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Encyclopedia > Hindu denominations
Part of the series on
Hinduism
History  · Deities
Denominations
Beliefs & practices
Reincarnation  · Moksha
Karma  · Puja  · Maya
Nirvana  · Dharma
Yoga  · Ayurveda
Yuga  · Vegetarianism
Bhakti  · Artha
Mythology & scriptures
Shruti : Upanishads
Vedas  · Brahmana
Smriti : Bhagavad Gita
Sutras  · Itihasa
Related topics
Hinduism by country
Leaders  · Mandir  ·
Caste system  · Mantra
Hindu festivals  · Murti

Hinduism encompasses many movements and schools fairly organized within Hindu denominations. A denomination shares a common ground of beliefs but embraces many different movements and schools inside its philosophical branches. This article is about the Hindu religion; for other meanings of the word, see Hindu (disambiguation). ... This is the Devanagari symbol for the Hindu sacred syllable Aum. ... The Indus Valley Civilization existed along the Indus River in present-day Pakistan. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Hindu philosophy (one of the main divisions of Indian philosophy) is traditionally seen through the prism of six different systems (called darshanas in Sanskrit) that are listed here and makes up the main belief systems of Hinduism. ... Past Lives redirects here. ... Moksha (Sanskrit: मोक्ष, liberation) or Mukti (Sanskrit: विमुक्ति, release) refers, in general, to liberation from the cycle of death and rebirth. ... KarmA (Sanskrit: कर्म from the root kri, to do, meaning deed) or Kamma (Pali: meaning action, effect, destiny) is a term in several Indian religions that comprises the entire cycle of cause and effect. ... PÅ«jā (alternative transliteration pooja, Sanskrit: reverence or worship, loosely) is a religious ritual which most Hindus perform every morning after bathing and dressing but prior to taking any food or drink. ... Maya in Hinduism In Vedic philosophy, maya is the illusion of a limited, purely physical and mental reality in which our everyday consciousness has become entangled, a veiling of the true, unitary Self, also known as Brahman. ... In the Indian religions Buddhism, Jainism and Hinduism, nirvāna (from the Sanskrit निर्वाण, Pali: Nibbāna -- Chinese: 涅槃; Pinyin: niè pán), literally extinction and/or extinguishing, is the culmination of the yogis pursuit of liberation. ... Dharma (sanskrit, roughly law or way) is the way of the higher Truths. ... Yoga (Sanskrit: Integration and union) is science, art and philophy of life. ... Ayurveda (आयुर्वेद Sanskrit: ayu—life; veda—knowledge of) or ayurvedic medicine is a comprehensive system of medicine, more than 5,000 years old and based on a holistic approach rooted in Vedic culture. ... In Hindu philosophy (and in the teachings of Surat Shabd Yoga) the cycle of creation is divided into four yugas (ages or eras): Satya Yuga or Krita Yuga Treta Yuga Dwapara Yuga Kali Yuga // The spiritual states of civilization in each yuga In Hindu tradition, the world goes through a... Vegetarianism is the practice of not eating meat, poultry, fish or their by-products, with or without the use of dairy products or eggs [2]. The exclusion may also extend to products derived from animal carcasses, such as lard, tallow, gelatin, rennet and cochineal. ... Bhakti is a Tamil or Sanskrit term from Hinduism that means intense devotion expressed by action (service). ... Artha is a Sanskrit term referring to the idea of material prosperity. ... The term Hindu mythology refers collectively to a large body of Indian literature (essentially, the mythology of Hinduism) that detail the lives and times of legendary personalities, deities and divine incarnations on earth interspersed with often large sections of philosophical and ethical discourse. ... Hindu scripture is overwhelmingly written in Sanskrit. ... Shruti (Sanskrit श्रुति, what is heard) is a canon of Hindu scriptures. ... The Upanishads (उपनिषद्, Upanişad) are part of the Hindu Shruti scriptures which primarily discuss meditation and philosophy and are seen as religious instructions by most schools of Hinduism. ... The Vedas (Sanskrit:- वेद), refers to collectively a corpus of old Indo Aryan religious literature that are considered to be revealed knowledge in Hinduism. ... The Brahmanas (Sanskrit ब्राह्मण, Brahmin Books) are part of the Hindu Shruti; They are composed in Vedic Sanskrit, and the period of their composition is sometimes referred to as the Brahmanic period or age (approximately between 900 BC and 500 BC). ... Smriti (Sanskrit स्मॄति, what is fit/deserves to be remembered) refers to a canon of Hindu religious scripture. ... Bhagavad Gīta भगवद्गीता, composed ca the fifth - second centuries BC, is part of the epic poem Mahabharata, located in the Bhisma-Parva chapters 23–40. ... Sutra (सूत्र) in Sanskrit is derived from the verb √siv, meaning to sew. ... Itihasa (Sanskrit: thus verily happened) refers collectively to the epic Hindu scriptures, detailing the actions of divine incarnations on earth while interspersing them with often large sections of philosophical and ethical discourse. ... The percentage of Hindu population of each country was taken from the US State Departments International Religious Freedom Report 2004 [1]. Other sources used were CIA Factbook [2] and adherents. ... These are some of the most noteworthy Gurus and Saints of Hinduism: Shankara Ramanuja Madhvacharya Ramakrishna Vivekananda Sree Narayana Guru Aurobindo Ramana Maharshi Sivananda Chinmayananda Yogaswami Sivaya Subramuniyaswami Swaminarayan A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada Satya Sai Baba Shirdi Sai Baba Categories: Hindu religious figures ... The Gopuram of temples, in south India, are adorned with colourful icons depicting a particular story surrounding the temples deity. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... In Tibet, many Buddhists carve mantras into rocks as a form of devotion. ... The Nataraja is one of the most famous images of Lord Siva Murtis are deities or images used by Hindus and also by some Mahayana Buddhists during worship as points of devotional and meditational focus. ... This article is about the Hindu religion; for other meanings of the word, see Hindu (disambiguation). ... There exist many schools and diverse movements of Hinduism. ...

