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Encyclopedia > History of the Pacific Islands


History of the Pacific Islands covers the history of the islands in the Pacific Ocean. This article is about the social science. ...

Contents

Histories

Australia

The written history of Australia began when Dutch explorers first sighted the country in the 17th century. The interpretation of the history of Australia is currently a matter of some contention, particularly regarding the British settlement and early treatment of Indigenous Australians. The written history of Australia began when Dutch explorers first sighted the landmass in the 17th century. ...


Hawaii

Hawaiian history is inextricably tied into a larger Polynesian phenomenon. Hawaiʻi is the apex of the Polynesian Triangle, a region of the Pacific Ocean anchored by three island groups: Hawaiʻi, Rapa Nui (Easter Island), and Aotearoa (New Zealand). The many island cultures within the Polynesian Triangle share similar languages derived from a proto-Malayo-Polynesian language used in Southeast Asia 5,000 years ago. Polynesians also share cultural traditions, such as religion, social organization, myths, and material culture. Anthropologists believe that all Polynesians have descended from a South Pacific proto-culture created by an Austronesian (Malayo-Polynesian) people that had migrated from Southeast Asia. The seven main Polynesian cultures are Aotearoa, Hawaiʻi, Rapa Nui, Marquesas, Sāmoa, Tahiti, and Tonga Carving from the ridgepole of a Māori house, ca 1840 Polynesia (from Greek: πολύς many, νῆσος island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands scattered over the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ... The Polynesian Triangle is a geographical region of the Pacific Ocean anchored by Hawaii, Rapa Nui and New Zealand. ... Rapa Nui redirects here. ... The Malayo-Polynesian languages are a subgroup of the Austronesian languages used by some 351 million speakers. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... This article is about the Māori people of New Zealand. ... Rapa Nui redirects here. ... The Marquesas Islands is a group of islands in French Polynesia. ... This article is about the state. ... Tahiti is the largest island in the Windward group of the French Polynesia, located in the archipelago of Society Islands in the southern Pacific Ocean. ...


The early settlement history of Hawaiʻi is still not completely resolved. Some believe that the first Polynesians arrived in Hawaiʻi in the 3rd century from the Marquesas and were followed by Tahitian settlers in 1300 CE who conquered the original inhabitants. Others believe that there was only a single, extended period of settlement. The Marquesas Islands is a group of islands in French Polynesia. ... Tahiti is the largest island in the Windward group of the French Polynesia, located in the archipelago of Society Islands in the southern Pacific Ocean. ...


Indonesia

In the history of Indonesia, Austronesian people, who form the majority of the modern population, migrated to South East Asia from Taiwan. They arrived in Indonesia around 2000 BC, and confined the native Melanesian peoples to the far eastern regions as they expanded.[1] Dong Son culture spread to Indonesia bringing with it techniques of wet-field rice cultivation, ritual buffalo sacrifice, bronze casting, megalithic practises, and ikat weaving methods. Ideal agricultural conditions, and the mastering of wet-field rice cultivation as early as the eighth century BCE,[2] allowed villages, towns, and small kingdoms to flourish by the first century CE. The Austronesian people are a population group in Oceania and Southeast Asia who speak or had ancestors who spoke one of the Austronesian languages. ... Melanesia (from Greek black islands) is a region extending from the west Pacific to the Arafura Sea, north and north-east of Australia. ... Drum from Sông Đà, Vietnam. ... Terrace of paddy fields in Yunnan Province, southern Peoples Republic of China. ... Megalithic tomb, Mane Braz, Brittany A megalith is a large stone which has been used to construct a structure or monument either alone or with other stones. ... Ikat weaving from the Island of Sumba, Indonesia Ikat is a style of weaving that uses a tie-dye process on either the warp or weft before the threads are woven to create a pattern or design. ...


Japan

The written history of Japan begins with brief references in the 1st century CE Twenty-Four Histories, a collection of Chinese historical texts. However, archaeological evidence indicates that people were living on the islands of Japan as early as the upper paleolithic period.[3] Following the last ice-age, around 12,000 BCE, the rich ecosystem of the Japanese Archipelago fostered human development. The earliest-known pottery belongs to the Jōmon period. bc The Twenty-Four Histories is a collection of historical books covering a period of history from 3000 B.C. to the Ming Dynasty in the 17th century. ... The Upper Paleolithic (or Upper Palaeolithic) is the third and last subdivision of the Paleolithic or Old Stone Age as it is understood in Europe, Africa and Asia. ... For the prehistoric era commonly referred to as The Ice Age, see the Pleistocene and the Paleolithic epoch. ... A coral reef near the Hawaiian islands is an example of a complex marine ecosystem. ... The Japanese Archipelago which forms the country of Japan extends from north to south along the eastern coast of the Eurasian Continent, the western shore of the Pacific Ocean. ... Pottery on display in Dilli Haat, Delhi, India. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Jomon Period. ...


