FACTOID # 25: If you're tired of sitting in traffic on your way to work, move to North Dakota.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > History of Georgetown University

The history of Georgetown University spans over four hundred years, and is closely tied to that of America. The school has grown with the United States and Washington, D.C., all which date their founding to 1789. Georgetown University, incorporated as the The President and Directors of the College of Georgetown, is a private university in the United States, located in Georgetown, a historic neighborhood of Washington, D.C. With roots extending back to March 25, 1634 and founded in its current form on January 23, 1789... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...

Contents

Founding

Above the door of White-Gravenor Hall are the two dates. Further up are the five seals, which mark the three prior incarnations of Jesuit schools in Maryland, the year John Carrol attended the Bohemia Manor school, and the present school at Georgetown Heights

The founding of Georgetown University took place on two main dates, 1634 and 1789. Until 1851, the school used 1788 as its founding date, the start of construction on the Old South building as its foundation. In that year a copy-edit in the college catalogue began mis-labeling the construction as beginning in 1789. This was discovered in preparation for the centennial celebration in 1889, at which point rather than correct the annual, the date of Georgetown's "foundation" was fixed to the date 1789-01-23.[1] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... Events Moses Amyrauts Traite de la predestination is published Curaçao captured by the Dutch Treaty of Polianovska First meeting of the Académie française The witchcraft affair at Loudun Jean Nicolet lands at Green Bay, Wisconsin Opening of Covent Garden Market in London English establish a settlement... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


First Establishments

On 1633-11-22 Jesuits Andrew White, John Altham Gravenor, and Thomas Gervase set sail on The Ark for America under the leadership and financing of the Lord Baltimore, Leonard Calvert.[2] Their landing on 1634-03-25 on St. Clement's Island marks the birth of the Maryland colony, this anniversary now celebrated as Maryland Day. These Jesuits were joined in 1636 by Thomas Copley and Ferdinand Poulton, together establishing near St. Mary's City some means of Christian education for the native Yaocomico tribe.[3] Inquiring about patronage for their school, Poulton wrote to superiors in Rome, who on 1640-09-15 approved the institution of a school in principle. That year they moved to a permanent building to Calverton Manor on in the Wicomico River. This early establishment was burnt in 1645 as part of the English Civil War, and the remaining Jesuits were brought to trial in England. The new protestant administration had their school outlawed, though it was functioning by 1648, when Thomas Copley managed to return there. Events February 13 - Galileo Galilei arrives in Rome for his trial before the Inquisition. ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Andrew White (1579-1665) was an English Jesuit missionary who was involved in the founding of the Maryland colony. ... British North America was an informal term first used in 1783, but uncommon before the Report on the Affairs of British North America (1839), called the Durham Report. ... Baron Baltimore is a defunct title in the Peerage of Ireland. ... Leonard Calvert (1606 - 1647) was the younger son of George Calvert, 1st Baron Baltimore. ... Events Moses Amyrauts Traite de la predestination is published Curaçao captured by the Dutch Treaty of Polianovska First meeting of the Académie française The witchcraft affair at Loudun Jean Nicolet lands at Green Bay, Wisconsin Opening of Covent Garden Market in London English establish a settlement... March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... St. ... The Great Seal of Maryland. ... Maryland Day is a legal holiday in the U.S. state of Maryland. ... Year 1636 (MDCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... St. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Yaocomico were a Native American tribe who lived along the north bank of the Potomac River near its confluence with the Chesapeake Bay in the 17th century. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Events December 1 - Portugal regains its independence from Spain and João IV of Portugal becomes king. ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Wicomico River is a tributary of the lower tidal portion of the Potomac River located in the state of Maryland south of Washington, DC. The river empties into the Potomac at Cobb and St. ... // Events January 10 - Archbishop Laud executed on Tower Hill, London. ... The English Civil War consisted of a series of armed conflicts and political machinations that took place between Parliamentarians (known as Roundheads) and Royalists (known as Cavaliers) between 1642 and 1651. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the Queen England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 967 AD  Area  -  Total 130,395 km²  50,346 sq mi  Population  -  2007 estimate 50... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... 1648 (MDCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Newtown Manor, also known as "Bretton's Neck," become available to the Jesuits in 1677. This house served as the Jesuit schoolhouse until 1704 when it's existence was alerted to British authorities. The school afterwards conducted itself periodically and in secrecy at the new Jesuit colony of Bohemia Manor. John Carroll attended this school in 1745 for one year at the age of twelve.[4] The American Revolution drastically changed the nature of their school, opening up new possibilities for growth. 1677 (MDCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events Building of the Students Monument in Aiud, Romania. ... Chesapeake City along the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. ... Bishop John Carroll painted by Gilbert Stuart 1804/1805 Bishop John Theodore Carroll, SJ, (January 8, 1735 – December 3, 1815) was the first bishop and archbishop in the United States — serving as the ordinary of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore. ... // Events May 11 - War of Austrian Succession: Battle of Fontenoy - At Fontenoy, French forces defeat an Anglo-Dutch-Hanoverian army including the Black Watch June 4 – Frederick the Great destroys Austrian army at Hohenfriedberg August 19 - Beginning of the 45 Jacobite Rising at Glenfinnan September 12 - Francis I is elected... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen Colonies that...


