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Encyclopedia > History of Coventry
Two of Coventry's three spires
Two of Coventry's three spires

This article is about the history of Coventry, a city in the Midlands, England. Download high resolution version (600x831, 208 KB)The twin spires in Coventry, of the Holy Trinity Church (left) and the old Coventry Cathedral (right). ... Download high resolution version (600x831, 208 KB)The twin spires in Coventry, of the Holy Trinity Church (left) and the old Coventry Cathedral (right). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Early history

Coventry cathedral is traditionally believed to have been established in the year 1043 with the founding of a Benedictine Abbey by Leofric, Earl of Mercia and his wife Lady Godiva. Current evidence suggests that this abbey was probably in existence by 1022, therefore Leofric and Godiva most likely endowed it around 1043. In time, a market was established at the abbey gates and the settlement expanded. The roofless ruins of the old cathedral. ... For the college, see Benedictine College. ... Leofric (born 968, died 31 August or 30 September 1057) was the Earl of Mercia and founded monasteries at Coventry and Much Wenlock. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Events Several Catharist heretics are killed in Toulouse. ... Look up Market in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


By the 13th century Coventry had become a centre of many textile trades, especially those related to wool. Coventry's prosperity rested largely on the dyers who produced "Coventry blue" cloth, which was highly sought after across Europe due to its non-fading qualities. (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ...


Due to its textile trade, by the 14th century and throughout the medieval period, Coventry was the fourth largest city in England, with a population of around 10,000; only Norwich, Bristol and London were larger. This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... For other places with the same name, see Norwich (disambiguation). ... This article is about the English city. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Due to its commercial and strategic importance, in 1355 construction began on city walls. The walls were completed in around 1400 and were an impressive feature, they measured nearly 2 1/2 miles (4km) around and consisted of two red sandstone walls infilled with rubble 9 feet (3 metres) thick, with five main gatehouses where roads entered the city. With its walls, Coventry was described as being the best-defended city in England outside London. This article is about the geological formation. ...


In February 2000, Channel 4's Time Team archaeologists discovered significant remnants of a major pre-Tudor cathedral/monastery complex (St Mary's) adjacent to the current cathedral, with the team revisiting the excavation site in March 2001 (the only occasion when the team have returned to a site). This article is about the British television station. ... Time Team is a popular British television series explaining the process of archaeology for the layman in the UK. Broadcast by Channel 4, the programme was first shown in 1994, and is presented by Tony Robinson. ...


On several occasions Coventry briefly served as the "second capital" of England. In 1404, King Henry IV summoned a parliament in Coventry as he needed money to fight rebellion and wealthy cities such as Coventry lent money to him. During the Wars of the Roses, the Royal Court was moved to Coventry by Margaret of Anjou the wife of Henry VI. On several occasions between 1456 and 1459 parliament was held in Coventry, which for a while served as the effective seat of government. This came to an end in 1461 when Edward IV was installed on the throne. Henry IV (3 April 1367 – 20 March 1413) was the King of England and France and Lord of Ireland from 1399 to 1413. ... Lancaster York For other uses, see Wars of the Roses (disambiguation). ... Margaret of Anjou (Marguerite dAnjou, March 23, 1429 – August 25, 1482) was the Queen consort of Henry VI of England from 1445 to 1471, and led the Lancastrian contingent, in the Wars of the Roses. ... Henry VI (December 6, 1421 – May 21, 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 (though with a Regent until 1437) and then from 1470 to 1471, and King of France from 1422 to 1453. ... Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470–1471. ...


Due to its importance, in 1345 Coventry was granted a city charter by King Edward III, and in 1451 King Henry VI granted Coventry a charter making Coventry a county in itself, a status it retained until 1842, when it reverted to being a part of Warwickshire. During the county period it was known as the County of the City of Coventry. The original city hall is still known as "County Hall" as a relic of this period. This article is about the King of England. ... Henry VI (December 6, 1421 – May 21, 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 (though with a Regent until 1437) and then from 1470 to 1471, and King of France from 1422 to 1453. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... A detailed map Stratford-upon-Avon Kenilworth Castle Warwickshire (pronounced // or //) is a landlocked non-metropolitan county in central England. ... The County of the City of Coventry was a former English county, which existed between 1451 and 1842. ...

