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Encyclopedia > History of the New York Yankees

The New York Yankees have a long history filled with many high points, milestones, and championships. With 26 world champions, they are the winningest team in baseball, and have acomplished this feat with the help of such names as Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, and Babe Ruth. Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as Americans... Henry Louis Gehrig (June 19, 1903 — June 2, 1941) was a Major League first baseman who played his entire career for the New York Yankees. ... Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ... Mickey Mantle on a 1953 cover of Time Magazine. ... For the band named Babe Ruth, see Babe Ruth (band). ...

Contents

Origins

At the end of the 1900 season the American League (AL) re-organized and, with its president Ban Johnson as the driving force, decided to assert itself as a new major league. Previously known as the Western League until 1899, the AL carried over five of its previous locations and added three more on the East Coast, including one in Baltimore, Maryland, which had lost its National League team when that league contracted the year before. The intention of Johnson and the American League had been to place a team in New York City, but their efforts had been stymied by the political connections that owners of the National League New York Giants had with Tammany Hall. See also: 1899 in sports, other events of 1900, 1901 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Ice Hockey Montreal Shamrocks defeat Halifax to win their 2nd straight Stanley Cup. ... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Byron Bancroft Johnson (January 5, 1864 - March 28, 1931) was an American executive in Major League Baseball who served as the founder and first president of the American League. ... Nickname: Monument City, Charm City, Mob Town, B-more, Balmerr,Bodymore, Murderland Motto: The Greatest City in America (formerly The City That Reads; Get In On It is not the citys motto, but rather the advertising slogan of the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association; BELIEVE is not the... The Baltimore Orioles were a 19th century American Association and National League team from 1882 to 1899. ... Nickname: Big Apple, City that never Sleeps, Gotham Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Manhattan Queens Brooklyn Staten Island Settled 1613 Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3,4,11,24,27,30,36,44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885-1957) New York Gothams (1883-1885) Troy Union Cities / Trojans (1879-1882) Ballpark AT&T Park (2000... Tammany Hall was the name given to the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in New York City politics from the 1790s to the 1960s. ...


When the team began play as the Baltimore Orioles in 1901, it was managed by John McGraw. As a result of a feud with league president Ban Johnson, who rigidly enforced rules about rowdiness on the field of play, McGraw jumped leagues to manage the New York Giants in the middle of the 1902 season. A week later the owner of the Giants also gained controlling interest of the Orioles and raided the team for players, after which the league took control of the team, still intending to move the franchise to New York when and if possible. The following are the baseball events of the year 1901 throughout the world. ... John Joseph McGraw (April 7, 1873–February 25, 1934), nicknamed Little Napoleon and Muggsy, was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... See also: 1901 in sports, other events of 1902, 1903 in sports and the list of years in sports. // American Football January 1 - The first Rose Bowl game is played in Pasadena, California December 28 - The first indoor professional American football game is played in New York City at Madison...


In January 1903, the American and National Leagues held a "peace conference" to settle conflicts over player contract disputes and to agree on future cooperation. The NL also agreed that the "junior circuit" could establish a franchise in New York. The AL's Baltimore franchise became the New York franchise when its new owners, Frank Farrell and William Devery, were able to find a ballpark location not blocked by the Giants. Farrell and Devery both had deep ties into city politics and gambling. Farrell owned a casino and several pool halls, while Devery had served as a blatantly corrupt chief of the New York City police and had only been forced out of the department at the start of 1902. See also: 1902 in sports, 1904 in sports and the list of years in sports. Cycling First Tour de France won by Maurice Garin Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League Collingwood wins the 7th VFL Premiership (Collingwood 4. ...


The Highlanders

The original Highlanders logo
The original Highlanders logo

The franchise's first park in New York was located at 165th Street and Broadway in Manhattan, near the highest point on the island. Consequently the field was known as Hilltop Park and the team quickly became known as the New York Highlanders. The name was also a reference to the noted British military unit The Gordon Highlanders, as the team president from 1903 to 1906 was named Joseph Gordon. Today the site of the original Hilltop Park is occupied by buildings of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. Image File history File links Highlanders. ... Image File history File links Highlanders. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City, and is the oldest north-south main thoroughfare in the city, dating to the first New Amsterdam settlement. ... The Borough of Manhattan, highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Hilltop Park was a baseball stadium that formerly stood in the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. ... The Gordon Highlanders was a British Army infantry regiment from 1881 until 1994. ... New York-Presbyterian Hospital is a prominent university hospital in New York City, composed of two medical centers, Columbia University Medical Center and New York Weill Cornell Medical Center, each affiliated with an Ivy League University. ...


As the Highlanders, the team enjoyed success only twice, finishing in second place in 1904 and 1910; but otherwise, much of its first fifteen years in New York was spent in the cellar. Its somewhat corrupt ownership, along with the questionable activities of some players, notably first baseman Hal Chase, raised suspicions of game-fixing, but little of that was ever proven. See also: 1903 in sports, 1905 in sports and the list of years in sports. Baseball May 5: Boston Americans ace Cy Young pitched the second of his three no-hitters, a 3-0 perfect game against the Philadelphia Athletics and pitcher Rube Waddell (the final batter he faced). ... See also: 1909 in sports, 1911 in sports and the list of years in sports. Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League - Collingwood wins the 14th VFL Premiership (Collingwood 9. ... Hal Chase, of the Chicago White Sox, at Comiskey Park. ...

Hilltop Park, home of the Highlanders
Hilltop Park, home of the Highlanders

The Highlanders' best chance came on the last day of the 1904 season, at the Hilltop. New York pitcher Jack Chesbro threw a wild pitch in the ninth inning which allowed the eventual pennant-winning run to score for the Boston Americans. This event had historical significance in several ways. First, the presence of the Highlanders in the race had led the Giants to announce the team would not participate in the World Series against a "minor league" team. Although Boston had won the pennant, the Giants still refused to participate. The resulting tongue-lashing of the Giants by the media stung its owner, John T. Brush, who then led a committee that formalized the rules governing the World Series. 1904 was the last year a Series was not played, until the strike-truncated year of 1994. For fans of the team formally named the Red Sox in 1908, the 1904 season ending game would prove to be the last time Boston would defeat the Yankees in a pennant-deciding game for a century. Image File history File links Hilltop4. ... Image File history File links Hilltop4. ... Jack Chesbro on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card. ... In baseball, a wild pitch (WP) is charged to a pitcher when a pitch is too high, too low, or too wide of home plate for the catcher to field capably, thereby allowing one or more runners to advance or to score. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1 • 4 • 8 • 9 • 27 • 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1907–present) See Nicknames before Red Sox for disputed nicknames Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds (1901-1911) Major league titles World... John T. Brush was the owner of the New York Giants in the first decades of the 20th Century. ...