Malaysia

History of Malaysia is the written past of a country in South East Asia whose strategic sea-lane position brought trade and foreign influences that fundamentally influenced its history. Hindu India, the Islamic Middle East and Christian Europe to its west, and China and Japan to the north-east were major influences brought by shipping routes passing through the region. Malaysian history is also intertwined with that of neighbouring Indonesia, Singapore, Philippines, Brunei and Thailand. This trade and foreign cultures brought the area great wealth and diversity, but has also domination and colonialism. The history of Malaysia is one of successive phases of outside influence, followed by the mid-twentieth century establishment of independence from foreign colonial powers. Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


New Zealand

The History of New Zealand dates back at least 700 years to when it was discovered and settled by Polynesians, who developed a distinct Māori culture centred on kinship links and land. The first European explorer came to New Zealand in 1642. From the late 18th century, the country was regularly visited by explorers and other sailors, missionaries, traders and adventurers. In 1840 the Treaty of Waitangi was signed between the British Crown and various Māori chiefs, bringing New Zealand into the British Empire and giving Māori equal rights with British citizens. There was extensive European and some Asian settlement throughout the rest of the century. War and the imposition of a European economic and legal system led to most of New Zealand's land passing from Māori to European ownership, and most Māori subsequently became impoverished. // The history of New Zealand dates back at least 700 years to when it was discovered and settled by Polynesians, who developed a distinct Māori culture centred on kinship links and land. ... Polynesia (from Greek, poly = many and nesi = island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands in the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ... This article is about the Māori people of New Zealand. ... One of the few extant copies of the Treaty of Waitangi The Treaty of Waitangi (Māori: Tiriti o Waitangi) is a treaty first signed on February 6, 1840, by representatives of the British Crown, and various Māori chiefs from the northern North Island of New Zealand. ... The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen_in_Parliament) legislative power. ... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ...


From the 1890s the New Zealand parliament enacted a number of progressive initiatives, including women's suffrage and old age pensions. From the 1930s the economy was highly regulated and an extensive welfare state was developed. Meanwhile, Māori culture underwent a renaissance, and from the 1950s Māori began moving to the cities in large numbers. This led to the development of a Māori protest movement which in turn led to greater recognition of the Treaty of Waitangi in the late twentieth century. In the 1980s the economy was largely deregulated and a number of socially liberal policies, such as decriminalisation of homosexuality, were put in place. Foreign policy, which had previously consisted mostly of following Britain or the United States, became more independent. Subsequent governments have generally maintained these policies, although tempering the free market ethos somewhat. The New Zealand Parliament is the legislative body of the New Zealand government. ... Womens suffrage in New Zealand was an important political issue at the turn of the 19th century. ... There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ... Although New Zealand today is widely regarded internationally as having fair relations with its indigenous Maori peoples compared to it’s immediate neighbours, and multiculturalism is considerd as a significant positive to it’s cultural identity and growing diverse communities; like most Indigenous peoples throughout the world Maoris have struggled...


Philippines

In the beginning of the history of the Philippines, the arrival of the first humans via land bridges at least 30,000 years ago.[4] The first recorded visit from the West is the arrival of Ferdinand Magellan on Homonhon Island, southeast of Samar on March 16, 1521.[5] Spanish colonization began with the arrival of Miguel López de Legazpi's expedition and permanent settlement in the island of Cebu,[6] and more settlements continued northward with the colonizers reaching the bay of Manila on the island of Luzon.[7] In Manila, they established a new town and thus began an era of Spanish colonization that lasted for more than three centuries.[8] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Upper Paleolithic (or Upper Palaeolithic) is the third and last subdivision of the Paleolithic or Old Stone Age as it is understood in Europe, Africa and Asia. ... Occident redirects here. ... For the Presidential railcar named Ferdinand Magellan, see Ferdinand Magellan Railcar. ... Samar, formerly Western Samar, is a province in the Philippines located in the Eastern Visayas region. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther in the papal bull Decet Romanum Pontificem. ... Miguel López de Legazpi (1502 - August 20, 1572, Manila), also known as El Adelantado (The Governor) and El Viejo (The Elder), was a Spanish conquistador who established the first colony in the Philippine Islands in 1565. ... For other uses, see Cebu (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of the word, see Manila (disambiguation). ... Map of the Philippines showing the island groups of Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao. ...


Tahiti

In the history of Tahiti, Tahiti is estimated to have been settled by Polynesians between CE 300 and 800 coming from Tonga and Samoa, although some estimates place the date earlier. The fertile island soil combined with fishing provided ample food for the population. Although the first European sighting of the islands was by a Spanish ship in 1606, Spain made no effort to trade with or colonize the island. Samuel Wallis, an English sea captain, sighted Tahiti on June 18, 1767, and is considered the first European visitor to the island. The perceived relaxation and contented nature of the local people and the characterization of the island as a paradise much impressed early European visitors, planting the seed for a romanticization by the West that endures to this day. Polynesia (from Greek, poly = many and nesi = island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands in the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ... For the computer security term, see Phishing. ... Samuel Wallis (c. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Occident redirects here. ...


Taiwan

In the history of Taiwan, Aboriginal peoples ancestors are believed to have been living on the islands for approximately 8,000 years before major Han Chinese immigration began in the 1600s.[9] The Taiwanese Aborigines are Austronesian peoples, with linguistic and genetic ties to other Austronesian ethnic groups, such as peoples of the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia and Oceania.[10] Taiwan's Austronesian speakers were traditionally distributed over much of the island's rugged central mountain range and concentrated in villages along the alluvial plains. Today, the bulk of the contemporary Taiwanese Aborigine population reside in the mountains and the cities. The issue of an ethnic identity unconnected to the Asian mainland has become one thread in the discourse regarding the political identity of Taiwan. The total population of Aborigines on Taiwan is around 458,000 as of January 2006,[11] which is approximately 2% of Taiwan's population. This article is about the majority ethnic group within China. ... Many inventions and institutions are created, including Hans Lippershey with the telescope (1608, used by Galileo the next year), the newspaper Avisa Relation oder Zeitung in Augsburg, and Cornelius Drebbel with the thermostat (1609). ... The Austronesian people are a population group in Oceania and Southeast Asia who speak or had ancestors who spoke one of the Austronesian languages. ... For other uses, see Oceania (disambiguation). ... The term Ethnicity redirects here. ...