Cheylesmore Manor (front view)
Cheylesmore Manor (front view)

Cheylesmore Manor House is the home of Coventry's Register office. Parts of the building date to 1250 and Edward the Black Prince and Henry VI were among the royals who lived there. Remnants of the main house survived the Second World War, but were demolished in 1955. Edward used Cheylesmore Manor as his hunting lodge. His grandmother, Queen Isabella of France, had gained the manorial rights when the Crown had acquired them from previous owners. It said that he was a frequenter of the area. Edward's armour was black, hence the Black Prince, and his helmet was surmounted by a "cat-a-mountain". Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Cheylesmore is a suburb in the Southern half of the city of Coventry, West Midlands, England. ... In England and Wales, The Register Office is primarily the local office for the registration of births, deaths and marriages (BD&M), and for the conducting of civil marriages. ... Edward the Black Prince - illustration from Cassells History of England circa 1902 Effigy on the Black Princes tomb in Canterbury Cathedral Edward, Prince of Wales, known as the Black Prince (June 15, 1330 - June 8, 1376) was the eldest son of King Edward III of England. ... Henry VI (December 6, 1421 – May 21, 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 (though with a Regent until 1437) and then from 1470 to 1471, and King of France from 1422 to 1453. ... Isabella returns to England with her son, Edward III. Jean Fouquet, 1455x1460. ...


The seal of the city bears the motto "Camera Principis" or the Prince's Chamber which, it is said, it owes to the close tie with the Black Prince. Also the cat-a-mountain of the Black Prince surmounts the Coat of Arms as a crest.


In the 16th century, due to the restrictive practices and monopolies of the trade guilds, the cloth trade declined and the city fell on hard times. (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... A guild is an association of craftspeople in a particular trade. ...


Civil War and aftermath

Swanswell gate, one of the few surviving fragments of Coventry's city walls

During the English Civil War Coventry became a stronghold of the Parliamentarian forces. On several occasions Coventry was attacked by Royalists, but on each occasion they were unable to breach the city walls. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x692, 281 KB) Swanswell gate in Coventry was built in around 1440 as part of Coventrys city walls. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x692, 281 KB) Swanswell gate in Coventry was built in around 1440 as part of Coventrys city walls. ... For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... The English parliament in front of the King, c. ... Prince Rupert of the Rhine Cavaliers was the name used by Parliamentarians for the Royalist supporters of King Charles I during the English Civil War (1642–1651). ...


In 1645, the parliamentary garrison was under the command of Colonel Willoughbie, Colonel Boseville and Colonel Bridges with 156 officers and 1,120 soldiers. The garrison was supported by levies from surrounding villages, troops ranging across "several counties", imposing forced levies and taking horses and free quartering from villages in south-west Leicestershire.[1]


The king made an unsuccessful attempt to take the town in late August 1642, appearing at the city gates with 6,000 horse troops, but was strongly beaten back by the Coventry garrison and townspeople.[2]


Coventry was used to house Royalist prisoners. It is believed that the phrase "sent to Coventry" grew out of the hostile attitude of residents of the city to either the troops billeted there or the Scottish Royalist prisoners held there (following the Battle of Preston (1648) in St. John's church, for whom being "sent to Coventry" was quite an ordeal [1]. Prince Rupert of the Rhine Cavaliers was the name used by Parliamentarians for the Royalist supporters of King Charles I during the English Civil War (1642–1651). ... See Battle of Preston (1715) for the battle of the Jacobite Rising. ... St. ...


In 1662, after the restoration of the monarchy, in revenge for the support Coventry gave to the Parliamentarians during the Civil War, the city walls were demolished on the orders of King Charles II. Now only a few short sections and two city gatehouses remain. Events February 1 - The Chinese pirate Koxinga seizes the island of Taiwan after a nine-month siege. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ...


Industrialisation

In the 18th century Coventry became home to a number of French immigrants, who brought with them silk and ribbon weaving skills, which became the basis of Coventry's economy. Coventry began to recover, and again became a major centre of a number of clothing trades. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... For other uses of this word, see Silk (disambiguation). ...


