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Encyclopedia > Hermann Göring
Hermann Göring
Hermann Göring

Hermann Wilhelm Göring (also Goering or Goring in English) (January 12, 1893October 15, 1946) was an early member of the Nazi party, founder of the Gestapo, and one of the main perpetrators of Nazi Germany. He was tried for war crimes and crimes against humanity at the Nuremberg Trials in 1945-1946 and sentenced to death, but he escaped the hangman by committing suicide in his cell, a few hours before the sentence was to be carried out. The copyright status of this vintage image is undetermined; it may still be copyrighted. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1893 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... October 15 is the 288th day of the year (289th in Leap years). ... 1946 was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The Nazi party used a right-facing swastika as their symbol and the red and black colors were said to represent Blut und Boden (blood and soil). ... The Gestapo was the official secret police force of Nazi Germany. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... This article is in need of attention. ... The Nuremberg Trials is the general name for two sets of trials of Nazis involved in World War II and the Holocaust. ...

Contents

1 Göring's last days
2 In fiction
3 Books about Göring

Early life

Goering was born in Rosenheim, Bavaria to Heinrich Ernst Göring, a lawyer and colonial bureaucrat, and Franziska. Often apart from his parents, he was tutored at home before attending cadet schools at Karlsruhe and Lichterfelde. Rosenheim is a town in Bavaria (Germany) on the river Inn. ... With an area of 70,553 km² (27,241 square miles) and 12. ... A lawyer is a person licensed by the state to advise clients in legal matters and represent them in courts of law (and in other forms of dispute resolution). ... A bureaucrat is a member of a bureaucracy, usually within an institution of the government. ... This article refers to the general definition of cadet. ... Map of Germany showing Karlsruhe Coat of Arms of Karlsruhe Karlsruhe castle at night Karlsruhe (population 282,595 in December 2003) is a city of Germany, in the Baden-Württemberg Bundesland, located near the French-German border. ...


In World War I he was commissioned in the infantry, then became a pilot. He flew reconnaisance and bombing missions before becoming a fighter pilot. By the end of the war he was a highly decorated "ace" and commanded the famed Richthofen Squadron. Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Fighter has a number of meanings: A fighter aircraft is a warplane designed to destroy other warplanes in combat. ...


In mid-1915 Goering began his pilot training at Freiburg, and on completing the course he was posted to Jagdstaffel 5. He was soon shot down and spent most of 1916 recovering from his injuries. On his return in November 1916 he joined Jagdstaffel 26, before being given his first command. In 1917 he was awarded the Pour le Mérite. On July 7, 1918, after the death of Manfred von Richthofen, he was made commander of Jagdgeschwader Freiherr von Richthofen (Jasta 11). He finished the war as an "ace," with 22 confirmed kills. Incidentally, he was the only veteran of Jasta 11 to have never been invited to the squadron's post-war reunions. 1915 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1916 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) Events January-February January 1 -The first successful blood transfusion using blood that had been stored and cooled. ... 1917 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Pour le Mérite, known informally as the Blue Max, was Germanys highest military order awarded during World War I. The award was first founded in 1740, named in French, the language of the royal court, for merit. ... July 7 is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 177 days remaining. ... 1918 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Manfred Albrecht Freiherr von Richthofen (May 2, 1892 – April 21, 1918) was a German pilot and is still regarded today as the ace of aces. He was a very successful fighter pilot, military leader and flying ace who won 80 air combats during World War I. Richthofen was known as... A flying ace is a military aviator who has shot down five or more enemy aircraft. ...


In June 1917, after a lengthy dogfight, Göring shot down a novice Australian pilot named Frank Slee. The battle is recounted flamboyantly in The Rise and Fall of Hermann Goering. Göring landed and met with the Australian, and presented Slee with his Iron Cross. Years after, Slee gave Göring's Iron Cross to a friend, who later died on the beaches of Normandy on D-Day. The Iron Cross (German: Eisernes Kreuz) is a military decoration of Germany which was established by King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia and first awarded on 10 March 1813. ... The Iron Cross (German: Eisernes Kreuz) is a military decoration of Germany which was established by King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia and first awarded on 10 March 1813. ... Normandy is a geographical region in northern France. ... Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ...