The Polo Grounds, home of the Yankees from 1913 to 1922
The Polo Grounds, home of the Yankees from 1913 to 1922

From 1913 to 1922 the team would play in the Polo Grounds, a park owned by its National League rivals, the Giants. Relations between the clubs had warmed when the Giants were allowed to lease Hilltop Park while the Polo Grounds was being rebuilt in 1911 following a disastrous fire. During the early 1900s, the nickname "Yankees" was occasionally applied to the club, as a variant on "Americans." Publisher William Randolph Hearst's New York Evening Journal called the team the "Invaders" in 1903, but switched to "Highlanders" in the spring of 1904. On April 7, 1904, a spring training story from Richmond, Virginia carried the headline: "Yankees Will Start Home From South To-Day." The April 14, 1904 opening day headline on page one of the New York Evening Journal screamed: "YANKEES BEAT BOSTON."[1] The name grew in popularity over the team's first decade. With the change of parks in 1913, the "Highlanders" reference became obsolete, and the team nickname became exclusively "Yankees". Before very long, "New York Yankees" had become the official nickname of the club. Image File history File links Scaled-down photo of the Polo Grounds the way it looked after 1911 resurrection and before 1923 remodeling. ... Image File history File links Scaled-down photo of the Polo Grounds the way it looked after 1911 resurrection and before 1923 remodeling. ... The Polo Grounds was the name given to four different stadiums in New York City used by Major League Baseballs New York Giants from 1883 until 1957, New York Metropolitans from 1883 until 1885, the New York Yankees from 1912 until 1922, and by the New York Mets in... See also: 1912 in sports, other events of 1913, 1914 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Baseball The Brooklyn Dodgers the John McGraws New York Giants to win the World Series Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League - Fitzroy wins the 17th VFL Premiership (Fitzroy 7. ... See also: 1921 in sports, other events of 1922, 1923 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League - Fitzroy wins the 26th VFL Premiership (Fitzroy 11. ... The Polo Grounds was the name given to four different stadiums in New York City used by Major League Baseballs New York Giants from 1883 until 1957, New York Metropolitans from 1883 until 1885, the New York Yankees from 1912 until 1922, and by the New York Mets in... William Randolph Hearst (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate, born in San Francisco, California. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... See also: 1903 in sports, 1905 in sports and the list of years in sports. Baseball May 5: Boston Americans ace Cy Young pitched the second of his three no-hitters, a 3-0 perfect game against the Philadelphia Athletics and pitcher Rube Waddell (the final batter he faced). ... Nickname: River City, Cap City, R-V-A Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent City Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (D) Area    - City 62. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (105th in leap years). ... See also: 1903 in sports, 1905 in sports and the list of years in sports. Baseball May 5: Boston Americans ace Cy Young pitched the second of his three no-hitters, a 3-0 perfect game against the Philadelphia Athletics and pitcher Rube Waddell (the final batter he faced). ...


By the mid 1910s, owners Farrell and Devery had become estranged and both were in need of money. At the start of 1915, they sold the team to Colonel Jacob Ruppert and Captain Tillinghast L'Hommedieu Huston. Ruppert inherited a brewery fortune and had also been tied to the Tammany Hall machine, serving as a U.S. Congressman for eight years. He later said, "For $450,000 we got an orphan ball club, without a home of its own, without players of outstanding ability, without prestige." But now with an owner possessing deep pockets, and a willingness to dig into them to produce a winning team, the Yankees were on their way to acquiring more prestige than Ruppert could have envisioned. See also: 1914 in sports, 1916 in sports and the list of years in sports. Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League - Carlton wins the 19th VFL Premiership (Carlton 11. ... Jacob Ruppert (August 5, 1867-January 13, 1939), sometimes referred to as Jake Ruppert, was a National Guard colonel and brewery owner who went on to own the New York Yankees. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ...


The Ruth and Gehrig era

Perhaps one of the greatest ironies of the Yankees dominance comes from its roots. The Yankees detente with the Boston Red Sox and Chicago White Sox circa 1920 (all three collectively known as the "Insurrectos") paid off well. Over the next few years the new owners would begin to enlarge the payroll. Many of the newly acquired players who would later contribute to the team's success came from the Boston Red Sox, whose owner, theater impresario Harry Frazee, had bought his team on credit and needed money to pay off his loans and purchase Fenway Park from the Fenway Park Trust. Further, as Frazee owned the strongest of the "Insurrectos" franchises, which antagonized A.L. President Ban Johnson, Frazee faced most of the legal battles which proved costly.[2] From 1919 to 1922, the Yankees acquired pitchers Waite Hoyt, Carl Mays and Herb Pennock, catcher Wally Schang, shortstop Everett Scott and third baseman Joe Dugan, all from the Red Sox. Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1 • 4 • 8 • 9 • 27 • 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1907–present) See Nicknames before Red Sox for disputed nicknames Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds (1901-1911) Major league titles World... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2,3,4,9,11,16,19,72 Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) White Stockings <no city in official name, but based in Chicago> (1901-1903) Ballpark U.S. Cellular Field (1991–present) Comiskey... Harry H. Frazee (1881 - June 4, 1929) was the baseball team owner who sold Babe Ruth to the New York Yankees. ... See also: 1918 in sports, other events of 1919, 1920 in sports and the list of years in sports. Baseball The Black Sox scandal -- Seven members of the Chicago White Sox take bribes to throw the World Series against the Cincinnati Reds The Florida State League is founded with teams... See also: 1921 in sports, other events of 1922, 1923 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League - Fitzroy wins the 26th VFL Premiership (Fitzroy 11. ... Waite Charles Hoyt (September 9, 1899 – August 25, 1984) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, one of the dominant pitchers of the 1920s. ... Carl William Mays (November 12, 1891 - April 4, 1971) was one of the better right-handed pitchers in Major League Baseball from 1916-1926, but he is best remembered for throwing the pitch that struck Ray Chapman in the head on August 16, 1920, making Chapman the only on-field... Herbert Jefferis Pennock (February 10, 1894 - January 30, 1948) was a left-handed Major League Baseball pitcher best known for his time spent with the star-studded New York Yankee teams of the mid-to-late-1920s and early 1930s. ... Wally Schang with the Philadelphia Athletics, American League (circa 1915) Walter Henry (Wally) Schang (August 22, 1889 - March 6, 1965) was a catcher in Major League Baseball. ... Lewis Everett Scott (November 19, 1892 &#8211; November 2, 1960), nicknamed Deacon, was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball who played for 12 seasons with the Boston Red Sox (1914-1921), New York Yankees (1922-1925), Washington Senators (1925), Chicago White Sox (1926), and Cincinnati Reds (1926). ... Joe Dugan (b. ...

