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Encyclopedia > Hindu wedding
A Hindu marriage ceremony from a Rajput wedding
A Hindu marriage ceremony from a Rajput wedding

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Hinduism Image File history File links Merge-arrows. ... The Hindu religion has a deep significance and meaning for the institution of marriage. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1,014 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1,014 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Rajput constitute one of the major Hindu Kshatriya groups from India. ... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages)[1] is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ...

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Denominations · Literature Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Hinduism has prehistoric roots, including suspected survivals of traditions of the Bronze Age and right through to when yamum got down and funky. ... Within Hinduism a large number of personalities, or forms, are worshipped as murtis. ... Hinduism encompasses many movements and schools fairly organized within Hindu denominations. ... Hindu mythology is a term used by modern scholarship for a large body of Indian literature that details the lives and times of legendary personalities, deities and divine incarnations on earth interspersed with often large sections of philosophical and ethical discourse. ...

Beliefs and practices

Dharma · Artha · Kama · Moksha
Karma · Samsara · Yoga · Bhakti
Maya · Puja · Mandir Hindu philosophy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... For other uses, see Dharma (disambiguation). ... Artha is a Sanskrit term referring to the idea of material prosperity. ... Kāma (Skt. ... For other uses, see Moksha (disambiguation). ... Karma is a concept in Hinduism, based on the Vedas and Upanishads, which explains causality through a system where beneficial events are derived from past beneficial actions and harmful events from past harmful actions, creating a system of actions and reactions throughout a persons reincarnated lives. ... For other uses, see Samsara (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Yoga (disambiguation). ... Bhakti (DevanāgarÄ«: भक्ति) is a word of Sanskrit origin meaning devotion and also the path of devotion itself, as in Bhakti-Yoga. ... Maya (illusion) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A puja as performed in Ujjain during the Monsoon on the banks of the overflowing river Shipra. ... The Gopuram of temples, in south India, are adorned with colourful icons depicting a particular story surrounding the temples deity. ...

Scriptures

Vedas · Upanishads · Ramayana
Mahabharata · Bhagavad Gita
Purana · others Template:Hindu scriptures - Vedic Scriptures Hindu scripture, which is known as Shastra is predominantly written in Sanskrit. ... Veda redirects here. ... The Upanishads (उपनिषद्, Upanişad) are part of the Hindu Shruti scriptures which primarily discuss meditation and philosophy and are seen as religious instructions by most schools of Hinduism. ... For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ... Bhagavad Gīta भगवद्गीता, composed ca the fifth - second centuries BC, is part of the epic poem Mahabharata, located in the Bhisma-Parva chapters 23–40. ... The Puranas are part of Hindu Smriti; these religious scriptures discuss devotion and mythology. ... The following is a bibliography of Hindu scriptures and texts. ...

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Hinduism by country
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Hinduism - Percentage by country The percentage of Hindu population of each country was taken from the US State Departments International Religious Freedom Report 2004. ... These are some of the most noteworthy Gurus and Saints of Hinduism (in alphabetical order): A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada Adi Shankara Akhandanand Mata Amritanandamayi Sri Aurobindo Baba Lokenath Brahmachari Bhakti Tirtha Swami Bhakti Vaibhava Puri Maharaj Bhagawan Nityananda Bhagwan Swaminarayan Chaitanya Mahaprabhu Chinmayananda Sri Chinmoy Dharmsamrat Paramhans Swami Madhavananda... Hinduism is going through a phase of regeneration and reform through the vehicle of several contemporary movements, collectively termed as Hindu reform movements. ... Shirodhara, one of the techniques of Ayurveda Ayurveda (Devanagari: ) or Ayurvedic medicine is an ancient system of health care that is native to the Indian subcontinent. ... A page from the Hindu calendar 1871-72. ... Glossary of terms in Hinduism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Jyotisha (, in Hindi and English usage Jyotish; sometimes called Hindu astrology, Indian astrology, and/or Vedic astrology) is the Hindu system of astrology, one of the six disciplines of Vedanga, and regarded as one of the oldest schools of ancient astrology to have had an independent origin, affecting all other...

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North Indian wedding ceremonies are traditionally conducted at least partially in Sanskrit, the language in which most holy Hindu ceremonies are conducted. The local language of the people involved is also used since most Hindus cannot understand Sanskrit. They have many rituals that have evolved since traditional times and differ in many ways from the modern western wedding ceremony and also among the different regions, families, and castes such as Rajput Wedding, Aggarwal Weddings, Iyer Weddings. The Hindus attach a lot of importance to weddings and the ceremonies are very colourful and extend for several days. Sanskrit ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... Nuptial is the adjective of wedding. It is used for example in zoology to denote plumage, coloration, behavior, etc related to or occurring in the mating season. ... Caste systems are traditional, hereditary systems of social classification, that evolved due to the enormous diversity in India (where all three primary races met, not by forced slavery but by immigration). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Nuptial is the adjective of wedding. It is used for example in zoology to denote plumage, coloration, behavior, etc related to or occurring in the mating season. ...


