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Encyclopedia > History of Queensland
This article is part of the series
History of Australia
States and Territories
New South Wales
Victoria
Queensland
Western Australia
South Australia
Tasmania
Australian Capital Territory
Northern Territory

The history of Queensland spans thousands of years, encompassing both a lengthy indigenous presence in the state, as well as the eventful times of post-European settlement. Estimated to have been settled by Indigenous Australians approximately 40 000 years ago, the north-eastern Australian region was explored by Dutch, Portuguese and French navigators before being encountered by Captain James Cook in 1770. The state has witnessed the tragic events of frontier warfare between European settlers and Indigenous inhabitants, as well as the employment of cheap Kanaka labour sourced from the South Pacific. Likewise, it has experienced dynamic growth and progress since its separation from New South Wales in 1859, currently being the fastest-growing state in Australia. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The history of Australia began when people first migrated to the Australian continent from the north, at least 40,000-45,000 years ago. ... // Foundation and growth Governor Lachlan Macquarie In 1770 Captain James Cook sailed along the east coast of Australia, the first European to do so. ... This article describes the history of Victoria. ... The human history of Western Australia spans between the first inhabitants arriving on the northwest coast about 55,000 years ago to events in the twentieth century. ... This article details the history of South Australia from the first human activity in the region to the 20th century. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The History of the Australian Capital Territory details the Australian Capital Territorys development from before white settlement to Canberras planning by the Chicago architect Walter Burley Griffin and subsequent development to the present day. ... The history of the Northern Territory began over 40,000 years ago when Indigenous Australians settled the region. ... Australian Aborigines are the indigenous peoples of Australia. ... Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Peter Beattie (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd)  - Product per capita  $40,170/person (6th) Population (End of November 2006)  - Population  4,164,590 (3rd)  - Density  2. ... Captain James Cook may refer to: James Cook - British explorer, navigator, and map maker Captain James Cook (TV miniseries) - 1987 Australian television miniseries This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Battle of Chesma, by Ivan Aivazovsky. ... Kanaka was an lead actress in Tamil movies. ... World map exhibiting a common interpretation of Oceania; other interpretations may vary. ... Capital Sydney Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Professor Marie Bashir Premier Morris Iemma (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 50  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $305,437 (1st)  - Product per capita  $45,153/person (4th) Population (End of March 2006)  - Population  6,817,100 (1st)  - Density  8. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Contents

Indigenous people

The first Aboriginal Australians arrived around 40 000 years ago by boat or land bridge across Torres Strait, presumably from Southeast Asia. The ethnically separate Torres Strait Islanders are Melanesian, and arrived some time later. Indigenous Australians or Aborigines[1][2] are the first human inhabitants of the Australian continent and its nearby islands. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Torres Strait - Cape York Peninsula is at the top; several of the Torres Strait Islands can be seen strung out towards Papua New Guinea (North is downwards in this image) The Torres Strait is a body of water which lies between Australia and the Melanesian island of New Guinea. ... The Torres Strait Islander Flag. ... Melanesia (from Greek black islands) is a region extending from the west Pacific to the Arafura Sea, north and north-east of Australia. ...


European exploration and settlement

Exploration

In 1605, the Dutch navigator Jansz landed near the town of Weipa on the western shore of Cape York. Willem Janszoon (c. ... Weipa (12°36′S 141°58′E), a town on the Gulf of Carpentaria coast on Cape York Peninsula in Queensland, Australia, is a mining town of approximately 3,000 people that exists because of the enormous bauxite deposits along the coast. ...


It is possible that the Spanish explorer, Torres saw the Queensland coast at the tip of Cape York in 1614, when he sailed through the Torres Strait which was named after him. Luiz Váez de Torres, Portuguese seaman, remembered chiefly because the Torres Strait separating Australia from Papua New Guinea is named for him. ... The Torres Strait - Cape York Peninsula is at the top; several of the Torres Strait Islands can be seen strung out towards Papua New Guinea (North is downwards in this image) The Torres Strait is a body of water which lies between Australia and the Melanesian island of New Guinea. ...