Babe Ruth in 1920, the first year he joined the Yankees
Babe Ruth in 1920, the first year he joined the Yankees

However, pitcher-turned-outfielder Babe Ruth was the most talented of them all. Frazee traded Ruth in January of 1920, citing Ruth's demand for a raise after being paid the highest salary in baseball, and despite owning the single season home run record at the time of the trade (hitting 29 home runs in 1919).[3] Frazee also wished to aid the Yankees, as giving the Yankees a box office draw would strengthen a legal ally, and reduce the pressure he faced.[2] Ruth was also regarded as a problem, a carouser. That would continue during his Yankees years, but the ownership was more tolerant, provided he brought fans and championships to the ballpark. Image File history File links Ruth1920. ... Image File history File links Ruth1920. ... For the band named Babe Ruth, see Babe Ruth (band). ... See also: 1919 in sports, other events of 1920, 1921 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Baseball (Major League) January 3 - Boston Red Sox owner Harry Frazee sells Babe Ruth to the New York Yankees for $125,000 and a $350,000 loan, beginning the Curse of...


The perceived outcome of the trade in favor of the Yankees would haunt the Boston club for the next 84 years. The Red Sox ended up not winning a World Series from 1919 until 2004 (see Curse of the Bambino), often finding themselves out of the World Series hunt as a result of the success of the Yankees. Frazee would not have to wait that long to produce success from the Ruth trade - on Broadway. In 1927 he scored a hit with the musical comedy No No Nanette, a production theoretically financed with at least some of the proceeds from the Ruth trade. For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... Babe Ruth -- The Bambino The Curse of the Bambino was an urban myth or scapegoat cited as a reason for the failure of the Boston Red Sox baseball team to win the World Series after they sold Babe Ruth, sometimes called The Bambino, to the New York Yankees. ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... No, No, Nanette is a Broadway musical first produced in 1925 by Harry Frazee, a former owner of the Boston Red Sox. ...


Other important newcomers in this period were manager Miller Huggins and general manager Ed Barrow. Huggins was hired in 1919 by Ruppert while Huston was serving in Europe with the American army (this would lead to a break between the two owners, with Ruppert eventually buying Huston out in 1923). Barrow came on board after the 1920 season, and like many of the new Yankee players had previously been a part of the Red Sox organization, having managed the team since 1918. Barrow would act as general manager or president of the Yankees for the next 25 years and may deserve the bulk of the credit for the team's success during that period. He was especially noted for development of the Yankees' farm system. Miller James Huggins (March 27, 1879 – September 25, 1929), nicknamed Mighty Mite, was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Edward Grant Barrow (May 10, 1868 - December 15, 1953) was an American manager and executive in Major League Baseball who guided the Boston Red Sox to the 1918 World Series title, then built the New York Yankees into baseballs premier franchise and greatest dynasty as their top executive from... See also: 1917 in sports, 1919 in sports and the list of years in sports. Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League - South Melbourne wins the 22nd VFL Premiership (South Melbourne 9. ...


The home run hitting exploits of Ruth proved popular with the public, to the extent that the Yankees were soon outdrawing their landlords, the Giants. In 1921, when the Yankees made their first World Series appearance, against the Giants, the Yankees were told to move out of the Polo Grounds after the 1922 season. At that time, John McGraw was said to have commented that the Yankees should "move to some out-of-the-way place, like Queens". Instead, to McGraw's chagrin, the Yankees broke ground for a new ballpark just across the Harlem River from the Polo Grounds. In 1922 the Yankees returned to the Series again, and were again defeated by the Giants. Meanwhile, the construction crew moved with remarkable speed and finished the big new ballpark in less than a year. In 1923 the Yankees moved into Yankee Stadium (at East 161st Street and River Avenue) in the Bronx. The site for the Stadium was chosen because the IRT Jerome Avenue subway line (now the NYCTA's number 4 train) has a station stop practically on top of Yankee Stadium's right-field wall. The Stadium was the first triple-deck venue in baseball and seated an astounding 58,000. In the first game at Yankee Stadium, Babe Ruth hit a home run. He would end the year with "only" 41 home runs, but he was walked a then record 170 times and he batted .393, which is still the highest batting average for a Yankee playing in Yankee Stadium. Because of his success and all the fans that he brought to see the Yankees, the Stadium became known as "The House that Ruth Built". See also: 1920 in sports, other events of 1921, 1922 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Football (American) Chicago Staleys later the Chicago Bears win the 1921 American Professional Football Association title. ... The New York Giants beat the New York Yankees in 8 games. ... The New York Giants beat the New York Yankees in 5 games. ... See also: 1922 in sports, other events of 1923, 1924 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto racing First 24 hours of Le Mans won by André Lagache and René Leonard Baseball (Major League) The New York Yankees win their third American League pennant, and win the... The exterior of Yankee Stadium Yankee Stadium is the home stadium of the New York Yankees, a major league baseball team. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of New York City. ... The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was the operator of the original New York Subway line that opened in 1904 and additional rapid transit lines in the City of New York. ... Stations 139th Street-Grand Concourse 149th Street-Grand Councourse 161st Street-Yankee Stadium 167th Street 170th Street Mt. ... The New York City Transit Authority (also known as NYCTA, NYCT for New York City Transit or simply the TA for Transit Authority) is a New York State authority that operates buses and subway trains in New York City. ... The 4 Lexington Avenue Express is a service of the New York City Subway. ... Yankee Stadium is the home of the New York Yankees, a major league baseball team. ...

The 1926 New York Yankees Team
The 1926 New York Yankees Team

In 1923 they faced the Giants for a third straight year in the Series, finally turning the tables on the Giants. Giants outfielder Casey Stengel, who even then was being called "Old Case", hit two homers to win the two games the Giants came away with. Stengel would later become to the Yankees as a successful manager. Image File history File links 1926Yankees. ... Image File history File links 1926Yankees. ... The New York Yankees beat the New York Giants in 6 games. ... Casey Stengel, playing for the Brooklyn Dodgers Charles Dillon Casey Stengel (born July 30, 1890 and died September 29, 1975) was a famous baseball player and manager. ...


