FACTOID # 25: If you're tired of sitting in traffic on your way to work, move to North Dakota.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Hertfordshire" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
Hertsflag.jpg
Flag of Hertfordshire
Motto of County Council: Trust and fear not
EnglandHertfordshire.png
Geography
Status Ceremonial & Non-metropolitan county
Origin Historic
Region East of England[1]
Area
- Total
- Admin. council
Ranked 36th
1,643 km2 (634 sq mi)
Ranked 32nd
Admin HQ Hertford
ISO 3166-2 GB-HRT
ONS code 26
NUTS 3 UKH23
Demography
Population
- Total (2008 est.)
- Density
- Admin. council
Ranked 14th
1,078,400
656 /km2 (1,699/sq mi)
Ranked 6th
Ethnicity 88.8% White British
1.7% White Irish
3.2% White Other
1.6% Indian
Politics
Arms of Hertfordshire County Council
Hertfordshire County Council
http://www.hertsdirect.org/
Executive Conservative
Members of Parliament
Districts
HertfordshireNumbered.png
  1. Three Rivers
  2. Watford
  3. Hertsmere
  4. Welwyn Hatfield
  5. Broxbourne
  6. East Hertfordshire
  7. Stevenage
  8. North Hertfordshire
  9. St Albans
  10. Dacorum

Hertfordshire (pronounced /ˈhɑrfərdʃər/ or /ˈhɑrtfərdʃɪər/  ( listen)), abbreviated Herts, is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan county in the East region of England. The county town is Hertford. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... In the British Isles, a county council is a council that governs a county. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... The East of England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a List of Ceremonial counties of England by Area. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... This is a List of Administrative shire counties of England by Area, that is to say Administrative counties with a two-tier County council structure, not including Administrative counties which are Unitary Authorities. ... The ISO 3166-2 codes for the United Kingdom correspond to the nations administrative divisions. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... The Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) is a geocode standard for referencing the administrative division of countries for statistical purposes. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This is a List of Ceremonial counties of England by Population - 2002 mid-year estimates from the Office for National Statistics, unrounded figures published by the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister in the Entitlement Notification Reports for Revenue Support Grants [1]. See also: List of Administrative shire counties of... This is a list of non-metropolitan counties of England by population. ... Hertfordshire (pronounced Hartfordshire and abbreviated as Herts) is an inland county in the United Kingdom, officially part of the East of England Government region. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... (William) James Clappison (born September 14, 1956) British politician and barrister. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Daphne Barbara Follett (born 25 December 1942, Kingston, Jamaica as Daphne Barbara Hubbard) is a British politician - she is the Labour Member of Parliament for Stevenage, which she first won at the 1997 general election. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... David Michael Gauke (born October 8, 1971) is the Conservative MP for Hertfordshire South West. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Oliver Heald (born December 15, 1954), British politician and barrister, is Conservative Member of Parliament for Hertfordshire North East. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Peter Bruce Lilley (born August 23, 1943, Hayes, Kent, England, educated at Dulwich College and Clare College, Cambridge) is a British Conservative Party politician who has been a Member of Parliament MP since 1983. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Anne Margaret Main (born Cardiff) is the Conservative MP for St Albans. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Michael Alan Penning (b. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Mark Michael Prisk (born 12 June 1962, Cornwall) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Grant Shapps (born September 14, 1968, Hertfordshire) is the Conservative Member of Parliament for Welwyn Hatfield in the United Kingdom, winning the seat in the 2005 election on 5 May 2005. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Charles Ashley Rupert Walker (born 11 September 1967) is a Conservative politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Claire Margaret Ward (born 9 May 1972) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Three Rivers is a local government district in Hertfordshire, England. ... For other uses, see Watford (disambiguation). ... Welwyn Hatfield is a local government district in southern Hertfordshire, England. ... Broxbourne is a local government district and borough in Hertfordshire, England. ... East Hertfordshire is a local government district in Hertfordshire, England. ... For other uses see Stevenage (disambiguation) Stevenage is a town and district in Hertfordshire, England. ... North Hertfordshire is a local government district in Hertfordshire, England. ... The City and District of St Albans is a local government district, in Hertfordshire, England. ... This is an article about The Borough of Dacorum. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... The traditional counties as usually portrayed. ... The East of England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ...


The county is one of the Home Counties and lies inland, bordered by Greater London, Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire (the unitary authorities of Luton and Central Bedfordshire), Cambridgeshire and Essex. Hertfordshire is well known as being the birthplace of Pope Adrian IV, the only pope ever from the British Isles. Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ... Bedfordshire (abbreviated Beds. ... For other uses, see Luton (disambiguation). ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... For other meanings of Essex, see Essex (disambiguation). ... Pope Adrian IV (c. ...