Georgetown Heights

In 1786, Fr. Carroll published formal plans or Proposals for an "academy, at George-town, Patowmack-River, Maryland," and in March 1787, formed a fund raising committee. In April 1788, construction on Georgetown's first building, "Old South," began, leading Fr. Carroll to write "We shall begin the building of our Academy this summer. On this Academy are built all my hopes of permanency and success of our holy religion in the United States."[5] His Academy was finally established on 1789-01-23, when the title to the land that became the core of the campus was formally acquired. As a result, the University celebrates 1789 as its founding year.[6] In November of that year Carroll became the first American bishop. The first student, William Gaston (1778-1844), was admitted in 1791, and classes commenced in early 1792.[7] 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The familiar golden dome of Washingtons once venerable Riggs Bank, now amalgamated into PNC Bank, at the northeast corner of Wisconsin Avenue and M Street NW. Georgetown in red Georgetown is a neighborhood located in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., along the Potomac River waterfront. ... The Potomac River flows into the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... William Gaston (September 19, 1778 - January 23, 1844) was a United States Representative from North Carolina. ... 1778 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Jan. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Early growth

Archbishop Leonard Neale overlooking Georgetown College in 1798

Carroll had difficulty filling the position of president of the university, with many candidates declining the job before Rev. Robert Plunkett first took the office in 1791, though only served 18 months. Georgetown's second building, Old North, which survives to this day, began construction in 1794. At three times the size of Old South, it greatly increased the number of classrooms and sleeping space on campus.[8] Upon the building's completion, George Washington visited and spoke from the porch, a position since reserved for sitting US Presidents. In 1796, Louis William Valentine Dubourg, S.S., arrived and became president. He would later become the first bishop of the Louisiana Territory. Rev. Leonard Neale and his brother Rev. Francis Neale over saw the growth of the university as presidents for a combined eleven years, beginning in 1798. Image File history File links Neale_large. ... Image File history File links Neale_large. ... The President of Georgetown University is the chief executive officer of the University. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The United States in 1810, following the Louisiana Purchase. ... Leonard Neale (1745 or 1746 — 1817) became, in 1800, the first bishop ordained in the US where he devoted almost all his time on the Visitation Sisters. ... Francis Neale was an American Roman Catholic priest of the Jesuit order who became president of Georgetown College on two occasions. ... Year 1798 (MDCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


