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Encyclopedia > History of Modern Serbia
Serbia
Medieval Serbia
Ottoman Serbia
Modern Serbia
Kingdom of Yugoslavia
Republic of Yugoslavia
Karađorđe Petrović, leader of Serbian uprising in 1804
Karađorđe Petrović, leader of Serbian uprising in 1804

Serbia gained its autonomy from the Ottoman Empire in two revolutions in 1804 and 1815, though Turkish troops continued to garrison the capital, Belgrade until 1867. Those revolutions revived the Serbian pride and gave them hope that their Empire might come into reality again. In 1829 Greece was given complete independence and Serbia was given its autonomy which made her semi-independent from Turkey. File links The following pages link to this file: Serbia Coat of arms List of Serbian monarchs History of Serbia Coat of Arms of Serbia Obrenovic Categories: Images with unknown source | Coat of arms images | Coats of arms | Coats of arms by nation | National coats of arms ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian1 Capital Belgrade Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  88,361 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2002)     (without Kosovo)  â€“ Density  7. ... The Serbs entered their present territory early in the 7th century AD, settling in six distinct tribal delimitations: Rascia/RaÅ¡ka (present-day Western Serbia and Northern Montenegro), Bosnia [1] (indistinct from Rascia until the 12th century), Zachumlie/Zahumlje (western Herzegovina), Trebounia/Travunija (eastern Herzegovina), Pagania/Paganija (middle Dalmatia) and... Portrait of Karadjordje. ... Portrait of Karadjordje. ... Imperial motto (Ottoman Turkish) Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (the Eternal State) The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Bursa (1335 - 1365), Edirne (1365-1453), Ä°stanbul (Constantinople) (1453-1922) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah of the Osmanli Dynasty Population ca 40... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Belgrade (Serbian, Београд, Beograd   listen[?]), is the capital of Serbia since 1404, Serbia and Montenegro (2003–Present) and Yugoslavia (1918–2003). ... 1867 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...

Southern and Northern Serbia (Vojvodina) in 1849
Southern and Northern Serbia (Vojvodina) in 1849

Between 1849 and 1860 there was an Austrian crown land known as Dukedom (Vojvodina) of Serbia and Tamis Banat. This region is latter known as Vojvodina. historic map This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... historic map This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Banat (Romanian: Banat; Serbian: Банат or Banat; German: Banat; Hungarian: Bánát or Bánság; Slovak: Banát) is a region in Southeastern Europe divided among three countries: the eastern part belongs to Romania (the counties of TimiÅŸ and CaraÅŸ-Severin), the western part to Serbia-Montenegro (the Serbian... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official languages Serbian, Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian, Rusin1 Capital Novi Sad Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  21,500 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2002)  â€“ Density  2,031,992  94. ...


Renewed war alongside Russia against the Turks in 1877 brought full independence for Serbia and large territorial gains toward the south-east, including Niš, henceforth Serbia's second largest city (Treaty of Berlin, 1878). Serbian Kingdom was proclaimed in 1882, under King Milan Obrenović IV. Serbia was one of the rear countries at the time that had its own domestic ruling dinasty on the throne (only few more, German Empire, Italy, Britain, Austro-Hungary). However, milions of Serbs still lived outside Serbia, in Austro-Hungarian Empire (Bosnia, Croatia, Vojvodina, Sandzak) and the Ottoman Empire (South Serbia, Kosovo, Macedonia). 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Nis redirects here. ... The Treaty of Berlin was the final Act of the Congress of Berlin (June 13-July 13, 1878), by which the United Kingdom, Austria-Hungary, France, Germany, Italy, Russia and Turkey revised the Treaty of San Stefano signed on March 3 of the same year. ... Milan I, born Milan Obrenovich IV, (August 22, 1854 – February 11, 1901), was the king of Serbia from 1882 to 1889. ...


The new country was, like most of the Balkan lands, overwhelmingly agrarian with little in the way of industry or modern infrastructure. The total population rose from a million in the early 19th century to 2.5 million in 1900, when Belgrade contained 100,000 inhabitants (northern part was held by Austro-Hungary), Niš 24,500 and half a dozen other cities 10-15,000 each. The Balkans is the historic and geographic name used to describe southeastern Europe (see the Definitions and boundaries section below). ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1900 is a common year starting on Monday. ...