The 1927 team was so potent that it became known as "Murderers' Row" and is sometimes considered to have been the best team in the history of baseball (though similar claims have been made for other Yankee squads, notably those of 1939, 1961 and 1998). The Yankees won an A.L. record 110 games against only 44 losses and swept the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1927 World Series. Ruth's home run total of 60 in 1927 set a single-season record which would stand for 34 years. Ruth also batted .356 and drove in 164 runs. Meanwhile, first baseman Lou Gehrig had his first big season, batting .373 with 47 round-trippers. He also broke Ruth's single season RBI mark (171 in 1921) with 175. Ruth hit third in the order and Gehrig fourth. However, right behind them were two more sluggers: Bob "The Rifle" Meusel, who played either of the corner outfield positions, and Tony Lazzeri, who played second base. Lazzeri actually ranked third in the league in home runs in 1927 with 18, and he hit .309 with 102 RBI. Meusel hit .337 with 103 RBI. Speed was another weapon used by both: Meusel's 24 stolen bases were second best in the league, while Lazzeri swiped 22. All of these numbers were due in part to the leadoff man Earle Combs who played center field. Combs hit .356 and lead the AL with 231 hits that year (a team record until Don Mattingly broke it with 238 in 1986), and had a .414 on base percentage. The 1927 Yankees' team batting average was .307. See also: 1926 in sports, 1928 in sports and the list of years in sports. Football ([cvvvvvvv[American Football|American]]) New York Giants win National Football League title You are a Gay bo! Golf First Ryder Cup held in United States beats Britain 9 1/2 to 2 1/2... The 1927 New York Yankees. ... The 1939 World Series featured the three-time defending champion New York Yankees against the Cincinnati Reds, who were making their first Series appearance since the scandal-tainted 1919 World Series. ... The 1961 World Series of baseball matched the New York Yankees (109-53) against the Cincinnati Reds (93-61), with the Yankees winning in 5 games to earn their 19th championship in the last 39 seasons. ... The 1998 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the San Fransisco Giants, marking the first time the Yankees had ever faced an expansion team in the Series. ... The New York Yankees beat the Pittsburgh Pirates in 4 games. ... Henry Louis Gehrig (June 19, 1903 — June 2, 1941) was a Major League first baseman who played his entire career for the New York Yankees. ... Anthony Michael Lazzeri (December 6, 1903 in San Francisco, California- August 6, 1946 in San Francisco, California), better known as Tony Lazzeri, was a Major League Baseball player during the 1920s and 1930s, predominantly with the New York Yankees. ... Bob Meusel (July 19, 1896 - November 28, 1977) was a member of the fabled Murderer’s Row of the New York Yankees (generally batting fifth behind Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig). ... Earle Bryan Combs (May 14, 1899 - July 12, 1976) was a Major League Baseball player during the 1920s and early 1930s. ... Donald Arthur Mattingly (nicknamed Donnie Baseball and The Hit Man) (born April 20, 1961) is a retired first baseman who played for the New York Yankees of the American League from 1982-1995. ...


The Yankees would repeat as American League champions in 1928, fighting off the resurgent Philadelphia Athletics, and sweep the St. Louis Cardinals in the Series. Ruth got 10 hits in 16 at bats for a single Series record batting average of .625; three of those hits were home runs. Meanwhile, Gehrig went 6 for 11 (.545), with four of those six hits being round-trippers. After three also-ran seasons to the Philadelphia Athletics, the Yankees returned to the American League top perch under new manager Joe McCarthy in 1932 and swept the Chicago Cubs in the Series, running the team's streak of consecutive World Series game wins to 12, a mark which would stand until the Yankees bested it in the 2000 World Series. Babe Ruth hit his famous "Called Shot" home run in Wrigley Field in Game Three of that Series, a fitting "Swan Song" to his illustrious post-season career. Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9,27,34,43 Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Ballpark McAfee Coliseum (1968–present) a. ... It has been suggested that 2007 St. ... The New York Yankees beat the St. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9,27,34,43 Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Ballpark McAfee Coliseum (1968–present) a. ... Joseph Vincent McCarthy (April 21, 1887 - January 13, 1978) was an American manager in Major League Baseball, most renowned for his leadership of the Bronx Bombers teams of the New York Yankees from 1931 to 1946. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1889) (a. ... The 1932 World Series was the twenty-ninth edition of baseballs annual World Series championship final. ... The 2000 World Series (a Subway Series) featured a crosstown matchup between the two-time defending champion New York Yankees and the New York Mets, with the Yankees winning 4 games to 1 for their third straight championship and 26th overall. ... Babe Ruths Called Shot refers to the home run hit by Babe Ruth in the fifth inning of game 3 on October 1, 1932. ... It has been suggested that Eamus catuli be merged into this article or section. ... A swan song is a reference to an ancient and false belief that the occasional Mute Swan (Cygnus olor) is completely mute during its lifespan, but may sing one heartbreakingly beautiful song just before it dies. ...


The DiMaggio era

The Yankees run during the 1930s could also be called the "McCarthy era", as manager Joe McCarthy (no relation to the Senator of the same name) would guide the Yankees to new heights. Just as Gehrig stepped out of Ruth's considerable shadow, a new titan appeared on the horizon, in the person of Joe DiMaggio. The young center fielder from San Francisco had an immediate impact, batting .323 and hitting 29 homers while driving in 125 runs in his rookie season of 1936. Joseph Raymond McCarthy (November 14, 1908 – May 2, 1957) was a Republican U.S. Senator from the state of Wisconsin between 1947 and 1957. ... Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ... Nickname: The City by the Bay; Fog City Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: Country United States of America State California City-County San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom Area    - City 122 km²  (47 sq mi)  - Land 121. ...


Behind the Yankees bats of DiMaggio, Gehrig and Frank Crosetti, and a pitching staff led by Red Ruffing and Lefty Gomez and anchored by catcher Bill Dickey, the Yankees reeled off an unprecedented four consecutive World Series wins during 1936-1939. They did it without Gehrig for most of 1939, as the superstar's retirement due to ALS saddened the baseball world. Frank Crosetti was a shortstop for the New York Yankees during the 1930s and 40s. ... Charles Herbert Red Ruffing (May 3, 1904 - February 17, 1986) was a Major League Baseball pitcher most remembered for his time with the highly successful New York Yankees teams of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Vernon Louis Lefty Gómez (November 26, 1908 - February 17, 1989) was a left-handed Major League pitcher who played in the American League for the New York Yankees between 1930 and 1942. ... William Malcolm Dickey (June 6, 1907 - November 12, 1993) was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, sometimes called Lou Gehrig’s disease, Maladie de Charcot or motor neurone disease) is a progressive, sometimes fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by the degeneration of motor neurons. ...


