FACTOID # 5: Minnesota and Connecticut are both in the top 5 in saving money and total tax burden per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > History of California
Californian poppy
History of California
To 1899
Gold Rush (1848)
American Civil War
(1861-1865)
Since 1900
Maritime
Railroad
Highways
Slavery
Los Angeles
Sacramento
San Diego

San Fernando Valley
San Francisco
San Jose Californias Yosemite Valley. ... The California Gold Rush (1848–1855) began shortly after January 24, 1848 (when gold was discovered at Sutters Mill in Coloma). ... Among the states, remote California played the least role in the American Civil War. ... This article continues the history of California in the years 1900 and later; for events through 1899, see History of California to 1899. ... Map showing Island of California, circa 1650 Maritime history of California is a term used to describe significant past events relating to the U.S. State of California in areas concerning shipping, shipwrecks, and military installations and lighthouses constructed to protect or aid navigation and development of the state. ... Slavery in California existed among the native peoples of that region long before the arrival of the first European colonists. ... // Pre-Sutter History – Through 1838 Indigenous people such as the Miwok and Maidu Indians had dwelt in the present-day Sacramento area for perhaps as long as thousands of years (the precise length of time is subject to dispute among historians, anthropologists, and Native American studies scholars, although no sources... The recorded history of the San Diego , California region goes back to the Spanish penetration of California in the 16th century. ... The history of San Francisco, California, has been greatly influenced by its coastal location, which has made it a natural center for maritime trade and military activity. ... // For thousands of years before the arrival of European settlers, the area now known as San Jose was inhabited by several groups of Ohlone Native Americans. ...

The History of California is divided into the following articles.

Contents

History of California to 1899

The remains of Arlington Springs Man on Santa Rosa Island are among the traces of a very early habitation, dated to the Wisconsin glaciation (the most recent ice age) about 13,000 years ago. In all, some 30 tribes or culture groups lived in what is now California, gathered into perhaps six different language family groups. It is estimated that by the time of extensive European contact in the 1700s, that perhaps 300,000 Native Americans were living within what is now California[citation needed]. This article is about the U.S state. ... Californias Yosemite Valley. ... Arlington Man is the name given a set of human remains. ... Santa Rosa Island Santa Rosa Island is the second largest of the Channel Islands of California at 52,794 acres (21,365 hectares). ... The Wisconsin (in North America), Devensian (in the British Isles), Midlandian (in Ireland), Würm (in the Alps), and Weichsel (in northern central Europe) glaciations are the most recent glaciations of the Pleistocene epoch, which ended around 10,000 BCE. The general glacial advance began about 70,000 BCE, and... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... The tribal belt of north-west India includes the states of Rajasthan, Ghujarat, Maharashtra and Karnataka. ... A language family is a group of languages related by descent from a common proto-language. ... For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ...


The first European explorers, flying the flags of Spain and of England, sailed along the coast of California from the early 1500s to the mid-1700s, but no European settlements were established. The California seen by these ship-bound explorers was one of hilly grasslands and forests, with few apparent resources or natural ports to attract colonists. It was not until the middle of the 1700s, that both Russian and British explorers and fur-traders began encroaching on the margins of the area. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


About 1530, Nuño Beltrán de Guzmán (President of New Spain) was told by an Indian slave a tale of the Seven Cities of Cibola that had streets paved with gold and silver. About the same time, Hernán Cortés was attracted by stories of a wonderful country far to the northwest, populated by Amazonish women and abounding with gold, pearls, and gems. The Spaniards conjectured that these places may be one and the same. Nuño Guzmán de Beltrán or Nuño Beltrán de Guzmán (15th century-1550) was a Spanish conquistador and dictator in colonial Mexico. ... map of New Spain in red, with territories claimed but not controlled in orange. ... Cibola is a mythical land whose seven cities golden treasures drew the Conquistadors northward through the Jornada del Muerto Desert, the Llano Estacado (Staked Plains), in which they encountered a Sea of Grass, and finally, the French, who resisted further northward advance. ... Hernán(do) Cortés Pizarro, 1st Marqués del Valle de Oaxaca (1485–December 2, 1547) was the conquistador who became famous for leading the military expedition that initiated the Spanish Conquest of Mexico. ... The Amazons (in Greek, ) were a mythical ancient nation of all-female warriors. ...