Contents


Basic overview

Contemporary Hinduism is traditionally divided into four major denominations, Śaivism, Shaktism, Vaishnavism, and Smartha. Shaivism, also Saivism, is a branch of Hinduism that worships Siva as the Supreme God. ... Shaktism is a denomination of Hinduism that worships Shakti, or Devi -- the Hindu name for the Great Mother -- in all of her forms whilst not rejecting the importance of masculine and neuter divinity. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... // Introduction The term Smartha refers to those who accept and profess the Advaitha or non-dualistic philosophy propounded by Sri Adi Shankaracharya. ...


Hinduism is a very rich and complex religion. Each of its four denominations shares rituals, beliefs, traditions and personal Gods with one another, but each denomination has a different philosophy on how to achieve life's ultimate goal (mokśa, liberation) and different views of the Gods. Each follows different methods of self-realization and worships different aspects of the One Supreme God. However, each respects and accepts all others, and conflict of any kind is rare. Among Hindu followers as a whole, there is a strong belief in there are many paths leading to the One God or the Source, whatever one chooses to call that ultimate Truth. A ritual is a formalised, predetermined set of symbolic actions generally performed in a particular environment at a regular, recurring interval. ... Belief is assent to a proposition. ... This article is about a religious term. ... The word source has more than one meaning: // Information Source Edit: A software program for developers in which you can edit your source code regardless of the computer language. ... When someone sincerely agrees with an assertion, they are claiming that it is the truth. ...


An established philosophical school withind a denomination is called a sampradaya and a traditional lineage of teachers from any sampradaya is a parampara. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Parampara denotes a long succession of teachers and disciples in traditional Indian culture. ...


The presence of different denominations and schools within Hinduism should not be viewed as a schism. On the contrary, there is no animosity between the schools. Instead there is a healthy cross-pollination of ideas and logical debate that serves to refine each school's philosophy. It is not uncommon, or disallowed, for an individual to follow one school but take the point of view of another school for a certain issue. The word schism, from the Greek σχισμα, schisma (from σχιζω, schizo, to split), means a division or a split, usually in an organization. ...


As per [Adherents.com] the majority of Hindus are Vaishnavas, though often mixing in some aspects of the Smarta viewpoint.