In India, where most Hindus live, the laws relating to marriage differ by religion. By the Hindu Marriage Act of 1955 passed by the Union Parliament of India, for all legal purposes, all Hindus of any caste, creed or sect, Sikh, Budhhists and Jains are considered as Hindus for the sake of the Hindu marriage Act — and can hence intermarry. By the Special Marriage Act, 1954, a Hindu can marry a non-Hindu employing any ceremony provided certain legal conditions are fulfilled. Sansad Bhavan, The Parliament of India The Parliament of India (or Sansad) is bicameral. ...


The pre-wedding ceremonies include engagement (involving vagdana or oral agreement and lagna-patra written declaration), and arrival of the groom's party at the bride's residence, often in the form of a formal procession. The post-wedding ceremonies involve welcoming the bride to her new home. “Engaged” redirects here. ...


An important thing to note is that despite the fact that the modern Hinduism is largely based on the puja form of the worship of devas as enshrined in the Puranas, a Hindu wedding ceremony at its core is essentially a Vedic yajña (a fire-sacrifice), in which the Aryan deities are invoked in the archaic Indo-Aryan style. It has a deep origin in the ancient ceremony of cementing the bonds of friendship/alliance (even among people of the same sex or people of different species in mythological contexts), although today, it only survives in the context of weddings. The primary witness of a Hindu marriage is the fire-deity (or the Sacred Fire) Agni, and by law and tradition, no Hindu marriage is deemed complete unless in the presence of the Sacred Fire, seven encirclements have been made around it by the bride and the groom together. A puja as performed in Ujjain during the Monsoon on the banks of the overflowing river Shipra. ... The Puranas are part of Hindu Smriti; these religious scriptures discuss devotion and mythology. ... Chinese (Wu Xing) Japanese (Godai) Earth (地) | Water (æ°´) | Fire (火) | Air / Wind (風) | Void / Sky / Heaven (空) Hinduism (Tattva) and Buddhism (MahābhÅ«ta) Vayu / Pavan — Air / Wind Agni / Tejas — Fire Akasha — Aether Prithvi / Bhumi — Earth Ap / Jala — Water Bön New Zealand Agni is a Hindu and Vedic deity. ...

Contents

Important Marriage ceremonies

A Yajna during a Hindu wedding
A Yajna during a Hindu wedding

The Hindu marriage ceremonies vary in different regions and according to family traditions. The major ceremonies are the following. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... In Hinduism, Yajna (Devanagari यज्ञ IAST ; also anglicized as Yagna or Yagya) is a ritual of sacrifice (Monier-Williams gives the meanings worship, prayer, praise; offering, oblation, sacrifice) more commonly practised during Vedic times. ...

  • Ganesh Pūja - Invoking Lord Ganesh
  • Agni Puja - Evoking the holy fire
  • Kanyādāna - Giving away the bride to the groom
  • Mangalsutra - Tying of holy necklace
  • Saptapadi - The Seven Holy Steps circling the fire
  • Śilārōhana - Bride steps on the stone

Many of the ceremonies involve the pandit (priest) chanting mantras of various prayers and blessings for the couple. Traditionally, both the bride's and groom's priests are present so that minor variations in the two family wedding traditions can be bridged. The variations across regions are considerable. For example, the Mangalsutra is not part of Punjabi culture. In Punjabi culture [Sindhoor][1] is given more importance. A puja as performed in Ujjain during the Monsoon on the banks of the overflooding river Shipra. ... Popular image of Ganesh In Hinduism, Ganesha (Gaṇeśa, lord of the hosts, also spelled Ganesa and sometimes referred to as Ganesh in Hindi, Bengali and other Indian vernaculars) is the god of wisdom, intelligence, education and prudence. ... For other senses of this word, see necklace (disambiguation). ... Saptapadi (in Sanskrit, written as सप्तपदी, saptapadÄ«) or Saat phere (in Hindi, written as सात फेरे, sāt phéré) is an important part of a Hindu marriage ceremony, undertaken by the bride and the groom around a sacred fire. ... A pandit or pundit(पन्दित् in Devanagari) is a Hindu Brahmin who has memorized a substantial portion of the Vedas, along with the proper rhythms and melodies for chanting or singing them. ... In Tibet, many Buddhists carve mantras into rocks as a form of devotion. ...