Other islands

History of American Samoa begins with inhabitation as early as 1000 BCE, Samoa was not reached by European explorers until the 18th century.[citation needed] American Samoa is the result of the Second Samoan Civil War and an agreement made between Germany, the United States, and the United Kingdom in 1899. ...


The history of Baker Island began when the United States of America took possession of the island in 1857, and its guano deposits were mined by US and British companies during the second half of the 19th century. In 1935, a short-lived attempt at colonization was begun on this island - as well as on nearby Howland Island - but was disrupted by World War II and thereafter abandoned. Presently the island is a National Wildlife Refuge run by the US Department of the Interior; a day beacon is situated near the middle of the west coast. Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A day beacon is an unlighted nautical navigational aid. ...


In the history of Brunei, the Sultanate of Brunei was very powerful from the fourteenth to the sixteenth century CE. Its realm covered the northern part of Borneo and the southwestern Philippines. European influence gradually brought an end to this regional power. Later, there was a brief war with Spain, in which Brunei was victorious. The decline of the Bruneian Empire culminated in the nineteenth century when Brunei lost much of its territory to the White Rajahs of Sarawak, resulting in its current small landmass and separation into two parts. Brunei was a British protectorate from 1888 to 1984. A sultan (Arabic: سلطان) is an Islamic monarch ruling under the terms of shariah. ... Φ Borneo is the third largest island in the world and is located at the centre of Maritime Southeast Asia. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... In international relations, a regional power is a state that has power within a geographic region. ... The White Rajahs refer to a dynasty that founded and ruled the Kingdom of Sarawak from 1841 to 1946. ... For the river, see Sarawak River. ... This article is about states protected and/or dominated by a foreign power. ...


The history of the Caroline Islands begins with the discovery by the occidentals in 1526, by the Spanish Toribio Alonso de Salazar, he called them "Carolinas" after the emperor Carlos I of Spain, and Charles V of Holy Roman Empire. The Portuguese Diego da Rocha, explorer of the Carolines, also named them the Sequeira Islands in 1527. Though early Spanish navigators in the area (from 1543) called them the Nuevas Filipinas ("New Philippines"), Admiral Francisco Lazeano named them the Carolinas after the Spanish King Charles II in 1686. For the Carlist claimant King Carlos V, see Infante Carlos, Count of Molina. ... Charles II of Spain (Carlos Segundo) (November 6, 1661, Madrid - November 1, 1700, Madrid) was King of Spain, Naples, Sicily, nearly all of Italy (except Piedmont, the Papal States and Venice), and Spains overseas Empire, stretching from Mexico to the Philippines. ...


Easter Island is one of the youngest inhabited territories on Earth, and for most of the History of Easter Island it was the most isolated inhabited territory on Earth. Its inhabitants the Rapanui have endured famines, epidemics, civil war, slave raids and colonialism; have seen their population crash on more than one occasion, and created a cultural legacy that has brought them fame out of all proportion to their numbers. The Rapanui or Rapa Nui (Big Rapa) are the native Polynesian inhabitants of Easter Island in the Pacific Ocean (the island itself is also called Rapa Nui). ...


In history of Fiji, Fijian history dates back to ancient time. By 1500 BCE, Fiji settled by Polynesian seafarers. By 900-600 BCE, Moturiki Island settled. By 500 BCE, Melanesian seafarers reach Fiji and intermarry with the Polynesian inhabitants, giving rise to the modern Fijian people. By1643 CE, Abel Tasman sights Vanua Levu Island and northern Taveuni. (Redirected from 1500 BCE) Centuries: 17th century BC - 16th century BC - 15th century BC Decades: 1550s BC 1540s BC 1530s BC 1520s BC 1510s BC - 1500s BC - 1490s BC 1480s BC 1470s BC 1460s BC 1450s BC Events and Trends Stonehenge built in Wiltshire, England The element Mercury has been... Carving from the ridgepole of a Māori house, ca 1840 Polynesia (from Greek: πολύς many, νῆσος island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands scattered over the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ... Centuries: 11th century BC - 10th century BC - 9th century BC Decades: 950s BC 940s BC 930s BC 920s BC 910s BC - 900s BC - 890s BC 880s BC 870s BC 860s BC 850s BC Events and trends 909 BC - Zhou xiao wang becomes King of the Zhou Dynasty of China. ... Centuries: 8th century BC - 7th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 650s BC 640s BC 630s BC 620s BC 610s BC - 600s BC - 590s BC 580s BC 570s BC 560s BC 550s BC Events and Trends Fall of the Assyrian Empire and Rise of Babylon 609 BC _ King Josiah... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC Events and trends September 13, 509 BC - The temple of Jupiter on Romes Capitoline Hill is... map of Melanesia Melanesia (from Greek: μέλας black, νῆσος island) is a subregion of Oceania extending from the western side of the West Pacific to the Arafura Sea, north and northeast of Australia. ... Indigenous Fijians are the major indigenous people of the Fiji Islands. ... // Events January 21 - Abel Tasman discovers Tonga February 6 - Abel Tasman discovers the Fiji islands. ... Portrait of Tasman Abel Janszoon Tasman (1603 - October 10, 1659), was a Dutch seafarer, explorer, and merchant. ... Vanua Levu is the second largest island of Fiji, and was formerly known as Sandalwood Island. ... Taveuni is the third-largest island in Fiji, after Vanua Levu and Viti Levu, and has a population of around 12,000. ...