Moved by stories of lands abounding with gold, in July 1539 Cortés sent Francisco de Ulloa out with three small vessels. He made it to the mouth of the Colorado, then sailed around the peninsula as far as Cedros Island. The account of this voyage marks the first recorded application of the name "California". Route of the 1539 voyage by Francisco de Ulloa from (Acapulco) along the west coast of Mexico Francisco de Ulloa (d. ... Cedros Island lies in the Pacific Ocean, 22 km (14 miles) off the west coast of Baja California, 426 km (265 miles) south of Ensenada. ...


The first European to explore the California coast was João Rodrigues Cabrilho, a Portuguese navigator sailing for the Spanish Crown. He landed on September 28, 1542 at San Diego Bay, claiming what he thought was the Island of California for Spain. The Cabrillo National Monument in San Diego, CA João Rodrigues Cabrilho, (ca 1499 – January 3, 1543) was a Portuguese explorer noted for his exploration of the west coast of North America while sailing for Spain. ... An anachronous map of the overseas Spanish Empire (1492-1898) in red, and the Spanish Habsburg realms in Europe (1516-1714) in orange. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Americas Finest City Location Location of San Diego within San Diego County Coordinates , Government County San Diego Mayor City Attorney         City Council District One District Two District Three District Four District Five District Six District Seven District Eight Jerry Sanders (R) Michael Aguirre Scott Peters Kevin... The Island of California is shown on a 1650 map by Nicolas Sanson The Island of California refers to a long-held European misconception, dating from the 16th century, that California was not part of mainland North America but rather a large island separated from the continent by the Mare...


In 1602, the Spaniard Sebastián Vizcaíno explored California's coastline as far north as Monterey Bay, where he put ashore. He made glowing reports of the Monterey area as an anchorage and as land suitable for settlement, and provided detailed charts he of the coastal waters (which were used for nearly 200 years).[1] Sebastián Vizcaíno (1548-1624) was a Spanish soldier, entrepreneur, explorer, and diplomat whose varied roles took him to New Spain, the Philippines, the Baja California peninsula, Alta California, and Japan. ... A view of Monterey Bay Monterey Bay is a bay of the Pacific Ocean, on the coast of California, south of San Francisco. ...


In 1778, the British seafaring Captain James Cook mapped the coast of California, and in fact the western coast of the North American continent all the way to the Bering Strait. This article is about the British explorer. ... Satellite photo of the Bering Strait Photo across the Bering Strait Nautical chart of the Bering Strait The Bering Strait (Russian: ) is a sea strait between Cape Dezhnev, Russia, the easternmost point (169°43 W) of the Asian continent and Cape Prince of Wales, Alaska, the westernmost point (168°05...


In 1786, Jean-François de Galaup, comte de La Pérouse, led a group of scientists and artists who compiled an account of the Californian mission system, the land and the people. Traders, whalers and scientific missions followed in the next decades.[2] La Pérouse in 1828, by François Rude. ...


In 1846, at the outset of the Mexican-American War (1846-1848), the California Republic was founded. The Republic came to a sudden end, however, when Commodore John D. Sloat of the United States Navy sailed into Monterey Bay and claimed California for the United States. Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... The Bear Flag Capital Sonoma, California Language(s) English and Spanish (de facto) Government Republic President William B. Ide History  - Independence from Mexico June 14, 1846  - Annexation by the United States of America July 9, 1846 The California Republic, also called the Bear Flag Republic, was the result of a... Commodore John D. Sloat John Drake Sloat (July 6, 1781 – November 28, 1867) was a commodore in the United States Navy and, in 1846, claimed California for the United States. ... USN redirects here. ... A view of Monterey Bay Monterey Bay is a bay of the Pacific Ocean, on the coast of California, south of San Francisco. ...

History of California 1900 to present

Maritime history of California

Maritime history of California is a term used to describe significant past events relating to the U.S. State of California in areas concerning shipping, shipwrecks, and military installations and lighthouses constructed to protect or aid navigation and development of the state. This article continues the history of California in the years 1900 and later; for events through 1899, see History of California to 1899. ... Map showing Island of California, circa 1650 Maritime history of California is a term used to describe significant past events relating to the U.S. State of California in areas concerning shipping, shipwrecks, and military installations and lighthouses constructed to protect or aid navigation and development of the state. ... This article is about the U.S state. ... Damaged package The Panama canal. ... This list of shipwrecks is of those sunken ships whose remains have been located. ... The Peggys Point lighthouse in Nova Scotia, Canada An aid for navigation and pilotage at sea, a lighthouse is a tower building or framework sending out light from a system of lamps and lenses or, in older times, from a fire. ... This article is about determination of position and direction on or above the surface of the earth. ...