In 1768 the French explorer Louis Antoine de Bougainville sailed west from the New Hebrides islands, getting to within a hundred miles of the Queensland coast. He did not reach the coast because he did not find a passage through the coral reefs, and turned back. Louis-Antoine de Bougainville (1729–1811) Louis-Antoine de Bougainville Louis Antoine de Bougainville, Comte de Bougainville (November 12, 1729 – August 20, 1811) was a French navigator and military commander. ... The New Hebrides are an island group in the South Pacific that now form the nation of Vanuatu. ...


Captain Cook (he was actually a Lieutenant and became a Captain after his return to England) sailed past the Queensland coast in 1770. He sailed past and named Stradbroke and Morton (now Moreton Island) islands, the Glasshouse mountains, Double Island Point, Wide Bay, Hervey Bay and the Great Sandy Cape, now called Fraser Island. His second landfall in Australia was at Round Hill Head, 500km north of Brisbane. His ship, the Endeavour was grounded on a coral reef which was part of the Great Barrier Reef near Cape Tribulation, on June 11, 1770. [1] The trip was delayed for almost seven weeks while they repaired the ship. This occurred where Cooktown now lies, on the Endeavour River, both places obviously named after the incident. On 22 August the Endeavour reached the tip of Queensland, which Cook named the Cape York Peninsula after the Duke of York British explorer James Cook is most noted for having discovered Australia and Hawaii. ... Stradbroke Island was a large sand island in Moreton Bay near Brisbane, Queensland. ... Moreton Island is the island in the top-right of this satellite image Moreton Island from above the waters of Moreton Bay Moreton Island is a large sand island on the eastern side of Moreton Bay, on the coast of south-east Queensland, Australia. ... Hervey Bay is a rapidly growing resort city in south eastern Queensland, Australia. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... The Great Barrier Reef in Australia is the worlds largest coral reef system,[1][2] composed of roughly 3,000 individual reefs and 900 islands that stretch for 2,600 kilometres (1,616 mi) and cover an area of approximately 344,400 square kilometres (132,974 sq mi). ... Cooktown is the northernmost town on the East coast of Australia, located at 15°28′ S 145°17′ E on Cape York Peninsula in Far North Queensland, Australia. ... This article is about the peninsula located in the Australian state of Queensland; it should not be confused with either Yorke Peninsula in South Australia, or Cape York, Greenland. ... Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of York (25 March 1739 – 17 September 1767) was the younger brother of George III of the United Kingdom, the second son of Frederick, Prince of Wales and Augusta of Saxe-Gotha. ...


In 1799 in the Norfolk, Matthew Flinders spent six weeks exploring the Queensland coast as far north as Hervey Bay. In 1802 he explored the coast again. On a later trip to England, his ship the HMS Porpoise and the accompanying Cato ran aground on a coral reef off the Queensland coast. Flinders set off for Sydney in an open cutter, at a distance of 750 miles, where the Governor sent ships back to rescue the crew from Wreck Reef. Captain Matthew Flinders RN (16 March 1774 – 19 July 1814) was one of the most accomplished navigators and cartographers of his age. ... An American-looking gaff cutter with a genoa jib set This French yawl has a gaff topsail set. ...


