978).
  • Lamis, Alexander P. ed. Southern Politics in the 1990s (1999)
  • MacNeil, Neil. Forge of Democracy: The House of Representatives (1963)
  • Martin, John Bartlow. Adlai Stevenson of Illinois: The Life of Adlai E. Stevenson (1976),
  • Moscow, Warren. The Last of the Big-Time Bosses: The Life and Times of Carmine de Sapio and the Rise and Fall of Tammany Hall (1971)
  • Patterson, James T. Grand Expectations: The United States, 1945-1974 (1997) well balanced scholarly synthesis.
  • Patterson, James T. Restless Giant: The United States from Watergate to Bush vs. Gore (2005) well balanced scholarly synthesis.
  • Patterson, James. Congressional Conservatism and the New Deal: The Growth of the Conservative Coalition in Congress, 1933-39 (1967)
  • Plotke, David. Building a Democratic Political Order: Reshaping American Liberalism in the 1930s and 1940s (1996).
  • Nicol C. Rae; Southern Democrats Oxford University Press. 1994
  • Sabato, Larry J. Divided States of America: The Slash and Burn Politics of the 2004 Presidential Election (2005), analytic.
  • Sabato, Larry J. and Bruce Larson. The Party's Just Begun: Shaping Political Parties for America's Future (2001) scholarly textbook.
  • Schlesinger, Arthur Meier, Jr. ed. History of American Presidential Elections, 1789-2000 (various multivolume editions, latest is 2001). For each election includes good scholarly history and selection of primary documents. Essays on the most important elections are reprinted in Schlesinger, The Coming to Power: Critical presidential elections in American history (1972)
  • Shelley II, Mack C. The Permanent Majority: The Conservative Coalition in the United States Congress (1983)
  • Sundquist, James L. Dynamics of the Party System: Alignment and Realignment of Political Parties in the United States (1983)

Popular Histories

  • Ling, Peter J. The Democratic Party: A Photographic History (2003).
  • Rutland, Robert Allen. The Democrats: From Jefferson to Clinton (1995).
  • Schlisinger, Galbraith. Of the People: The 200 Year History of the Democratic Party (1992) popular essays by scholars.
  • Witcover, Jules. Party of the People: A History of the Democrats (2003), 900 pages

Primary sources

The national committees of major parties published a "campaign textbook" every presidential election from about 1856 to about 1932. They were designed for speakers and are jammed with statistics, speeches, summaries of legislation, and documents, with plenty of argumentation. Only large academic libraries have them, but some are online.

  • Democratic National Committee. The Campaign Text Book: Why the People Want a Change. The Republican Party Reviewed... (1876)
  • Campaign Text-book of the National Democratic Party (1896) by Democratic Party (U.S.) National committee this is the Gold Democrats handbook; it strongly opposed Bryan
  • The Republican Campaign Text Book for 1882 by Republican Congressional Committee
  • The Republican Campaign Text Book for 1884
  • The Republican Campaign Text-book for 1888
  • Republican Campaign Text Book, 1894
  • Schlesinger, Arthur Meier, Jr. ed. History of American Presidential Elections, 1789-2000 (various multivolume editions, latest is 2001). For each election includes scholarly history and selection of primary documents.