John Carroll didn't seek civil recognition for Georgetown until after the suppression of the Jesuits ended in 1814. Instead of seeking a state charter, he went to the federal government, then in charge of the District of Columbia. Now Congressman William Gaston sponsored the legislation, and Georgetown received the first federal charter in 1815.[9] Other Jesuit school would confer degrees under Georgetown's charter for many years afterwards.[10] On 1844-06-10, the school was incorporated by Congress under the name The President and Directors of Georgetown College. The Suppression of the Jesuits in Portugal, France, the Two Sicilies, Parma and the Spanish Empire by 1767 was a product of a series of political moves rather than a theological controversy. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Jan. ... June 10 is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The first student society, the Sodality was founded in 1810 as a religious devotional group.[11] In 1830, the Philodemic Society was founded as the schools debating society, the oldest of its kind in America and the oldest secular group at Georgetown. The The Dramatic Association of Georgetown College, renamed the Mask and Bauble Dramatic Society after World War I, was founded in 1852, and is itself the oldest continuous dramatic society in America. John Barrymore was a member of the group, as was the playwright John Guare, and director Jack Hofiss, who was the youngest person ever to win Broadway's Tony Award for Best Director when he received the prize for "The Elephant Man."[12] The Sodality of Our Lady (also known as the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin Mary (in Latin, ) is an association of Catholics founded in 1563 in the Roman College of the Society of Jesus. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Philodemic Society is a student debating club at Georgetown University. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


The Civil War

Student David Herold at the Washington Navy Yard after his arrest

The Civil War was an important and tragic time for the University. Many students left their studies to join both the Union Army and the Confederate Army, and only seven students graduated in 1869, down from over 300 a decade prior. Fist fights on campus between northern and southern students were common. Responding to lack of adequate hospital beds and housing for soldiers needed to protect the District, the north sequestered University buildings, and by the time of President Abraham Lincoln's May 1861 visit to campus, 1,400 Union Army troops were stationed in temporary quarters there.[13] Georgetown would later be connected to the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. While John Wilkes Booth was not a student, he was active in the school's dramatic society, and familiar with many students, like David Herold, who accompanied him in his escape. Dr. Samuel Mudd, a Georgetown alumnus, set Booth's broken ankle, and Charles Lieberman, one of the founders of the medical school treated Lincoln. After the war, Georgetown College Boat Club, the school's rowing team, adopted blue, color of the northern army, and gray, color of the southern army, as their colors in order to signify the peaceful unity between students from the North and those from the South.[14] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 536 × 599 pixels Full resolution (605 × 676 pixel, file size: 41 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 536 × 599 pixels Full resolution (605 × 676 pixel, file size: 41 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... This article is in need of attention. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar) // January 1 - Benito Juárez captures Mexico City January 2 - Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia dies and is succeeded by... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Assassination of Abraham Lincoln From left to right: Major Henry Rathbone, Clara Harris, Mary Todd Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln, and John Wilkes Booth. ... John Wilkes Booth (May 10, 1838 – April 26, 1865) was an American actor from Maryland, who fatally shot President of the United States Abraham Lincoln at Fords Theatre in Washington, D.C. on April 14, 1865. ... David Herold, Washington Navy Yard, 1865 Execution of the four persons condemned as conspirators (Mary E. Surratt, Lewis T. Powell, David E. Herold, and George A. Atzerodt), July 7, 1865, at Fort McNair in Washington, D.C. David Edgar Herold (16 June 1842 – 7 July 1865) conspired with John Wilkes... Samuel Alexander Mudd, I (December 20, 1833 – January 10, 1883) was a Maryland doctor implicated and imprisoned for aiding John Wilkes Booth in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. ...


Expansion

Medical School

In 1830, construction of an infirmary in the new Gervase Building brought the first hospital beds to Georgetown. In 1849, four Catholic doctors, frustrated with discriminatory practices at neighboring Columbia University, petitioned Georgetown President James Ryder to found a medical program.[15] A building for this purpose was purchased at 12th and F Streets, and the School of Medicine was founded in 1850, holding its first classes the following year.[16] In 1898, Georgetown University Hospital was established on campus, and in 1930, classes moved back to Georgetown. Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM) is Georgetown Universitys medical school. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...   The George Washington University (GWU), or informally, G.W., is a private, coeducational, non-sectarian university located in Washington, D.C.. Founded in 1821 as the Columbian College, the university has since developed into a leading educational and research institution. ... Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM) is Georgetown Universitys medical school. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) Year 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Dental School

Law School

The Law School sign, preserved from the E Street building.

A school of law was approved in March 1870, and graduated their first students in 1872. In 1884 they moved the school to at 6th and F Streets, not far from the Medical School, and again in 1891 to 506 E Street. In 1971, the school moved to its present location at 1st and F Streets. The schools original sign, preserved on the north quad of the present-day campus. ... Original sign of the Georgetown University Law Center. ... Original sign of the Georgetown University Law Center. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ...


