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Encyclopedia > History of Illinois
State of Illinois
Flag of Illinois State seal of Illinois
Flag of Illinois Seal
Nickname(s): Land of Lincoln, The Prairie State
Motto(s): State sovereignty, national union
Official language(s) English[1]
Capital Springfield
Largest city Chicago
Largest county {{{LargestCounty}}}
Largest metro area Chicago
Area  Ranked 25th in the US
 - Total 57,918 sq mi
(149,998 km²)
 - Width 210 miles (340 km)
 - Length 390 miles (629 km)
 - % water 4.0
 - Latitude 36°58'N to 42°30'N
 - Longitude 87°30'W to 91°30'W
Population  Ranked 5th in the US
 - Total 12,419,293
 - Density 223.4/sq mi 
86.27/km² (11 in the US)
 - Median income  $45,787[2] (18)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Charles Mound[3]
1,235 ft  (377 m)
 - Mean 600 ft  (182 m)
 - Lowest point Mississippi River[3]
279 ft  (85 m)
Admission to Union  December 3, 1818 (21st)
Governor Rod Blagojevich (D)
Lieutenant Governor {{{Lieutenant Governor}}}
U.S. Senators Richard Durbin (D)
Barack Obama (D)
Congressional Delegation List
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Abbreviations IL US-IL
Website www.illinois.gov

Contents

Image File history File links Flag_of_Illinois. ... State seal of Illinois. ... Flag of Illinois The flag of the state of Illinois was designed in 1912 by Lucy Derwent in response to a contest held by the Daughters of the American Revolution. ... The Great Seal of the State of Illinois was first adopted in 1819 by the first Illinois General Assembly. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses, see Prairie (disambiguation). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_IL.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Illinois ... The United States does not have an official language, but English is spoken by about 82% of the population as a native language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... : Home of President Abraham Lincoln United States Illinois Sangamon 60. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... Chicagoland is an informal name for the Chicago metropolitan area, used primarily by copywriters, advertising agencies, native residents, and traffic reporters. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Map of states populations (2007) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2007, according to the 2007 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... For information on the income of individuals, see Personal income in the United States. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... Charles Mound is a gentle, 1,235-foot-high hill in northern Jo Daviess County, near the small town of Scales Mound and 11 miles northeast of Galena. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Milorad Blagojevich, commonly known as Rod R. Blagojevich (pronounced  , born December 10, 1956) is an American politician from the state of Illinois. ... This is a complete and current List of United States Lieutenant Governors. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Richard Joseph Dick Durbin, (born November 21, 1944) is currently the senior United States Senator from Illinois and Democratic Whip, the second highest position in the party leadership in the Senate. ... “Barack” redirects here. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... These are tables of congressional delegations from Illinois to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Standard Time Zone (CST) is a geographic region in the Americas that keeps time by subtracting six hours from UTC (UTC-6). ... UTC redirects here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML...

Pre-Columbian

Main article: Pre-Columbian history of Illinois

Cahokia, the urban center of the pre-Columbian Mississippian culture, was located near present-day Collinsville, Illinois. That civilization vanished circa 1400-1500 for unknown reasons. The next major power in the region was the Illiniwek Confederation, a political alliance among several tribes. The Illiniwek gave Illinois its name. The Illini suffered in the seventeenth century as Iroquois expansion (caused by European expansion in the eastern United States) forced them to compete with several tribes for land. The Illini were replaced in Illinois by the Pottawatomie, Miami, Sauk, and other tribes. Cahokia is the site of an ancient Native American city near Collinsville, Illinois, across the Mississippi River from St. ... The Mississippian culture was a mound-building Native American culture that flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States from approximately 800 to 1500 A.D., varying regionally. ... Collinsville is a city in Madison County, Illinois and partially in St. ... There was much conflict with a neigboring tribe of aliens!The Illiniwek (also known as the Illini, Illinois, Illinois Confederacy) were a group of six Native American tribes in the upper Mississippi River valley of North America. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... The Potawatomi (also spelled Pottawatomie or Pottawatomi) are an Aboriginal American people of the upper Mississippi River region. ... This article is about the city in Florida. ... For the abbreviation or acronym SAC, please see SAC. The Sauks or Sacs (Asakiwaki in their own language) are a group of Native Americans whose original territory may have been along the St. ...


European exploration

Main article: History of European exploration in Illinois

French explorers Jacques Marquette and Louis Joliet explored the Mississippi and Illinois Rivers in 1673. As a result of their exploration, Illinois was part of the French empire until 1763, when it passed to the British. The area was ceded to the new United States in 1783 and became part of the Northwest Territory. Father Jacques Marquette (French: Père Jacques Marquette) (June 10, 1637–May 18, 1675) and Louis Jolliet were the first Europeans to see and map the Mississippi River. ... Louis Joliet, also known Louis Jolliet (September 21, 1645–May 1700), was a Canadian explorer born in Quebec who is important for his discoveries in North America. ... 1673 (MDCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North West of the Ohio, was a governmental region within the early United States. ...