Connections were made with the expanding national transport networks. The Coventry Canal was opened in the late 1700s, and one of the first trunk railway lines, the London and Birmingham Railway, was built through Coventry and opened in 1838. Coventry Canal near Fradley Coventry Canal viewed from Foleshill Rd The Coventry Canal is a narrow canal in the Midlands of England. ... The London and Birmingham Railway (L&BR) was an early railway company in the United Kingdom from 1833 until 1846, at which date it became a constituent part of the London and North Western Railway. ...


Coventry's first industrial boom, based upon textiles and ribbon weaving, came to a sudden end during the 1860s when foreign imports killed off the industry, and Coventry went into a slump. However, before long other industries began to develop and Coventry regained prosperity. Industries which developed included watch and clock making, manufacture of sewing machines, and from the 1880s onwards bicycle manufacture, which was pioneered by James Starley. Due to this industrialisation Coventry's population grew rapidly. // The First Transcontinental Railroad in the USA was built in the six year period between 1863 and 1869. ... For other uses, see Watch (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Clock (disambiguation). ... A sewing machine is a mechanical (or electrical) device that joins fabric using thread, in a manner similar to manual sewing. ... // Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ... For other uses, see Bicycle (disambiguation). ... Statue commemorating James Starley in Coventry James Starley (Born April 21, 1830, died June 17, 1881) was an English inventor and Father of the Bicycle Industry. ...


One of the first modern bicycles was invented in Coventry. The Starley Safety Bicycle invented by John Kemp Starley and produced by Rover in 1885, was the first bicycle to include modern features such as a chain-driven rear wheel with equal-sized wheels on the front and rear. Prior to this, most bicycles had been of the Penny-farthing design. John Kemp Starley (1854 - 1901) was an English inventor and industrialist. ... // Rover was a British automobile manufacturer and later a marque based at the former Austin Longbridge plant in Birmingham. ... Year 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The penny-farthing is an early model of bicycle, produced in England in 1870. ...


By the 1890s the cycle trade was booming and Coventry had developed the largest bicycle industry in the world. The industry employed nearly 40,000 workers in the 248 cycle manufacturers that were based in Coventry. The 1890s were sometimes referred to as the Mauve Decade, because William Henry Perkins aniline dye allowed the widespread use of that colour in fashion, and also as the Gay Nineties, under the then-current usage of the word gay which referred simply to merriment and frivolity, with no...


20th century

By the 1930s bicycle making had evolved into motor manufacture, and Coventry had become a centre of the British motor industry, Jaguar, Rover and Rootes being just three of many famous British manufacturers to be based in the area. The city remained prosperous and largely immune to the economic slump of that decade. In fact during the 1930s the population of Coventry grew by 90,000. The 1930s were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the [[. In East Asia, the rise of militarism occurred. ... The British motor industry is historically centred around Coventry in the West Midlands. ... Jaguar Cars Limited is a luxury car manufacturer, originally with headquarters in Browns Lane, Coventry, England but now at Whitley, Coventry. ... // Rover was a British automobile manufacturer and later a marque based at the former Austin Longbridge plant in Birmingham. ... The Rootes Group is a now-defunct British automobile manufacturer. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


As late as the 1920s, Coventry was being described as "The best preserved Medieval City in England". However the narrow medieval streets proved ill-suited to modern motor traffic, and during the 1930s many old streets were cleared to make way for wider roads. The 1920s is sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually when speaking about the United States. ...


On the 25 August 1939, Coventry was the scene of an early mainland bicycle bomb attack by the IRA. At 2.30 in the afternoon, the bomb exploded inside the satchel of a tradesman's bicycle which had been left outside a shop on Broadgate. The explosion killed five people, injured 100 more and caused extensive damage to shops in the area. Five IRA members were put on trial for murder and two were hanged in February 1940, although the identity of the man who rode the bicycle to the Broadgate and planted the bomb was never discovered. The bomb plotters had been operating out of a house at 25 Clara Street. Coming nine days before the outbreak of World War II, the IRA bombing was an omen of what was about to happen in the City at the hands of the German Luftwaffe. is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A bicycle bomb (or bike bomb) is an improvised explosive device that is placed on a bicycle. ... This article is about the historical army of the Irish Republic (1919–1922) which fought in the Irish War of Independence 1919–21, and the Irish Civil War 1922–23. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Deutsche Luftwaffe or   (German: air force, IPA: ) is the commonly used term for the German air force. ...