Settlement

In 1823, John Oxley sailed north from Sydney to inspect Port Curtis (now Gladstone) and Moreton Bay as possible sites for a penal colony. At Moreton Bay, he found the Brisbane River whose existence Cook had predicted, and proceeded to explore the lower part of it. In September 1824, he returned with soldiers and established a temporary settlement at Redcliffe. On December 2, the settlement was transferred to where the Central Business District (CBD) of Brisbane now stands. The settlement was initially called Edenglassie, a portmanteu of the Scottish towns Edinburgh and Glasgow. In 1839 transportation of convicts ceased, culminatng in the closure of the Brisbane penal settlement. In 1842 free settlement was permitted. In 1847, the Port of Maryborough was opened as a wool port [2]. John Oxley John Oxley (1783 – 1828) was an explorer and surveyor of Australia in the early period of English colonisation. ... The Sydney Opera House on Sydney Harbour Sydney (pronounced ) is the most populous city in Australia, with a metropolitan area population of over 4,200,000 people, and 151,920 in the City of Sydney. ... For other uses, see Gladstone (disambiguation). ... Moreton Bay from space, from a NASA photograph Moreton Bay is a large bay on the eastern coast of Australia 19 km from Brisbane, Queensland. ... The Brisbane River is situated in southeast Queensland, Australia, and flows through the city of Brisbane, before emptying into Moreton Bay. ... Redcliffe is both the name of a peninsula on the north-west of Moreton Bay in South East Queensland, Australia and the city located on the peninsula. ... Edenglassie was the former name for the town of Brisbane, Australia. ... Portmanteau has two meanings. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic) Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic and Scots1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... “Glaswegian” redirects here. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Maryborough is a city located on the Mary River in South East Queensland, Australia, approximately 300 kilometres north of the state capital, Brisbane. ...


Frontier war

Fighting between Aborigines and settlers in Queensland was more bloody than any other state in Australia. It is estimated that during the nineteenth century, 2,000 white settlers and at least 10,000 Aborigines had been killed in the wars. [3] On 27 October 1857 11 Europeans were killed at Martha Fraser's Hornet Bank station on the Dawson River, in central Queensland. [4] On 17th October 1861 nineteen white settlers were killed at Cullin La Ringo, the largest massacre of whites by Aborigines in Australian history. Dawson River is a river in eastern Queensland, Australia. ... Central Queensland is an ambigious geographical division of Queensland (a state in Australia) that centers on the eastern coast, around the Tropic of Capricorn. ... The Cullin-La-Ringo massacre, was the largest ever massacre of white settlers by aborigines in Australia,[1] occurring in central Queensland on 17 October 1861. ...


Colony of Queensland

Ipswich and Rockhampton became towns in 1860, with Maryborough and Warwick becoming towns the following year. 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... Capital Sydney Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Professor Marie Bashir Premier Morris Iemma (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 50  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $305,437 (1st)  - Product per capita  $45,153/person (4th) Population (End of March 2006)  - Population  6,817,100 (1st)  - Density  8. ... Sir George Bowen Sir George Ferguson Bowen (Chinese Translated Name 寶雲) (November 2, 1821 - February 21, 1899) was a British colonial governor who became the 9th Governor of Hong Kong. ... Robert George Wyndham Herbert (1831-1905), was the first Premier of Queensland, Australia. ... List of Premiers of Queensland Before the 1890s there was no formal party system in Queensland. ... Ipswich is a city and Local Government Area situated on the Bremer River in South East Queensland, Australia. ... Rockhampton, sometimes abbreviated to Rocky, is a city in Central Queensland, Australia, located inland from the Capricorn Coast on the Bruce Highway, approximately north of Queenslands capital city, Brisbane. ... Warwick is a city and Local Government Area of Queensland, Australia lying 130km south-west of Brisbane. ...


In 1861, rescue parties for Burke and Wills which failed to find them, did some exploratory work of their own, in central and north-western Queensland. Notably among these was Frederick Walker (explorer) who originally worked for the native police [5] Brisbane was linked by electric telegraph to Sydney in 1861. The route Burke & Wills took north (red) and south (dark blue) Robert OHara Burke William John Wills Artists depiction of Burkes death In 1860-61, Robert OHara Burke and William John Wills were sent on an expedition to cross Australia from south to north. ... Frederick Walker was born in England around 1820 and died of gulf fever in Floraville, Queensland on 19 September 1866 Walker emigrated to Australia as a young man. ...