Nursing School

The Georgetown University School of Nursing and Health Studies (NHS) has, since its founding in 1903, been at the forefront of education in the health care field, offering many programs unique to Americas elite institutions. ...

School of Foreign Service

Father Edmund A. Walsh, S.J. Founder and first dean of SFS

Image File history File links Eawalsh. ... Image File history File links Eawalsh. ... The Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service (commonly abbreviated SFS) is a school within Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., United States. ...

School of Business

The McDonough School of Business is a part of Georgetown University in Washington, DC that offers both undergraduate and graduate degrees in business. ...

Present position

Traditions

Georgetown in fiction

The Exorcist
St. Elmo's Fire

Georgetown, as a major world University, has been featured in many media over the years. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (510x755, 58 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (510x755, 58 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links StElmosFire. ... Image File history File links StElmosFire. ...

  • The 1973 horror film The Exorcist was set and filmed in Georgetown. It was based on a novel by William Peter Blatty, who received an English degree from Georgetown in 1950. Blatty wrote the script in a room in Holy Trinity Church's school, a Catholic parish adjacent to Georgetown University.
  • The 1985 "Brat Pack" movie St. Elmo's Fire revolved around a group of students who had just graduated from Georgetown. The bar that much of the film takes place in is based on The Tombs, a bar and restaurant known for its large student clientele and rowing decòr, located one block from Georgetown's front gates. The university denied the producers the rights to film on campus, so parts of the film were shot at the nearby University of Maryland.
  • In the NBC television series The West Wing, President Bartlet's daughter Zoey attended Georgetown. In the show's fourth season, an episode entitled "Commencement" was filmed on campus, with current Georgetown students used as extras.
  • In the movie National Treasure, Benjamin "Ben" Gates (played by Nicolas Cage) is said to have a degree in American History from Georgetown.
  • In The Girl Next Door, one of the main character's (Matthew) goals is to get into Georgetown, although the university shown at the film's conclusion is not Georgetown.
  • In Save the Last Dance, one of the main character (Derek) receives an acceptance letter to Georgetown University early in the movie.
  • On The Steve Harvey Show, Romeo tells Steve about his ambitions to go to college by saying, "I don't wanna be one of those guys that just WEARS the Georgetown jacket!"
  • In Above the Rim, the main character, Kyle-Lee, hopes to get a scholarship to play basketball at Georgetown.
  • A second season sub-plotline of The Sopranos concerns Meadow Soprano's ambition to gain acceptance to Georgetown, and her mother Carmela's machinations on her behalf. Rumor has it that the school denied the show permission to film on campus, leading to a somewhat abrupt switch of college choice to Columbia.
  • In Election, the main character, Tracy Flick (played by Reese Witherspoon), ends up at Georgetown.
  • In 24, one of the main characters, President David Palmer attended Georgetown where he played on the basketball team. Dennis Haysbert, the actor who plays David Palmer, is the uncle of Nazareth Haysbert who graduated from Georgetown's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service in 2005.
  • In Syriana, Prince Nasir al-Subaai says: "I studied at Oxford. I have a Ph.D from Georgetown."
  • The major motion picture "Memento" was written by a Georgetown alumnus, and the main character's nemesis, John G., is said to be named after John Glavin, a professor of creative writing at Georgetown.
  • In Stargate Atlantis, the main character, Dr. Elizabeth Weir taught a political science course at Georgetown before going to Atlantis.
  • In Atlantis: The Lost Empire, Milo Thatch's grandfather, Thaddeus Thatch, and the eccentric millionaire, Preston B. Whitmore, are both members of the Class of 1866.
  • In Enemy of the State, Will Smith's character is a graduate of Georgetown University Law Center.
  • In The Pelican Brief, several scenes are shot inside the Georgetown University Law Center and the Edward B. Williams Law Library.
  • In the later Jason Bourne novels, such as The Bourne Ultimatum and The Bourne Legacy, Jason Bourne becomes a professor at Georgetown.
  • Jack Ryan, the main character of several Tom Clancy books, received his Ph.D from Georgetown.
  • In Young Indiana Jones and the Plantation Treasure, Jones' father, a professor of Medieval history, lectures at Georgetown while Indiana explores the underground railroad in the Carolinas.