The first recorded shipwreck in California is that of the San Augustin, a Spanish Manila galleon, which was driven ashore in a gale in 1595 and was anchored in Drake’s Bay, northwest of San Francisco. The Farallon Islands and the mainland coast north of the Golden Gate Bridge have historically provided hazardous navigational obstacles to shipping. Year-round fogs and dangerous winds and storms often led ships to rocks and beaches to be pounded by the Pacific swells. Since the San Augustin, thousands of vessels have been lost in the states' coastal waters. Events January 30 - William Shakespeares Romeo and Juliet is performed for the first time. ... Farallon Islands, with border of Farallon Islands National Wildlife Refuge Southeast Farallon Islands (from nautical chart of 1957) View of research station at Marine Terrace, with Farallon Island Light above The Farallon Islands are a group of islands and rocks found in the Gulf of the Farallones, off the coast... The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening of the San Francisco Bay onto the Pacific Ocean. ... For other uses, see Fog (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wind (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Storm (disambiguation). ...

History of slavery in California

A type of slavery existed among the native peoples of the California region long before the arrival of European colonists. Spanish colonists—participants in the Atlantic slave trade and owners of both Indian and African slaves—introduced such concepts as chattel slavery and involuntary servitude to the area. Anglo settlers from the Southern and Eastern United States brought centuries of experience and insatiable habits to California. Many free and enslaved people of African ancestry were part of the California Gold Rush (1848–1855), and many were able to buy their freedom and freedom for their families, primarily in the South with the gold they found. [1] Slavery in California existed among the native peoples of that region long before the arrival of the first European colonists. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The Spanish colonization of the Americas was Spains conquest, settlement, and rule over much of the western hemisphere from 1492-1898. ... The Atlantic slave trade, also known as the transatlantic slave trade, was the trade of African people supplied to the colonies of the New World that occurred in and around the Atlantic Ocean. ... The slave trade in Africa existed for thousands of years. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into slavery. ... Involuntary servitude is the condition of a person laboring to benefit another against his will due to coercive influence directed toward him. ... The term Anglo-America is used to describe those parts of North America in which English is the main language. ... Historic Southern United States. ... Red shows states east of the Mississippi River, pink shows states not fully eastern or western The U.S. Eastern states are the states east of the Mississippi River. ... The California Gold Rush (1848–1855) began shortly after January 24, 1848 (when gold was discovered at Sutters Mill in Coloma). ...

California Gold Rush

In the early years of the California Gold Rush, placer mining methods were used, from panning to "cradles" and "rockers" or "long-toms", to diverting the water from an entire river into a sluice alongside the river, and then dig for gold in the newly-exposed river bottom. Some 12 million ounces[3] (370 t) of gold were removed in the first five years of the Gold Rush. By the mid-1880s, it is estimated that 11 million ounces (340 t) of gold (worth approximately US$6.6 billion at November 2006 prices) had been recovered via "hydraulicking," a style of hydraulic mining that later spread around the world. By the late 1890s, dredging technology had become economical,[4] and it is estimated that more than 20 million ounces (620 t) were recovered by dredging (worth approximately US$12 billion at November 2006 prices). Both during the Gold Rush and in the decades that followed, hard-rock mining wound up being the single largest source of gold produced in the Gold Country.[5] The California Gold Rush (1848–1855) began shortly after January 24, 1848 (when gold was discovered at Sutters Mill in Coloma). ... Miners operate a hydraulic sluice in San Francisquito Canyon, Los Angeles County. ... Sluice gates near Henley, on the River Thames A small wooden sluice in Magome, Japan, used to power a waterwheel. ... A tonne (also called metric ton) is a non-SI unit of mass, accepted for use with SI, defined as: 1 tonne = 103 kg (= 106 g). ... Hydraulic mining, or hydraulicking, is a form of mining that employs water under pressure to dislodge rock material or move sediment. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Gold Country (also Mother Lode Country) is a region of northeastern California famed for the mines and mineral deposits which so famously brought the 49ers west for the California Gold Rush. ...