Contents

History

Hertfordshire was originally the area assigned to a fortress constructed at Hertford under the rule of Edward the Elder in 913. The name Hertford is derived from the Anglo-Saxon heort ford, meaning deer crossing (of a watercourse). The name Hertfordshire first appears in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle in 1011. Deer feature prominently in many county emblems. Edward the Elder (Old English: Ä’adweard se Ieldra) (c. ... Old English redirects here. ... This article is about the ruminant animal. ... The initial page of the Peterborough Chronicle. ...


There is evidence of human beings living in Hertfordshire since the Middle Stone Age. It was first farmed during the Neolithic period and permanent habitation appeared at the beginning of the Bronze Age. This was followed by tribes settling in the area during the Iron Age. Homo sapiens redirects here. ... The Mesolithic (Greek mesos=middle and lithos=stone or the Middle Stone Age) is the period between the Paleolithic and Neolithic periods. ... The Neolithic, (Greek neos=new, lithos=stone, or New Stone Age) was a period in the development of human technology that is traditionally the last part of the Stone Age. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland In archaeology, the Iron Age is the stage in the development of any people where the use of iron implements as tools and weapons is preeminent. ...


Following the Roman conquest of Britain in AD 43, Hertfordshire adapted quickly to the Roman way of life; one of the new towns, Verulamium, became the third largest town in Roman Britain. After the Romans left Britain, the Anglo-Saxons occupied the area, creating their own towns, including the county town of Hertford. Britain was the target of invasion by forces of the Roman Republic and Roman Empire several times during its history. ... Events The Roman conquest of Britain begins with the Battle of Medway. ... Remains of the city walls Verulamium was the third largest city in Roman Britain. ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ...


The Norman conquest in 1066 reached its climax at Berkhamsted where William the Conqueror accepted the final Saxon surrender. After the Norman conquest, Hertfordshire was used for some of the new Norman castles at Bishop's Stortford and at the royal residence of Berkhamsted. Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... , Berkhamsted is a historic town of some 19,000 people. ... William I ( 1027 – September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. ... , Bishops Stortford is a market town in east Hertfordshire, England, just touching the county boundary with Essex. ... , Berkhamsted is a historic town of some 19,000 people. ...


The Domesday Book recorded the county as having nine hundreds. Tring and Danais became one, Dacorum, from (Danis Corum or Danish rule harking back to a Viking not Saxon past). The other seven were Braughing, Broadwater, Cashio, Edwinstree, Hertford, Hitchin and Odsey. A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... A hundred is a geographic division used in England, Denmark, South Australia and some parts of the USA, Germany, Sweden (and todays Finland) and Norway, which historically was used to divide a larger region into smaller administrative units. ... Map sources for Tring at grid reference SP924117 Tring is a small market town in the Chiltern Hills in Hertfordshire, England with a population of 13,000. ... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Saxon (disambiguation). ... Braughing is a village in East Hertfordshire, England, between the rivers Quin and Rib. ...


As London grew, Hertfordshire became conveniently close to the English capital; much of the area was owned by the nobility and aristocracy, this patronage helped to boost the local economy. However, the greatest boost to Hertfordshire came during the Industrial Revolution, after which the population rose dramatically. In 1903, Letchworth became the world's first garden city and Stevenage became the first town to redevelop under the New Towns Act 1946. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ... Aristocrat redirects here. ... ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... , Letchworth Garden City, more commonly Letchworth, is a town in Hertfordshire, England. ... Ebenezer Howards 3 magnets diagram which addressed the question Where will the people go?, the choices being Town, Country or Town-Country The garden city movement is an approach to urban planning that was founded in 1898 by Ebenezer Howard in England. ... For other uses see Stevenage (disambiguation) Stevenage is a town and district in Hertfordshire, England. ... In 1945 Lord Reith was appointed as chair of the government sponsored New Towns Committee. ...