Internal politics revolved largely around the dynastic rivalry between the Obrenović and Karađorđević families, descendants respectively of Miloš Obrenović, (recognised as hereditary prince in 1829) and Karađorđe (Black George), leader of the 1804 revolt but killed in 1817, allegedly at Miloš's behest. The Obrenovići headed the emerging state in 18171842 and 18581903, the Karađorđevići in 18421858 and after 1903. The house Obrenović(i) ruled Serbia from 1815-1842 and 1858-1903. ... The KaraÄ‘orÄ‘ević (Karadjordjevic) Serbian ruling dynasty is descended from KaraÄ‘orÄ‘e (Karadjordje). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... KaraÄ‘orÄ‘e or Карађорђе (November 3, 1768 – July 13, 1817) was the leader of the First Serbian uprising against the Turks, and the founder of the House of KaraÄ‘orÄ‘ević. He was born Ђорђе Петровић (ĐorÄ‘e Petrović). Because of his dark complexion and short temper he was nicknamed Black Djordje... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1858 is a common year starting on Friday. ... 1903 has the latest occurring solstices and equinoxes for 400 years, because the Gregorian calendar hasnt had a leap year for seven years or a century leap year since 1600. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1858 is a common year starting on Friday. ... 1903 has the latest occurring solstices and equinoxes for 400 years, because the Gregorian calendar hasnt had a leap year for seven years or a century leap year since 1600. ...


Historical map showing Serbia, Montenegro and Bosnia in 1897. The borders are result of enlarging of Serbia in 1877 and were unchanged until 1912, except for annexation of Bosnia by Austria-Hungary.
Historical map showing Serbia, Montenegro and Bosnia in 1897. The borders are result of enlarging of Serbia in 1877 and were unchanged until 1912, except for annexation of Bosnia by Austria-Hungary.
Legend:
To the north and west, Austria-Hungary; yellow to the east Romania; orange to the east, Bulgaria; to the south Ottoman Turkey; in bottom left corner a piece of Italy; large river in upper right is Danube.

After the 1880s the dynastic issue became entwined to some extent with wider diplomatic divisions in Europe, Milan Obrenović aligning his foreign policy with that of neighbouring Austria-Hungary in return for Habsburg support for his elevation to king. The Karadjordjevici inclined more toward Russia, gaining the throne in June 1903 after a bloody palace coup by army officers hostile to Habsburg rule over neighbouring South Slavs. Historical map of Serbia, Montenegro and Bosnia from 1897. ... 1897 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1912 was a leap year starting on Monday. ... Bosnia and Herzegovina (officially Bosna i Hercegovina, shortened to BiH, also in English variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... Mayor Dragoljub Davidović Area  - Total 93. ... Belgrade (Serbian, Београд, Beograd   listen[?]), is the capital of Serbia since 1404, Serbia and Montenegro (2003–Present) and Yugoslavia (1918–2003). ... Bosnia and Herzegovina (officially Bosna i Hercegovina, shortened to BiH, also in English variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. ... Mayor Unknown Area km² Population  - city  - urban  - density 14,700 in 2003 /km² Time zone Summer Time CET (UTC +1) CEST (UTC +2) founded became capital last independence Unknown 1482 1918 Latitude Longitude ° N ° E Area code +381 86 Car plates CT Official Website Cetinje is a city (population 14... Mostar Coat of Arms Riverside in Mostar Old Bridge at Night Mostar is a city of 105,448 (2003) in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the center of the Herzegovina-Neretva Canton of the Federation. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian Capital Podgorica Former Royal Capital Cetinje President Filip Vujanović Prime Minister Milo Đukanović Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  13,812 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2003)  â€“ Density  616,258  48. ... Novi Pazar (Нови Пазар) is a city located in Serbia and Montenegro at 43. ... Nis redirects here. ... View of Prizren Prizren (Serbian Cyrillic Призрен; Albanian Prizreni) is an historic city located in Kosovo at 42. ... Sarajevo is the capital and largest city of Bosnia and Herzegovina, located at 43°52′ N 18°25′ E. According to the 1991 census, its population was 429,672; currently estimated at around 290,000. ... Sava also Save (German Save, Hungarian Száva) is a river in Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Serbia, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. ... Shkodër (Albanian: Shkodër or Shkodra, Serbian Skadar, Latin Scutari, German Skutari) is a city located in North West Albania, in the District of Shkodër and it is the capital of the County of Shkodër. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian1 Capital Belgrade Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  88,361 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2002)     (without Kosovo)  â€“ Density  7. ... The city of Sofia (Bulgarian: София), at the foot of the Vitosha mountain, has a population of 1,208,930 (2003), and is the biggest city and capital of the Republic of Bulgaria. ... Southern Carpathians (also called Transylvanian Alps; in Romanian: Carpaţii Meridionali) are located between the Prahova river in the east and the Timiş river and Cerna river in the west. ... The Adriatic Sea Source: NASA The Adriatic Sea is an arm of the Mediterranean Sea separating the Apennine peninsula (Italy) from the Balkan peninsula, and the system of the Apennine Mountains from that of the Dinaric Alps and adjacent ranges. ... Skopje (Macedonian: Скопје; Albanian: Shkup; Bulgarian: Скопие; Greek: Σκόπια, Skópia; Latin: Scupi; Serbian: Скопље, Skoplje; Turkish: Ãœsküb) is the capital city of the Republic of Macedonia. ... Postcard from Valjevo Valjevo (Ваљево) is a city located in Serbia and Montenegro at 44. ... VrÅ¡ac (Serbian: Вршац or VrÅ¡ac; Romanian: VârÅŸeÅ£; Hungarian: Versec; German: Werschetz) is a city located in Serbia and Montenegro at 45. ... Vidin is a Bulgarian town. ... Zadar (Italian Zara) is a city in Croatia on the Adriatic Sea, with a population of 72,718 (2001). ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... Imperial motto (Ottoman Turkish) Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (the Eternal State) The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Bursa (1335 - 1365), Edirne (1365-1453), Ä°stanbul (Constantinople) (1453-1922) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah of the Osmanli Dynasty Population ca 40... The Danube (Donau in German; Dunaj in Slovak; Donava in Slovene; Duna in Hungarian; Dunav in Croatian and Serbian; Dunav or Дунав in Bulgarian; Dunăre in Romanian; Дунай (Dunay) in Ukrainian; Danuvius in Latin) is Europes second-longest river (after the Volga). ... // Events and Trends Technology Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ... Milan I, born Milan Obrenovich IV, (August 22, 1854 – February 11, 1901), was the king of Serbia from 1882 to 1889. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ... A monarch is a type of ruler or head of state, whose titles and ascent are often inherited, not earned, and who represents a larger monarchical system which has established rules and customs regarding succession, duties, and powers. ... 1903 has the latest occurring solstices and equinoxes for 400 years, because the Gregorian calendar hasnt had a leap year for seven years or a century leap year since 1600. ...