In the history of French Polynesia, the French Polynesian island groups do not share a common history before the establishment of the French protectorate in 1889. The first French Polynesian islands to be settled by Polynesians were the Marquesas Islands in AD 300 and the Society Islands in CE 800. The Polynesians were organized in petty chieftainships. [12] National motto: Tahiti Nui Marearea Official languages French, Tahitian Political status Dependent territory (Pays doutre-mer) Capital Papeete Largest City Papeete President Oscar Temaru Area  - Total  - % water 4,167 km² 12% Population  - Total (2002)  - Density 245,405 64/km² Currency CFP franc Time zone UTC -10 Internet... Polynesia (from Greek, poly = many and nesi = island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands in the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ... National motto: Mau‘u‘u ha‘e iti Official languages French, Tahitian Political status Dependent territory, administrative division of French Polynesia Capital Tai o Hae Largest City Tai o Hae Area 1,274 km² ( 492 sq. ... Map of Society Islands One of the islands. ...


European discovery in the History of the Galapagos Islands occurred when Dominican Fray Tomás de Berlanga, the fourth Bishop of Panama, sailed to Peru to settle a dispute between Francisco Pizarro and his lieutenants. De Berlanga's vessel drifted off course when the winds diminished, and his party reached the islands on March 10, 1535. According to a 1956 study by Thor Heyerdahl and Arne Skjølsvold, remains of potsherds and other artifacts from several sites on the islands suggest visitation by South American peoples prior to the arrival of the Spanish. Statue of Fray Tomás in Berlanga de Duero Fray Tomás de Berlanga (1487-1551) was born in Berlanga de Duero in Soria, Spain. ... Francisco Pizarro Francisco Pizarro González should not be confused with another Francisco Pizarro who joined Hernán Cortés to conquer the Aztecs. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... pie is nice Year 1535 was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Hi Every Body For the cruiseferry, see: M/S Thor Heyerdahl Thor Heyerdahl Thor Heyerdahl (October 6, 1914 Larvik, Norway – April 18, 2002 Colla Micheri, Italy) was a Norwegian ethnographer and adventurer with a scientific background in zoology and geography. ...


The History of Guam involves phases including the early arrival of people known today as the ancient Chamorros, the development of "pre-contact" society, Spanish colonization, and the present American rule of the island. Guam's history of colonialism is the longest among the Pacific islands. Depiction of latte stone colonnades on the island of Tinian. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Colonialism. ...


Historical evidence suggests that Howland Island was the site of prehistoric settlement, which may have extended down to Rawaki, Kanton, Manra and Orona of the Phoenix Islands 500 to 700 km southeast. This settlement might have taken the form of a single community utilising several adjacent islands, but the hard life on these isolated islands, together with the uncertainty of fresh water supplies, led to an extinction of or dereliction by the settled peoples, in such a way that other islands in the area (such as Kiritimati and Pitcairn) were abandoned.[13] Such settlements probably began around 1000 BCE, when eastern Melanesians travelled north.[14] Rawaki Island is one of the Phoenix Islands in the Republic of Kiribati, also known by its previous name of Phoenix Island. ... Canton Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Kanton Island (also known as Canton Island or Abariringa Island), alternatively Mary Island, Mary Balcout Island or Swallow Island, is the largest, most northern, and, as of 2005, the sole inhabited island of the Phoenix Islands, Republic of Kiribati. ... Manra Island is one of the Phoenix Islands in the Republic of Kiribati. ... Orona atoll, formerly known as Hull Island, is one of the Phoenix Islands in the Republic of Kiribati. ... The Phoenix Islands are a group of eight atolls, plus two submerged coral reefs in the central Pacific Ocean, east of the Gilbert Islands and west of the Line Islands. ... For the island in the Indian Ocean, see Christmas Island. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... map of Melanesia Melanesia (from Greek: μέλας black, νῆσος island) is a subregion of Oceania extending from the western side of the West Pacific to the Arafura Sea, north and northeast of Australia. ...


The history of Jarvis Island begins with the island's first known sighting by Europeans was on 21 August 1821 by the British ship Eliza Francis (or Eliza Frances) owned by Edward, Thomas and William Jarvis[15][16] and commanded by Captain Brown. In March 1857 the uninhabited island was claimed for the United States under the Guano Islands Act and formally annexed on 27 February 1858. The Guano Islands Act (48 U.S.C. ch. ...


In the history of Kiribati, the islands which now form the Republic of Kiribati have been inhabited for at least seven hundred years, and possibly much longer. The initial Micronesian population, which remains the overwhelming majority today, was visited by Polynesian and Melanesian invaders before the first European sailors "discovered" the islands in the 16th century. For much of the subsequent period, the main island chain, the Gilbert Islands, was ruled as part of the British Empire. The country gained its independence in 1979 and has since been known as Kiribati. Polynesia (from Greek, poly = many and nesi = island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands in the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ... Melanesia (from Greek black islands) is a region extending from the west Pacific to the Arafura Sea, north and north-east of Australia. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... It has been suggested that Central Gilberts be merged into this article or section. ... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ...