The Exorcist is an Academy Award-winning 1973 American horror and thriller film, adapted from the 1971 novel of the same name by William Peter Blatty, dealing with the demonic possession of a young girl, and her mother’s desperate attempts to win back her daughter through an Exorcisim conducted... The Exorcist is a horror novel written by William Peter Blatty first published in 1971. ... William Peter Blatty (born January 7, 1928) is an American writer. ... Holy Trinity Catholic Church, Washington, D.C. was established in 1794 and is the oldest church in continuous operation in the nations capitol. ... The Brat Pack is a group of young actors and actresses who frequently appeared together in teen-oriented films in the 1980s and as well as socializing together off the set. ... St. ... NBC (a former acronym for National Broadcasting Company) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... “The West Wing” redirects here. ... National Treasure is a 2004 movie from Walt Disney Pictures written by Jim Kouf, Cormac Wibberley and Marianne Wibberley, produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, and directed by Jon Turteltaub. ... Nicolas Cage (born January 7, 1964) is an American actor. ... Pre-Colonial America For details, see the main Pre-Colonial America article. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Save the Last Dance is a motion picture produced by MTV Films, directed by Thomas Carter, written by Duane Adler, and released by Paramount Pictures on January 12, 2001. ... The Steve Harvey Show (August 25, 1996—February 24, 2002) aired for six seasons on The WB Television Network. ... Above the Rim is a 1994 basketball-drama film, written by Jeff Pollack and Benny Medina, and directed by Jeff Pollack. ... This article is about the TV series. ... Election is a 1999 film adapted from a novel of the same name by Tom Perrotta. ... 24 is an Emmy and Golden Globe award-winning American television series created by Joel Surnow and Robert Cochran, and produced by Imagine Television. ... David Palmer was a fictional President of the United States of America played by Dennis Haysbert as part of the television series, 24. ... Syriana is a 2005 Academy Award-winning geopolitical thriller film written and directed by Stephen Gaghan. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... This article is about the film. ... Stargate Atlantis is a Canadian-American science fiction television program, part of the Stargate franchise. ... This article needs to be updated. ... Milo trying to convince scholars of Atlantis existence. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Enemy of the State is a 1998 film written by David Marconi, directed by Tony Scott, and starring Will Smith, Gene Hackman, Jon Voight, Lisa Bonet and Regina King. ... The Pelican Brief is a legal/suspense thriller written by John Grisham in 1992. ... Jason Bourne is a fictional character in a series of novels by Robert Ludlum and later Eric Van Lustbader, who picks up where Ludlum left off. ... Book Cover The Bourne Ultimatum is the conclusion to Robert Ludlums Jason Bourne trilogy and a sequel to The Bourne Supremacy. ... Book Cover The Bourne Legacy is a spy fiction thriller written by Eric Van Lustbader and based on the character of Jason Bourne created by author Robert Ludlum. ... Thomas Leo Clancy Jr. ... Dr. Henry Indiana Jones, Jr. ...

See also

The President of Georgetown University is the chief executive officer of the University. ...