Gold rush

Although smaller than the gold rushes of Victoria and New South Wales, Queensland had its own series of gold rushes in the later half of the nineteenth century. In 1858, gold was discovered at Canoona [6] In 1867, gold was discovered in Gympie. In 1872 William Hann discovers gold on the Palmer river, southwest of Cooktown. Chinese settlers began to arrive in the goldfields, by 1877 there were 17,000 Chinese on Queensland gold fields. In that year restrictions on Chinese immigration were passed. Location of Gympie in Queensland (red) The town of Gympie is located in south eastern Queensland, Australia, and is approximately 160 kilometres north of the state capital, Brisbane. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

  • 1862 Queensland's western boundary changed from longitude 141° E to 138°E
  • 1863 First Chief Justice appointed (Sir James Cockle)
  • 1864 Was an annus horribilis for Queensland:
    • In March, major flooding of the Brisbane River inundated the centre of town
    • In April, fires devastated the west side of Queen Street (the main shopping centre)
    • In December, another fire (Brisbane's worst) wiped out the rest of Queen Street and adjoining streets
  • 1865 First steam trains in Queensland (from Ipswich to Bigge's Camp (now Grandchester)).
  • 1867
    • Queensland Constitution consolidated from existing legislation (Constitution Act 1867)
    • Sugar production was becoming a major industry. In 1867 six mills produced 168 tons of cane-sugar, by 1870 there were 28 mills with a production of 2,854 tons. The production of sugar started around Brisbane, but spread to Mackay and Cairns, and by 1888 the annual output of sugar was 60,000 tons.
  • 1871 George Phipps, 2nd Marquess of Normanby becomes Governor of Queensland.
  • 1876 The first record of a rugby match played in Queensland.
  • 1877 Arthur Edward Kennedy becomes Governor of Queensland
  • 1883 Queensland Premier Sir Thomas McIlwraith annexes Papua (later repudiated by British government). On 2 June the decision to form a rugby union association was made at the Exchange hotel in Brisbane. [7] The same year Queensland's population passed the 250,000 mark.

In 1887 the Brisbane-Wallangarra railway line was opened, and in 1888 there was a 483 mile line opened between Brisbane and Charleville. There were other lines which were nearly complete from Rockhampton to Longreach, and others being constructed around Maryborough, Mackay and Townsville. 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Chief Justice in many countries is the name for the presiding member of a Supreme Court in Commonwealth- or other countries with an Anglosaxon type of justice, such as the Supreme Court of the United States, the Supreme Court of Canada, the Supreme Court of New Zealand, the Supreme... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Annus horribilis is a Latin phrase meaning horrible year. It is a pun on annus mirabilis meaning year of wonders. // The Year of Wonders (1666) According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the first known written usage of the latin phrase Annus Mirabilis is as the title of a poem composed... The Brisbane River is situated in southeast Queensland, Australia, and flows through the city of Brisbane, before emptying into Moreton Bay. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Ipswich is a city and Local Government Area situated on the Bremer River in South East Queensland, Australia. ... Grandchester is a town in the Lockyer Valley region in Queensland, Australia. ... Townsville in 2004. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Mackay (, pop. ... Central Cairns from Mount Whitfield looking southeast. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... George Augustus Constantine Phipps, 2nd Marquess of Normanby (July 23, 1819 - April 3, 1890) was a politician of the United Kingdom. ... 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Sir Arthur Kennedy Sir Arthur Edward Kennedy (5 April 1809–3 June 1883) was a British colonial administrator who served as governor of a number of British colonies, namely Sierra Leone, Western Australia, Vancouver Island, Hong Kong and Queensland. ... 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Sir Thomas McIlwraith KCMG (1835-1900) was for many years the dominant figure of colonial politics in Queensland. ... The Territory of Papua was an Australian possession comprising the southeastern quarter of the island of New Guinea, existing from roughly 1902 to 1949. ... A rugby union scrum. ... Wallangarra is a village on the border between Queensland and New South Wales in Australia. ... The town of Charleville is located in South Western Queensland, Australia, 758 kilometres by road west of the state capital, Brisbane. ... Australian Stockmans Hall of Fame in Longreach Location of Longreach in Queensland (red) Longreach is a town and shire located in central western Queensland, Australia and is approximately 700 kilometres from the coast, west of Rockhampton. ...


By 1888, there were more than 5 million cattle in Queensland. Binomial name Bos taurus Linnaeus, 1758 Cattle (often called cows in vernacular and contemporary usage, or kye as the Scots plural of cou) are domesticated ungulates, a member of the subfamily Bovinae of the family Bovidae. ...