The 1800s

Historical populations
Census
year
Population

1800 2,458
1810 12,282
1820 55,211
1830 157,445
1840 476,183
1850 851,470
1860 1,711,951
1870 2,539,891
1880 3,077,871
1890 3,826,352
1900 4,821,550
1910 5,638,591
1920 6,485,280
1930 7,630,654
1940 7,897,241
1950 8,712,176
1960 10,081,158
1970 11,113,976
1980 11,426,518
1990 11,430,602
2000 12,419,293

The Illinois-Wabash Company was an early claimant to much of Illinois. The Illinois Territory was created on February 3, 1809. In 1818, Illinois became the 21st U.S. state. Early U.S. settlement began in the south part of the state and quickly spread northward, driving out the native residents. In 1832, some Indians returned from Iowa but were driven out in the Black Hawk War, fought by militia. The United States Census of 1800 was the second Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Illinois-Wabash Company land holdings included Illinois, Minnesota and Wisconsin. ... Categories: Stub | Illinois history | U.S. historical regions and territories ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Black Hawk War (disambiguation). ...


Illinois is known as the "Land of Lincoln" because it is here that the 16th President spent his formative years. Chicago gained prominence as a lake and canal port after 1848, and as a rail hub soon afterward. By 1857, Chicago was the state's dominant metropolis. (see History of Chicago). For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Chicago, looking North from State and Washington Streets This article is about the history of Chicago, Illinois. ...


Mormons at Nauvoo

Main articles: History of the Latter Day Saint movement and History of the Latter Day Saint Movement in Illinois

1839 members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, also known as Mormons or LDS, fleeing persecution in Missouri, purchased a tiny town that would be renamed Nauvoo. The city, situated on a prominent bend along the Mississippi River, quickly grew to 12,000 inhabitants, and was for a time rivaling for the title of largest city in Illinois. In some ways it was a theocracy, but it held democratic elections. The fact that LDS voted in blocs, and that Mormons benefited from a collective effort as opposed to the more isolated and independent non-Mormon farmer, caused many non-LDS in the nearby areas to become suspicious and jealous.[4] By the early 1840s the LDS church built a large stone temple in Nauvoo, one of the largest buildings in Illinois at the time, which was completed in 1846. In 1844 Smith was assassinated in nearby Carthage, Illinois, even though he was under the protection of Illinois judicial system, with assurances of his safety from then Governor Ford. In 1846 the Mormons under Brigham Young left Illinois for what would become Utah, but what was still then Mexican territory. A small breakaway group remained, but Nauvoo fell largely into abandonment. The Nauvoo temple was completed in 1846, but only used for a few months before it was sold in 1846 as the LDS left Nauvoo. Years later an Icarian utopian community came to Nauvoo, but it eventually disbanded. Nauvoo today has many restored buildings from the 1840s.[5] The Latter Day Saint movement is a religious movement within Christian Restorationism beginning in the early 19th century that led to the set of doctrines, practices, and cultures called Mormonism and to the existence of numerous Latter Day Saint churches. ... The Church of Christ, later called Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, was the original church organization founded by Joseph Smith, Jr. ... The term Mormon is a colloquial name, most-often used to refer to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). ... LDS is a TLA that can mean: Latter-Day Saint, a person who is a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Latter Day Saint, a person who identifies with the Latter Day Saint religious movement (Not to be confused with Latter Day Saint (note: without... Nauvoo (נאוו to be beautiful, Sephardi Hebrew Nåvu, Tiberian Hebrew Nâwû) is a city located in Hancock County, Illinois. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      For the metal band, refer to Theocracy (band). ... See also: Nauvoo Illinois Temple for information about the modern structure rebuilt on the same site. ... Carthage is a city in Hancock County, Illinois, United States. ... Thomas Ford (December 5, 1800 - November 3, 1850) was a Democrat and governor of Illinois from 1842 to 1846 remembered largely for the Illinois Mormon War. ... For other uses, see Brigham Young (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Étienne Cabet ( January 1, 1788 – November 9, 1856) was a French philosopher and utopian socialist. ...


Today large visitor centers are operated by the LDS church as well as the Community of Christ church. The LDS church rebuilt the Nauvoo temple in 2002, which once again occupies the exact same spot, atop a hill overlooking a prominent bend in the Mississippi river.


The Civil War

During the Civil War, over 250,000 Illinois men served in the Union Army, more than any other northern state except New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio. Beginning with President Lincoln's first call for troops and continuing throughout the war, Illinois mustered 150 infantry regiments (see Illinois in the Civil War), which were numbered from the 7th IL to the 156th IL. Seventeen cavalry regiments were also mustered, as well as two light artillery regiments. Illinois infantry regimental flag (77th IL is shown) ROCHER MEANNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNAmerican Civil War, over 250,000 Illinois men served in the Union Army, more than any other northern state except New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio. ... Illinois infantry regimental flag (77th IL is shown) ROCHER MEANNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNAmerican Civil War, over 250,000 Illinois men served in the Union Army, more than any other northern state except New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio. ...


Throughout the war the Republicans were in control, under the firm leadership of Governor Richard Yates. Richard Yates (January 18, 1818 - November 27, 1873) was wartime governor of Illinois. ...


Twentieth century

Main article: History of Illinois in the 20th century

In the 20th century, Illinois emerged as one of the most important states in the Union. Edward F. Dunne was a Chicago Democrat and leader of the progressive movement, who served as governor 1913-1917. He was succeeded by Frank Lowden, who led the war effort and was Republican presidential hopeful in 1920. Edward Fitzsimmons Dunne (1853–1937) was a U.S. political figure. ... Frank Orren Lowden (1861 - 1943) was a U.S. political figure. ...