Notes

  1. ^ O'Neill, Paul R.; Paul K. Williams (2003). Georgetown University. Arcadia, 7. ISBN 0-7385-1509-4. 
  2. ^ Nevils, William Coleman (1934). Miniatures of Georgetown: Tercentennial Causeries. Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press, 1-25. 
  3. ^ Spillane, Edward P. (1909). "Philip Fisher". Catholic Encyclopedia. Robert Appleton Company. Retrieved on 2007-03-06. 
  4. ^ The Bohemia Manor Academy. Bicentennial Exhibit. Retrieved on 2007-03-06.
  5. ^ The first University building. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
  6. ^ About Georgetown. www.georgetown.edu (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-19.
  7. ^ The first student. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
  8. ^ O'Neill, Paul R.; Paul K. Williams (2003). Georgetown University. Arcadia, 14. ISBN 0-7385-1509-4. 
  9. ^ The Federal Charter. About Georgetown. Retrieved on 2007-03-06.
  10. ^ O'Neill, Paul R.; Paul K. Williams (2003). Georgetown University. Arcadia, 20. ISBN 0-7385-1509-4. 
  11. ^ O'Neill, Paul R.; Paul K. Williams (2003). Georgetown University. Arcadia, 25. ISBN 0-7385-1509-4. 
  12. ^ Mask and Bauble Dramatic Society. Performing Arts (2006-06-04). Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  13. ^ O'Neill, Paul R.; Paul K. Williams (2003). Georgetown University. Arcadia, 36. ISBN 0-7385-1509-4. 
  14. ^ Georgetown Traditions: The Blue & Gray. HoyaSaxa.com (2005-08-17). Retrieved on 2007-04-26.
  15. ^ O'Neill, Paul R.; Paul K. Williams (2003). Georgetown University. Arcadia, 35. ISBN 0-7385-1509-4. 
  16. ^ The Medical School. About Georgetown. Retrieved on 2007-03-04.
Georgetown University
v  d  e

Academics 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Catholic Encyclopedia, also referred to today as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia, is an English-language encyclopedia published in 1913 by The Encyclopedia Press. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 20 is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 17 is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 26 is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Georgetown University, incorporated as the The President and Directors of the College of Georgetown, is a private university in the United States, located in Georgetown, a historic neighborhood of Washington, D.C. With roots extending back to March 25, 1634 and founded in its current form on January 23, 1789... Georgetown University, incorporated as the The President and Directors of the College of Georgetown, is a private university in the United States, located in Georgetown, a historic neighborhood of Washington, D.C. With roots extending back to March 25, 1634 and founded in its current form on January 23, 1789...

Undergraduate Colleges and Schools
Georgetown CollegeSchool of Nursing and Health StudiesSchool of BusinessSchool of Foreign ServiceQatar Georgetown College is the oldest and largest school at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. Category: ... The Georgetown University School of Nursing and Health Studies (NHS) has, since its founding in 1903, been at the forefront of education in the health care field, offering many programs unique to Americas elite institutions. ... The McDonough School of Business is a part of Georgetown University in Washington, DC that offers both undergraduate and graduate degrees in business. ... The Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service (commonly abbreviated SFS) is a school within Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., United States. ...


Graduate Colleges and Schools
Law CenterSchool of MedicineSchool of BusinessPublic Policy Institute The schools original sign, preserved on the north quad of the present-day campus. ... Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM) is Georgetown Universitys medical school. ... The McDonough School of Business is a part of Georgetown University in Washington, DC that offers both undergraduate and graduate degrees in business. ... Georgetown Public Policy Institute (GPPI) is a leading public policy school affiliated to Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.. Under the leadership of Dean Judy Feder, GPPI offers both Master of Public Policy and Master of Policy Management degrees and boasts 5 affiliated research institutes, 17 full time faculty, 30...

Athletics The Georgetown Hoyas are the athletics teams that officially represent Georgetown University in college sports. ...

Big EastBasketballRugbyMcDonough GymnasiumVerizon Center • Multi-Sport Field • There Goes Old GeorgetownSergeant Stubby The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... The Georgetown University Mens Basketball team (which, like all sports teams at Georgetown University, is named the Georgetown Hoyas) is a well-known basketball program in the NCAA. Georgetowns first intercollegiate mens basketball team was formed in 1907; the team played its first game February 9, 1907... The Georgetown University Rugby Football Club is the intercollegiate mens rugby team that represents Georgetown University in the USA Rugby league. ... McDonough Gymnasium is a multi-purpose arena in Washington, D.C.. The arena opened in 1952 and holds 2,500 people. ... The Verizon Center is a sports and entertainment arena in Washington, D.C., USA, named after telecommunications sponsor Verizon Communications. ... Multi-Sport Field is a 2,500-seat multi-purpose stadium in Washington, D.C.. It is home to the Georgetown University Hoyas football team. ... There Goes Old Georgetown is the unofficial name of the Georgetown University sports teams fight song. ... Stubby, as the Georgetown mascot Sergeant Stubby (1916 or 1917 – 1926) was the most decorated wardog of World War I, and the only dog to be promoted to sergeant through combat. ...