Vaishnavism

Vaishnavas worship Vishnu, or Krishna and his avataras (especially Rama) as the supreme deity. This is the largest denomination. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... For other uses of the name Vishnu, see Vishnu (disambiguation). ... Lord Krishna revealing his Universal form to Arjuna Krishna (कृष्ण, pronounced as kŖιŞhŅə, Sanskrit for black), is according to common Hindu tradition the eighth avatar of Vishnu. ... See Avatar (disambiguation) for other meanings. ... Deities of Sri Sri Sita (far right), Rama (center), Lakshmana (far left) and Hanuman (below seated) at the Bhaktivedanta Manor, Watford England Lord Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman. ...


Vaishnava sampradayas:

Modern Vaishnava groups attached to the main sampradayas: ... Sri Ramanuja Acharya (1017 - 1137 AD) was an Indian philosopher and is recognized as the most important saint of Sri Vaishnavism. ... Vallabhacharya (1479 - 1531) was the founder of the Vallabha sect in Indian philosophy. ... Gaudiya Vaishnavism, (Bengal) Vaishnavism, is a sect of Hinduism founded by Chaitanya Mahaprabhu. ... Deities of Sri Chaitanya Mahaprabhu (right) and Sri Nityananda (left) at Radha-Krishna temple in Radhadesh, Belgium Chaitanya Mahaprabhu (also transliterated Caitanya) (Bangla:চৈতন্য মহাপ্রভূ) (1486 - 1534), was an ascetic Hindu monk and social reformer in 16th century Bengal, India (present-day West Bengal and Bangladesh). ...

Bhagwan Shree Swaminarayan in his ultimate form. ... The International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON), popularly called Hare Krishna, is a new religious movement founded by A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, referred to by followers as Srila Prabhupada, in New York in 1966. ... Bhakti Vaibhava Puri Maharaj Founder-Acharya of Sri Krishna Chaitanya Mission Sri Krishna Chaitanya Mission is a religious organisation in the Gaudiya Vaishnavism tradition founded by Srila Bhakti Vaibhava Puri Maharaj; Maharaj received initiation from Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Saraswati Thakur, so the mission operates in the Saraswat tradition of Bhaktisiddhanta and...

Śaivism

Śaivites are those who primarily worship God Śiva as Supreme God, both Immanent and Transcendent. Shaivism, also Saivism, is a branch of Hinduism that worships Siva as the Supreme God. ... This article is about the Hindu God. ... Immanence is a religious and philosophical concept. ... Transcendental in philosophical contexts In philosophy, transcendental experiences are experiences of an exclusively human nature that are other-worldly or beyond the human realm of understanding. ...


Śaivism embraces at the same time Monism and Dualism. It focuses on yoga, meditation and love for all beings. Shaivism, also Saivism, is a branch of Hinduism that worships Siva as the Supreme God. ... Monism is the metaphysical view that there is only one principle, essence, substance or energy. ... The term dualism can refer to a variety of doctrines, mainly in theology and philosophy, each involving the purported existence of two opposites of some kind. ...


To Saivites God Śiva is both with and without form; He is the Supreme Dancer, Nataraja; He is the linga, without beginning or end. Bronze Chola Statue of Nataraja Nataraja (literally, The King of Dance) is the dancing posture of Lord Åšiva, the aspect of God as the Destroyer in Hinduism. ... Linga worship (Estate of Cynthia and Harlen Welsh) Lingam or Linga is the Sanskrit word for mark. ...

Siddha Yoga is a spiritual group teaching traditional Hindu or yogic practices both in India and in the West. ... Virasaivism is a religious movement of Hinduism in India. ...