Navigation

United States Presidential Elections

1789–1840: 1789 - 1792 - 1796 - 1800 - 1804 - 1808 - 1812 - 1816 - 1820 - 1824 - 1828 - 1832 - 1836 - 1840
1844–1896: 1844 - 1848 - 1852 - 1856 - 1860 - 1864 - 1868 - 1872 - 1876 - 1880 - 1884 - 1888 - 1892 - 1896
1900–1952: 1900 - 1904 - 1908 - 1912 - 1916 - 1920 - 1924 - 1928 - 1932 - 1936 - 1940 - 1944 - 1948 - 1952
1956–2008: 1956 - 1960 - 1964 - 1968 - 1972 - 1976 - 1980 - 1984 - 1988 - 1992 - 1996 - 2000 - 2004 - 2008 United States presidential elections determine who serves as President and Vice President of the United States for four-year terms, starting on Inauguration Day, which is January 20th of the year after the election. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 1792 was the second presidential election in the United States, and the first in which each of the original 13 states appointed electors (in addition to newly added states Kentucky and Vermont). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 1804 pitted incumbent (Democratic-)Republican President Thomas Jefferson against Federalist Charles Cotesworth Pinckney. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Summary Incumbent President Ulysses S. Grant was easily elected to a second term in office despite a split within the Republican Party that resulted in a defection of many key Republicans to opponent Horace Greeley. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 1876 was perhaps the most disputed presidential election in American history. ... The U.S. presidential election of 1880 was largely seen as a referendum on the Republicans relaxation of Reconstruction efforts in the southern states. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential election results map. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 2008 is scheduled to occur on November 4, 2008. ...

See also: House | Senate | Governors
United States Presidential Elections

1789–1840: 1789 - 1792 - 1796 - 1800 - 1804 - 1808 - 1812 - 1816 - 1820 - 1824 - 1828 - 1832 - 1836 - 1840
1844–1896: 1844 - 1848 - 1852 - 1856 - 1860 - 1864 - 1868 - 1872 - 1876 - 1880 - 1884 - 1888 - 1892 - 1896
1900–1952: 1900 - 1904 - 1908 - 1912 - 1916 - 1920 - 1924 - 1928 - 1932 - 1936 - 1940 - 1944 - 1948 - 1952
1956–2008: 1956 - 1960 - 1964 - 1968 - 1972 - 1976 - 1980 - 1984 - 1988 - 1992 - 1996 - 2000 - 2004 - 2008 United States presidential elections determine who serves as President and Vice President of the United States for four-year terms, starting on Inauguration Day, which is January 20th of the year after the election. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 1792 was the second presidential election in the United States, and the first in which each of the original 13 states appointed electors (in addition to newly added states Kentucky and Vermont). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 1804 pitted incumbent (Democratic-)Republican President Thomas Jefferson against Federalist Charles Cotesworth Pinckney. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Summary Incumbent President Ulysses S. Grant was easily elected to a second term in office despite a split within the Republican Party that resulted in a defection of many key Republicans to opponent Horace Greeley. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 1876 was perhaps the most disputed presidential election in American history. ... The U.S. presidential election of 1880 was largely seen as a referendum on the Republicans relaxation of Reconstruction efforts in the southern states. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential election results map. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 2008 is scheduled to occur on November 4, 2008. ...