Campus Georgetown University, incorporated as the The President and Directors of the College of Georgetown, is a private university in the United States, located in Georgetown, a historic neighborhood of Washington, D.C. With roots extending back to March 25, 1634 and founded in its current form on January 23, 1789...

Georgetown, D.C.Healy HallLauinger LibraryLaw LibraryDarnall HallNew SouthQatar Campus The familiar golden dome of Washingtons once venerable Riggs Bank, now amalgamated into PNC Bank, at the northeast corner of Wisconsin Avenue and M Street NW. Georgetown in red Georgetown is a neighborhood located in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., along the Potomac River waterfront. ... Healy Hall amid the autumn foliage Healy Hall is a classroom and office building at Georgetown University. ... The Joseph Mark Lauinger Library is the main library of Georgetown University. ... The Georgetown University Law Library supports the research and educational endeavors of the students and faculty of the Georgetown University Law Center. ... Darnall Hall is one of the dormitories housing first-year students at Georgetown University. ... New entry to New South New South, frequently known as Dirty South, is one of the dormitories housing first-year students at Georgetown University. ... Georgetown University Georgetown University began studying the feasibility of opening a campus of the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service in Qatar in October 2002, when the Qatar Foundation, which is funding the entire enterprise, first proposed the idea. ...

History

PresidentsAlumni • Faculty • 1789Andrew WhiteJohn CarrollPatrick Francis HealyEdmund A. Walsh The President of Georgetown University is the chief executive officer of the University. ... The following is a list of Georgetown University alumni. ... The history of Georgetown University spans over four hundred years, and is closely tied to that of America. ... Andrew White (1579-1665) was an English Jesuit missionary who was involved in the founding of the Maryland colony. ... Bishop John Carroll painted by Gilbert Stuart 1804/1805 Bishop John Theodore Carroll, SJ, (January 8, 1735 – December 3, 1815) was the first bishop and archbishop in the United States — serving as the ordinary of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore. ... Healy Hall at Georgetown University was named in honour of Patrick Francis Healy Father Patrick Francis Healy (February 2, 1834 - January 10, 1910) was the first African American to earn a PhD, the first black Jesuit and later was appointed twenty-ninth president President of Georgetown University, becoming the first... Father Walsh with General Douglas MacArthur in Tokyo, 1948 Edmund Aloysius Walsh S.J. (1885 - 1956) was a Jesuit professor of geopolitics and founder of the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service. ...

Student Life Georgetown University, incorporated as the The President and Directors of the College of Georgetown, is a private university in the United States, located in Georgetown, a historic neighborhood of Washington, D.C. With roots extending back to March 25, 1634 and founded in its current form on January 23, 1789...

Student AssociationThe HoyaThe HecklerThe CorpChimesGERMSΔΦΕPhilodemicWGTBGUTVGUSIFA cappella FestivalSolidarity The Georgetown University Student Association (GUSA) is the student government of Georgetown University in Washington, DC (United States). ... The Hoya is Georgetown Universitys campus newspaper that prints an edition every Tuesday and Friday. ... The Georgetown Heckler is an undergraduate humor magazine founded in 2003 at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. The sartirical and comedic publication bills itself as GUs Finest Humor Magazine, though it has been the only publication of its kind active at Georgetown during its history. ... Students of Georgetown, Inc. ... Founded in 1946, The Georgetown Chimes are Georgetown Universitys oldest and only all-male a cappella singing group. ... This article is about disease-causing organisms. ... Delta Phi Epsilon (ΔΦΕ) is the name given to several college fraternities and sororities. ... The Philodemic Society is a student debating club at Georgetown University. ... WGTB is a student-run radio station at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. The station was originally founded in 1946 by Rev. ... Georgetown University Television (GUTV) is Georgetown Universitys student-run campus television station, founded in 1998. ... Georgetown University Student Investment Fund (GUSIF) is a professional money managing fund, which serves two clients: Georgetown University and the Georgetown University Alumni Association. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Georgetown Solidarity Committee (GSC) is a student organization at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, that takes action to support the struggles of service workers on the Georgetown campus as well as workers around the world. ...


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m