Democrat Adlai Stevenson served as governor in 1948-52. William G. Stratton led a Republican statehouse in the 1950s. In 1960 Otto Kerner, Jr. led the Democrats back to power. He promoted economic development, education, mental health services, and equal access to jobs and housing. In a federal trial in 1973, Kerner was convicted on 17 counts of bribery while he was governor, plus other charges; he went to prison. Richard Ogilvie, a Republican, won in 1968. Bolstered by large Republican majorities in the state house, Ogilvie embarked upon a major modernization of state government. He successfully advocated for a state constitutional convention, increased social spending, and secured Illinois' first state income tax. The latter was particularly unpopular with the electorate, and the modest Ogilvie lost a close election to the flashy Democrat Dan Walker in 1972. The state constitutional convention of 1970 wrote a new document that was approved by the voters. It modernized government and ended the old system of three-person districts which froze the political system in place. This is about the mid-20th-century politician and diplomat; for other American politicians so named, see Adlai Stevenson (disambiguation). ... William Grant Stratton (February 26, 1914–March 2, 2001), known as Billy the Kid, was the Republican Governor of the U.S. state of Illinois from 1953 to 1961, succeeding Adlai Stevenson in that office. ... Otto Kerner, Jr. ... Richard Buell Ogilvie (1923–1988) was an American political figure. ... Daniel Walker (born August 6, 1922) was governor of the U.S. state of Illinois from 1973 to 1977. ...


Walker did not repeal the income tax that Ogilvie had enacted and wedged between machine Democrats and Republicans had little success with the Illinois legislature during his tenure. In 1987 he was convicted of business crimes not related to his governorship. In the 1976 gubernatorial election, Jim Thompson, a Republican prosecutor from Chicago won 65 percent of the vote over Michael Howlett. Thompson was reelected in 1978 with 60 percent of the vote, defeating State Superintendent Michael Bakalis. Thompson was very narrowly reelected in 1982 against former U.S. Senator Adlai E. Stevenson III, and then won decisively against him in a rematch in 1986. Thompson was succeeded by Republican Jim Edgar who won a close race in 1990 against his Democratic opponent, attorney general Neil Hartigan, and was reelected in 1994 by a wide margin against another Democratic opponent, state comptroller and former state senator Dawn Clark Netsch. In the elections of 1992 and 1994, the Republicans succeeded in capturing both houses of the state legislature and all statewide offices, putting Edgar in a very strong political position. He advocated increases in funding for education along with cuts in government employment, spending and welfare programs. He was succeeded by yet another Republican, George H. Ryan. Ryan worked for extensive repairs of the Illinois Highway System called "Illinois FIRST." FIRST was an acronym for "Fund for Infrastructure, Roads, Schools, and Transit." Signed into law in May 1999, the law created a $6.3 billion package for use in school and transportation projects. With various matching funds programs, Illinois FIRST provided $2.2 billion for schools, $4.1 billion for public transportation, another $4.1 billion for roads, and $1.6 billion for other projects. Ryan gained national attention in January 2003 when he commuted the sentences of everyone on or waiting to be sent to death row in Illinois—a total of 167 convicts—due to his belief that the death penalty was incapable of being administered fairly. Ryan's term was marked by scandals, and as of late 2005 he was himself on trial. This does not cite its references or sources. ... Michael J. Howlett was born August 30, 1914. ... Mike Bakalis was the Democratic nominee for governor of Illinois in 1978. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Adlai Stevenson III Adlai Ewing Stevenson III (born October 10, 1930, in Chicago) is an American politician of the Democratic party. ... James Edgar (born January 22, 1946, Vinita, Oklahoma) is an American politician who was the Governor of Illinois from 1991 to 1999. ... George Homer Ryan (born February 24, 1934 in Maquoketa, Iowa) was the Governor of the U.S. state of Illinois from 1999 until 2003. ...


Rod Blagojevich, elected in 2002, was the first Democratic governor in a quarter century. Illinois was trending sharply toward the Democratic party in both national and state elections. After the 2002 elections, Democrats had control of the House, Senate, and all but one statewide office. Blagojevich signed numerous pieces of progressive legislation such as ethics reform, death penalty reform, a state Earned Income Tax Credit, and expansions of health programs like KidCare and FamilyCare. Blagojevich signed a bill in 2005 that prohibited discrimination based on sexual orientation in employment, housing, public accommodations, and credit. Other notable actions of his term include a strict new ethics law and a comprehensive death penalty reform bill that was written by Sen. Barack Obama in his capacity as a state senator, and the late-Sen. Paul M. Simon. Despite an annual budget crunch, Blagojevich has overseen an increase in funding for health care and education every year without raising general sales or income taxes. He has been feuding with his powerful father-in-law Chicago Alderman Richard Mell. Blagojevich has been criticized for using what his opponents call "gimmicks" to balance the state budget. Republicans have also claimed that he is simply passing the state's fiscal problems on to future generations by borrowing his way to balanced budgets. Indeed, the 2005 state budget called for paying the bills by shorting state employees' pension fund by $1.2 billion, which led to a backlash among educators. Blagojevich has been criticized for too rapidly expanding the role of state government. In October 2005, the state had $1.4 billion in overdue medical bills, yet in November 2005, Blagojevich created two new government agencies and signed the All Kids health insurance bill, which obligates Illinois to provide affordable, comprehensive health insurance to every child in the state. Milorad Blagojevich, commonly known as Rod R. Blagojevich (pronounced  , born December 10, 1956) is an American politician from the state of Illinois. ... The United States federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a refundable tax credit that reduces or eliminates the taxes that low-income married or single working people pay (such as payroll taxes) and also frequently operates as a wage subsidy for low-income workers. ... “Barack” redirects here. ... Paul Martin Simon (November 29, 1928 - December 9, 2003) was an American politician from Illinois. ... The list below includes the aldermen of Chicago in order by ward. ...