  • 1891 Great Shearers' Strike at Barcaldine leads to formation of the Labor Party. The issue in the strike was whether employers were entitled to use non-union labour. There were troops and police called in, some sheds were fired, and there were mass riots. There was a second shearers strike in 1894. Union sponsored candidates won sixteen seats at the Queensland elections in 1893.
  • The land where the Brisbane Cricket Ground now sits was first used as a cricket ground in 1895, with the first cricket match played there in December 1896.
  • 1897 Native (Aboriginal) Police force disbanded.
  • 1899 World's first Labor Party Government (Premier Anderson Dawson lasted one week)

In July 1899 Queensland offered to send a force of 250 mounted infantry to help Britain in the Second Boer War. Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Barcaldine is a small town located in Western Queensland, Australia, approximately 520 kilometres by road west of the city of Rockhampton. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Brisbane Cricket Ground is a major sports stadium in the Queensland capital of Brisbane. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Andrew Dawson (usually known as Anderson Dawson) (1863-1910), was Premier of Australia for one week in 1899, this was the first Labor Party government anywhere in the world. ... Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 5000 - 6000 Battlefield casualties, 15,000 disease related. ...


Immigration

During the 1890s many workers known as the Kanakas were brought to Queensland from neighbouring Pacific Island nations to work in the sugar cane fields. Some of whom had possibly been kidnapped under a process known as Blackbirding. When Australia was federated in 1901, the White Australia policy came into effect, whereby all foreign workers in Australia were deported under the Pacific Island Labourers Act of 1901 [8]. At this time there were between 7,000 and 10,000 Pacific Islanders living in Queensland. Most of them had been deported by 1908, by which time there were only 1500-2500 remaining. The Kanakas were workers brought from the Pacific Islands as indentured servants to cover serious labor shortages in various European colonies, such as Fiji, Australia and British Columbia, Canada. ... Blackbirding refers to the recruitment of people through trickery and kidnappings to work on plantations, particularly the sugar cane plantations of Queensland (Australia) and Fiji[1] , as well as in the early days of the pearling industry in Broome. ... This badge from 1906 shows the use of the expression White Australia at that time The White Australia policy is a generic term used to describe a collection of historical legislation and policies, intended to restrict non-white immigration to Australia, and to promote European immigration, from 1901 to 1973. ...


State of Queensland

Map of Queensland in 1916
Map of Queensland in 1916

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 454 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (3280 × 4328 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 454 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (3280 × 4328 pixel, file size: 3. ...

Federation to Second World War

1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The history of Australia from 1901 - 1945 begins with the federation of the colnies to create the Commonwealth of Australia. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... The term womens suffrage refers to an economic and political reform movement aimed at extending suffrage — the right to vote — to women. ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The University of Queensland (UQ) is the longest-established university in the state of Queensland, Australia, and a member of Australias Group of Eight. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Illustration from the Brisbane Worker newspaper condemning the brutality of the Queensland Police on Black Friday The 1912 Brisbane General Strike in Queensland, Australia, began when members of the Australian Tramway Employees Association were dismissed when they wore union badges to work on 18 January 1912. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Qantas (pronounced ) is the name and callsign of the national airline of Australia and the worlds oldest continuously running independent airline. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Sir Matthew Nathan Sir Matthew Nathan GCMG, (Chinese Translated Name 彌敦) (3 January 1862 – 18 April 1939) was a British soldier and civil servant, who variously served as the Governor of Sierra Leone, Gold Coast, Hong Kong, Natal and Queensland. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... The Queensland Legislative Council was the upper house of the parliament in the Australian state of Queensland, until its abolition in 1922. ... In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... An RFDS Pilatus PC-12 on a remote airstrip in Queensland, Australia. ... Location of Cloncurry in Queensland (red) Cloncurry () is a town and Local Government Area situated in north west Queensland, Australia, 770 kilometres west of the city of Townsville via the Flinders Highway. ... Kingsford Smith in his flying gear Air Commodore Sir Charles Edward Kingsford Smith MC, AFC (February 9, 1897 - November 8, 1935), often called Charles Kingsford Smith, or by his nickname Smithy, was the best-known early Australian aviator. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Binomial name Bufo marinus Linnaeus, 1758 Distribution of the Cane Toad. ... Innisfail is a town located in the far north of the state of Queensland, Australia, approximately 90km by road south of Cairns. ... Gordonvale is a small sugar-growing town in north Queensland, Australia. ...