In the history of Marquesas Islands, the first recorded settlers of the Marquesas were Polynesians, who, from archеological evidence, are believed to have arrived before 100 AD. Ethnological and linguistic evidence suggests that they likely arrived from the region of Tonga and Samoa. The islands were given their name by the Spanish explorer Álvaro de Mendaña de Neira who reached them on 21 July 1595. He named them after his patron, García Hurtado de Mendoza, Marquis of Cañete, who was Viceroy of Peru at the time. Mendaña visited first Fatu Hiva and then Tahuata before continuing on to the Solomon Islands. The Marquesas Islands is a group of islands in French Polynesia. ... Polynesia (from Greek, poly = many and nesi = island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands in the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ... (Redirected from 100 AD) For other uses, see number 100. ... Álvaro de Mendaña de Neira. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 30 - William Shakespeares Romeo and Juliet is performed for the first time. ... García Hurtado de Mendoza, governor of Chile and viceroy of Perú García Hurtado de Mendoza y Manrique, Marquis of Cañete (Spanish: García Hurtado de Mendoza y Manrique, marqués de Cañete) (Cuenca, July 21, 1535 - Madrid, 1609) was a Spanish soldier, governor of Chile, and... Created in 1542, the Viceroyalty of Peru (in Spanish, Virreinato del Perú) contained most of Spanish-ruled South America until the creation of the separate viceroyalties of New Granada (now Colombia, Ecuador, Panamá and Venezuela, the last-named previously in the Viceroyalty of New Spain) in 1717 and Río... Country France French Polynesia Archipelago Marquesas Islands Region South Pacific Ocean Area 32. ... Map of Tahuata (modified from a screenshot of a map from MSMaps) Tahuata is the smallest of the inhabited Marquesas Islands. ...


In the history of Melanesia, the original inhabitants of the islands now named Melanesia were likely the ancestors of the present day Papuan-speaking people. These people are thought to have occupied New Guinea tens of millennia ago and reached the islands 35,000 years ago (according to radiocarbon dating). They appear to have occupied these islands as far east as the main islands in the Solomon Islands (i.e., including San Cristobal) and perhaps even to the smaller islands farther to the east.[17] The Island of Makira (formerly San Cristobal) in the Solomon Islands is the largest island of Makira/Ulawa Province. ...


The ancestors of the Micronesians in the history of Micronesia settled there over 4,000 years ago. A decentralized chieftain-based system eventually evolved into a more centralized economic and religious empire centered on Yap. European explorers - first the Portuguese in search of the Spice Islands (Indonesia) and then the Spanish - reached the Carolines in the 16th century, with the Spanish establishing sovereignty. YAP (which stands for Yet Another Previewer or Yet Another Prolog) is the acronym used for two document previewing applications and one Prolog compiler. ... Spice Islands most commonly refers to the Maluku Islands (formerly the Moluccas), which lie on the equator, between Sulawesi (Celebes) and New Guinea in what is now Indonesia. ...


Researchers of the History of the Marshall Islands agree on little more than that successive waves of migratory peoples from Southeast Asia spread across the Western Pacific about 3,000 years ago, and that some of them landed on and remained on these islands. The Spanish explorer Alonso de Salazar landed there in 1529. They were named for English explorer John Marshall, who visited them in 1799. The Marshall Islands were claimed by Spain in 1874. Following papal mediation and German compensation of $4.5 million, Spain recognized Germany's claim in 1885, which established a protectorate and set up trading stations on the islands of Jaluit and Ebon to carry out the flourishing copra (dried coconut meat) trade. Marshallese Iroij (high chiefs) continued to rule under indirect colonial German administration. Net migration rates for 2006: positive (blue), negative (orange) and stable (green). ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Alonso de Salazar was the first European (Spanish) explorer to discover the Marshall Islands on August 21, 1526. ... Events April 22 - Treaty of Saragossa divides the eastern hemisphere between Spain and Portugal, stipulating that the dividing line should lie 297. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... See also explorations, sea explorers, astronaut, conquistador, travelogue, the History of Science and Technology and Biography. ... John Marshall was born in Ramsgate,Kent,England on 15 February 1748. ... Year 1799 (MDCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday [1]of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Pope John Paul II has reigned since 22 Oct 1978. ... Year 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about states protected and/or dominated by a foreign power. ... Jaluit Atoll is an atoll of 91 islands in the Pacific Ocean. ... , Ebon Atoll is an atoll of 22 islands in the Pacific Ocean. ... Copra drying in the sun Copra is the dried meat, or kernel, of the coconut. ... For other uses, see Coconut (disambiguation). ...


In the history of New Caledonia, the diverse group of people that settled over the Melanesian archipelagos are known as the Lapita. They arrived in the archipelago now commonly known as New Caledonia and the Loyalty Islands around 1500 BCE. The Lapita were highly skilled navigators and agriculturists with influence over a large area of the Pacific. From about the 11th century Polynesians also arrived and mixed with the populations of the archipelago. Europeans first sighted New Caledonia and the Loyalty Islands in the late 18th century. The British explorer James Cook sighted Grande Terre in 1774 and named it New Caledonia, Caledonia being the Latin name for Scotland. During the same voyage he also named the islands to the north of New Caledonia the New Hebrides (now Vanuatu), after the islands north of Scotland. Melanesia (from Greek black islands) is a region extending from the west Pacific to the Arafura Sea, north and north-east of Australia. ... The Mergui Archipelago The Archipelago Sea, situated between the Gulf of Bothnia and the Gulf of Finland, the largest archipelago in the world by the number of islands. ... Lapita is the common name of an ancient Pacific Ocean culture which is believed by some to be the common ancestor of several cultures in Polynesia and surrounding areas. ... The Mergui Archipelago The Archipelago Sea, situated between the Gulf of Bothnia and the Gulf of Finland, the largest archipelago in the world by the number of islands. ... The Loyalty Islands. ... Lapita is the common name of an ancient Pacific Ocean culture which is believed by some to be the common ancestor of several cultures in Polynesia and surrounding areas. ... The Navigators is a worldwide Christian parachurch organization headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA. Its main purpose is the discipling (training) of Christians with a particular emphasis on enabling them to share their faith with others. ... For other meanings of Pacific, see Pacific (disambiguation). ... This article is about the British explorer. ... Guadeloupe consists of two islands separated by a salt river and whose combined shape resembles a butterfly. ... The New Hebrides are an island group in the South Pacific that now form the nation of Vanuatu. ...