Illinois, as of the census of 2000, currently has the 5th largest population of the 50 U.S. states. Chicago, in terms of populations, is the third largest city in the country.[citation needed]


Famous Illinois People

Most pre 1940 names have been selected from the WPA Guide[6] This is a list of people from Illinois; people are not included if they left the state before beginning a career. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ...

Before 1940

Recent

Laura Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935) was a founder of the U.S. Settlement House movement, and the first American woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. ... George Ade (February 9, 1866 - May 16, 1944) was an American writer, newspaper columnist, and playwright. ... Dankmar Adler (born July 3, 1844 in Germany; died April 16, 1900 in Chicago, Illinois, USA) was a German American architect of Jewish belief. ... Nelson Algren (March 28, 1909 - May 9, 1981) was a famous American writer. ... John Peter Altgeld (December 30, 1847 - March 12, 1902) was the governor of the U.S. state of Illinois from 1893 until 1897. ... Philip Danforth Armour (1832-1901) was born in Stockbridge, New York, of Scottish descent. ... Louis[1] Armstrong[2] (4 August 1901[3] – July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo[4] and Pops, was an American jazz musician. ... Edward Beecher (August 27, 1803–July 28, 1895) son of Lyman Beecher and the brother of Harriet Beecher Stowe and noted Illinois theologian. ... Portrait of Lydia Moss Bradley Lydia Moss Bradley, (Born: July 31, 1816, Vevay, Indiana, died: January 16, 1908, Peoria, Illinois). ... Masonic Temple Building Daniel Hudson Burnham (September 4, 1846 - June 1, 1912) was born in Henderson, New York and raised in Chicago, Illinois. ... Joe Cannon may refer to: Joe Cannon (soccer), American goalkeeper Joseph Gurney Cannon (1836–1926), U.S. Representative from Illinois and Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives; nicknamed Uncle Joe Joe B. Cannon, Texas state representative, 1959–1965 Joe F. Cannon, recently deceased Texas criminal defense attorney, famous... Anton Cermak Anton Cermak, in Czech Antonín ÄŒermák, (May 9, 1873 – March 6, 1933) was the mayor of Chicago, Illinois, from 1931 until his death in 1933. ... Bathhouse John Coughlin (1860-1938) was a First Ward Alderman in Chicago from 1893 until his death in 1938. ... Clarence Seward Darrow (April 18, 1857 Kinsman Township, Trumbull County, Ohio - March 13, 1938 Chicago) was an American lawyer and leading member of the American Civil Liberties Union, best known for defending teenage thrill killers Leopold and Loeb in their trial for murdering 14-year-old Bobby Franks (1924) and... John Dewey (October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer, whose thoughts and ideas have been greatly influential in the United States and around the world. ... Stephen A. Douglas Stephen Arnold Douglas (April 23, 1813 - June 3, 1861), American politician from Illinois, was one of the Democratic Party nominees for President in 1860 (the other being John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky). ... Finley Peter Dunne (1867 - 1936) was a Chicago-based U.S. author, writer and humorist. ... Jean Baptiste Pointe du Sable Jean Baptiste Pointe du Sable (1745(?) - August 28, 1818), popularly known as The Father of Chicago,[1] was the first known settler in the area which is now Chicago, Illinois. ... Ninian Edwards (March 17, 1775–July 20, 1833) was a U.S. political figure. ... James Thomas Farrell was born on 27 February 1904, in Chicago. ... Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser (August 27, 1871 – December 28, 1945) was an American author of the naturalist school, known for dealing with the gritty reality of life. ... Eugene Field, American writer Eugene Field (September 2, 1850 - November 4, 1895) American writer, best known for poetry for children and for humorous essays. ... Marshall Field (1834 -1906) was founder of Marshall Field and Company, the Chicago based chain of department stores. ... Thomas Ford (composer) Thomas Ford (politician), Governor of the state of Illinois This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... John Towner Frederick (February 1, 1893–January 31, 1975), born Corning, Iowa and only child of Oliver Roberts and Mary Elmira Frederick. ... Lyman Judson Gage Lyman Judson Gage (June 28, 1836–January 26, 1927) was an American financier and Presidential Cabinet officer. ... Ulysses Simpson Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American Civil War General and the 18th (1869–1877) President of the United States. ... Harold (Red) Edward Grange (June 13, 1903 – January 28, 1991), was a professional and college American football player. ... Frank Wakeley Gunsaulus D.D. LL.D (January 1, 1856–March 17, 1921) was a noted preacher, educator, pastor, author and humanitarian. ... William Rainey Harper ( 1856- 1906) Noted academic; organizer and first President of the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. ... Carter Henry Harrison, Sr. ... Carter Henry Harrison, Jr. ... A photograph of G.P.A. Healy by Mathew Brady George Peter Alexander Healy (July 15, 1808 - June 24, 1894), American painter, was born in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Ben Hecht (February 28, 1894 – April 18, 1964) was a