Shaktism

Shaktas worship Shakti, the divine Mother, in her many forms like (Kali, Durga, etc.). In Shaktism, as Satguru Sivaya Subramuniyaswami, along with many scholars, noted, emphasis is given to the feminine manifest by which the masculine Un-manifest Parasiva is ultimately reached. The Divine Mother is thus the mediatrix, and bestows advaitic moksha on those who worship Her. Hence, Shaktism is effectively a sub-denomination of Saivism as Devi is worshipped in order to attain union with Siva, who in Shaktism is the impersonal unmanifest Absolute. Shaktism is a denomination of Hinduism that worships Shakti, or Devi -- the Hindu name for the Great Mother -- in all of her forms whilst not rejecting the importance of masculine and neuter divinity. ... In most South Asian languages, Shakti translates literally as power. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Sivaya Subramuniyaswami (1927 - 2001), affectionately known as Gurudeva, was born in Oakland, California on January 5th, 1927. ... Parasiva is the aspect of Siva, the Absolute which is beyond human comprehension and is beyond all attributes. ...


Shakta form was one of the oldest form of Hindu religion, but with evolution of civilisation and emergence of various doctrines, various other forms of Hindu philosophy emerged. Shaivism and Shakta forms are really unseparable, as is the description of Shiva and Shakti/Sati/Parvati. Vaishanvism has also its connections with Shakta philosphy as Goddess Durga herself is called Narayani. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... In most South Asian languages, Shakti translates literally as power. ... Sati may refer to any of the following: The Hindu Goddess Sati, daughter of Daksha and wife of Shiva A social practise in some parts of India in past centuries, often spelt Suttee The Buddhist Sati; see mindfulness. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Narayani Zone of Nepal borders India on the south. ...


Shakta in behaviour are identical to the Shaivites or Vaishanvites in the fundamental philosophy, but they tend to be very liberal in their thinking. Typically in a Shakta family/household, all Ishwar forms are worshipped alongside. Shaktas many a times don't identify themselves as Shaktas but as Hindus in general. In India, Bengal, Assam, Orissa and Bihar are the main regions where detailed Devi Pujan or Shakta rituals are followed. Madhya Pradesh (Chamunda Pujan), Rajasthan and Gujrat (Nav Durga) are also equally zealous and various rituals for Devi Pujan and celebration take place in these regions. It is actually unfair and very hard to identify or isolate Shaktas amongst any other denominations. Shaktas do not beleive in denominations, and believe that these ideas of classification are a very Christian way of classification. This might be true as Devi Pujan (worship) is actually a nationwide phenomenon. Ishvara (ईश्वर in devanagari script, pronunciation ī:shvərə), also variously transliterated (romanized) as Īshvara, Īshwara, Īshwar, Īśvara, etc. ... Devi as Vaishnodevi Commonly known as Devi (goddess), Vaishnodevi (देवी, Devī in Hindi and Sanskrit) is the Divine Mother of Hinduism. ... In Hinduism, Chamunda or Camunda is an aspect of Devi, the supreme mother goddess. ... Devi as Vaishnodevi Commonly known as Devi (goddess), Vaishnodevi (देवी, Devī in Hindi and Sanskrit) is the Divine Mother of Hinduism. ... Devi as Vaishnodevi Commonly known as Devi (goddess), Vaishnodevi (देवी, Devī in Hindi and Sanskrit) is the Divine Mother of Hinduism. ...


One of the unique features of Shaktas is, that there is immense respect for women as mothers in common household.


ANY FAMILY WHERE MOTHERS AND WOMEN ARE NOT RESPECTED, CANNOT CALL THEMSELVES AS SHAKTI WORSHIPPERS.


To roughly cover the Shakta centers all over India, one could begin with all the Shakti Peeth in India. There are typically 51 Shakti Peeth all over India, which are typically revered as places of pilgrimage. The mythological background behind these temples or Shakti Peeth goes back to the story of Shiva performing "Tandava" (the dance of fury) carrying the dead and burnt body of Sati in immense anger, effectively destroying the entire Universe. Seeing Shiva's rage, Vishnu realised that that Shiva's strength emerged from the dead body of Sati/Shakti and decided to cut her dead body to peices with his Sudarshan chakra, which led to halting of Shiva's wrath. There were 51 peices of her dead body which fell on earth at 51 places and those are the spots of Shakti Peeth. To name a few are the Kalighat Mandir at Kolkata, the Kamakhya Mandir at Assam, the Vaishnav Devi Mandir at Jammu and many others. According to Hindu Mythology, King Daksha once performed Vrihaspati Yagya, to take revenge with lord Shiva. ... According to Hindu Mythology, King Daksha once performed Vrihaspati Yagya, to take revenge with lord Shiva. ... According to Hindu Mythology, King Daksha once performed Vrihaspati Yagya, to take revenge with lord Shiva. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Sati may refer to any of the following: The Hindu Goddess Sati, daughter of Daksha and wife of Shiva A social practise in some parts of India in past centuries, often spelt Suttee The Buddhist Sati; see mindfulness. ... For other uses of the name Vishnu, see Vishnu (disambiguation). ... Sati may refer to any of the following: The Hindu Goddess Sati, daughter of Daksha and wife of Shiva A social practise in some parts of India in past centuries, often spelt Suttee The Buddhist Sati; see mindfulness. ... In most South Asian languages, Shakti translates literally as power. ... According to Hindu Mythology, King Daksha once performed Vrihaspati Yagya, to take revenge with lord Shiva. ...