Though Mangalya dharanam (tying of the holy mangalsutra) is considered to be the important part of the marriage, the wedding is considered complete only after Saptapadhi. The Hindu marriage ceremony consists of these major rituals as described below but every part of India have some variations in all the ceremonies. These are the main ceremonies but the explanation of these rituals here is typically North Indian or Punjabi style and are not the same for all Hindu marriages. MANGALSUTHRA / MAANGALYAM / THAALI as it is variously refered to is the symbol of marriage. ...


Saptapadi (स‌प्त‌पदी)

Main article: Saptapadi

The bridegroom gets up from his seat holding his bride's right hand. He then goes around the Holy Fire (Agni) from the right side, by lifting his bride's right feet at each step. This is done for seven steps. With each step, he recites a mantra addressed to the bride with the following meaning. Saptapadi (in Sanskrit, written as सप्तपदी, saptapadī) or Saat phere (in Hindi, written as सात फेरे, sāt phéré) is an important part of a Hindu marriage ceremony, undertaken by the bride and the groom around a sacred fire. ... Russian pilgrims bathing with the holy fire without harm. ... Chinese (Wu Xing) Japanese (Godai) Earth (地) | Water (水) | Fire (火) | Air / Wind (風) | Void / Sky / Heaven (空) Hinduism (Tattva) and Buddhism (Mahābhūta) Vayu / Pavan — Air / Wind Agni / Tejas — Fire Akasha — Aether Prithvi / Bhumi — Earth Ap / Jala — Water Bön New Zealand Agni is a Hindu and Vedic deity. ...

  • Let Lord Maha Vishnu follow each one of your steps for the following specific purposes.
  • :To give you unlimited food.
  • :To give you excellent health and energy.
  • :Todained in Vedas, during your life time.
  • :To give you happiness in life.
  • :To make your cows and good animals to grow in strength and in numbers.
  • :To make all the seasons be beneficial to you.
  • :To make the homams (sacrifices to be done in Holy Fire) to be performed by you in your life as ordained in Vedas, successful and free from hindrances.

The idea behind this is to pray to Lord Vishnu, the protector of life, for his blessings in marital life. The groom then recites a mantra to convey the following meaning: Vishnu (Hindi: (विष्‍णु) is a form of God, whom Hindus pray to. ...

After crossing seven steps with me thus, you should become my friend. I too have become your friend now. I will never discord this friendship and you should not also do that. Let us be together always. Let us resolve to do things in life in the same manner and tread the same path. Let us lead a life by liking and loving each other, having good heart and thoughts, and enjoying the food and our strong points together. Let us have undivided opinions. We will perform the vrithas united. Let us have same and joint desires. I will be Sama (one of the vedas); you will be Rig (another Veda). Let me be the Heaven; you be the Earth. Let me be the Shukla (Moon) and you be its wearer. Let me be the mind and you its spokesman (Vak). With these qualities, you be my follower. You the sweet tongued, come to me to get good male children and wealth.

See also: Yalgnavakya Smrithi For other uses, see Friendship (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Friendship (disambiguation). ... Look up sama in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Shukla is Sanskrit for white, also bright phase of lunar fortnight, as opposed to Krishna, or dark phase. ...


Barni Bandhwana

Approximately 15 days prior to the actual wedding, on an auspicious day, the pandit will perform a puja to Lord Ganesh (the remover of obstacles). During this puja, a piece of mauli (thread) is tied to the hands of the groom, and his parents. This puja is done to make a humble request to Lord Ganesh that the wedding happen without any problems, beside the occasional mishap e.g tripping over. After that day, the family performs a puja to Lord Ganesh every day until after the wedding is complete. For other uses, see Ganesha (disambiguation). ... A puja as performed in Ujjain during the Monsoon on the banks of the overflowing river Shipra. ... For other uses, see Ganesha (disambiguation). ...


Byaha Hath

These are ritualistic ceremonies signifying the cleansing of one's mind, body and soul before embarking on the path of marriage. This daytime ceremony prepares both of them for the nuptials. 'Uptan' is a paste made from sandalwood, turmeric and rose water and is applied by seven unmarried female members of the families, to the faces, hands and feet of the bride and groom. After this ceremony the bride and the groom are barred from stepping outdoors until after the wedding ceremony. Part of the ceremony of the Changing of the Guard in Whitehall, London. ... The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view. ...


Symbols

There are many symbols in a Hindu wedding, like, for example, the color red which represents life, and the turnip, which represents fulfillment and a happy marriage. There are others like fire, a scarf which is tied around the bride and the groom to show that they have been united, and also the seven steps. These are just traditional things which many Hindus do at their weddings.