The History of Papua New Guinea can be traced back to about 60,000 years ago when people first migrated towards the Australian continent. The written history began when European navigators first sighted New Guinea in the early part of the 16th century. Archaeological evidence indicates that humans arrived on New Guinea at least 60,000 years ago, probably by sea from Southeast Asia during an ice age period when the sea was lower and distances between islands shorter. For an overview of the geological history of the continent of which New Guinea is a part, see Australia-New Guinea. Although the first arrivals were hunters and gatherers, early evidence shows that people managed the forest environment to provide food. The gardens of the New Guinea highlands are ancient, intensive permacultures, adapted to high population densities, very high rainfalls (as high as 10,000mm/yr (400in/yr)), earthquakes, hilly land, and occasional frost. There are indications that gardening was being practiced at the same time that agriculture was developing in Mesopotamia and Egypt. The Australian continental shelf (light blue) is contiguous with New Guinea, but not with other Pacific islands like New Zealand. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... Australia-New Guinea, also called Sahul or Meganesia, is made up of the continent of Australia and the islands of New Guinea and Tasmania. ... In anthropology, the hunter-gatherer way of life is that led by certain societies of the Neolithic Era based on the exploitation of wild plants and animals. ... Permaculture Mandala summarising the ethics and principles of permaculture design. ... Mesopotamia was a cradle of civilization geographically located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, largely corresponding to modern-day Iraq. ...


In the History of Samoa, contact with Europeans began in the early 1700s but did not intensify until the arrival of the English. In 1722, Dutchman Jacob Roggeveen was the first European to sight the islands. Missionaries and traders arrived in the 1830s. Halfway through the 19th century, the United Kingdom, Germany and the United States all claimed parts of the kingdom of Samoa, and established trade posts. King Malietoa Leaupepe died in 1898 and was succeeded by Malietoa Tooa Mataafa. The US and British consuls supported Malietoa Tanu, Leaupepe's son. US and British warships, including the USS Philadelphia shelled Apia on March 15, 1899. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Events and trends The Bonneville Slide blocks the Columbia River near the site of present-day Cascade Locks, Oregon with a land bridge 200 feet (60 m) high. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... // Events Abraham De Moivre states De Moivres theorem connecting trigonometric functions and complex numbers Publication of the first book of Bachs Well-Tempered Clavier Fall of Persias Safavid dynasty during a bloody revolt of the Afghani people. ... For other uses, see Netherlands (disambiguation). ... Jacob Roggeveen (January 1659 - 31 January 1729) was a Dutch explorer who was sent to find Terra Australis, but he instead discovered Easter Island by chance. ... For other uses, see Missionary (disambiguation). ... // Electromagnetic induction discovered by Michael Faraday Evolutionary theorist Charles Darwins expedition on the HMS Beagle. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... A trading post is a place where trading of goods takes place. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The fourth USS Philadelphia (C-4), also known as Cruiser No. ... Apia, Samoa is the capital of Samoa. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In the History of the Society Islands, the archipelago is generally believed to have been named by Captain James Cook in honor of the Royal Society, sponsor of the first British scientific survey of the islands; however, Cook states in his journal that he called the islands Society "as they lay contiguous to one another"[18]. The Mergui Archipelago The Archipelago Sea, situated between the Gulf of Bothnia and the Gulf of Finland, the largest archipelago in the world by the number of islands. ... This article is about the British explorer. ... For other uses, see Royal Society (disambiguation). ...


The human history of the Solomon Islands begins with the first settlement at least 30,000 years ago from New Guinea. They represented the furthest expansion of humans into the Pacific until the expansion of Austronesian-language speakers through the area around 4000 BCE, bringing new agricultural and maritime technology. Most of the languages spoken today in the Solomon Islands derive from this era, but some thirty languages of the pre-Austronesian settlers survive (see East Papuan languages). Ships of the Spanish explorer Álvaro de Mendaña de Neira first sighted Santa Isabel island on 7 February 1568. Finding signs of alluvial gold on Guadalcanal, Mendaña believed he had found the source of King Solomon's wealth, and consequently named the islands "The Islands of Solomon". In 1595 and 1605 Spain again sent several expeditions to find the islands and establish a colony, however these were unsuccessful. In 1767 Captain Philip Carteret rediscovered Santa Cruz and Malaita. Later, Dutch, French and British navigators visited the islands; their reception was often hostile. Pacific redirects here. ... Austronesian redirects here. ... The East Papuan languages, also called the East Papuan phylum, is a hypothetical family of Papuan languages spoken on the islands east of New Guinea, including New Britain, New Ireland, Bougainville, the Solomon Islands, and the Santa Cruz Islands. ... Álvaro de Mendaña de Neira. ... Solomon Islands map, highlighting Santa Isabel Santa Isabel, neighbouring islands, and towns and villages Santa Isabel Island is the longest in the Solomon Islands, South Pacific, and the largest in Isabel Province. ... It has been suggested that Sulayman be merged into this article or section. ... Philip Carteret (1733 - 1796) was a British naval officer and explorer who participated in the Royal Navys circumnavigation expedition of 1766. ... The Santa Cruz Islands are a group of islands in the Pacific Ocean, part of Temotu Province of the Solomon Islands. ... Malaita Province is one of the largest provinces of the Solomon Islands. ...