From the 1920s until the late 1980s, the town of Borehamwood was home to one of the major British film studio complexes, including the MGM-British Studios. Many well-known films were made here including the first three Star Wars movies (IV, V, & VI). The studios generally used the name of Elstree (the adjoining village). In more recent times, Elstree has had the likes of Big Brother UK and Who Wants To Be A Millionaire? filmed there, whilst EastEnders is also filmed at the studios. Also Hertfordshire has seen development in other film studio complexes, Leavesden Film Studios were developed on the Leavesden Aerodome site. The Harry Potter series was filmed at the studios, whilst the 1996 James Bond film GoldenEye was also filmed there.[2] List of 1920s films Films released in the 1920s include: The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923) Metropolis (1927) ok yeash your gay this site sucks! Other lists of movies List of years in film in the 1920s 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 Decades in Film... The decade of the 1980s in film involved many significant films. ... , Borehamwood (sometimes referred to as Boreham Wood) is a town in southern Hertfordshire, just north of London. ... A film studio is a controlled environment for the making of a film. ... Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) established a British operation, initially, at Denham Film Studios in 1936. ... This article is about the series. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... Movie poster Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back is the sequel to the first released Star Wars movie, and the second film released in the original trilogy. ... Movie poster Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, is a science fiction film that debuted in 1983, and re-released with changes in 1997 and 2004. ... Elstree is a small village in Hertsmere borough of Hertfordshire on the A5, north of London. ... Big Brother is a reality show shown on Channel 4 in which a number of contestants live in an isolated house trying to avoid being evicted by the public with the aim of winning a large cash prize at the end of the run. ... For other uses, see Who Wants to Be a Millionaire (disambiguation). ... Albert Square in the 1980s. ... A film studio is a controlled environment for the making of a film. ... Leavesden Film Studios is a film and media complex constructed on the site of the former Rolls Royce factory at Leavesden Aerodrome, which was an important centre of aircraft production during World War II. It is situated approximately 20 miles northwest of central London near the town of Watford. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... For other uses, see Goldeneye (disambiguation). ...


On 17 October 2000, the Hatfield rail crash killed four people with 170 injured. The crash exposed the shortcomings of Railtrack, which consequently saw speed restrictions and major track replacement. On 10 May 2002, the second of the Potters Bar rail accidents occurred killing seven people; the train was at high speed when it derailed and flipped into the air when one of the carriage's slid along the platform where it came to rest. In early December 2005 the 2005 Hemel Hempstead fuel depot explosions occurred at the Hertfordshire Oil Storage Terminal. The Hatfield rail crash was a railway accident that occurred on 17 October 2000, at Hatfield, Hertfordshire, UK. A Great North Eastern Railway Intercity train bound for Leeds had left London Kings Cross at 1210 local time. ... For the generic term, see rail tracks. ... There have been two or more railway accidents in Potters Bar, a town in Hertfordshire, United Kingdom, just to the north of Greater London. ... Image of the explosion from Sky News. ... The Hertfordshire Oil Storage Terminal, known locally as the Buncefield oil depot, is an oil depot located on the edge of Hemel Hempstead (Grid reference TL087084) to the north of London in the United Kingdom. ...


In 2012, the town of Waltham Cross, within the borough of Broxbourne, will host the canoe and kayak slalom events of the 2012 Summer Olympic Games. Waltham Cross is the most south-easterly town in Hertfordshire, England. ... Broxbourne is a local government district and borough in Hertfordshire, England. ... The venue for the slalom canoeing and slalom kayaking for the 2012 Summer Olympics will be built at Broxbourne in Hertfordshire. ... The 2012 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXX Olympiad, will be held in London, United Kingdom from 27 July 2012 to 12 August 2012. ...


Following a proposal put forward by The Welwyn Garden Heritage Trust, town-planner Andrés Duany has suggested that designated "Garden Villages" could be built within Hertfordshire to relieve some of the pressure for new homes, with perhaps a third Garden City to follow.[citation needed] Andrés Duany (born September 7, 1949) is a American architect and urban planner. ...

Geography

Hertfordshire is located immediately to the north of Greater London and is part of the East of England Government Office Region.[1] Much of the county is part of the London commuter belt. To the east of Hertfordshire is Essex, to the west is Buckinghamshire and to the north are Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire. Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... The East of England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity in England. ... Commuters from East Anglia arrive at Londons Liverpool Street station The London commuter belt is the metropolitan area surrounding London from which it is possible to commute to work in the capital. ... For other meanings of Essex, see Essex (disambiguation). ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ... Bedfordshire (abbreviated Beds. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ...


The county's boundaries were fixed by the Counties (Detached Parts) Act 1844 which eliminated exclaves. They were amended when, in 1965 under the London Government Act 1963, East Barnet Urban District and Barnet Urban District were abolished and their area was transferred to Greater London to form part of the present-day London Borough of Barnet. At the same time the Potters Bar Urban District of Middlesex was transferred to Hertfordshire. The Counties (Detached Parts) Act 1844 (7 & 8 Vict. ... D is Bs exclave, but is not an enclave. ... The London Government Act 1963 was an Act of the UK parliament which led to the official recognition of the conurbation known as Greater London. ... Arms of the former East Barnet Urban District Council East Barnet is a place in the London Borough of Barnet. ... High Barnet or Chipping Barnet is a place in the London Borough of Barnet. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... The London Borough of Barnet ( ) is a London borough in North London and forms part of Outer London. ... Location within the British Isles Potters Bar is a town in Hertfordshire, England, just north of London. ... The Middlesex Guildhall at Westminster Middlesex is one of the 39 historic counties of England and was the second smallest (after Rutland). ...