prolific Hollywood screenwriter, even though he professed disdain for the motion picture industry. ... Born: September 11th, 1854 in Amenia Union, New York Died: July 19th, 1923 in Evanston, Illinois Partnered with: Martin Roche Holabird studied at the Military Academy at West Point but resigned and moved to Chicago. ... Raymond M. Hood (March 29, 1881 - August 14, 1934) was an early-mid twentieth century architect who worked in the Art Deco style. ... Henry Horner (November 30, 1879 – October 6, 1940) was a Democrat governor of Illinois, serving from 1933 to 1940. ... Robert Maynard Hutchins (January 17, 1899, Brooklyn, New York - May 17, 1977, Santa Barbara, California) was a philosopher. ... Colonel Robert G. Ingersoll (August 11, 1833 - July 21, 1899) was an American political leader and orator, noted for his broad range of culture and his defense of agnosticism. ... Samuel Insull (November 11, 1859 - July 16, 1938) was an investor in Chicago who was known for purchasing utilities and railroads. ... The Home Insurance Building in Chicago built in 1885 Leiter II Building, South State & East Congress Streets, Chicago, Cook County, IL William Le Baron Jenney (25 September 1832—14 June 1907) was an American architect and engineer who became known as the Father of the American skyscraper . ... Leslie Keeley (1836-1900) was an American physician, originator of the Keeley Cure. ... Florence Kelley (September 12, 1859 - February 17, 1932) was a reformer from Philadelphia. ... John Kinzie (December 3, 1763 - January 6, 1828) is known as Chicago’s first permanent white settler. ... Frank Knox William Franklin Frank Knox (January 1, 1874–April 28, 1944) was the Secretary of the Navy under Franklin D. Roosevelt during most of World War II. He was also the Republican vice presidential candidate in 1936. ... Engraving of Cavelier de La Salle A later engraving of Robert de LaSalle Memorial Plaque to de La Salle in Rouen René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, or Robert de LaSalle (November 22, 1643 – March 19, 1687) was a French explorer. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Mary Ann Todd Lincoln (December 13, 1818 – July 16, 1882) was the First Lady of the United States when her husband, Abraham Lincoln, served as the sixteenth President, from 1861 until 1865. ... Robert Todd Lincoln (August 1, 1843 – July 26, 1926) was the first son of Abraham Lincoln and Mary Ann Todd. ... Nicholas Vachel Lindsay (November 10, 1879 – December 5, 1931) was an American poet. ... For other persons with similar names, see John Logan. ... Frank Orren Lowden (1861 - 1943) was a U.S. political figure. ... Cyrus Hall McCormick (February 15, 1809 - May 13, 1884) was famous as the inventor of the mechanical reaper in 1831. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... James Robert Mann, about 1920 James Robert Mann (October 20, 1856–November 30, 1922) was an American legislator and a representative from Illinois, 1897–1922. ... Edgar Lee Masters (August 23, 1868 - March 5, 1950) was an American poet, biographer and dramatist. ... Joseph Medill (April 6, 1823–March 16, 1899) is better known as the business manager and managing editor of the Chicago Tribune than as mayor of Chicago, Illinois, although his term in office occurred during two of the most important years of the citys history as Chicago tried to... Harriet Monroe (1860-12-23 – 1936-09-26) was an American editor, scholar, literary critic, and patron of the arts. ... Dwight Lyman Moody (February 5, 1837 - December 22, 1899), also known as D.L. Moody, was an American evangelist and publisher who founded the Moody Church, Northfield School and Mount Hermon School in Massachusetts (now the Northfield Mount Hermon School), the Moody Bible Institute and Moody Publishers. ... William Vaughn Moody (1869 - 1910) was a U.S. dramatist and poet. ... George Cardinal Mundelein became such a beloved pastoral leader that over a million people made a pilgrimage as his body lay in state at Holy Name Cathedral. ... William Butler Ogden (June 15, 1805 - August 3, 1877) was the first Mayor of Chicago, Illinois. ... Richard James Oglesby (1824 - 1899) was a U.S. political figure. ... John McAuley Palmer (September 13, 1817 – September 25, 1900) was a Union Major General during the American Civil War. ... Potter Palmer Potter Palmer (1826 - 1902) was a Chicago businessman who was responsible for much of the development of State Street. ... Bertha Palmer (born May 22, 1849 - died May 5, 1918) was an American musician, linguist, and writer. ... Francis W. Parker (1837-1902) Francis Wayland Parker (October 9, 1837 – March 2, 1902) was a pioneer of the progressive school movement in the United States. ... John Mason Peck (1789–1858) was an American Baptist missionary to the western frontier of the Unites States, especially in Missouri. ... George Mortimer Pullman (March 3, 1831 – October 19, 1897) was an American inventor and industrialist. ... Henry Thomas Rainey (August 20, 1860–August 19, 1934) was a prominent U.S. politician during the first third of the 20th century. ... John Wellborn Root (January 10, 1850 - January 15, 1891) was a significant U.S. architect who worked out of Chicago with Daniel Burnham. ... Julius Rosenwald Julius Rosenwald (born August 12, 1862 in Springfield, Illinois - January 6, 1932) was a U.S. manufacturer, business executive, and