Mayara

The mayara is an important ceremony, common to both the bride and the groom’s families. This ceremony is performed by the maternal uncle of the groom/bride, who, along with his wife and family, arrives with much fanfare, and is received by the bride/groom’s mother with the traditional welcome. The clothes that the uncle gives are then worn by the family during the wedding.


Sangeet Sandhya

The sangeet sandhya is an evening of musical entertainment. The groom’s family puts on a show for the groom and bride. Included as part of this event is an introduction of all the family members for the bride.


Tilak Ceremony (तिलक‌)

Tilak is a mark of auspiciousness. It is put on the forehead using Kumkum, a red turmeric powder. The male members of the bride's family, like her father, brother, uncles place a tilak on the forehead of the groom. This is typically followed by giving some gifts to the groom and the groom's accompanying family members requesting them to take care of the bride later.


Mehendi Lagwana (मॆह्न्दी)

Another name for “Vivaah” is “haath pila karna” or simply translated, making hands yellow. Mehendi (henna) is applied to the bride’s hands and feet. In the right hand, a round spot is left open for Hathlewa. Mehandi on a hand Another intricate Mehandi pattern Mehndi (or Hina} is the application of henna (Hindustani: हेना حنا) as a temporary form of skin decoration, orginated in India it is most popular in South Asia, the Middle East, North Africa and Somaliland as well as expatriate communities from these areas. ... Look up henna in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Biradh Morcha

The groom’s family’s elder members go to the bride’s house. There Lord Krishna’s Deity is decorated and aarti is performed. This is ended by some hymns.


Barat Nikasi (बारात‌)

The groom leaves for the wedding venue riding a decorated horse or elephant. This is a very colorful and grand ceremony. The groom is dressed in a sherwani (long jacket) and 'churidars' (fitted trousers). On his head he wears a 'safa' (turban) with a 'kalgi' (brooch) pinned onto it.


Before he departs, his relatives apply the ceremonial 'tilak' on his forehead and his sister feeds the horse or elephant sweetened grain. The baraat is headed by the dancing of the congregated folks. Accompanied by the rhythm of the north Indian dholak the baraat reaches the place of the wedding. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Upon arriving at the venue of the wedding, the groom is welcomed by a welcome song. This is called “talota.” Then the groom knocks on the door with his sword and enters.


Var Mala (वर माला) / Jay Mala (जय माला)

The groom is led to a small stage where he is “attacked” by the bride with flowers. A close family member of the groom defends him with a shield. The bride does this while circling the groom four times. Following this, the groom and bride exchange garlands (these are the "var mala") signifying their acceptance of each other as husband and wife. Then, the groom’s mother-in-law measures the groom’s chest, and pokes and prods him to make sure he is tough enough to defend her daughter. She then puts kajal on the groom to ward off evil spirits. This is followed by aarti.


Aarti (आरती)

The 'baraatis' (groom's party) are received by the bride's family and at the entrance to the wedding venue. The bride's mother welcomes the groom by performing the 'aarti' (traditional Indian welcome ritual with a lamp or 'diya' placed on a platter or 'thali') to welcome her son-in-law and placing a tilak on his forehead.


Hathlewa (हाथलॆवा)

After being led to the wedding mandup, the bride and groom have their hands tied together. The Panditji does a puja to Lord Ganesh and than puts a coin & mehendi on the groom’s right hand where the round empty spot is (where no mehendi was put) and ties his hand with the brides. This puja is done schedule in advance based on an auspicious time & date.


Havan (हवन‌)

The ritual connotes the actual core wedding ceremony, for the very meaning of the word "vivaah" is-marriage. The priest ties the end of the groom's dhoti or the kurta; whichever he is wearing, with that of the bride's saree, the knot signifying the sacred wedlock. The groom and the bride then circle the holy fire seven times, making seven promises to be fulfilled in the married life, after which they are considered to be 'married' to each other. This ritual is called "phere".


Saat Phere / Wedding Vows (सात फॆरॆ)

1. With the first step, the couple invokes the manifestations of god for plenty of pure and nourishing food. "With God as our guide, let us take the first step to live with honour and respect. Let us walk together so we get food," the couple prays.


2. With the second step, the couple prays to the God to give them the mental, physical and spiritual strength to lead a healthy life. "Let us be happy and enjoy life. Let us walk together so we grow together in strength," they pray.


3. The third step is for preserving wealth and prosperity in life. The chant at this stage means, "let us share joys and pains together. Let us walk together so we get wealth."