The highest point in the county is 803 feet (245 m) above sea level, a quarter mile (400 m) from the village of Hastoe near Tring.[citation needed] Map sources for Tring at grid reference SP924117 Tring is a small market town in the Chiltern Hills in Hertfordshire, England with a population of 13,000. ...


As part of a 2002 marketing campaign, the plant conservation charity Plantlife chose the Pasqueflower as Hertfordshire's county flower.[citation needed] Binomial name Pulsatilla vulgaris L. Pulsatilla vulgaris (Pasque Flower or Common Pasque flower) belongs to the Buttercup family (Ranunculaceae), native to western, central and southern Europe. ... A county flower is a flowering plant chosen to symbolise a county. ...

Geology

The rocks of Hertfordshire belong to the great shallow syncline known as the London Basin. The beds dip in a south-easterly direction towards the syncline's lowest point roughly under the River Thames. The most important formations are the Cretaceous Chalk, exposed as the high ground in the north and west of the county, forming the Chiltern Hills and the younger Palaeocene, Reading Beds and Eocene, London Clay which occupy the remaining southern part. The eastern half of the county was covered by glaciers during the Ice Age and has a superficial layer of glacial boulder clays. The rocks of the English county of Hertfordshire belong to the great shallow syncline known as the London basin, the beds dip in a south-easterly direction towards the synclines lowest point roughly under the River Thames. ... Road Cut near Ft. ... This article is about the River Thames in southern England. ... // The Cretaceous Period (pronounced ) is one of the major divisions of the geologic timescale, reaching from the end of the Jurassic Period (i. ... For other uses, see Chalk (disambiguation). ... The Chiltern Hills are a chalk escarpment in south east England. ... The Paleocene epoch (65-56 MYA) (early dawn of the recent) is the first geologic epoch of the Palaeogene period in the modern Cenozoic era. ... The Woolwich-and-Reading Beds, in geology, are a series of argillaceous and sandy deposits of lower Eocene age found in the London and Hampshire basins. ... hfajhfiudshfas == == == --24. ... The London Clay is a marine deposit which is well known for the fossils it contains. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... Boulder clay in geology, is a deposit of clay, often full of boulders, which is formed in and beneath glaciers and ice-sheets wherever they are found, but is in a special sense the typical deposit of the Glacial Period in northern Europe and America. ...

Natural resources and environment

Despite the spread of built areas, much of the county is given over to agriculture. One product, now largely defunct, was water-cress, based in Hemel Hempstead and Berkhamsted supported by reliable, clean chalk rivers. , Berkhamsted is a historic town of some 19,000 people. ...


Some quarrying of sand and gravel occurs in the St. Albans area. In the past, clay has supplied local brick-making and still does in Bovingdon, just south-west of Hemel Hempstead. The chalk that is the bedrock of much of the county provides an aquifer that feeds streams and is also exploited to provide water supplies for much of the county and beyond. Chalk has also been used as a building material and, once fired, the resultant lime was spread on agricultural land to improve fertility. The mining of chalk since the early 18th century has left unrecorded underground galleries that occasionally collapse unexpectedly and endanger buildings[3]. For other uses, see Quarry (disambiguation). ... Bovingdon Bovingdon is a large village in the Chiltern Hills, in Hertfordshire, England, close to the town of Hemel Hempstead and within the local authority area of Dacorum. ... An aquifer is an underground layer of water-bearing permeable rock or unconsolidated materials (gravel, sand, silt, or clay) from which groundwater can be usefully extracted using a water well. ...


Fresh water is supplied to London from Ware, using the New River built by Hugh Myddleton and opened in 1613. Local rivers, although small, supported developing industries such as paper production at Nash Mills. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Ware (disambiguation). ... There are also other rivers called the New River New Gauge where water leaves the River Lea at the start of the New River The New River is a man-made waterway in England, opened in 1613 to supply London with fresh drinking water. ... Statue of Sir Hugh Myddleton near the terminus of the New River Sir Hugh Myddleton (1560-10 December 1631) was a Welsh goldsmith, clothmaker, banker, entrepreneur, mine-owner and self-taught engineer. ... Nash Mills, originally a corn-mill recorded in Domesday and belonging in the Middle Ages to the Abbey of St Albans, was purchased in 1811 by John Dickinson. ...


Hertfordshire affords habitat for a variety of flora and fauna. One bird common in the shire is the Royston Crow, which is the eponymous name of the regional newspaper, the Royston Crow published in Royston. This article is about Royston, Hertfordshire. ...