Archaeological evidence indicates that history of Tokelau's atol — Atafu, Nukunonu, and Fakaofo — were settled about 1000 years ago, probably by voyages from Samoa, the Cook Islands and Tuvalu. Oral history traces local traditions and genealogies back several hundred years.[19] Inhabitants followed Polynesian mythology with the local god Tui Tokelau; and developed forms of music (see Music of Tokelau) and art. The three atolls functioned largely independently while maintaining social and linguistic cohesion. Tokelauan society was governed by chiefly clans, and there were occasional inter-atoll skirmishes and wars as well as inter-marriage. Fakaofo, the "chiefly island,"[20] held some dominance over Atafu and Nukunonu. Life on the atolls was subsistence-based, with reliance on fish and coconut.[19] Commodore John Byron discovered Atafu on 24 June 1765 and named it "Duke of York's Island." Parties onshore reported that there were no signs of current or previous inhabitants.[21][22] Atafu, formerly known as the Duke of York Group is a group of coral islets within Tokelau in the south Pacific Ocean. ... Nukunonu, formerly known as the Duke of Clarence Group, is a group of coral islets within Tokelau in the south Pacific Ocean. ... Fakaofo, formerly known as the Bowditch Island, is a group of coral islets within Tokelau in the south Pacific Ocean. ... Polynesian mythology is the oral traditions of the people of Polynesia (meaning many islands in Greek) a grouping of Central and South Pacific Ocean island archipelagos in the Polynesian triangle together with the scattered cultures known as the Polynesian outliers. ... Tokelau is a non-self-governing territory of New Zealand, located in the Pacific Ocean. ... For other uses, see Clan (disambiguation). ... -1... Matrimony redirects here. ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Coconut (disambiguation). ... John Byron (November 8, 1723 – April 10, 1786) was a British vice-admiral. ... Atafu, formerly known as the Duke of York Group is a group of coral islets within Tokelau in the south Pacific Ocean. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1765 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The History of Tonga stretches back to around roughly 4000 BCE. when the Polynesians arrived. Tonga became known as the Tongan Empire through extensive trading. The Europeans arrived in the 17th century which was followed after a couple hundred years by a single unified Tongan kingdom. Archaeological evidence shows that the first settlers in Tonga sailed from the Santa Cruz Islands, as part of the original Austronesian-speakers' (Lapita) migration which originated out of S.E. Asia some 6000 years before present. Archaeological dating places Tonga as the oldest known site in Polynesia for the distinctive Lapita ceramic ware, at 2800—2750 years before present. Polynesia (from Greek, poly = many and nesi = island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands in the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ... The TuÊ»i Tonga Empire or Tongan Empire was a powerful Oceanian empire. ... The Santa Cruz Islands are a group of islands in the Pacific Ocean, part of Temotu Province of the Solomon Islands. ... Lapita is the common name of an ancient Pacific Ocean culture which is believed by some to be the common ancestor of several cultures in Polynesia and surrounding areas. ...


In the history of Tuamotu, the Tuamotus were first discovered by Ferdinand Magellan, during his circumglobal voyage in 1521. From the Inca Empire, Tupac Inca Yupanqui is also credited with leading a circa 10 month-long voyage of exploration into the Pacific around 1480. None of these visits were of political consequence, the islands being in the sphere of influence of the Pomare dynasty of Tahiti. At the beginning 18th century the first Christian missionaries arrived. The islands' pearls penetrated the European market in the late 1800s, making them a coveted possession. Following the forced abdication of King Pomare V of Tahiti, the islands were annexed as an overseas territory of France For the Presidential railcar named Ferdinand Magellan, see Ferdinand Magellan Railcar. ... Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther in the papal bull Decet Romanum Pontificem. ... For the a general view of Inca civilisation, people and culture, see Incas. ... Drawing of Tupac Inca Yupanqui by Guaman Poma (1615 CE) Tupac Inca Yupanqui (a. ... Tahiti is the largest island in the Windward group of the French Polynesia, located in the archipelago of Society Islands in the southern Pacific Ocean. ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... For other uses, see Missionary (disambiguation). ... Pomare V (3 November 1839 - 12 June 1891) was the last king of Tahiti, reigning from 1877 until his forced abdication in 1880. ... Tahiti is the largest island in the Windward group of the French Polynesia, located in the archipelago of Society Islands in the southern Pacific Ocean. ... Types of administrative and/or political territories include: A legally administered territory, which is a non-sovereign geographic area that has come under the authority of another government. ...