Bombing during the Blitz

main article Coventry Blitz

Coventry's darkest hour came during World War II when Adolf Hitler singled out Coventry for heavy bombing raids, due to the fact that it was a major industrial centre providing the manufacture of aeroplanes, tanks, engines and armament. Large areas of the city were destroyed in a massive German bombing raid on November 14, 1940. Firemen from throughout the Midlands came to fight the fires but found that each brigade had different connections for their hoses. Consequently much fire-fighting equipment could not be used.[2] The Coventry blitz was a series of bombing raids (blitzes) that took place in the English city of Coventry. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Hitler redirects here. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The attack destroyed most of the city centre and the city's medieval cathedral; 568 people were killed, 4,330 homes were destroyed and thousands more damaged. Industry was also hard hit with 75% of factories being damaged, although war production was only briefly disrupted with much of it being continued in shadow factories around the city and further afield.

The city centre following the November 14th air raid
The city centre following the November 14th air raid
The ruins of Coventry Cathedral
The ruins of Coventry Cathedral

Aside from London and Plymouth, Coventry suffered more damage than any other British city during the Luftwaffe attacks, with huge firestorms devastating most of the city centre. The city was targeted due to its high concentration of armaments, munitions and engine plants which contributed greatly to the British war effort. Residential areas were not specifically targeted, although factories such as the Rolls Royce plant, where plane engines were built, were located in or near some. Following the raids the majority of Coventry's historic buildings could not be saved as they were in ruinous states or were deemed unsafe for any future use. Download high resolution version (1000x651, 201 KB)The ruins of the old Coventry Cathedral. ... Download high resolution version (1000x651, 201 KB)The ruins of the old Coventry Cathedral. ... The Deutsche Luftwaffe or   (German: air force, IPA: ) is the commonly used term for the German air force. ... Rolls-Royce Limited was an British car and, later, aero-engine manufacturing company founded by Henry Royce and Charles Stewart Rolls on 15 March 1906 and was the result of a partnership formed in 1904. ...


The devastation was so great that the word Koventrieren -- to "Coventrate" or devastate by aerial bombing -- entered the German and English languages. In response, the Royal Air Force intensified the carpet bombings against German towns. RAF redirects here. ... The phrase carpet bombing refers to the use of large numbers of unguided gravity bombs, often with a high proportion of incendiary bombs, to attempt the complete destruction of a target region, either to destroy personnel and materiel, or as a means to demoralize the enemy (see terror bombing). ...


On the 8 April 1941 Coventry was hit by another massive air raid, which brought the total killed in the city by bombing to 1,236 with 1,746 injured. is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ...


A common myth surrounding the bombing is that Coventry (due in part to such books as Winterbotham's The Ultra Secret) was deliberately undefended in order to prevent the Germans realizing that Enigma cipher machine traffic (information from which was termed Ultra) were being read by British cryptanalysts at Bletchley Park. This claim is untrue — Winston Churchill was aware that a major bombing raid was to take place, but no one knew beforehand where the raid was meant to strike [3][4]. For a discussion of how Enigma-derived intelligence was put to use, see Ultra (WWII intelligence). ... Ultra (sometimes capitalized ULTRA) was the name used by the British for intelligence resulting from decryption of German communications in World War II. The term eventually became the standard designation in both Britain and the United States for all intelligence from high-level cryptanalytic sources. ... During World War II, codebreakers at Bletchley Park decrypted and interpreted messages from a large number of Axis code and cipher systems, including the German Enigma machine. ... Churchill redirects here. ...