Urban areas

Economy

This is a chart of trend of regional gross value added of Hertfordshire at current basic prices published (pp.240–253) by Office for National Statistics with figures in millions of British Pounds Sterling. This is a list of settlements in the ceremonial county of Hertfordshire, England. ... , Berkhamsted is a historic town of some 19,000 people. ... , Bishops Stortford is a market town in east Hertfordshire, England, just touching the county boundary with Essex. ... , Borehamwood (sometimes referred to as Boreham Wood) is a town in southern Hertfordshire, just north of London. ... Broxbourne is a commuter town in the Broxbourne borough of Hertfordshire in the East of England. ... , Buntingford is a small market town in the district of East Hertfordshire, in the county of Hertfordshire, England. ... Bushey (population 24,000) is a town in the Hertsmere borough of Hertfordshire in the South East of England. ... Statistics Population: 51,998 (Census 2001) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TL358021 Administration District: Broxbourne Shire county: Hertfordshire Region: East of England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Hertfordshire Historic county: Hertfordshire Services Police force: Hertfordshire Constabulary Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: East of England Post... , Harpenden is a town in the City and District of St Albans of Hertfordshire in the South East of England. ... Arms of the former Hatfield Rural District Council Hatfield, originally Bishops Hatfield, is in the Welwyn Hatfield district of Hertfordshire, in the south of England. ... , Letchworth Garden City, more commonly Letchworth, is a town in Hertfordshire, England. ... Darkes Lane, Potters Bar, looking north towards the railway bridge Potters Bar is a town in the Hertsmere borough of Hertfordshire, United Kingdom,[2] located 16 miles (25 km) directly north of London. ... , Rickmansworth is a town in the Three Rivers district of Hertfordshire, England, 4¼ miles (7km) west of Watford. ... This article is about Royston, Hertfordshire. ... For other uses see Stevenage (disambiguation) Stevenage is a town and district in Hertfordshire, England. ... , St Albans is the main urban area of the City and District of St Albans in southern Hertfordshire, England, around 22 miles (35 km) north of central London. ... Map sources for Tring at grid reference SP924117 Tring is a small market town in the Chiltern Hills in Hertfordshire, England with a population of 13,000. ... For other uses, see Ware (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Watford (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Welwyn. ... This page is about Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire, England. ... High Barnet or Chipping Barnet is a town in the London Borough of Barnet. ... Enfield Town is a town in the London Borough of Enfield. ... Harlow is a new town and local government district in Essex, England. ... For other uses, see Luton (disambiguation). ... , Milton Keynes ( ; IPA ) is a large town in South East England, about 45 miles (75 km) north-west of London. ... For other uses, see Stanmore (disambiguation). ...

Year Regional Gross Value Added[notes 1] Agriculture[notes 2] Industry[notes 3] Services[notes 4]
1995 11,742 96 3,292 8,354
2000 18,370 77 4,138 14,155
2003 20,937 82 4,348 16,507

Hertfordshire has headquarters of many large well-known UK companies. Hemel Hempstead is home to DSG International. Tesco are based in Cheshunt. Pure Digital the DAB radio maker is based in Kings Langley. JD Wetherspoon is in Watford. Comet and Skanska are in Rickmansworth, whilst GlaxoSmithKline has plants in Ware and Stevenage. Hatfield used to be connected with the aircraft industry, as it was where de Havilland developed the world's first commercial jet liner, the Comet. Now the site is a business park and new campus for the University of Hertfordshire. This major new employment site is home to, among others, T-Mobile, Computacenter and Ocado. A subsidiary of BAE Systems, EADS and Finmeccanica in Stevenage, MBDA, develops missiles. In the same town EADS Astrium produces satellites. The National Pharmacy Association (NPA), the trade association for all of the UK's community pharmacies, is based in St. Albans. The United Kingdom based company DSG international plc (aka DSGi), formerly Dixons Stores Group plc, is one of the largest consumer electronics retailers in Europe. ... , For other uses, see Tesco (disambiguation). ... Statistics Population: 51,998 (Census 2001) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TL358021 Administration District: Broxbourne Shire county: Hertfordshire Region: East of England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Hertfordshire Historic county: Hertfordshire Services Police force: Hertfordshire Constabulary Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: East of England Post... Pure Digital is a British consumer electronics company, based in Kings Langley, Hertfordshire. ... Countries with DAB, DAB+ or DMB broadcasts. ... Kings Langley is a village in the borough of Dacorum in the county of Hertfordshire, England on the southern edge of the Chiltern Hills. ... The Moon Under Water in Hounslow J. D. Wetherspoon plc (LSE: JDW) (commonly referred to as Wetherspoons or spoons) is a British pub chain founded by Tim Martin. ... Comet, founded in 1933 by George Hollingberry in Hull as Comet Battery Stores Limited, is now a wholly owned subsidiary of KESA Electricals Plc specialising in Electrical retailing. ... Work in progress on 30 St Mary Axe, one of Skanskas most high-profile contracts. ... , Rickmansworth is a town in the Three Rivers district of Hertfordshire, England, 4¼ miles (7km) west of Watford. ... GlaxoSmithKline plc (LSE: GSK NYSE: GSK) is a United Kingdom-based pharmaceutical, biological, and healthcare company. ... For other uses, see Ware (disambiguation). ... For other uses see Stevenage (disambiguation) Stevenage is a town and district in Hertfordshire, England. ... For other uses, see De Havilland (disambiguation). ... Comet Hale-Bopp Comet West For other uses, see Comet (disambiguation). ... The University of Hertfordshire is a modern university based largely in Hatfield, in the county of Hertfordshire, England, from which the university takes its name. ... T-Mobile logo T-Mobile is a multinational mobile phone operator. ... Computacenter plc is a computer services company operating in Western Europe. ... An Ocado delivery in progress Ocado is the first new brand in grocery retailing in the UK for a generation. ... , BAE Systems plc (BAE) is a British defence and aerospace company headquartered at Farnborough, England, UK, that has worldwide interests, particularly in North America through its subsidiary BAE Systems Inc. ... For other uses, see Eads. ... Finmeccanica S.p. ... For other uses see Stevenage (disambiguation) Stevenage is a town and district in Hertfordshire, England. ... MBDA is a European arms company which manufactures missiles and is the result of the 2001 merger of Aérospatiale-Matra Missiles (of EADS), Alenia Marconi Systems missile divisions and Matra BAe Dynamics. ... For other uses, see Missile (disambiguation). ... EADS Astrium, one of the three business units of EADS Space, this company being a subsidiary of EADS, is an European space manufacturer involved in the manufacture of spacecraft used for science, Earth observation and telecommunication, as well as the equipment and subsystems used therein and related ground systems. ... St Albans, St. ...