See also: House | Senate | Governors
United States Senate elections

1908 | 1910 | 1912 | 1914 | 1916 | 1918 | 1920 | 1922 | 1924 | 1926 | 1928 | 1930 | 1932 | 1934 | 1936 | 1938 | 1940 | 1942 | 1944 | 1946 | 1948 | 1950 | 1952 | 1954 | 1956 | 1958 | 1960 | 1962 | 1964 | 1966 | 1968 | 1970 | 1972 | 1974 | 1976 | 1978 | 1980 | 1982 | 1984 | 1986 | 1988 | 1990 | 1992 | 1994 | 1996 | 1998 | 2000 | 2002 | 2004 | 2006 | 2008 | 2010
See also: House | President | Governors The United States has a federal government, with elected officials at federal (national), state and local level. ... Some states elected their Senators directly even before passage of the 17th Amendment in 1913. ... Some states elected their Senators directly even before passage of the 17th Amendment in 1913. ... Some states elected their Senators directly even before passage of the 17th Amendment in 1913. ... With the passage of the 17th Amendment in 1913, the U.S. Senate election of 1914 was the first time that all senators were popularly elected instead of chosen by their state legislatures. ... The U.S. Senate election, 1916 was an election that coincided with the re-election of Democrat President Woodrow Wilson. ... The 1918 U.S. Senate election occurred on November 5, coinciding with the midpoint of Woodrow Wilsons second term as President of the United States. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1920 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of Warren G. Harding as President. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Farmer-Labor pickup The U.S. Senate election, 1922 was an election for the United States Senate which occurred in the middle of Republican President Warren G. Hardings term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1924 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the re-election of Republican President Calvin Coolidge. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1926 was an election for the United States Senate which occurred in the middle of Republican President Calvin Coolidges second term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Farmer-Labor hold The U.S. Senate election, 1928 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of Republican Herbert Hoover as President. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Simultaneous Republican hold and Democratic pickup The U.S. Senate election, 1930 was an election for the United States Senate which occurred in the middle of Republican President Herbert Hoovers first term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1932 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with Democrat Franklin Delano Roosevelts crushing defeat of incumbent Herbert Hoover in the presidential election. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Simultaneous hold  Farmer-Labor hold  Progressive hold Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue, simultaneous hold in purple, Farmer-Labor hold in orange, Progressive hold in green]] The U.S...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Farmer-Labor hold  Independent hold The United States Senate election, 1936 coincided with the re-election of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1938 was an election for the United States Senate which occurred in the middle of Franklin Delano Roosevelts second term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Progressive hold The U.S. Senate election, 1940 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of Franklin Delano Roosevelt to his third term as President. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Simultaneous hold The U.S. Senate election, 1942 was an election for the United States Senate which occurred midway through Franklin Delano Roosevelts third term as President. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1944 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the re-election of Franklin Delano Roosevelt to his fourth term as President. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1946 was an election for the United States Senate in the middle of Democratic President Harry Trumans first term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1948 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of Democratic President Harry Truman for a full term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1950 was an election for the United States Senate which occurred in the middle of Harry Trumans second term as President. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1952 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of Dwight D. Eisenhower to the presidency by a large margin. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1954 was an election for the United States Senate which was a midterm election in the first term of Dwight D. Eisenhowers presidency. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1956 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the re-election of President Dwight D. Eisenhower. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1958 was an election for the United States Senate which occurred in the middle of President Dwight D. Eisenhowers second term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1960 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of John F. Kennedy as president. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Simultaneous hold  Republican hold and Democratic pickup The U.S. Senate election, 1962 was an election for the United States Senate which occurred in the middle of John F. Kennedys term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1964 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of President Lyndon Baines Johnson by an overwhelming majority. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue, simultaneous hold in purple The U.S. Senate election, 1966 was an election for the United States Senate which occurred midway through the term of President Lyndon Baines Johnson. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1968 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the 1968 presidential election. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Independent pickups  Conservative pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1970 was an election for the United States Senate which was a midterm election in the term of President Richard M. Nixon. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1972 was an election for the United States Senate coinciding with the landslide re-election of Richard M. Nixon. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1974 was an election for the United States Senate held in the wake of the Watergate scandal, Richard M. Nixons resignation from the presidency, and Gerald Fords subsequent pardon of Nixon. ... Results -- Independent holds in light yellow, Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1976 was an election for the United States Senate that coincided with Democratic Jimmy Carters election to the presidency. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1978 was an election for the United States Senate in the middle of Democratic President Jimmy Carters term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1980 was an election for the United States Senate that coincided with Ronald W. Reagans election to the presidency. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1982 was an election for the United States Senate following the Republican gains in 1980. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1984 was an election for the United States Senate that coincided with Ronald Reagans landslide re-election as president. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1986 was an election for the United States Senate in the middle of Ronald Reagans second presidential term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1988 was an election for the United States Senate in which, in spite of the Republican victory by George Herbert Walker Bush in the presidential election, the Republicans had a net loss of one seat in the...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1990 was an election for the United States Senate in which the Democratic Party increased its majority with a net gain of one seat from the Republicans. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1992 was an election for the United States Senate in which the victory of Bill Clinton in the presidential election was not accompanied by major Democratic gains in the Senate. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1994 was an election in which the Republican Party was able to take control of the Senate from the Democrats by mobilizing voters discontented with congressional incumbents and the early presidency of Bill Clinton. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1996 was an election for United States Senate which coincided with the re-election of Bill Clinton as president. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1998 was a roughly even contest between the Republican and Democratic parties. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 2000 was an election for United States Senate which coincided with the election of George W. Bush as president. ...  Republican hold  Republican pickup  Democratic hold  Democratic pickup The U.S. Senate election, 2002 was a fiercely-contested race that resulted in a victory for the Republican Party, which gained two seats and thus a narrow majority from the Democratic Party in the United States Senate. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The United States Senate election, 2004 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the re-election of George W. Bush as president and the United States House election, as well as many state and local elections. ... Senate Seats up for election:  Republican incumbent  Retiring Republican  Democratic incumbent  Retiring Democrat  Retiring Independent  States without a seat up for reelection // Elections for the United States Senate will be held on November 7, 2006, with 33 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate being contested. ... Elections for the United States Senate will be held on November 4, 2008, with 33 of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested. ... Elections to the United States Senate will be held on November 2, 2010, with thirty four of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested. ...