He remained in flying after the war, worked briefly at Fokker, tried "barnstorming," and in 1920 he joined Svenska Lufttrafik. He was also listed on the officer rolls of the Reichswehr, the post-World War I peacetime army of Germany, and by 1933 had risen to the rank of Generalmajor. He was made a Generalleutnant in 1935 and then a General in the Luftwaffe (German air force) upon its founding later that year. Fokker 100 of British Midland Airways Fokker was a Dutch aircraft manufacturer named after its founder, Anthony Fokker. ... Barnstorming was a popular form of entertainment in the 1920s in which stunt pilots would perform tricks with airplanes, often in groups as a flying circus. ... 1920 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... Svenska Luftrafik was a Swedish Airline. ... The Reichswehr (literally National Defence or National Militia) formed the military organization of Germany from 1918 until 1935, when the government rebranded it as the Wehrmacht (Defence Force). ... 1933 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1935 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Luftwaffe (literally, air weapon, pronounced looft-vaaf-feh) is the air force of Germany. ...


In Stockholm he met Karin von Kantzow (née Fock, 1888-1931), whom he later married. She died in 1931, and soon after he married actress Emmy Sonnemann. The Stockholm City Hall Stockholm  listen is the capital and the largest city of Sweden. ... 1888 is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... 1931 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1931 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Emmy Sonnemann, born on March 24, 1893 in Hamburg, Germany, dead on June 8, 1973 in Munich, German actress. ...


Political career

As early as 1922, Göring joined the Nazi Party and initially took over the SA leadership as the Oberste SA-Führer. After stepping down as the SA Commander, he was appointed an SA-Gruppenführer (Lieutenant General) and held this rank on the SA rolls until 1945. 1922 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Nazi swastika symbol The National Socialist German Workers Party ( German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei), better known as the NSDAP or the Nazi Party was a political party that was led to power in Germany by Adolf Hitler in 1933. ... Hitler addressing SA members in the late 1920s The Sturmabteilung (SA, German for Storm Division and is usually translated as stormtroops or stormtroopers) functioned as a paramilitary organisation of the NSDAP – the German Nazi party. ... Hermann Göring as the SA Commander in 1923 Oberste SA-Führer was a title used by the Sturmabteilung from 1920 to 1945. ... SS-Gruppenführer collar patch SA-Gruppenführer rank insignia Volkssturm Gruppenführer insignia Gruppenführer was an early paramilitary rank of the Nazi Party, first created in 1925 as a senior rank of the SA. SA Rank Translated as “Group Leader”, a Gruppenführer was typically in charge of large numbers of SA units...


Having been a member of the Reichstag since 1928, he became the parliament's president from 1932 to 1933, and was one of the key figures in the process of Gleichschaltung that established the Nazi dictatorship. The term Reichstag [ɹaɪʃtag] (in English: Imperial Diet) is a composition of German Reich (Empire) and tag (which does not mean day here, but is a derivate of the verb tagen, which means assembling for debate). ... 1928 was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... 1932 is a leap year starting on a Friday. ... 1933 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... The German word Gleichschaltung (literally synchronising, synchronization) is used in a political sense to describe the process by which the Nazi regime successively established a system of totalitarian control over the individual, and tight coordination over all aspects of society and commerce. ... Benito Mussolini and Adolf Hitler were two of the 20th centurys most notorious dictators. ...


In its early years, he served as minister in various key positions at both the Reich level and in Prussia, being responsible for the economy as well as the build-up of the German military in preparation for the war. Among others, he was appointed Reichsluftfahrtminister in 1935, head of the Luftwaffe. In 1939, he became the first Luftwaffe Field Marshall (Generalfeldmarshal) and by a decree on 29 June 1941, Hitler appointed Göring his formal successor and promoted him to the rank of Reichsmarshall, the highest military rank of the Greater German Reich. Reichsmarshall was a special rank intended for Göring and which made him senior to all Army and Air Force Field Marshals. The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Prussia, 1701-1918 The word Prussia (German: Preußen or Preussen, Polish: Prusy, Lithuanian: Prūsai, Latin: Borussia) has had various (often contradictory) meanings: The land of the Baltic Prussians (in what is now parts of southern Lithuania, the Kaliningrad exclave of Russia and... 1939 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Note: This article is about the military usage of the word marshal. For other usages, see the end of this article. ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... 1941 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler (April 20, 1889 – April 30, 1945, standard German pronunciation in the IPA) was the Führer (leader) of the National Socialist German Workers Party (Nazi Party) and of Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945. ...