Second World War

April 1942. US military police (MPs) outside the Central Hotel, Brisbane. Later that year there was violence between Australians and US MPs in the "Battle of Brisbane". The pipe on which they are resting their feet carried sea water, for use in fighting fires, in the event of air raids.
April 1942. US military police (MPs) outside the Central Hotel, Brisbane. Later that year there was violence between Australians and US MPs in the "Battle of Brisbane". The pipe on which they are resting their feet carried sea water, for use in fighting fires, in the event of air raids.

During World War II, many Queenslanders volunteered for the Australian Imperial Force, the Royal Australian Air Force and the Royal Australian Navy. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 664 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (812 × 733 pixel, file size: 73 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)April 4, 1942. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 664 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (812 × 733 pixel, file size: 73 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)April 4, 1942. ... Battle of Brisbane During World War II, many US forces were stationed in and around the city, and, for a time, it was the headquarters for General Douglas MacArthur, Supreme Allied Commander, South West Pacific Area. ... The Second Australian Imperial Force (2nd AIF) was the name given to the volunteer units of the Australian Army in World War II. The 2nd AIF was formed, from 1939 onwards, to fight overseas: most army units were Militia (reserve) units and under Australian law at the time, Militia troops... The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is the Air Force branch of the Australian Defence Force. ... The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) is the naval branch of the Australian Defence Force. ...


Following the outbreak of war with Japan, Queensland soon became a virtual frontline, as fears of invasion grew. Several cities and places in Northern Queensland were bombed by the Japanese during their air attacks on Australia. These included Horn Island, Townsville Cairns and Mossman. There was a massive build up of Australian and United States forces in the state, and the Allied Supreme Commander in the South West Pacific Area, General Douglas MacArthur, established his headquarters in Brisbane. Tens of thousands of Queenslanders were conscripted into Militia (reserve) units. Combatants China (from 1937) United States (1941) U.K. (1941) Australia (from 1941) Free France (1941) Netherlands (1941) New Zealand (1941) Canada (1941) Soviet Union (1945) Japan (from 1937)  Germany (1941) Thailand (from 1942) Manchukuo Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Franklin D. Roosevelt Winston Churchill John Curtin Fumimaro Konoe Hideki Tojo... From February 1942 to November 1943, during the Pacific War, the Australian mainland and offshore islands were attacked at least 97 times by aircraft from the Imperial Japanese Navy and Imperial Japanese Army Air Force. ... Horn Island is a long, thin barrier island off the Gulf Coast of Mississippi, near Pascagoula. ... Townsville (Postcodes: 4810-4819) is a city on the north-eastern coast of Australia, located in the state of Queensland. ... For the collection of Horsedrawn Carrages see Mossman Collection Mossman is a town of 1700 people in Far North Queensland, Australia, on the Mossman River. ... A map of the Pacific Theater. ... Douglas MacArthur (January 26, 1880 - April 5, 1964), was an American Field Marshal (only in the Philippines) and general who played a prominent role in the Pacific theater of World War II. He was poised to command the invasion of Japan in November 1945 but was instead instructed to accept... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


On 14 May 1943 the Australian Hospital Ship Centaur was sunk off Stradbroke Island, by a torpedo from a Japanese Navy submarine. May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Australian Hospital Ship (AHS) Centaur was a hospital ship during World War II, which was attacked and sunk by a Japanese submarine in 1943. ... Stradbroke Island was a large sand island in Moreton Bay near Brisbane, Queensland. ... The Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) (: 大日本帝國海軍 Shinjitai: 大日本帝国海軍   or 日本海軍 Nippon Kaigun), officially Navy of Empire of Greater Japan, also known as the Japanese Navy or Combined Fleet was the Navy of Empire of Japan from 1869 until 1947, when it was dissolved following Japans constitutional renunciation of the use of force... Alvin in 1978, a year after first exploring hydrothermal vents. ...