United States House of Representatives Elections

1789 | 1790 | 1792 | 1794 | 1796 | 1798 | 1800 | 1802 | 1804 | 1806 | 1808 | 1810 | 1812 | 1814 | 1816 | 1818 | 1820 | 1822 | 1824 | 1826 | 1828 | 1830 | 1832 | 1834 | 1836 | 1838 | 1840 | 1842 | 1844 | 1846 | 1848 | 1850 | 1852 | 1854 | 1856 | 1858 | 1860 | 1862 | 1864 | 1866 | 1868 | 1870 | 1872 | 1874 | 1876 | 1878 | 1880 | 1882 | 1884 | 1886 | 1888 | 1890 | 1892 | 1894 | 1896 | 1898 | 1900 | 1902 | 1904 | 1906 | 1908 | 1910 | 1912 | 1914 | 1916 | 1918 | 1920 | 1922 | 1924 | 1926 | 1928 | 1930 | 1932 | 1934 | 1936 | 1938 | 1940 | 1942 | 1944 | 1946 | 1948 | 1950 | 1952 | 1954 | 1956 | 1958 | 1960 | 1962 | 1964 | 1966 | 1968 | 1970 | 1972 | 1974 | 1976 | 1978 | 1980 | 1982 | 1984 | 1986 | 1988 | 1990 | 1992 | 1994 | 1996 | 1998 | 2000 | 2002 | 2004 | 2006 | 2008 | Special
See also: Senate | President | Governors The United States has a federal government, with elected officials at federal (national), state and local level. ... The U.S. House election, 1789 was the first election for the United States House of Representatives. ... The U.S. House election, 1790 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1790. ... The U.S. House election, 1792 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1792. ... The U.S. House election, 1794 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1794. ... The U.S. House election, 1796 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1796. ... The U.S. House election, 1798 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1798. ... The U.S. House election, 1800 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1800. ... The U.S. House election, 1802 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1802. ... The U.S. House election, 1804 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1804. ... The U.S. House election, 1806 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1806. ... The U.S. House election, 1808 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1808. ... The U.S. House election, 1810 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1810. ... The U.S. House election, 1812 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1812. ... The U.S. House election, 1814 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1814. ... The U.S. House election, 1816 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1816. ... The U.S. House election, 1818 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1818. ... The U.S. House election, 1820 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1820. ... The U.S. House election, 1822 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1822. ... The U.S. House election, 1824 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1824. ... The U.S. House election, 1826 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1826. ... The U.S. House election, 1828 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1828. ... The U.S. House election, 1830 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1830. ... The U.S. House election, 1832 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1832. ... The U.S. House election, 1834 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1834. ... The U.S. House election, 1836 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1836. ... The U.S. House election, 1838 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1838. ... The U.S. House election, 1840 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1840. ... The U.S. House election, 1842 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1842. ... The United States House election, 1844 was an election in 1844 in which all 227 members of the United States House of Representatives were elected and who took their seats in March 1845. ... The U.S. House election, 1846 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1846. ... The U.S. House election, 1848 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1848. ... The U.S. House election, 1850 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1850. ... The U.S. House election, 1852 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1852. ... The U.S. House election, 1854 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1854. ... The U.S. House election, 1856 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1856. ... The U.S. House election, 1858 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1858. ... The U.S. House election, 1860 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1860 which coincided with the election of President Abraham Lincoln. ... The U.S. House election, 1862 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1862 which occurred in the middle of President Abraham Lincolns first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1864 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1864 which coincided with the re-election of President Abraham Lincoln. ... The U.S. House election, 1866 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1866 which occurred during President Andrew Johnsons term. ... The U.S. House election, 1868 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1868 which coincided with the election of President Ulysses S. Grant. ... The U.S. House election, 1870 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1870 which occurred in the middle of President Ulysses S. Grants first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1872 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1872 which coincided with the re-election of President Ulysses S. Grant. ... The U.S. House election, 1874 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1874 which occurred in the middle of President Ulysses S. Grants second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1876 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1876 which coincided with the (heavily contested) election of President Rutherford