4. With the fourth step, the bride and groom invoke the god for attainment of happiness and harmony by mutual love and trust in all walks of life. "Let us not forget parents and elders. Let us walk together so we get happiness by sharing our joys and sorrows," they say.


5. With the fifth step, they pray for the welfare of all living beings in the Universe and pray for virtuous, noble and heroic children." Let us observe all acts of charity. Let us walk together so we have family," the mantras say.


6. With the sixth step, they ask god to give them a long, joyous life and togetherness forever. "Let us live a long and peaceful life. Let us walk together so we have joy," the couple prays.


7. With the seventh, and last, step, the couple prays for understanding, companionship, loyalty and unity. "Let us be friends with love and sacrifice. Let us walk together so we have friendship," the holy chants signify.


8. After the seventh step, the groom says to the bride: "With seven steps we have become friends. Let me reach your friendship. Let me not be severed from your friendship. Let your friendship not be severed from me."


Only after the 7 steps, are the couple pronounced husband and wife.


Kanya Daan (क‌न्या दान)

Kana Danam is performed by the father of the bride in presence of a large gathering that is invited to witness the wedding.


The father pours out a libation of sacred water symbolizing the giving away of the daughter to the bride groom. The groom recites Vedic hymns to Kama, the god of love, for pure love and blessings.


As a condition for offering his daughter for marriage, the father of the bride requests a promise from the groom for assisting the bride in realizing the three ends : dharma, artha, and kama. The groom makes the promise by repeating three times that he will not fail the bride in realizing dharma, artha and kama.


Vidaai (विदाई)

This is considered to be the most emotional ritual, when the bride leaves her parents' home and makes her way to her husband's. Family and friends, who also shower her with blessings and gifts, give her a tearful farewell. The male members of the bride's family bid farewell to the groom by applying the traditional 'tilak' (vermilion) on his forehead and shower him with gifts.
In earlier times the bride use to leave in a palanquin. These days the couple leaves in a decorated car. Japanese Palanquin Indian Palanquin A palanquin aka palkhi is a covered sedan chair (or litter) carried on four poles. ...


Baasi-Jawari

This event takes place the day of the wedding. The brides sisters hide the groom's shoes and ask for money if he (groom) wants them back and be able to go home with the bride.


Dwar-Rokai (द्वार रोकाई)

After leaving the groom’s father-in-law’s house, the couple come home. They are stopped at the entrance of the house by either the groom’s sister or his father’s sister. There, in an earthen vessel, the sister/aunt uses a mixture of salt and water to ward off evil spirits from the groom. After this, the pot is thrown on the ground and destroyed. After this, the couple enter the house.


Griha Pravesh

When the bride arrives at her new home, her mother-in-law, who welcomes her with the traditional 'Aarti’.. At the entrance, she puts her right foot onto a tray of vermilion powder mixed in water or milk, symbolizing the arrival of good fortune and purity. With both her feet now covered in the red powder paste, she kicks over a vessel filled with rice and coins to denote the arrival of fertility and wealth in her marital home. Vermilion, also spelled vermillion, when found naturally-occurring, is an opaque reddish orange pigment, used since antiquity, originally derived from the powdered mineral cinnabar. ...


Mooh Dikhai

The family now indulges in a series of games and post-wedding rituals, amidst much laughter to make the new member feel comfortable. One such ritual is the Mooh dikhai. Literally translated, Mooh Dikhai means 'show your face', but this is a ritual, which helps to introduce the newly wed to members of her husband's family! Each member of the groom's family comes in turn to make an acquaintance with the new bride.


Modern Hindu weddings

A mandap from a modern wedding
A mandap from a modern wedding

Modern Hindu weddings are often much shorter and do not involve all of the rituals of the traditional ceremony which sometimes were for five days. Instead certain ceremonies are picked by the families of the bride and the groom depending on their family tradition, caste, jāti etc. Hence the ceremonies vary among the various ethnic groups that practice Hinduism. The wedding is normally conducted under a mandap, a canopy traditionally with four pillars, and an important component of the ceremony is the sacred fire (Agni) that is witness to the ceremony. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 747 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2208 × 1772 pixel, file size: 623 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 747 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2208 × 1772 pixel, file size: 623 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Jātis (the word literally means births) comprise the subcastes found within the four major castes, or varnas, of the Indian caste system. ... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages)[1] is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... Open mandapa at Amritapura A mandapa (also spelled mantapa or mandapam) in Indian architecture is a pillared outdoor hall or pavillion. ...


See also

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

External links

  • "Nothing to Go Back To - The Fate of the Widows of Vrindavan, India" WNN - Women News Network Nov 5, 2007

  Results from FactBites:
 
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