Later in the war, the 3rd Division, a Militia unit made of predominantly Queensland personnel, took part in the Bougainville campaign. The Australian 3rd Division was a first formed in World War I, as part of the Australian Imperial Force. ... Combatants United States Australia New Zealand Fiji Empire of Japan Commanders Roy Geiger Theodore S. Wilkinson Oscar Griswold Stanley Savige Harukichi Hyakutake Masatane Kanda Strength 126,000 troops,[1] 728 aircraft[2] 65,000 troops,[3] 154 aircraft[4] Casualties 1,243 dead[5] 44,000 dead[6] The Bougainville...


Post War Period

Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen Sir Johannes Bjelke-Petersen (13 January 1911 - 23 April 2005) was an Australian politician who was Premier of the state of Queensland from 1968 to 1987, the states longest serving Premier. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ... The 1971 Springboks tour was a six-week rugby union tour by the South African national team to Australia. ... A state of emergency is a governmental declaration that may suspend certain normal functions of government, may work to alert citizens to alter their normal behaviors, or may order government agencies to implement emergency preparedness plans. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Johannes Joh Bjelke-Petersen, KCMG (13 January 1911 – 23 April 2005), New Zealand-born Australian politician, was the longest-serving and longest-lived Premier of the state of Queensland. ... List of Premiers of Queensland Before the 1890s there was no formal party system in Queensland. ... Sir Walter Campbell was Governor of Queensland from 1985-1992. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Current flag of the Commonwealth Games Federation Locations of the games, and participating countries British Commonwealth Games seal Commonwealth Games Federation seal, adopted in 2001 The Commonwealth Games is a multinational, multi-sport event. ... Expo 88 - as seen from the Brisbane River (photo taken from Victoria Bridge) Expo 88 - showing a globe of the world (photo taken from Victoria Bridge) Expo 88 at night (photo taken from Victoria Bridge) Expo 88 was a Worlds Fair held in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia between April 30...

Mabo

In 1982, Eddie Mabo began action in the High Court to claim ownership of their land in the Torres Strait, following the Queensland Amendment Act which was passed that year. In 1985, the Queensland government tried to end proceedings in the High Court by passing the Queensland Coast Islands Declaratory Act, which claimed that Queensland had total control of the Torres Strait Islands after they had been annexed in 1879. This act was held as contrary to the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 by the High Court in 1988. The well known Mabo v Queensland (No 2) (1992) decision was handed down in 1992 which recognised native title. Eddie Koiki Mabo (c. ... The Torres Strait - Cape York Peninsula is at the top; several of the Torres Strait Islands can be seen strung out towards Papua New Guinea (North is downwards in this image) The Torres Strait is a body of water which lies between Australia and the Melanesian island of New Guinea. ... The Racial Discrimination Act 1975 is a statute passed by the Parliament of Australia under the Government of former Labor Prime Minister Gough Whitlam. ... Mabo v Queensland (No 2) (commonly known as Mabo) is a landmark Australian court case which was decided by the High Court of Australia on June 3, 1992. ...