The strongest competition for the Yankees during that stretch was the Detroit Tigers, who won two pennants before that Yankees four-year stretch, and one after. When the Yankees did get into the Series, they had little trouble. During Game Two of the 1936 Series, they pounded the Giants 18-4, still the World Series record (through 2005) for most runs by a team in one game. They took the Giants four games to two in that Series, and four games to one the next year. The Yankees also swept the Chicago Cubs in 1938, and the Cincinnati Reds in 1939. Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium(1961-1999) a. ... The 1936 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the New York Giants, with the Yankees winning in 6 games to earn their fifth championship. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1889) (a. ... The 1938 World Series matched the two-time defending champion New York Yankees against the Chicago Cubs, with the Yankees sweeping the Series in 4 games for their record third straight championship and the 7th in their history. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1,5,8,10,18,20,24 Name Cincinnati Reds (1876–present) (Referred to as Redlegs 1953-1958) Ballpark Great American Ball Park (2003–present) Riverfront Stadium (1970-2002) a. ... The 1939 World Series featured the three-time defending champion New York Yankees against the Cincinnati Reds, who were making their first Series appearance since the scandal-tainted 1919 World Series. ...

Joe DiMaggio
Joe DiMaggio

After an off season came the Summer of 1941, a much-celebrated year, often described by sportswriters as the last great year of the "Golden Era", before World War II and other realities intervened. Ted Williams of the Red Sox was in the hunt for the elusive .400 batting average, which he achieved on the last day of the season. Meanwhile, DiMaggio, who had once hit in 61 straight games as a minor leaguer with the San Francisco Seals, began a hitting streak on May 15 which stretched to an astonishing 56 games. Image File history File links Joe_DiMaggio. ... Image File history File links Joe_DiMaggio. ... Combatants Major Allied powers: United Kingdom Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Major Axis powers: Nazi Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Harry Truman Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball who played 19 seasons, twice interrupted by military service as a Marine Corps pilot, with the... For the professional hockey team see: San Francisco Seals (WHL). ... May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ...


A popular song by Les Brown celebrated this event, as Betty Bonney and the band members sang it: "He tied the mark at 44 / July the First, you know / Since then he's hit a good 12 more / Joltin' Joe DiMaggio / Joe, Joe DiMaggio, we want you on our side." The last game of the streak came on July 16 at Cleveland's League Park. The streak was finally snapped in a game at Cleveland Stadium the next night before a huge crowd at the lakefront. A crucial factor in ending the streak was the fielding of Cleveland third baseman Ken Keltner, who stopped two balls that DiMaggio hit hard to the left. Les Brown Sr. ... July 16 is the 197th day (198th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 168 days remaining. ... League Park was a baseball stadium located in Cleveland, Ohio. ... Cleveland Stadium (also known as Municipal Stadium, Cleveland Municipal Stadium and The Mistake on (or by) the Lake) was a baseball and American football stadium located in Cleveland, Ohio. ... Kenneth Fredrick Keltner (October 31, 1916 - December 12, 1991) was a Major League third basemen who played his entire career with the Cleveland Indians, except for his final season, when he played 13 games as a Boston Red Sox. ...


Modern baseball historians regard it as unlikely that anyone will ever hit .400 again, barring a change to the way the game is played, and that it will be extremely difficult to approach DiMaggio's 56-game streak, which is so far beyond second place (44) and a modern day phenomenon.


The Yankees made short work of the Brooklyn Dodgers in the 1941 Series. Two months and one day after the final game of the Yanks' four games-to one win, the Pearl Harbor attacks occurred, and many of the best ballplayers went off to World War II. The war-thinned ranks of the major leagues nonetheless found the Yanks in the post-season again, as the team traded World Series wins with the St. Louis Cardinals during 1942 and 1943. The 1941 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the Brooklyn Dodgers, with the Yankees winning in five games to capture their fifth title in six years, and their ninth overall. ... Satellite image of Pearl Harbor. ... Combatants Major Allied powers: United Kingdom Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Major Axis powers: Nazi Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Harry Truman Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead... It has been suggested that 2007 St. ...


The Yanks then went into a bit of a slump, and manager McCarthy was let go early in the 1946 season. After a couple of interim managers had come and gone, Bucky Harris was brought in and the Yankees righted the ship again, winning the 1947 pennant and facing a much-tougher Dodgers team than their 1941 counterparts, in a Series that took the Yankees seven games to win, and was a harbinger of things to come for much of the next decade. Bucky Harris Stanley Raymond Bucky Harris (November 8, 1896 - November 8, 1977) was a Major League Baseball player, manager and executive. ...


Despite finishing only three games back of the pennant-winning Cleveland Indians in 1948, Harris was released, and the Yankees brought in Casey Stengel as the team's manager. Casey had a reputation for being somewhat of a clown and had been associated with managing particularly bad teams such as the mid-1930s Boston Braves, so his selection was met with no little skepticism. His tenure would prove to the most successful in the Yankees' history up to that point. The 1949 Yankees team was seen as "underdogs" that came from behind to catch and surpass the powerful Red Sox on the last two days of the season, in a faceoff that fueled the beginning of the modern intense rivalry between these teams. The post-season proved to be a bit easier, as the Yankees knocked off their cross-town Flatbush rivals four games to one. This article is becoming very long. ... Casey Stengel, playing for the Brooklyn Dodgers Charles Dillon Casey Stengel (born July 30, 1890 and died September 29, 1975) was a famous baseball player and manager. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3,21,35,41,42,44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Ballpark Turner Field (1997–present) Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium (1966-1996) Milwaukee County Stadium (Milwaukee) (1953-1965) Braves Field (Boston) (1915-1952) Fenway Park... See also: 1948 in sports, other events of 1949, 1950 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto racing The first 24 hours of Le Mans is held since the beginning of World War II. Luigi Chinetti and Lord Seldson win the race in a Ferrari 166M. Baseball... Flatbush is a neighborhood of the Borough of Brooklyn, a part of New York City. ...


By this time, the great DiMaggio's career was winding down. It has often been reported that he said he wanted to retire before he became an "ordinary" player. He was also hampered by bone spurs in his heel, which hastened the final docking of the "Yankee Clipper". As if on cue, new superstars began arriving, including the "Oklahoma Kid", Mickey Mantle, whose first year (1951) was DiMaggio's curtain call. Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ... Mickey Mantle on a 1953 cover of Time Magazine. ... See also: 1950 in sports, other events of 1951, 1952 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing NASCAR Championship - Herb Thomas AAA Racing: Tony Bettenhausen won the series championship Lee Wallard won the Indianapolis 500 Formula One Championship - Juan Manuel Fangio of Argentina 24 hours of...