philanthropist. ... Ann Rutledge (January 7, 1813 - August 25, 1835) was allegedly Abraham Lincolns first love. ... E.W. Scripps, 1925 Edward Wyllis Scripps (June 18, 1854 – March 12, 1926), was an American newspaper publisher and founder of The E.W. Scripps Company, a diversified media conglomerate, and United Press International news syndicate. ... Richard Warren Sears Richard Warren Sears (born December 7, 1863 in Stewartville, Minnesota - 1913) was a manager and businessman. ... Albion Woodbury Small (May 11, 1854 - 1926) founded the first Department of Sociology in the USA at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois in 1892. ... Joseph Smith redirects here. ... John Spalding (1763-26 August 1815) was a Scottish MP in the British Parliament. ... Amos Alonzo Stagg (August 16, 1862 – March 17, 1965) was a renowned American collegiate coach in multiple sports, primarily football, and an overall athletic pioneer. ... We dont have an article called Ellen Gates Starr Start this article Search for Ellen Gates Starr in. ... Melville Elijah Stone (born 1848 in Hudson, Illinois- died 1929) Newspaper publisher, the founder of the Chicago Daily News, who became well known as the general manager of the reorganized Associated Press. ... This is about the mid-20th-century politician and diplomat; for other American politicians so named, see Adlai Stevenson (disambiguation). ... Gustavus Franklin Swift (June 24, 1839 in Massachusetts - March 29, 1903 in Chicago, Illinois) was a U.S. meat businessman. ... Graham Taylor may refer to one of the following individuals: Graham Taylor (football manager) (born 1944) Graham Taylor (author) (born 1961), British novelist and part-time priest Graham Taylor (clergyman) (1851–1938), American clergyman and reformer in Chicago Graham Taylor (The Dude) (born 1987) This human name article is a... Theodore Thomas (October 11, 1835–January 4, 1905) was a German-American musician and conductor. ... Lyman Trumbull was the United States Senator from Illinois during the American Civil War Categories: American politician stubs ... Jonathan John Turner was a fictional character in the television sitcom Boy Meets World. ... Aaron Montgomery Ward (February 17, 1844 - December 7, 1913) was an American businessman notable for the invention of mail order. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: John Wentworth (mayor) Long John Wentworth. ... Frances Elizabeth Caroline Willard (September 28, 1839-February 17, 1898) was an American educator, temperance reformer, and womens suffragist. ... The Womens Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) is the oldest continuing non-sectarian womens organization in the US. Founded in Evanston, Illinois in 1874, its purpose was to combat the influence of alcohol on families and society. ... Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was an American architect, interior designer, writer, educator, and philosopher from Oak Park, Illinois. ... There have been several people by the name of Richard Yates: Richard Yates (governor) Richard Yates (novelist) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Charles Tyson Yerkes (June 25, 1837 – December 29, 1905) was an American financier, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Benjamin Agosto (born January 15, 1982, Chicago, Illinois, USA) is an American skater. ... Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ... John Bardeen (May 23, 1908 – January 30, 1991) was an American physicist and electrical engineer, who won the Nobel Prize in Physics twice: first in 1956 with William Shockley and Walter Brattain for the invention of the transistor; and again in 1972 with Leon Neil Cooper and John Robert Schrieffer... Cardinal Bernardins Final Resting Place His Eminence, Joseph Louis Cardinal Bernardin (originally Bernardini), (April 2, 1928–November 14, 1996) was an American clergyman, the twelfth bishop (seventh archbishop) of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Chicago, serving from 1982 to 1996 (succeeded John Cardinal Cody). ... Richard Joseph Daley (May 15, 1902 – December 20, 1976) was the longest-serving mayor of Chicago. ... Richard Michael Daley (born April 24, 1942) is a United States politician, member of the national and local Democratic Party and current mayor of Chicago, Illinois. ... Everett McKinley Dirksen Everett McKinley Dirksen (January 4, 1896 – September 7, 1969) was a Republican U.S. Congressman and Senator from Illinois. ... Fermi redirects here. ... The Rev. ... George Stanley Halas, Sr. ... Robert H. Michel (March 2, 1923- ) was a Representive from Illinois. ... Reagan redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Ludwig Mies van der Rohe born Maria Ludwig Michael Mies (March 27, 1886 – August 17, 1969) was a German architect. ... Katherine Shindle (b. ... For the patriotically-themed comic book superheroines, see Miss America (comics). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... William Bradford Shockley (February 13, 1910 – August 12, 1989) was a British-born American physicist and inventor. ... Portrait of Adlai Stevenson Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900–July 14, 1965) was an American politician and statesman, noted for his skill in debate and oratory. ... Jerry Van Dyke (born July 27, 1931, in Danville, Illinois) is an American comedian and actor. ...