Typically in Shakta philosophy dominated regions, various forms of Hindu religion thrive harmoniously. It is the understanding of Shaktas, that everyone is the son/daughter of the same Divine Mother, and hence harmonious existence is "Mother's" desire. Various stalwarts of Hindu Philosophy viz. Sri Ramakrishna Paramhansa Dev and Swami Vivekananda who guided the Hindu world with their depth of understanding of humanity and religion, were Shaktas. Sri Thakur Gadadhar Chattopadhyaya Ramakrishna Paramahamsa (February 18, 1836 - August 16, 1886) was a Bengali saint. ... Swami Vivekananda (Bangla: স্বামী বিবেকানন্দ, Hindi: स्वामी विवेकानन्द) (whose pre-monastic name was Narendranath Dutta Bangla: নরেন্দ্রনাথ দত্ত, Hindi: नरेन्द्रनाथ दत्त) (January 12, 1863 - July 4, 1902) is considered one of the most famous and influential spiritual leaders of the Hindu religion. ...


Shaktas celebrate all festivals like Dussera/Durga Puja, Diwali/Kali Puja/Lakshmi Puja, Satya Narayan Puja, Ganesha Puja, Saraswati Puja, Kartik Puja, Janmashtami, Shivaratri, Sankranti etc. including all possible days. Shaktas never refuse to worship one or the other form of God unlike some Vaishnavites in South India. Shaktas also have diverse philosophy and rituals including Mantra/Mantrik and Tantra/Tantrik. Several Hindu rituals like putting sindoor and bindi and basically the entire attire of Hindu bride has originated from the concept of Goddess Durga. This article needs cleanup. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... DiwālÄ« or DÄ«pāvali (also transliterated Deepavali; Sanskrit: row of lights) is the Hindu Festival of Lights. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Popular image of Lakshmi In Hinduism, Lakshmi or Laxmi (Sanskrit: लक्ष्मी) is the goddess of wealth, light and fortune, as well as (secondarily) luck, beauty and fertility. ... Narayan may mean any of several things. ... Lord Ganesha In Hinduism, Ganesha (or lord of the hosts, also spelled as Ganesa and sometimes referred to as Ganapati in Marathi, Gujarati and other Indian languages) is a son of Shiva and Parvati, and the husband of Bharati, Riddhi and Siddhi. ... Saraswati, goddess of education Saraswati is the first of the three great goddesses of Hinduism, the other two being Lakshmi and Durga. ... Kaartika ( Hindi: कातिक kaatik or कार्तिक kaartik) is a month of the Hindu calendar. ... Janmashtami (जन्माष्टमी) is a celebration of the birth of Lord Krishna the eighth avatar (incarnation) of Vishnu, and every ritual in the celebration of this auspicious occasion is associated with various phases of his life, which have been immortalized in both the religious and the folk literature. ... Maha Shivratri or Shivaratri (Night of Shiva) is an Hindu festival celebrated every year on the 14th day in the Krishna Paksha of the month Phalguna in the Hindu Calendar. ... Sankranthi, or Sankranti, is a festival that signifies the beginning of the harvest season for the farmers of India. ... In Tibet, many Buddhists carve mantras into rocks as a form of devotion. ... Tantra (Sanskrit: loom), tantric yoga or tantrism is any of several esoteric traditions rooted in the religions of India. ... Tantrik is a man who is usually associated with black magic and practices of the occult. ... Sindoor is a red powder used by married Hindu women. ... Bindi is a forehead decoration; it is also a slang term for the Mumbai/Bombay dialect of Hindi, or Bambaiya Hindi. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Shakta being the oldest form has its origin in Vedas, and Puran. Durga Puran, Kalika Puran and Skanda Puran are some of the basic sources. But because of the liberal nature and the coherence and consistence amongst Shaktas; Ramayan, Mahabharat and Shrimad Bhagvat Gita also form the basic texts read and revered by Shaktas. Its is very common to see Krishna Pujan and Shiva Pujan in Shakta families. The Vedas (Sanskrit:- वेद), refers to collectively a corpus of old Indo Aryan religious literature that are considered to be revealed knowledge in Hinduism. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... We learn more of Durgas legends and myths from the Kalika Purana. ... In Hinduism, Kartikeya (also Murugan, Subrahmanya, Skanda, Kumaran, Swaminanda) is a deity born out of a magical spark created by Shiva. ... Lord Ram, Laxman, Sita and Hanuman(crouching) The Ramayana (Sanskrit: march (ayana) of Rama) is part of the Hindu smriti, written by Valmiki. ... The Mahabharata (Devanagari: महाभारत, phonetically Mahābhārata - see note), sometimes just called Bharata, is the great religious, philosophical and mythological epic of India. ... Bhagavad Gīta भगवद्गीता, composed ca the fifth - second centuries BC, is part of the epic poem Mahabharata, located in the Bhisma-Parva chapters 23–40. ... Lord Krishna revealing his Universal form to Arjuna Krishna (कृष्ण, pronounced as kŖιŞhÅ…É™, Sanskrit for black), is according to common Hindu tradition the eighth avatar of Vishnu. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Smartha sect