B. Hayes. ... The U.S. House election, 1878 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1878 which occurred in the middle of President Rutherford B. Hayes term. ... The U.S. House election, 1880 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1880 which coincided with the election of President James A. Garfield. ... The U.S. House election, 1882 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1882 which occurred during President Chester A. Arthurs term. ... The U.S. House election, 1884 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1884 which coincided with the election of President Grover Cleveland. ... The U.S. House election, 1886 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1886 which occurred in the middle of President Grover Clevelands first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1888 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1888 which coincided with the election of President Benjamin Harrison. ... The U.S. House election, 1890 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1890 which occurred in the middle of President Benjamin Harrisons term. ... The U.S. House election, 1892 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1892 which coincided with the election of Grover Cleveland as President for the second time, defeating incumbent Benjamin Harrison. ... The U.S. House election, 1894 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1894 which occurred in the middle of President Grover Clevelands second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1896 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1896 which coincided with the election of President William McKinley. ... The U.S. House election, 1898 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1898 which occurred in the middle of President William McKinleys first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1900 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1900 which coincided with the re-election of President William McKinley. ... The U.S. House election, 1902 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1902 which occurred in the middle of President Theodore Roosevelts first term, about a year after the assassination of President William McKinley in September 1901. ... The U.S. House election, 1904 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1904 which coincided with the re-election of President Theodore Roosevelt. ... The U.S. House election, 1906 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1906 which occurred in the middle of President Theodore Roosevelts second term. ... The U.S. House election in 1908 for the U.S. House of Representatives coincided with the 1908 presidential election, which William Howard Taft won. ... The U.S. House election, 1910 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1910 which occurred in the middle of President William Howard Tafts term. ... The U.S. House election, 1912 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1912 which coincided with the election of President Woodrow Wilson. ... The U.S. House election, 1914 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1914 which occurred in the middle of President Woodrow Wilsons first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1916 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1916 which coincided with President Woodrow Wilsons re-election. ... The U.S. House election, 1918 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1918 which occurred in the middle of President Woodrow Wilsons second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1920 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1920 which coincided with the election of President Warren G. Harding. ... The U.S. House election, 1922 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1922 which occurred in the middle of President Warren G. Hardings term. ... The U.S. House election, 1924 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1924 which coincided with the re-election of President Calvin Coolidge. ... The U.S. House election, 1926 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1926 which occurred in the middle of President Calvin Coolidges second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1928 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1928 which coincided with the election of President Herbert Hoover. ... The U.S. House election, 1930 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1930 which occurred in the middle of President Herbert Hoovers term. ... The U.S. House election, 1932 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1932 which coincided with the landslide election of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. ... The U.S. House election, 1934 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1934 which occurred in the middle of President Franklin Delano Roosevelts first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1936 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1936 which coincided with President Franklin Delano Roosevelts landslide re-election. ... The U.S. House election, 1938 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1938 which occurred in the middle of President Franklin Delano Roosevelts second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1940 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1940 which coincided with President Franklin Delano Roosevelts re-election to an unprecedented third term. ... The U.S. House election, 1942 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1942 which occurred in the middle of President Franklin Delano Roosevelts third term. ... The U.S. House election, 1944 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1944 which coincided with President Franklin Delano Roosevelts re-election to a fourth term. ... The U.S. House election, 1946 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1946 which