Postwar

After the war, the city was extensively rebuilt. The new city centre built in the 1950s was designed by young town planner Donald Gibson and included one of Europe's first traffic-free shopping precincts (in 1946 the first one was realized in Rotterdam, the idea of which was copied throughout the world). The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... An Urban planner is a professional who works in the field of urban planning. ... Nickname: Motto: Sterker door strijd (Stronger through Struggle) Location of Rotterdam Coordinates: , Country Province Government  - Mayor Ivo Opstelten  - Aldermen Jeannette Baljeu Hamit Karakus Orhan Kaya Lucas Bolsius Jantine Kriens Dominic Schrijer Roelf de Boer Leonard Geluk Area [1]  - Total 319 km² (123. ...

Model of the redevelopment plan for Coventry city centre

The rebuilt Coventry Cathedral was opened in 1962 next to and incorporating the ruins of the old cathedral. It was designed by Basil Spence and contains the tapestry, "Christ in Majesty" by Graham Sutherland and the bronze statue "St. Michael and the Devil" by Jacob Epstein. The roofless ruins of the old cathedral. ... Sir Basil Urwin Spence, OM, OBE, RA, (13 August 1907 – 19 November 1976) was a Scottish architect, most notably associated with Coventry Cathedral and the Beehive, but also responsible for numerous other buildings in the Modernist/Brutalist style. ... Graham Vivian Sutherland (August 24, 1903 – February 17, 1980) was an English artist. ... Jacob Epstein photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1934 Sir Jacob Epstein (10 November 1880 – 19 August 1959) was an American-born Jewish sculptor who worked chiefly in the UK, where he pioneered modern sculpture, often producing controversial works that challenged taboos concerning what public artworks appropriately depict. ...


As a result of postwar redevelopment, Coventry now shares in the stereotype of 1960s architecture: concrete and brutalist. The development of Coventry's central business district was unnaturally restricted through the construction of a major orbital ringroad in the early-1970s, leading to a hodge-podge of "mixed use" city zones with no clearly-defined functions, aside from the cathedral quarter and a dated 1950s shopping precinct. The construction of the Cathedral Lanes shopping complex in 1990 at Broadgate significantly altered the original layout .Nevertheless, several pockets of the city centre still have a number of fine medieval and neo-Gothic buildings (Ford's Hospital, The Golden Cross, St Mary's Guildhall, Spon Street, Bluecoats, the Council House and the old Cathedral etc) having survived both the Blitz and the post war planners. ‹ The template below (Citations missing) is being considered for deletion. ...


The city was twinned with Dresden, which had suffered an even more devastating attack by the Anglo-American bombing late in the war, and groups from both cities became involved in demonstrations of post-war reconciliation. Today Coventry has a strong partnership with Dresden and is deeply supported by the populace in both cities. The city played a major role in representing the entire nation when the reconstruction of the Dresden Frauenkirche was completed in 2003. This article is about the city in Germany. ... The bombing of Dresden, led by Royal Air Force (RAF) and followed by the United States Army Air Force (USAAF) between February 13 and February 15, 1945, remains one of the more controversial Allied actions of World War II. The exact number of casualties is uncertain, but most historians agree... This article is about the city in Germany. ... The Dresden Frauenkirche in October 2005, only two weeks prior to its reconsecration and opening to the public. ...


Throughout the 1950s and up until the mid-1970s, Coventry remained prosperous and was often monikered as "Motor City" or "Britain's Detroit" due to the large concentration of car production plants across the city, notably Jaguar, Standard-Triumph (part of British Leyland), Hillman-Chrysler (later Talbot and Peugeot) and Alvis. During this period, the city had one of the country's highest standards of living outside of south-eastern England. The population of the city peaked in the late 1960s at around 335,000. The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... Jaguar Cars Limited is a luxury car manufacturer, originally with headquarters in Browns Lane, Coventry, England but now at Whitley, Coventry. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ...


The introduction of high-quality housing developments, particularly around the city's southern suburbs (such as Cannon Park, Styvechale Grange and south Finham) catered for a larger middle-class (and relatively well-paid working class) population. Coupled with some of the UK's finest sporting and leisure facilities of their time, including an Olympic-standard swimming complex and its pedestrianised shopping precinct, Coventrians enjoyed a short-lived golden age.