The loss of aircraft manufacture at Hatfield is just one of a number of industrial losses as companies capitalise on land values and move to regions where land is cheaper and recruitment is easier.[citation needed] Examples include Scammell, (formerly of Watford), DRG (Hemel Hempstead) and Lucas (also Hemel). In general, the land thus freed has been used for housing or service industries. Arms of the former Hatfield Rural District Council Hatfield, originally Bishops Hatfield, is in the Welwyn Hatfield district of Hertfordshire, in the south of England. ... TBO 312 Scammell Scarab - Steam Museum, Swindon. ... John Dickinson Stationery Limited is a leading British stationery company. ... Lucas Industries plc was a famous manufacturer of components for the motor industry and aerospace industry. ...

Landmarks

Below is a list of places, large and small, to visit in Hertfordshire.

Transport

Hertfordshire lies across routes between London and the North, the North-West and the Midlands and as a consequence it is well-served by road and rail routes and, in the past, by canals. Aldenham is a village in Hertfordshire, England. ... Ashridge Forest, April The Bridgewater Monument View from Bridgewater Monument to the house Ashridge is an estate and house in Hertfordshire, England; part of the land stretches into Buckinghamshire and it is close to the Bedfordshire border. ... Fonthill Abbey. ... The standard of the National Trust The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, usually known as The National Trust, is a British preservation organization. ... The momument The Bridgewater Monument (Grid ref: SP 970 131) is a tower in the Chiltern Hills in England, built in 1832 in memory of Francis Egerton, 3rd Duke of Bridgewater, the father of inland navigation. It is 108 feet tall, with 170 steps inside, designed by Sir Jeffry Wyatville... Ruinous flint walls, keepers house, castle mound in background Berkhamstead (or Berkhamsted) Castle in Hertfordshire had a leading role in English medieval history, but very little is now to be seen, the ruins having passed into the care of English Heritage. ... A de Havilland DH.104 Dove at the museum The de Havilland Aircraft Heritage Centre, formerly the Mosquito Aircraft Museum, is a volunteer run aviation museum in the English county of Hertfordshire, just north of Greater London. ... London Colney is a village in Hertfordshire, England. ... South Mimms is a location in Hertfordshire that was originally part of the traditional county of Middlesex Categories: UK geography stubs | Middlesex | Hertfordshire ... Chiswell Green is a village near St Albans, Hertfordshire with a population of approximately 2,800, in the City and District of St Albans It is situated 2 miles south of St Albans on the A405 road. ... The Royal National Rose Society is dedicated to the cultivation and appreciation of roses. ... Arms of the former Hatfield Rural District Council Hatfield, originally Bishops Hatfield, is in the Welwyn Hatfield district of Hertfordshire, in the south of England. ... The great hall Hatfield House is a country house set in a large park, the Great Park, on the eastern side of the town of Hatfield, Hertfordshire, England. ... Mill Green Watermill and Museum is in Hatfield, Hertfordshire. ... The Henry Moore Foundation is a registered charity established for education and promotion of the fine arts — in particular, to advance understanding of the works of Henry Moore. ... Much Hadham is a village in Hertfordshire, England. ... Knebworth House is a country house near Stevenage in Hertfordshire, England. ... The Magic Roundabout or Funny Roundabout in Hemel Hempstead is the familiar name given to a complex road junction also known as the Moor End roundabout. ... Royston cave is a small but absorbingly interesting artificial cave in Royston in Hertfordshire, England. ... This article is about Royston, Hertfordshire. ... , St Albans is the main urban area of the City and District of St Albans in southern Hertfordshire, England, around 22 miles (35 km) north of central London. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland In archaeology, the Iron Age is the stage in the development of any people where the use of iron implements as tools and weapons is preeminent. ... St Albans Cathedral from the west. ... Remains of the city walls Verulamium was the third largest city in Roman Britain. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Ye Olde Fighting Cocks - the view along the River Ver Thorn Olde Fighting Cocks is a public house in St Albans, Hertfordshire, which is one of several that lay claim to being the oldest in England. ... For other uses, see Ware (disambiguation). ... Shaws Corner was the home of playwright George Bernard Shaw from 1906 until his death in 1950. ... Ayot St Lawrence is a small village in Hertfordshire, between Harpenden and Welwyn. ... George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was a world-renowned Irish author. ... For other uses see Stevenage (disambiguation) Stevenage is a town and district in Hertfordshire, England. ... Below is a list of some of the new towns in the United Kingdom created under the various New Town Acts of the 20th century. ... The Six Hills, April 2004 The Six Hills are a collection of Roman barrows situated alongside the old Great North Road in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, England. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Therfield Heath is a Nature Reserve on the chalk escarpment just north of Therfield, Hertfordshire. ... Welwyn Viaduct from the ground The Welwyn Viaduct, also called Digswell Viaduct is a famous viaduct over the River Mimram and a locally important landmark. ... Rye House 1823 The Rye House Plot of 1683 was a plan to assassinate King Charles II of England and his brother (and heir to the throne) James, Duke of York. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... The Walter Rothschild Zoological Museum was once the private museum of Lionel Walter, 2nd Baron Rothschild, and is located in the grounds of the former Rothschild family home of Tring Park, Tring, Hertfordshire in the United Kingdom. ... Map sources for Tring at grid reference SP924117 Tring is a small market town in the Chiltern Hills in Hertfordshire, England with a population of 13,000. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The North may refer to: A geographical section of the world (see latitude). ... -1... The midlands of a territory are its central regions. ... For other uses, see Road (disambiguation). ... railroads redirects here. ... For other uses, see Canal (disambiguation). ...


The county has always been traversed by some of the principal roads in England, originally the A1 (Great North Road) to Yorkshire and Scotland, A5 (Watling Street) to North Wales, A6 to North West England and the A41 (Sparrows Herne turnpike) to the Midlands and now the M1, M11, A1(M) and the M25. For other uses, see Yorkshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... The modern Watling Street crossing the Medway at Rochester near the Roman and Celt crossings Watling Street is the name given to an ancient trackway in England and Wales that was first used by the Celts mainly between the modern cities of Canterbury and St Albans. ... Approximate extent of North Wales North Wales (known in some archaic texts as Northgalis) is the northernmost unofficial region of Wales, bordered to the south by Mid Wales. ... -1... The midlands of a territory are its central regions. ... The M1 motorway heading south towards junction 37 at Barnsley, South Yorkshire. ... This page is about the M11 motorway in England. ... The M25 motorway looking south between junctions 14 and 15, near Heathrow Airport. ...


Principal rail routes lie through Stevenage to Yorkshire and Scotland, and through Watford to the Midlands, north Wales, the North West and Glasgow. Lesser routes serve St. Albans (and the East Midlands) and Royston (to Cambridge and Norwich). Commuter routes supplement the through routes and the London Underground extends to Watford. For other uses see Stevenage (disambiguation) Stevenage is a town and district in Hertfordshire, England. ... For other uses, see Yorkshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Watford (disambiguation). ... The midlands of a territory are its central regions. ... This article is about the country. ... -1... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... St Albans, St. ... This article is about the region. ... This article is about Royston, Hertfordshire. ... This article is about the city in England. ... For other places with the same name, see Norwich (disambiguation). ... The London Underground is a rapid transit system that serves a large part of Greater London and some neighbouring areas of Essex, Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire. ... For other uses, see Watford (disambiguation). ...


Two international airports lie just outside the county Stansted and Luton. At Elstree, there is a busy airfield for light aircraft. London Stansted Airport (IATA: STN, ICAO: EGSS) is a large passenger airport located in the Uttlesford District of the English county of Essex about 30 miles (48 km) north-east of London. ... , London Luton Airport (IATA: LTN, ICAO: EGGW) (previously called Luton International Airport)[3] is an international airport located on the edge of the town of Luton, Bedfordshire, England approximately 30 miles (48 km) north of London. ... Elstree is a small village in Hertsmere borough of Hertfordshire on the A5, north of London. ...