Sport

Players are selected to play for the state in which they played their first senior football, hence the name state of origin. Prior to 1980 players were selected for interstate matches on the basis of where they were playing their club football at the time. ... This is a list of games played in the annual State of Origin rugby league series, played between New South Wales and Queensland 1980 Only game: Queensland 20, New South Wales 10 (Lang Park, July 8) 1981 Only game: Queensland 22, New South Wales 15 (Lang Park, July 28) 1982... Matilda the Kangaroo mascot for the 1982 Commonwealth Games (shown here during her circuit of the track at the stadium during the Games Opening Ceremony, and with a silhouette of Matilda and several joey kangaroos on a large screen, during Rolf Harris segment) Matilda turns her head and winks at... The Brisbane Bears Football Club was the first Queensland-based club in the Victorian Football League. ... This article is about the national league in Australian rules football. ... Capital Melbourne Government Constitutional monarchy Governor David de Kretser Premier Steve Bracks (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 37  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $222,022 (2nd)  - Product per capita  $44,443/person (5th) Population (End of September 2006)  - Population  5,110,500 (2nd)  - Density  22. ... The Brisbane Lions Australian Football Club (the trading name for the Brisbane Bears-Fitzroy Football Club) are an Australian Football League club based in Brisbane, Queensland. ... The first Rugby World Cup took place in New Zealand and Australia in 1987, and was won by New Zealand. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Gold Coast are a rugby league team who played in the NSWRL competition from 1988-1997, and the NRL in 1998. ... The South Queensland Crushers were a rugby league team who played in the NSWRL/ARL competition from 1995–1997. ... The North Queensland Cowboys are an Australian professional rugby league football team based in Townsville, Queensland. ... Logo of the 2nd Games in Seattle The Goodwill Games were an international sports competition, created by Ted Turner in reaction to the political troubles surrounding the Olympic Games of the 1980s. ... The 2003 Rugby World Cup was the fifth rugby union world cup. ...

Pauline Hanson

In 1996, Pauline Hanson won a Federal house of representatives seat in the Queensland division of Oxley, which is based around Ipswich, having previously been a candidate endorsed by the Liberal party. Her controversial views on ending Asian immigration to Australia, and being against government funding to Aborigines were seen as racist by many Australians, although she was given much support by some people, especially in Queensland. Pauline Lee Hanson (born 27 May 1954) is an Australian politician who was the leader of One Nation Party, a party with an anti-immigration, nativist platform. ... Timber framed buildings in St Nicholas Street The Ancient House is decorated with a particularly fine example of pargeting Ipswich (pronounced ) is the county town of Suffolk and a non-metropolitan district in East Anglia, England on the estuary of the River Orwell. ...


The One Nation party she founded did well for a new political party, in the Queensland state elections in June 1998, winning 21% of the vote, and 11 out of 89 seats in the Queensland Legislative Assembly One Nation is a nationalist and protectionist political group in Australia. ... The Legislative Assembly. ...


In 1999, the City Country Alliance was formed from One Nation members, which held six state seats. It lost all the seats in the election in 2001, and the party lost its status as a political party in 2003. In this election, One Nation won only 8.69% of the vote. In 2004, One Nation had less than 5% of the vote. The City Country Alliance (1999-2003) was a short lived conservative Australian political party that briefly held six Queensland state seats. ...


See also

List of Governors of Queensland See Governors of the Australian states for a description and history of the office of Governor. ... List of Premiers of Queensland Before the 1890s there was no formal party system in Queensland. ... view of the State Library of Queensland from the Brisbane River The State Library of Queensland is a large public library provided to the people of the State of Queensland, Australia, by the State Government. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

References

  • Rienits, Rex & Thea (1969). A Pictorial History of Australia. Hamlyn Publishing Group. ISBN 0-600-03125-X. 

Further information

  • Queensland History
  • Central Queensland History
  • Queensland State Archives - the state's major source of historical documentation relating to governmenthi wotz up

  Results from FactBites:
 
Queensland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1338 words)
Queensland is often nicknamed the Sunshine State, since it enjoys warm weather and a sizable portion of the state is in the tropics.
West To the west, Queensland is bordered by the Northern Territory, at the 138° E. longitude, and to the south-west by the north-eastern corner of South Australia.
Queensland is served by a a number of National Highways and, particularly in South East Queensland, high quality motorways such as the M1.
Queensland Government (1618 words)
Queensland was first seen by Europeans in the 1600s.  Dutch explorer Willem Jansz landed on the Cape York Peninsula in 1606 and in 1623 Jan Carstens explored the Gulf of Carpentaria.
Queensland's early days were spent as part of the British-administered Colony of New South Wales which, at that time, occupied a large part of the Australian continent.
The physical remoteness of Queensland from the centre of government in New South Wales and disquiet with the maintenance of public infrastructure, further contributed to a desire for independence.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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