See also

  • List of historical sites related to the Illinois labor movement

References

  1. ^ 5 ILCS 460/20 (from Ch. 1, par. 2901‑20) - Sec. 20. "Official language. The official language of the State of Illinois is English."
  2. ^ US Census Bureau, median household income by state 2004. Retrieved on 2006-07-01.
  3. ^ a b Elevations and Distances in the United States. U.S Geological Survey (29 April 2005). Retrieved on November 6, 2006.
  4. ^ Heidi S. Swinton and Lee Groberg, Sacred Stone (2002), a PBS documentary and companion book, see. p. 86-87
  5. ^ Robert Bruce Flanders, Nauvoo Kingdom on the Mississippi (1965)
  6. ^ Works Progress Administration. Illinois: A Descriptive and Historical Guide (1939). ISBN 0-394-72195-0. One of the most famous surveys--covers every town and city and much more.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... WPA Graphic The Works Progress Administration (later Work Projects Administration, abbreviated WPA), was created on May 6, 1935 by Presidential order (Congress funded it annually but did not set it up). ...

Secondary sources

  • Adams, Jane. The Transformation of Rural Life: Southern Illinois, 1890-1990 (1994)
  • Angle, Paul M. Here I Have Lived: A History of Lincoln's Springfield, 1821-1865 (1935)
  • Baringer, William E. and Romaine Proctor. Lincoln's Vandalia, a Pioneer Portrait (1949)
  • Barnard, Harry. "Eagle Forgotten": The Life of John Peter Altgeld (1938)
  • Beveridge, Albert J. Abraham Lincoln, 1809-1858 (1928)
  • Biles, Roger. Illinois: A History Of The Land And Its People (2005)
  • Buck, Solon J. Illinois in 1818 (1917): online
  • The Centennial History of Illinois
    • vol. 1. The Illinois Country 1673-1818 by Clarence Walworth Alvord. (1920)
    • vol. 2. The Frontier State, 1818-1848 by Theodore Calvin Pease. (1919)
    • vol. 3. The Era of the Civil War 1848-1870 by Arthur Charles Cole (1919)
    • vol. 4. The Industrial State 1870-1893 by Ernest Ludlow Bogart & Charles Manfred Thompson, (1920)
    • vol. 5. The Modern Commonwealth, 1893-1918 by Ernest Ludlow Bogart and John Mabry Mathews (1920).
  • Carr, Kay J. Belleville, Ottawa, and Galesburg: Community and Democracy on the Illinois Frontier (1996)
  • Chapman, Margaret L. et al. Mitsubishi Motors in Illinois: Global Strategies, Local Impacts (1995)
  • Davis, James E. Frontier Illinois (1998).
  • Elazar, Daniel J. Cities of the Prairie Revisited (1986)
  • Garland, John H. The North American Midwest: A Regional Geography (1955)
  • Gjerde, Jon. The Minds of the West: Ethnocultural Evolution in the Rural Middle West, 1830-1917 (1997)
  • Gove, Samuel K. and James D. Nowlan. Illinois Politics & Government: The Expanding Metropolitan Frontier (1996)
  • Hallwas, John E. ed., Illinois Literature: The Nineteenth Century (1986)
  • Hartley, Robert E. Big Jim Thompson of Illinois (1979), governor 1980s
  • Hartley, Robert E. Paul Powell of Illinois: A Lifelong Democrat (1999)
  • Hicken, Victor. Illinois in the Civil War (1966).
  • Hoffmann, John. A Guide to the History of Illinois. (1991)
  • Howard, Robert P. Illinois: A History of the Prairie State (1972).
  • Howard, Robert P. Mostly Good and Competent Men: Illinois Governors 1818-1988 (1988)
  • Hutchinson, William. Lowden of Illinois the Life of Frank O. Lowden 2 vol (1957) governor in 1917-21
  • Jensen, Richard. Illinois: A History (2001). interpretive history using model of traditional-modern-postmodern
  • Keiser, John H. Building for the Centuries: Illinois 1865-1898 (1977)
  • Kenney, David The Political Passage: The Career of Stratton of Illinois (1990). Governor in 1950s.
  • Kinsley, Philip. The Chicago Tribune: Its First Hundred Years (1943)
  • Kleppner, Paul. Political Atlas of Illinois (1988) maps for 1980s.
  • Leonard, Gerald. The Invention of Party Politics: Federalism, Popular Sovereignty, and Constitutional Development in Jacksonian Illinois (2002)
  • Littlewood, Thomas B. Horner of Illinois (1969), governor 1933-40
  • Martin, John Bartlow. Adlai Stevenson of Illinois (1977). Governor 1948-52.
  • Meyer, Douglas K. Making the Heartland Quilt: A Geographical History of Settlement and Migration in Early-Nineteenth-Century Illinois (2000)
  • Miller, Kristie. Ruth Hanna Mccormick: A Life in Politics, 1880-1944 (1992)
  • Morton, Richard Allen. Justice and Humanity: Edward F. Dunne, Illinois Progressive (1997) governor 1913-17.
  • Nardulli, Peter, ed.Diversity, Conflict, and State Politics: Regionalism in Illinois (1989)
  • Peirce, Neal, and John Keefe. The Great Lakes States of America: People, Politics, and Power in the Five Great Lakes States (1990)
  • Plummer, Mark A. Lincoln's Rail Splitter: Governor Richard J. Oglesby (2001) governor 1865-69, 1885-89
  • Riddle, Donald W. Lincoln Runs for Congress (1948)
  • Simpson, Dick. Rogues, Rebels, and Rubber Stamps: The Politics of the Chicago City Council from 1863 to the Present (2001)
  • WPA. Illinois: A Descriptive and Historical Guide (1939)