Smarthas have free rein to choose whichever deity they wish to worship. They usually worship five deities (pancopasana). It is a liberal and eclectic sect. Aum, a symbol of Hinduism, taken from Dancing with Siva. ...


Some prominent Smarta communities:

Iyer is the name given to a community of Brahmins (members of the priestly class / caste) of India whose members profess the advaita philosophy propounded by sri Shankaracharya and whose ancestors have had strong ties with the Tamil region,for many centuries. ... // Introduction The Mulukanadu community is a caste of Telugu speaking Vaidiki Smartha Brahmins. ... The Namboothiris are the Brahmins of Kerala. ... Kota Brahmins hail from the Kundapur and surrounding areas of Udupi district in Karnataka. ... Niyogis are a sub-sect of brahmins and are predominantly telugu speakers. ... Karhade Brahmins form one of the three major sub-castes of Maharashtrian Brahmins, the other two being Deshastha Brahmins and Konkanastha Brahmins. ... Deshastha Brahmins (Kannada: ದೇಶಸ್ತ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣರು) are a Brahmin sub-caste primarily from the Indian state of Maharashtra, but have spread throughout South India. ... Chitpavan brahmins are from the coastal belt of western Maharashtra known as Konkan. ... The Saraswat Brahmins claim descent from a Brahmin caste mentioned in ancient Hindu scriptures as inhabiting the Saraswati River valley, the geographic location of which is not known. ... The Saraswat Brahmins claim descent from a Brahmin caste mentioned in ancient Hindu scriptures as inhabiting the Saraswati River valley, the geographic location of which is not known. ...

Newer denominations

Agama Hindu Dharma

The newest and least numerous denomination are comprised of Balinese Hindus, who make up a sect of Hinduism which once flourished on the nearby island of Java until late 16th century when a vast majority of its adherents converted to Islam. Agama Hindu Dharma is the formal name of Hinduism in Indonesia. ... Map of Java Java (Indonesian, Javanese, and Sundanese: Jawa) is an island of Indonesia, and the site of its capital city, Jakarta. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Islam ▶(?) (Arabic: الإسلام al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions and the worlds second largest religion. ...


See also

Scope The article presents a comparative overview of the leading Hindu organisations of India. ...

External links

  • Overview of the four divisions of Hinduism

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