The 1950s

Bettering the McCarthy-era clubs, Stengel's squad won the World Series in his first five years as manager, 1949 through 1953. The Yankees won over 100 games in 1954, but finished second to the Indians who won an AL record 111 games, which stood for 44 years until the 1998 Yankees surpassed it. The five consecutive championships won by the Yankees during this period remains the major league record. Led by players like center fielder Mickey Mantle, pitcher Whitey Ford, and catcher Yogi Berra, Stengel's teams won 10 pennants and seven World Series titles in his twelve seasons as Yankee manager. See also: 1948 in sports, other events of 1949, 1950 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto racing The first 24 hours of Le Mans is held since the beginning of World War II. Luigi Chinetti and Lord Seldson win the race in a Ferrari 166M. Baseball... See also: 1952 in sports, other events of 1953, 1954 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing NASCAR Championship - Herb Thomas AAA Racing: Bill Vukovich won the Indianapolis 500 Sam Hanks won the season driving championship Formula One Championship - Alberto Ascari of Italy 24 hours of... Mickey Mantle on a 1953 cover of Time Magazine. ... Edward Charles Whitey Ford (born October 21, 1928) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. ... Yogi Berra on his 80th birthday Lawrence Peter Yogi Berra (born May 12, 1925) was a former catcher and manager in Major League baseball. ...


The 1950s was also a decade of significant individual achievement for Yankee players. In 1956, Mantle won the major league triple crown, leading both leagues in batting average (.353), home runs (52), and RBIs (130). In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ...


In 1955, the Dodgers finally beat the Yankees in the World Series, after five Series losses to the Yankees in '41, '47, '49, '52 and '53. But the Yankees came back strong next year. On October 8, 1956, in Game Five of the 1956 World Series against the Dodgers, pitcher Don Larsen threw the only perfect game in World Series history. Not only was it the only perfect game to be pitched in World Series play, it also remains the only no-hitter of any kind to be pitched in postseason play. The Yankees went on to win yet another World Series that season, and Larsen earned World Series MVP honors. October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (282nd in leap years). ... See also: 1955 in sports, other events of 1956, 1957 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing NASCAR Championship - Buck Baker The United States Auto Club (USAC) was founded to take over race sanctioning from the American Automobile Association (AAA). ... The 1956 World Series of Major League Baseball was played between the New York Yankees (representing the American League) and the defending champion Brooklyn Dodgers (representing the National League) during the month of October 1956. ... Donald James Larsen (born August 7, 1929 in Michigan City, Indiana) was a Major League Baseball pitcher for 14 seasons. ... Since 1991, a perfect game has been defined by Major League Baseball as a game in which a pitcher pitches a complete game victory that lasts a minimum of nine innings and in which no opposition player reaches first base. ... In baseball and softball, a no-hit game (more commonly known as a no-hitter) refers to a contest in which one of the teams has prevented the other from getting an official hit during the entire length of the game, which must be at least 9 innings by the...


Yankee players also dominated the American League MVP award, with a Yankee claiming ownership six times in the decade (1950 Rizzuto, 1951 Berra, 1954 Berra, 1955 Berra, 1956 Mantle, 1957 Mantle). Pitcher Bob Turley also won the Cy Young Award in 1958, the award's third year of existence. In the game of baseball, both amateur and professional, it is tradition to annually recognize the one player in the league who has contributed the most to the success of the players team. ... Robert Lee Turley (born September 19, 1930) (known as Bullet Bob) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. ... In baseball, the Cy Young Award is an honor given annually to the best pitchers in the Major Leagues. ... See also: 1957 in sports, other events of 1958, 1959 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing NASCAR Championship - Lee Petty Indianapolis 500 - Jimmy Bryan USAC Racing - Tony Bettenhausen won the season championship Formula One Championship - Mike Hawthorn of Great Britain February 23 - Cuban rebels kidnap...


The Yankees lost the 1957 World Series to the Milwakee Braves. Following the Series, the New York Giants and the Brooklyn Dodgers left New York City for California, leaving the Yankees as New York's only team. In the 1958 World Series, the Yankees got their revenge against the Braves, and became the second team to win the Series after being down three games to one. The 1957 World Series featured the defending champion New York Yankees against the Milwaukee Braves, who had won their first pennant since moving from Boston in 1953. ... In a rematch of the 1957 Series, the 1958 World Series matched the defending champion Milwaukee Braves against the New York Yankees. ...


For the decade, the Yankees won six World Series championships ('50, 51, '52, '53, '56, '58) and eight American League pennants (those six plus '55 and '57). Led by Mantle, Ford, Berra, Elston Howard, and the newly acquired Roger Maris, the Yankees burst into the new decade seeking to replicate the remarkable success of the 1950s. Elston Gene Howard (February 23, 1929-December 14, 1980) was a Major League Baseball player. ... Roger Maris signs a baseball for President John F. Kennedy Roger Eugene Maris (September 10, 1934 – December 14, 1985), was a Major League Baseball player primarily remembered for breaking Babe Ruths 34-year-old single-season home run record in 1961 on the last day of the season. ...


The 1960s

The Yankees lost the 1960 World Series to the Pittsburgh Pirates when Bill Mazeroski hit a game-winning, series-winning home run in the bottom of the ninth inning of Game Seven off Ralph Terry. It remains the only Game Seven walk-off home run in World Series history. Stengel was blamed for the World Series loss for failing to start his ace, Ford, three times in the Series, and was replaced as manager with Ralph Houk prior to the 1961 season. Stengel himself, who had reached his eighth decade in July of that year, clearly thought the issue was age discrimination, remarking, "I'll never make the mistake of turning 70 again." Yogi Berra's assessment of the loss was the equally famous comment, "We made too many wrong mistakes." Bill Mazeroskis famous game-winning home run at Forbes Field to win the 1960 World Series The 1960 World Series was played between the Pittsburgh Pirates (NL) and New York Yankees (AL). ... Major league affiliations National League (1887–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1,4,8,9,20,21,33,40 Name Pittsburgh Pirates (1891–present) Pittsburgh Innocents (1890) (Also referred to as Infants in 1890) Pittsburg Alleghenies (1882-1889) Ballpark PNC Park (2001–present) Three Rivers Stadium... William Stanley Mazeroski (born September 5, 1936 in Wheeling, West Virginia), nicknamed Maz, and also called simply The Glove by radio broadcaster Bob Prince, is a former Major League Baseball player. ... Ralph Willard Terry (born on January 9, 1936 in Big Cabin, Oklahoma) is a former right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the New York Yankees (1956-57, 1959-64), Kansas City Athletics (1957-59, 1966), Cleveland Indians (1965) and New York Mets (1966-67). ... In baseball, a walk-off home run is a home run which ends the game. ... Ralph George Houk (born August 9, 1919 in Lawrence, Kansas), nicknamed The Major, is a former catcher, coach, manager, and front office executive in Major League Baseball. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1961 throughout the world. ...