California and the railroads

The establishment of America's transcontinental rail lines securely linked California to the rest of the country, and the far-reaching transportation systems that grew out of them during the century that followed contributed to the state’s social, political, and economic development. When California was admitted as a state to the United States in 1850, and for nearly two decades thereafter, it was in many ways isolated, an outpost on the Pacific. In recent years, passenger railroad building has picked up steam, with the introduction of services such as Metrolink, Caltrain, Amtrak California, and others. This is expected to continue, thanks to the passing of various rail-construction measures on November 4, 2008, including Proposition 1a. The establishment of Americas transcontinental rail lines securely linked California to the rest of the country, and the far-reaching transportation systems that grew out of them during the century that followed contributed to the state’s social, political, and economic development. ... A Transcontinental Railroad is a railway that crosses a continent typically from sea to sea. Terminals are at or connected to different oceans. ... This article is about the U.S state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Pacific redirects here. ... Map of St. ... Caltrain is a commuter rail line on the San Francisco Peninsula and the Santa Clara Valley in the United States. ... Amtrak California is a brand name used by Caltrans Division of Rail on all state supported and Amtrak operated rail routes within the State of California. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...

California in the American Civil War

California's involvement in the American Civil War included sending gold east, recruiting or funding a limited number of combat units, maintaining numerous fortifications, and sending troops east, some of whom became famous. Californias involvement in the American Civil War included sending gold east, recruiting or funding a limited number of combat units, maintaining numerous fortifications, and sending east some soldiers who became famous. ... This article is about the U.S state. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


Republican supporters of Lincoln took control of the state in 1861, minimizing the influence of the large southern population. Their great success was in obtaining a Pacific railroad land grant and authorization to build the Central Pacific as the western half of the transcontinental railroad. GOP redirects here. ... The Gov. ...


California was settled primarily by Midwestern and Southern farmers, miners and businessmen. Though the southerners tended to favor the Confederacy, the state did not have slavery, and they were generally powerless during the war itself. California was home for powerful businessmen who played a significant role in Californian politics through their control of mines, shipping, finance, and the Republican Party. The possibility of splitting off Southern California as a territory instead of a state was rejected by the national government, and the idea was dead by 1861 when patriotic fervor swept California after the attack on Fort Sumter. Midwest redirects here. ... Historic Southern United States. ... Fort Sumter, a Third System masonry coastal fortification located in Charleston harbor, South Carolina, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ...

See also

History of locations in California

References

  1. ^ Information from Monterey County Museum about Vizcaino's voyage and Monterey landing (retrieved 2006-12-18); Summary of Vizcaino expedition diary (retrieved 2006-12-18]
  2. ^ "The French In Early California". Ancestry Magazine. http://www.ancestry.myfamily.com/learn/library/article.aspx?article=808. Retrieved March 24 2006. 
  3. ^ The Troy weight system is traditionally used to measure precious metals, not the more familiar avoirdupois weight system. The term "ounces" used in this article to refer to gold typically refers to troy ounces. There are some historical uses where, because of the age of the use, the intention is ambiguous.
  4. ^ Rawls, James J. and Orsi, Richard (eds.) (1999), p. 199.
  5. ^ Charles N. Alpers, Michael P. Hunerlach, Jason T. May, and Roger L. Hothem. "Mercury Contamination from Historical Gold Mining in California". U.S. Geological Survey. http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2005/3014/. Retrieved 2008-02-26. 


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Ultimate California English - American History Information Guide and Reference (1336 words)
California English is a variety of the English language spoken in the U.S. state of California.
Several phonological processes are noted as being common to California English, although it should be noted not all Californians may participate in these specific speech patterns and these characteristics may be noted in areas outside of California, as well.
California English is in a somewhat unusual position amongst English varieties in that it is spoken in a state noted for its high concentration of media-related industries such as television, radio, and films, which are commonly broadcast throughout the United States and often the rest of the world.
History of California - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4730 words)
California and the territories that later became the states of Nevada, Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico were surrendered by Mexico under the Mexican Cession of the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.
California's role in the American Civil War is one of the least researched areas of American and Californian history, but it nonetheless played a distant role which is important for the many ways in which it was a microcosm of the whole United States, both North and South.
California also was the destination for a minority of powerful Northeastern capitalists who played a significant role in Californian politics through their control of mines, shipping, and finance.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m