In the history of Vanuatu, the commonly held theory of Vanuatu's prehistory from archaeological evidence supports that peoples speaking Austronesian languages first came to the islands some 4,000 to 6,000 years ago.[23] Pottery fragments have been found dating back to 1300 B.C.[24] What little is known of the pre-European contact history of Vanuatu has been gleaned from oral histories and legends. One important early king was Roy Mata, who united several tribes, and was buried in a large mound with several retainers. The first island in the Vanuatu group discovered by Spaniards was Espiritu Santo when, in 1606, the Portuguese explorer, Pedro Fernández de Quirós, spied what he thought was a southern continent. Europeans did not return until 1768, when Louis Antoine de Bougainville rediscovered the islands. Stonehenge, England, erected by Neolithic peoples ca. ... Austronesian redirects here. ... Pottery on display in Dilli Haat, Delhi, India. ... Espiritu Santo (Spanish: Holy Ghost) is is the largest island in the nation of Vanuatu. ... Explorer redirects here. ... Pedro Fernández de Quirós (1565 - 1614) (in Portuguese Pedro Fernandes de Queirós), was a Portuguese seaman and explorer. ... Animated, colour-coded map showing the various continents. ... Louis-Antoine de Bougainville, by Jean-Pierre Franquel Louis-Antoine, comte de Bougainville (November 12, 1729 Paris - August 20, 1811 Paris) was a French navigator and military commander. ...


See also

Tuamotu, French Polynesia The Pacific Ocean contains an estimated 20,000 to 30,000 islands (the exact number has yet to be precisely determined). ...

References

  1. ^ Taylor (2003), pages 5-7
  2. ^ Taylor, Jean Gelman. Indonesia. New Haven and London: Yale University Press. pp. pp.8–9. ISBN 0-300-10518-5. 
  3. ^ Global archaeological evidence for proboscidean overkill, Todd Surovell et al., Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2005
  4. ^ Dolan 1991-3
  5. ^ Gaspar, Roger Gerard B, Sacred Homes of the Ekklesia: The Colonial Churches of the Philippines, University of Hawaii, http://www2.hawaii.edu/~gaspar/churches.html, retrieved on 2008-02-05 
  6. ^ Cebu, bartleby.com, citing The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-07, http://www.bartleby.com/65/ce/Cebu.html, retrieved on 2008-02-05 
  7. ^ "Philippines, The". The Columbia Encyclopedia (6th ed.). Columbia University Press. 2007. http://www.bartleby.com/65/ph/PhilipRep.html. 
  8. ^ ([dead link]Scholar search) Philippines - Intro, CIA World Factbook, https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/RP.html, retrieved on 2008-02-05 
  9. ^ Blust, Robert. "Subgrouping, circularity and extinction: some issues in Austronesian comparative linguistics," (1999)
  10. ^ Hill et al., "A Mitochondrial Stratigraphy for Island Southeast Asia," (2007); Bird et al., "Populating PEP II: the dispersal of humans and agriculture through Austral-Asia and Oceania," (2004)
  11. ^ CIP, "Statistics of Indigenous Population in Taiwan and Fukien Areas," (2006)
  12. ^ Ganse, Alexander. "History of Polynesia, before 1797". http://www.zum.de/whkmla/region/pacific/frpolynpre1797.html. Retrieved on 2007-10-20. 
  13. ^ Irwin, pp. 176–179.
  14. ^ Suárez 2004, p. 17.
  15. ^ "North Pacific Pilot page 282" (png). http://jarvisisland.info/north_pacific_pilot.html#282. Retrieved on 2007-01-26. 
  16. ^ "R. v. Higgins, Fuller, Anderson, Thomas, Belford and Walsh". legal proceeding. http://www.law.mq.edu.au/scnsw/Cases1833-34/html/r_v_higgins_and_others__1833.htm. Retrieved on 2007-01-25. 
  17. ^ Dunn, Michael, Angela Terrill, Ger Reesink, Robert A. Foley, Stephen C. Levinson (2005). "Structural Phylogenetics and the Reconstruction of Ancient Language History". Science 309: 2072–2075. doi:10.1126/science.1114615. PMID 16179483. 
  18. ^ Horwitz, Tony. Oct. 2003, Blue Latitudes: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before, Bloomsbury, ISBN 0-7475-6455-8
  19. ^ a b "Tokelau". New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade. http://www.mfat.govt.nz/Countries/Pacific/Tokelau.php. Retrieved on 2007-09-29. 
  20. ^ "Fakaofo". http://www.fakaofo.tk/page001.html. Retrieved on 2007-09-29. 
  21. ^ John Byron, John Samuel Wallis, Philip Carteret, James Cook, Joseph Banks (1773). An Account of the Voyages Undertaken by the Order of His Present Majesty for making discoveries in the southern hemisphere and successfully performed by Commodore Byron, Captain Carteret, Captain Wallis and Captain Cook in the Dolphin, the Swallow, and the Endeavour. pp. 132, 133. http://books.google.com/books?id=8lgBAAAAYAAJ. Retrieved on 2007-09-29. 
  22. ^ MacGregor, 30
  23. ^ "A Pacific engaged: Australias (sic) relations with Papua New Guinea and the island states of the southwest Pacific", Australian Senate, August 12, 2003, p.288
  24. ^ Ron Adams, "History (from Vanuatu)", Encyclopædia Britannica, 2006
The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, usually referred to as PNAS, is the official journal of the United States National Academy of Sciences. ... This article is about the University of Hawaii system. ... The Columbia Encyclopedia is a one-volume encyclopedia produced by Columbia University Press and sold by the Gale Group. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... Tony Horwitz is a reporter and author of the acclaimed books Confederates In The Attic and Baghdad Without A Map. ... the New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT) is the New Zealand Government ministry responsible for promoting New Zealands interests in trade and international relations. ... The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ...

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