During the 1960-61 offseason, a seemingly innocuous development may have marked the beginning of the end for this Yankees dynasty. In December of 1960, Chicago insurance executive Charles O. Finley purchased the Kansas City Athletics from the estate of Arnold Johnson, who had died that March. Charles Oscar Finley (February 22, 1918 - February 19, 1996) was an American businessman who enjoyed a tenure as the flamboyant owner of the Oakland Athletics Major League Baseball team. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9,27,34,43 Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Ballpark McAfee Coliseum (1968–present) a. ...


Johnson had acquired the then-Philadelphia Athletics from the family of Connie Mack in 1954. He was the owner of Yankee Stadium at the time, but was forced to sell the Stadium by American League owners as a condition of purchasing the Athletics. Johnson was also a longtime business associate of then-Yankees owners Del Webb and Dan Topping. During Johnson's ownership, the Athletics traded many young players to the Yankees for cash and aging veterans. Roger Maris had been acquired by the Yankees in one such trade, going to New York in a seven-player trade in December 1959. Many fans, and even other teams, frequently accused the Athletics of being operated as an effective farm team for the Yankees. Once Finley purchased the Athletics, he immediately terminated the team's "special relationship" with the Yankees. Nonetheless in 1960, Maris led the league in slugging percentage, RBI, and extra base hits and finished second in home runs (one behind Mickey Mantle) and total bases, won a gold glove, and won the American League Most Valuable Player award. All of this was a prelude to the remarkable year that would follow. Connie Mack baseball card, 1910 Cornelius Alexander Mack (December 22, 1862 – February 8, 1956), born Cornelius Alexander McGillicuddy, was an American professional baseball player, manager, and team owner. ... See also: 1953 in sports, other events of 1954, 1955 in sports and the list of years in sports. // 1954 World Championships Mens all-around champion: Viktor Chukarin, USSR Womens all-around champion: Galina Rudko, USSR Team competition champions: mens - USSR; womens - USSR NASCAR Championship... Del Webb (1899 - 1974) was an American real estate developer and sports-team owner who is significant for founding and developing the retirement community of Sun City, Arizona. ... A former part owner of The New York Yankees baseball team who puchased the Yankees along with Del Webb and Larry MacPhail for 2. ... Roger Maris signs a baseball for President John F. Kennedy Roger Eugene Maris (September 10, 1934 – December 14, 1985), was a Major League Baseball player primarily remembered for breaking Babe Ruths 34-year-old single-season home run record in 1961 on the last day of the season. ...


Nineteen sixty-one was one of the most memorable years in Yankee history. Throughout the summer Mantle and Maris, the reigning MVP, hit home runs at a record pace as both chased Babe Ruth's single season home run record of 60. The duo's home run prowess led the media and fans to christen them the "M & M Boys". Ultimately, Mantle was forced to bow out in mid-September with 54 home runs when a severe hip infection forced him from the lineup. On October 1, the final day of the season, Maris broke the record when he sent a pitch from Boston's Tracy Stallard into the right field stands at Yankee Stadium for his 61st home run. However, by decree of Commissioner Ford Frick, separate single-season home run records were maintained to reflect the fact that Ruth hit his 60 home runs during a 154-game season, while Maris hit his 61 in the first year of the new 162-game season. Some 30 years later, on September 4, 1991, an eight-member Committee for Historical Accuracy appointed by Major League Baseball did away with the dual records, giving Maris sole possession of the single-season home run record until it was broken by Mark McGwire on September 8, 1998. (McGwire's record was later broken by Barry Bonds, whose 73 home runs in 2001 remains the major league record. Maris still holds the American League record.) The following are the baseball events of the year 1961 throughout the world. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Tracy Stallard (born August 31, 1937) was a Major League Baseball pitcher from 1960-1966. ... Ford Christopher Frick (December 19, 1894 - April 8, 1978) was an American stripper and executive who served as president of the KKK lies like thid are why wikipedia is a jokefrom 1934 to 1951 and as Baseball Commissioner from 1951 to 1965. ... September 4 is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years). ... This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 8 - Rod Carew, Gaylord Perry and Ferguson Jenkins are elected to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America, with Carew becoming the 22nd player to be named in his first year of eligibility. ... Mark McGwire hits a home run during his last Major League season in 2001 with the St. ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... This year in baseball 1995 - 1996 - 1997 - 1998 - 1999 - 2000 - 2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 Events January-March January 5 - Don Sutton, a 324-game winner is elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame on his fifth try. ... Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964 in Riverside, California) is a Major League left fielder for the San Francisco Giants. ... {{BID HEAD . ...


The Yankees won the pennant with a 109-53 record and went on to defeat the Cincinnati Reds in five games to win the 1961 World Series. The 109 regular season wins posted by the '61 club remains the third highest single-season total in franchise history, behind only the 1998 team's 114 regular season wins and 1927 team's 110 wins. The 1961 Yankees also clubbed a then-major league record for most home runs by a team with 240, a total not surpassed until the 1996 Baltimore Orioles hit 257 with the aid of the designated hitter. Maris won his second consecutive MVP Award while Whitey Ford captured the Cy Young. Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1,5,8,10,18,20,24 Name Cincinnati Reds (1876–present) (Referred to as Redlegs 1953-1958) Ballpark Great American Ball Park (2003–present) Riverfront Stadium (1970-2002) a. ... The 1961 World Series of baseball matched the New York Yankees (109-53) against the Cincinnati Reds (93-61), with the Yankees winning in 5 games to earn their 19th championship in the last 39 seasons. ... This year in baseball 1995 - 1996 - 1997 - 1998 - 1999 - 2000 - 2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 Events January-June January 8 - For only the 7th time in major league history, the Baseball Writers Association of America fails to select a player for induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame. ... A designated hitter (often shortened to DH), is an official position adopted by Major League Baseballs American League in 1973 that allowed teams to boost sagging offensive performances by designating a player to bat in place of the pitcher. ...