The Grand Union Canal passes west Hertfordshire, through Watford, Hemel Hempstead and Berkhamsted. The canal at Braunston The Grand Union Canal is a canal in England and part of the British canal system. ... For other uses, see Watford (disambiguation). ... , Berkhamsted is a historic town of some 19,000 people. ...

Education

Hertfordshire has 26 independent schools and 73 state secondary schools. The state secondary schools are entirely comprehensive, although 7 schools in the south and southwest of the county are partially selective (see Education in Watford). All state schools have sixth forms, and there are no sixth form colleges. The tertiary colleges, each with multiple campuses, are Hertford Regional College, North Hertfordshire College, Oaklands College and West Herts College. The University of Hertfordshire is a modern university based largely in Hatfield. It has more than 23,000 students. A comprehensive school is a secondary school that does not select children on the basis of academic attainment or aptitude. ... For other uses, see Watford (disambiguation). ... England, Wales, Northern Ireland The sixth form, in the English, Welsh and Northern Irish education systems, is the term used to refer to the final two years of secondary schooling (when students are about sixteen to eighteen years of age), during which students normally prepare for their GCE A-level... A sixth form college is an educational institution in England, Wales or Northern Ireland where students aged 16 to 18 complete post-compulsary further education qualifications, such as A Levels. ... North Hertfordshire College is a medium sized further education College operating predominantly in North Hertfordshire, with 29,000 enrolments in 2005-06. ... Oaklands College is a Further education college in Hertfordshire, England in the United Kingdom. ... The University of Hertfordshire is a modern university based largely in Hatfield, in the county of Hertfordshire, England, from which the university takes its name. ... Arms of the former Hatfield Rural District Council Hatfield, originally Bishops Hatfield, is in the Welwyn Hatfield district of Hertfordshire, in the south of England. ...

Literature

Hertfordshire is the location of Jack Worthing's country house in Oscar Wilde's play The Importance of Being Earnest. For other uses, see The Importance of Being Earnest (disambiguation). ... Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ... For other uses, see The Importance of Being Earnest (disambiguation). ...


Jane Austen's novel Pride and Prejudice is primarily set in Hertfordshire. Topographical scholars place the town of Meryton either as Hertford or Hemel Hempstead, based on how far Mr Collins travels on the post from Watford, in either an easterly or westerly direction. The former location places the Bennet family home Longbourn as the town of Ware. A watercolour and pencil sketch of Jane Austen, believed to be drawn from life by her sister Cassandra (c. ... This article is about the novel. ... For other uses, see Watford (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ware (disambiguation). ...


The eponymous residence in E. M. Forster's novel, Howards End was based on Rooks Nest House just outside Stevenage. In the novel, Forster describes Hertfordshire as "England at its quietest"[4]. Howards End is a novel by E. M. Forster, first published in 1910, which tells a story of class struggle in turn-of-the-century England. ... For other uses see Stevenage (disambiguation) Stevenage is a town and district in Hertfordshire, England. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Components may not sum to totals due to rounding
  2. ^ includes hunting and forestry
  3. ^ includes energy and construction
  4. ^ includes financial intermediation services indirectly measured

References

  1. ^ a b "The East of England". East of England Regional Assembly. http://www.eera.gov.uk/category.asp?cat=390. Retrieved 2007-11-14. 
  2. ^ http://www.filmlondon.org.uk/content.asp?CategoryID=836
  3. ^ "About the chalk mines". Dacorum Borough Council. 2008. http://www.dacorum.gov.uk/default.aspx?page=5692. Retrieved 7 Feb 2009. 
  4. ^ http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext01/hoend10h.htm Gutenberg etext

Coordinates: 51°54′N 0°12′W / 51.9°N 0.2°W / 51.9; -0.2 East of England region The East of England Regional Assembly is the regional assembly for the East of England region of the United Kingdom. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
"Hertfordshire Family History File - Home Page" (251 words)
The image is from a brass plate in the parish church of St. Ippollitts, south of Hitchin in Hertfordshire.
Hertfordshire is a county north of London, one of the Home Counties adjacent to the capital.
Officially, Hertfordshire is designated to be in the south of East Anglia, the ancient territory of the East Angles and East Saxons.
Hertfordshire (81 words)
Hertfordshire is an inland county, officially part of the East of England Government region.
To the east of Hertfordshire is Essex, to the west is Buckinghamshire and to the north are Bedfordshire, Luton and Cambridgeshire.
The districts[?] of Hertfordshire are (approximately north to south):
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m