However, the decline of the British motor industry during the late-1970s and 80s hit Coventry hard, and in the early-1980s up to 20% of the workforce was unemployed, amongst the highest rates in the UK. A corresponding rapid increase in petty crime also began to give the city a poor reputation nationally. A hit record widely believed to be about Coventry "Ghost Town", by local band The Specials, summed up the situation in the city in the summer of 1981. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989, also called The Eighties. The decade saw social, economic and general upheaval as wealth, production and western culture migrated to new industrializing economies. ... For other uses, see Ghost town (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


The economic recession of 1990-1994 also hit the city hard, but in recent years Coventry has largely recovered, undergoing significant redevelopment and regeneration (again, not to everyone's taste) and encouraging newer industries to locate in the city. Although no further car production will take place in Coventry after December 2006, both Jaguar and Peugeot UK have vowed to continue with their head office and research operations in the city. However, motor production in the city still exists today in the form of the LTI (London Taxis International, formerly Carbodies) production plant in Holyhead Road, which employs 450 people and manufactures the popular "black cab", the current model being the LTI TX11. The world-famous FX4 black cabs were manufactured in Coventry from 1959 to 1994. The recession of the late nineteen-eighties was an economic recession that hit much of the world beginning in 1987. ... Carbodies is a British company based in Holyhead Road, Coventry, that started as a coachbuilder but is now best known for its Taxicab production business. ...


Historic population

  • 16,000 (1801)
  • 62,000 (1901)
  • 220,000 (1945)
  • 335,238 (1971)
  • 300,800 (2001)

See also

  • History of Warwickshire
  • History of Birmingham

In the 8th and 9th century, what is now Warwickshire was a part of the kingdom of Mercia. ... St Martins Church and the Selfridges building This article is about the history of Birmingham in England. ...

Further reading

  • Albert Smith and David Fry: (1991). The Coventry We Have Lost. Vol 1. Simanda Press, Berkswell. ISBN 0-9513867-1-9
  • Albert Smith and David Fry: (1993). The Coventry We Have Lost. Vol 2. Simanda Press, Berkswell. ISBN 0-9513867-2-7

Notes

  1. ^ History of St. Johns
  2. ^ Regan, Geoffrey (1996). The Guinness Book of Flying Blunders. Guinness Books. ISBN 0-85112-607-3. 
  3. ^ historiccoventry.co.uk
  4. ^ The Churchill Centre

References

  • McGrory, David (1993). Coventry: History and Guide. Dover, N.H.: A. Sutton. ISBN 0-7509-0194-2. 
  • Slater, Terry (1981). A History of Warwickshire. London: Phillimore. ISBN 0-85033-416-0. 
  • The websites below were also used as references

External links

  • Coventry history website
  • Local history page from Coventry City Council
  • All surviving traces of the wall
  • Coventry Air Raids and Blitz deaths
  • Information on the bombing of Coventry

  Results from FactBites:
 
Coventry West, Inc. - New, Rebuilt, Used Jaguar & Land Rover Parts (284 words)
Established in 1977, Coventry West is one of the largest suppliers of new, rebuilt, and used Jaguar and Land Rover parts and accessories in the United States.
Coventry West is an active buyer for wrecked or inoperative late-model Jaguar and Land Rover vehicles located in the Southeastern US for our salvage operation.
Coventry West, Inc. is not affiliated with the manufacturers, importers, or distributors of Jaguar or Land Rover automobiles.
History of Coventry - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1625 words)
Coventry is traditionally believed to have been established in the year 1043 with the founding of a Benedictine Abbey by Leofric, Earl of Mercia and his wife Lady Godiva.
Due to its importance, in 1345 Coventry was granted a city charter by King Edward III, and in 1451 King Henry VI granted Coventry a charter, which made Coventry a county in itself, a status it retained until 1842, when it reverted to being a part of Warwickshire.
Coventry's darkest hour came during World War II when Adolf Hitler singled out Coventry for heavy bombing raids, due to the fact that it was a major industrial centre providing the manufacture of aeroplanes, tanks, engines and armament.
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