Primary documents

  • Johnson, Walter. Governor of Illinois 1949-1953 (Papers of Adlai E. Stevenson, Volume 3) (1973), primary documents.
  • Peck, J. M. A Gazetteer of Illinois (1837), a primary source online
  • Quaife, Milo Milton ed. Growing Up with Southern Illinois, 1820 to 1861: From the Memoirs of Daniel Harmon Brush (1944)
  • Sutton, Robert P. ed. The Prairie State: A Documentary History of Illinois (1977).

External links

American history redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Alabama State Flag This is the history of the State of Alabama, in the United States of America. ... Alaska in 1895 (Rand McNally). ... The first Native Americans arrived in Arizona between 16,000 BC and 10,000 BCE, while the history of Arizona as recorded by Europeans began when Marcos de Niza, a Franciscan, explored the area in 1539. ... Arkansas was the 25th state admitted to the United States. ... A field of California golden poppies circa 1910. ... In the history of Colorado, the first inhabitants of what was to become the State of Colorado were the American Indians. ... 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History of North Carolina For the state today see North Carolina // Bibliography Surveys James Clay and Douglas Orr, eds. ... First Nations in the region 1789: Louisiana and Ruperts Land 1803: US buys Louisiana 1812: Louisiana Territory renamed Missouri Territory 1861: Dakota Territory formed 1889: North Dakota statehood North Dakota was first settled by Native Americans several thousand years ago. ... Serpent Mound, Ohio, USA Hopewell Mound, Ohio, USA 1775 Ohio is not part of the original 13 colonies, but is part of British territories 1789 U.S. constitution, present day is part of an unorganized territory. ... This article is about the History of Oklahoma. ... Official language(s) None Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... The History of Pennsylvania is as varied as any in the American experience and reflects the melting pot vision of the United States. ... The history of Rhode Island includes the history of Rhode Island from pre-colonial times (1636) to modern day. ... South Carolina is one of the original states of the United States of America, and its history has been remarkable for an extraordinary commitment to political independence, whether from overseas or federal control. ... The Tennessee State Capitol in Nashville has been the sight of much of the States history. ... The history of Texas (as part of the United States) began in 1845, but settlement of the region dates back to the end of the Upper Paleolithic Period, around 10,000 BC. Its history has been shaped by being part of six independent countries: Spain, France, Mexico, the Republic of... The History of Utah (IPA: ) is an examination of the human history and social activity within the state of Utah located in the western United States. ... Mount Mansfield, at 4,393 feet, is the highest elevation point in Vermont. ... 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The Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) is a commonwealth in political union with the United States of America at a strategic location in the West Pacific Ocean. ... Puerto Rico The history of Puerto Rico began with the settlement of the archipelago of Puerto Rico by the Ortoiroid people between 3000 and 2000 BC. Other tribes, such as the Saladoid and Arawak Indians, populated the island between 430 BC and 1000 AD. At the time of Christopher Columbus... The United States Virgin Islands, often abbreviated USVI, is a group of islands and cays in the Caribbean to the east of Puerto Rico. ... The flag of the United States is used for all of the United States Minor Outlying Islands The United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of nine insular United States possessions: All of these islands are in the Pacific Ocean except Navassa Island... Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°13′ N, 176°31′ W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Orthographic projection centered over Howland Island. ... Jarvis Island (formerly also known as Bunker Island[1]) is an uninhabited 4. ... Johnston Atoll is a 2. ... Kingman Reef is a one-square-kilometer tropical coral reef located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly half way between Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa at 6°24 N, 162°24 W. It is the northernmost of the Northern Line Islands and an unincorporated territory of the United States administered... Navassa Island map from The World Factbook Navassa Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Navassa Island (La Navase in French, Lanavaz in Haitian Kreyòl) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. ... Wake Island is an atoll (having a coastline of 19. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
History of Illinois - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1797 words)
Illinois is known as the "Land of Lincoln" because it is here that the 16th President spent his formative years.
The latter was particularly unpopular with the electorate, and the modest Ogilvie lost a close election to the flashy Democrat Dan Walker in 1972.
Illinois, as of the census of 2000, currently has the 6th largest population of the 50 U.S. states.
Welcome to ILLINOIS Genealogy and History! (179 words)
It is an Algonquin word meaning "Men" or "Warriors." Illinois was discovered in 1673, settled in 1720 and entered the Union on 3 December, 1818.
Illinois is surrounding by bodies of water on nearly every border: Mississippi River on the west; Ohio and Wabash Rivers in the south and Lake Michigan in the North.
The highest point in Illinois is Charles Mound in JoDaviess County, elevation, 1, 235 and the lowest point is in Cairo, Alexander county at the Mississippi River, elevation 279.
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