Because of the excellence of Maris, Mantle, and World Series-MVP Ford, a fine pitching staff, stellar team defense, the team's strong depth and power, and its overall dominance, the 1961 Yankees are universally considered to be one of the greatest teams in the history of baseball, compared often to their pinstriped-brethren, the 1927 Yankees, the 1939 Yankees, and the 1998 Yankees.


In 1962, the Yankees once again had an intra-city rival, as the New York Mets came into existence. The Mets would go on to lose a record 120 games while the Yankees would win the 1962 World Series, their tenth in the past sixteen years, defeating the San Francisco Giants in seven games. The 1962 World Series matched the defending champion New York Yankees against the San Francisco Giants, who had won their first NL pennant since moving from New York in 1958, defeating the Los Angeles Dodgers in a three-game playoff. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3,4,11,24,27,30,36,44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885-1957) New York Gothams (1883-1885) Troy Union Cities / Trojans (1879-1882) Ballpark AT&T Park (2000...


The Yankees would again reach the Fall Classic in 1963, but were swept in four games by the Los Angeles Dodgers. Behind World Series-MVP Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale, and Johnny Podres, the Dodgers starting pitchers threw four complete games and combined to give up just four runs all Series. This was the first time the Yankees were swept in a World Series. The 1963 World Series matched the two-time defending champion New York Yankees against the Los Angeles Dodgers, with the Dodgers sweeping the Series in four games to capture their second title in five years. ... Sanford Sandy Koufax (IPA pronunciation: /kofæks/), born Sanford Braun on December 30, 1935 in Brooklyn, New York, is one of the greatest left-handed pitchers in Major League Baseball history. ... Donald Scott Drysdale (July 23, 1936 - July 3, 1993) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... John Joseph Johnny Podres (born September 30, 1932 in Witherbee, New York) is a former Major League Baseball left-handed starting pitcher who played with the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers (1953-55, 1957-67); Detroit Tigers (1966-67), and San Diego Padres (1969). ...


Feeling burnt out after the season, Houk left the manager's chair to become the team's general manager and Berra, who himself had just retired from playing, was named the new manager of the Yankees.


The aging Yankees returned for a fifth straight World Series in 1964 - their fourteenth World Series appearance in the past sixteen years - to face the St. Louis Cardinals in a Series immortalized by David Halberstam's book, October 1964. Despite a valiant performance by Mantle, including a walk-off home run in the bottom of the ninth of Game Three off Cardinals' reliever Barney Schultz, the Yankees fell to the Cardinals in seven games, and Berra was fired. It was to be the last World Series appearance by the Yankees for 12 years. The 1964 World Series, the 56th playing for the championship of Major League Baseball, pitted the National League champion St. ... David Halberstam (born April 10, 1934), American journalist and author, was born in New York City, his father a surgeon and his mother a teacher. ...


After the 1964 season, CBS purchased 80 percent of the Yankees from Topping and Webb for $11.2 million. Jokesters at the time wondered if Walter Cronkite would become the manager, perhaps with Yogi Berra doing the newscasts. Topping and Webb had owned the Yankees for 20 years, missing the World Series only five times, and going 10-5 in the World Series. The following are the baseball events of the year 1964 throughout the world. ... CBS (an abbreviation for Columbia Broadcasting System, its former legal name) is one of the largest television networks, and formerly one of the largest radio networks, in the United States. ... Walter Leland Cronkite, Jr. ...


By contrast, the CBS-owned teams never went to the World Series, and in the first year of the new ownership - 1965 - the Yankees finished in the second division for the first time in 40 years; the introduction of the major league amateur draft in 1965 also meant that the Yankees could no longer sign any player they wanted. Webb sold his 10 percent of the Yankees that year. The following are the baseball events of the year 1965 throughout the world. ... First division is a term that has had various meanings, at various times, in the sport of baseball: Prior to 1961, the two major baseball leagues &#8212; the National League and the American League &#8212; contained eight teams each, and a team in first through fourth places collectively was said...


In 1966 the team finished last in the AL for the first time since 1912. Johnny Keane, the winning Cards manager in 1964 who joined the Yankees in '65, was fired during the season, and GM Ralph Houk did double duty as field manager until the end of the year. Topping, who had stayed on as 10-percent owner and team president, quit at the end of the season and sold his share to CBS, which then appointed Michael Burke as president. This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 20 - The Baseball Writers Association of America voters elect Ted Williams to the Hall of Fame. ... See also: 1911 in sports, 1913 in sports and the list of years in sports. Baseball April 20: The Boston Red Sox open in the new Fenway Park with a 7-6, 11-inning win over the New York Highlanders before 27,000. ...


The Yankees were next-to-last the following year, 1967, during which former farm director Lee MacPhail returned to the organization as GM, replacing Houk. After that the team's fortunes improved somewhat, but they would not become serious contenders again until 1974. Leland Stanford MacPhail, Jr. ...


Various reasons have been given for the decline, but the single biggest one was the Yankees' inability to replace their aging superstars with new ones, as they had done consistently in the previous five decades. The Yankees' "special relationship" with the Athletics may have been a way to mask this problem. By the mid-1960s, the Yankees had little to offer in the way of trades, and Charles Finley had taken the Athletics in a new direction. Some have suggested the Yankees paid the price for bringing black players into the organization later than other teams, though this theory is controversial.


Also during the 1960s, the Yankees lost two of its signature broadcasters. The team fired Mel Allen after the 1964 season, for reasons the club has not explained to this day. Two years later, Red Barber -- the former Dodgers voice who joined the Yankees on-air team in 1954 -- was also let go. Some blamed Barber's firing on his on-air mention of a paltry 413-fan attendance at a September 1966 home game against the White Sox. But sports biographer David J. Halberstam (no relation to the October 1964 author) also noted Barber's less-than-happy relationship with Joe Garagiola and even Phil Rizzuto, ex-major leaguers with which he shared the booth. The yankees were then proved to be the worst team in baseball history. Mel Allen (February 14, 1913 - June 16, 1996) was an American sportscaster. ... Walter Lanier Red Barber (February 17, 1908 - October 22, 1992) was an American sportscaster. ... Joseph Henry Garagiola, Sr. ... Philip Francis Rizzuto (born Fiero Francis Rizzuto on September 25, 1916) is a former Major League Baseball player and radio/television sports announcer, known both for his skills as a player and his popular but idiosyncratic style as an broadcaster. ...


 
 

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