occurred in the middle of President Harry Trumans first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1948 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1948 which coincided with President Harry Trumans re-election. ... The U.S. House election, 1950 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1950 which occurred in the middle of President Harry Trumans second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1952 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1952 which coincided with the election of President Dwight Eisenhower. ... The U.S. House election, 1954 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1954 which occurred in the middle of President Dwight Eisenhowers first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1956 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1956 which coincided with the re-election of President Dwight Eisenhower. ... The U.S. House election, 1958 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1958 which occurred in the middle of President Dwight Eisenhowers second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1960 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1960 which coincided with the election of President John F. Kennedy. ... The U.S. House election, 1962 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1962 which occurred in the middle of President John F. Kennedys term. ... The U.S. House election, 1964 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1964 which coincided with the re-election of President Lyndon Johnson. ... The U.S. House election, 1966 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1966 which occurred in the middle of President Lyndon Johnsons second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1968 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1968 which coincided with Richard M. Nixons election as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1970 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1970 which occurred in the middle of President Richard M. Nixons first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1972 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1972 which coincided with the landslide re-election victory of President Richard M. Nixon. ... The U.S. House election, 1974 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1974 which occurred in the wake of the Watergate scandal which forced President Richard M. Nixon to resign in favor of Gerald Ford. ... The U.S. House election, 1976 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1976 which coincided with Jimmy Carters election as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1978 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1978 which occurred in the middle of President Jimmy Carters term. ... The U.S. House election, 1980 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1980 which coincided with the election of Ronald Reagan as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1982 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1982 which occurred in the middle of President Ronald Reagans first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1984 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1984 which coincided with the re-election of President Ronald Reagan in a landslide. ... The U.S. House election, 1986 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1986 which occurred in the middle of President Ronald Reagans second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1988 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1988 which coincided with the election of George H. W. Bush as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1990 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1990 which occurred in the middle of President George H. W. Bushs term. ... The U.S. House election, 1992 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1992 which coincided with the election of Bill Clinton as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1994 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1994 which occurred in the middle of President Bill Clintons first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1996 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1996 which coincided with the re-election of Bill Clinton as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1998 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1998 which occurred in the middle of President Bill Clintons second term. ... The U.S. House election, 2000 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 2000 which coincided with the election of George W. Bush as President. ... The U.S. House election, 2002 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 2002 in the middle of President George W. Bushs first term. ... Elections to the 109th United States House of Representatives were held on November 2, 2004. ... It has been suggested that United States House election, 2006 complete list be merged into this article or section. ... Elections for the United States House of Representatives will be held on November 4, 2008, with all of the 435 seats in the House being contested. ... 107th Congress (2001 - 2003) 108th Congress (2003 - 2005) 109th Congress (2005 - 2007) ...


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United States House of Representatives - Knowmore (4519 words)
Each state is represented in the House in accordance with the size of its population, with the proviso that each state is entitled to at least one Representative member.
In the history of the United States, only five members have been expelled from the House; three of them were removed in 1861 for supporting the Confederate secession, which led to the American Civil War.
The party with a majority of seats in the House is known as the majority party; the next-largest party is the minority party.
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