Serbian opposition to Austria-Hungary's October 1908 annexation of Bosnia-Herzegovina brought about a serious European crisis: German and Austro-Hungarian pressure forced Russia to prevail on Serbia (March 31, 1909) to accept the annexation, but Russia undertook to defend Serbia against any future threat to her independence. Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... 1908 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Bosnia and Herzegovina (also variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining, as the final day of March. ... 1909 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Following Bulgaria's independence (October 1908) from Ottoman overlordship and a successful movement by Greek army officers (August 1909) to steer their government onto a more nationalistic course, Serbia joined with the other two countries and her Serb-populated neighbour Montenegro in invading (October 1912) Ottoman-held Macedonia (not the Republic of Macedonia) and reducing Turkey-in-Europe to a small region around Constantinople (now Istanbul). 1908 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1909 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian Capital Podgorica Former Royal Capital Cetinje President Filip Vujanović Prime Minister Milo Đukanović Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  13,812 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2003)  â€“ Density  616,258  48. ... 1912 was a leap year starting on Monday. ... Official languages Macedonian¤,2 Capital Skopje President Branko Crvenkovski Prime Minister Vlado Bučkovski Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water Ranked 145th  25,713 km²  1. ... Map of Constantinople. ... Shows the Location of the Province Ä°stanbul Istanbul (Turkish: Ä°stanbul; a contraction of Greek εις την πολιν into the city, the former Constantinople, Κωνσταντινούπολις) is the largest city in Turkey, and arguably the most important. ...


Bulgaria failed in her subsequent attempt (July 1913) to take from her allies territory which she had originally been promised (see Balkan Wars), and to Habsburg alarm at another near-doubling of Serbia's territory was added Bulgarian resentment at having been denied what she saw as her just share of the territorial gains. Link title1913 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... The outcome as of April 1913 The Balkan Wars were two wars in South-eastern Europe in 1912-1913 in the course of which the Balkan League (Bulgaria, Montenegro, Greece, and Serbia) first conquered Ottoman-held Macedonia and most of Thrace and then fell out of fellowship over the division...


Serbia in World War I

The assassination in the Bosnian capital Sarajevo (June 28, 1914) of the Archduke Francis Ferdinand, heir to the Habsburg throne, by a young Bosnian Serb, provoked an ultimatum from Vienna requiring Serbia to allow Austro-Hungarian investigation of the plot on Serbian soil. Despite Serbia's acceptance (July 25) of nearly all the demands, Austria-Hungary declared war on July 28. Russia's mobilisation in support of Serbia in turn brought a German ultimatum requiring her to stand down her forces, and war was declared among the great powers in the first week of August. Sarajevo is the capital and largest city of Bosnia and Herzegovina, located at 43°52′ N 18°25′ E. According to the 1991 census, its population was 429,672; currently estimated at around 290,000. ... (Some entries on this page have been duplicated on August 1. ... 1914 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Franz Ferdinand links to here. ... Vienna (German: Wien [viːn]; Hungarian: Bécs) is the capital of Austria, and also one of Austrias nine federal states (Bundesland Wien). ... July 25 is the 206th day (207th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 159 days remaining. ... July 28 is the 209th day (210th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 156 days remaining. ... Mobilization (or mobilisation in British English) is the act of assembling and making both troops and supplies ready for war. ...


Serbia repulsed three Austro-Hungarian invasions (August, September and November – December 1914), in the last of which Belgrade was held temporarily by the enemy. But during 1915 an epidemic of typhus decimated the Serbian army, and renewed invasion in early October, this time involving also German and Bulgarian forces, resulted in the occupation of the whole country. The remnants of Serbia's armed forces retreated into Albania and Macedonia, where British and French forces had landed at Thessaloniki. Persecutions and deaths followed. Belgrade (Serbian, Београд, Beograd   listen[?]), is the capital of Serbia since 1404, Serbia and Montenegro (2003–Present) and Yugoslavia (1918–2003). ... 1915 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... This is about the disease Typhus. ... Thessaloníki (Greek: Θεσσαλονίκη; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is the second-largest city of Greece and is the principal, the largest city and the capital of Macedonia. ...


The period of government exile in Macedonia was marked by a significant shift in the balance of political forces, when the pan-Serb militant Col. Dragutin Dimitrijević ("Apis") (a leader of the 1903 coup and head of the shadowy "Black Hand" organisation accused of complicity in the Sarajevo assassination) was tried and executed (June 1917) on charges of plotting against the royal government. Military circles would henceforth be dominated by the royalist "White Hand" faction of Gen. Petar Živković, later prime minister (19291932) of an extra-constitutional monarchical regime. Dragutin Dimitrijević Apis Serbian Cyrillic Драгутин Димитријевић Апис (August 17, 1876 - June 27, 1917), was a Serbian nationalist leader. ... 1903 has the latest occurring solstices and equinoxes for 400 years, because the Gregorian calendar hasnt had a leap year for seven years or a century leap year since 1600. ... Members of the Black Hand Black Hand, or Crna ruka (Црна рука), officially Ujedinjenje ili Smrt (Уједињење или смрт) (Unification or Death) was a secret association founded in Serbia by pan-Serbian nationalists in May 1911 with the intention of uniting all of the territories containing Serb populations (notably Bosnia and Herzegovina, annexed by Austria... 1917 was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ... White Hand, or Bela Ruka, was a secret, unofficial military organization in the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (and later in the Kingdom of Yugoslavia). ... 1929 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1932 is a leap year starting on a Friday. ...


A successful Allied offensive in September 1918 secured first Bulgaria's surrender and then the liberation of the occupied territories (November 1918). On November 25 the Great Peoples Assembly of Vojvodina voted to join the Serbia. Also, on November 29 the National Assembly of Montenegro voted for union with Serbia, and two days later an assembly of leaders of Austria–Hungary's southern Slav regions voted to join the new State of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. For subsequent history, also see history of Yugoslavia. Comparing to the other European countries Serbia had by far the greatest casualties in the war, having over 30% (1,3 million) of its total population perished. 1918 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... 1918 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official languages Serbian, Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian, Rusin1 Capital Novi Sad Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  21,500 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2002)  â€“ Density  2,031,992  94. ... November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in all south Slavic languages) is a term used for three separate but successive political entities that existed during most of the 20th century on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
History of Serbia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4446 words)
Serbia gained its autonomy from the Ottoman Empire in two uprisings in 1804 (led by Đorđe Petrović - Karađorđe) and 1815 (led by Miloš Obrenović), although Turkish troops continued to garrison the capital, Belgrade, until 1867.
Serbia was a principality or kneževina (knjaževina), between 1817 and 1882, and a kingdom between 1882 and 1918, during which time the internal politics revolved largely around dynastic rivalry between the Obrenović and Karađorđević families.
On 16 August Serbia was promised by the Entente the territories of Srem, Bačka, Baranja, eastern Slavonia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and eastern Dalmatia as a reward after the war.
3. Serbia. 2001. The Encyclopedia of World History (563 words)
Like most Balkan nations, Serbia in the 19th century expended most of its energies on establishing itself as a European nation, complete with a modern state apparatus; by 1866 Serbia had the largest army in the Balkans.
Milosh was recognized by the sultan as prince of Serbia (the pashalik of Belgrade), which was given a measure of self-government.
The Treaty of Adrianople guaranteed the autonomy of Serbia and religious liberty.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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