The Reichstag Fire, according to the Nuremberg testimony of General Franz Halder, was the handiwork of Göring, not of 'Communist instigators.' "At a luncheon on the birthday of Hitler in 1942..." Halder testifies, "[Göring said]...The only one who really knows about the Reichstag is I, because I set it on fire!" "With that," said Halder, "he slapped his thigh with the flat of his hand." The Reichstag fire was a pivotal event in the establishment of Nazi Germany. ... The Nuremberg Trials is the general name for two sets of trials of Nazis involved in World War II and the Holocaust. ... Field Marshal Wilhelm Keitel, Adolf Hitler, a General Staff officer and General Franz Halder Franz Ritter von Halder (June 30, 1884- April 2, 1972) was a German General and the head of the Army General Staff from 1938 until September 1942, when he was dismissed after frequent disagreements with Adolf... Communism - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ...


The following quotation is held to be oft-stated by Göring: "When I hear the word culture, I reach for my Browning". Whether he used this phrase often or not, he did not originate it. The quote comes from German playwright Hanns Johst's play Schlageter, "Wenn ich Kultur höre ... entsichere ich meinen Browning," "Whenever I hear of culture... I release the safety-catch of my Browning!" (Act 1, Scene 1). Nor was Göring the only Nazi official to use this phrase: Rudolf Hess used it as well. Browning Arms Company was founded in Utah in 1927. ... A playwright is an author of plays for performance in the theater. ... Hanns Johst (July 8, 1890 - November 23, 1978) was a German playwright and Nazi Poet Laureate. ... Kultur is the German concept and influence of a particular Germanic attitude, spirit, temperament, ambition, achievement, and purpose. ... Rudolf Hess Rudolf Hess should not be confused with another prominent Nazi, Rudolf Höß (also spelled Höss or Hoess. ...

Göring at Nuremberg
Göring at Nuremberg

Göring was known for his extravagant tastes and garish clothing. As the only major Nazi with a prominent World War I record, he was a key connection between the former corporal Hitler and the traditional military elite. Göring, married to a Swedish baroness, exulted in aristocratic trappings and built up a considerable estate, Karinhall, in Prussia during the Nazi period. Handsome and athletic in his youth, a painful injury sustained during the Beer Hall Putsch left Göring dependent on narcotic painkillers, particularly morphine, and contributed to his later obesity. Hermann Goering in the witness box at the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg The copyright status of this vintage image is undetermined; it may still be copyrighted. ... Hermann Goering in the witness box at the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg The copyright status of this vintage image is undetermined; it may still be copyrighted. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Etymology The Ancient Greek term Aristocracy meant a system of government with rule by the best. This is the first definition given in most dictionaries. ... The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Prussia, 1701-1918 The word Prussia (German: Preußen or Preussen, Polish: Prusy, Lithuanian: Prūsai, Latin: Borussia) has had various (often contradictory) meanings: The land of the Baltic Prussians (in what is now parts of southern Lithuania, the Kaliningrad exclave of Russia and... The Beer Hall Putsch occurred in the evening of Thursday, November 8 to early afternoon of Friday, November 9, 1923 when the nascent Nazi partys Führer Adolf Hitler, the popular World War I General Erich Ludendorff, and other leaders of the Kampfbund, unsuccessfully tried to gain power in Munich... The term narcotic, derived from the Greek word for stupor, originally referred to a variety of substances that induced sleep (such state is narcosis). ... For other uses of painkiller, see painkiller (disambiguation) An analgesic (colloquially known as painkiller) is any member of the diverse group of drugs used to relieve pain. ... Morphine (INN), the principal active agent in opium, is a powerful opioid analgesic drug. ...


World War II

Once World War II started, Göring became the driving force behind the failed attempt to force Britain's surrender (or at least acquiescence) by air battle in the Battle of Britain. After that campaign he lost much of his influence in the Nazi hierarchy, exacerbated by the Luftwaffe's failings in Russia and against the Allied bomber raids. His reputation for extravagance made him particularly unpopular as ordinary Germans began to suffer deprivations. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (over 11 miles) into the air. ... A major campaign of World War II, the Battle of Britain is the name for the attempt by Germanys Luftwaffe to gain control of British airspace and destroy the Royal Air Force (RAF). ...


Göring was the only WWII recipient of the Grand Cross of the Iron Cross, awarded to him by Hitler for his leadership of the Luftwaffe during the conquest of France and the Low Countries. He avidly pursued additional decorations, in marked contrast to Hitler, who wore only what he earned in WWI. The Grand Cross of the Iron Cross was an award intended for senior Generals of the German Army and dated back to 1870. ...


Göring also sponsored a ground combat unit, the eponymous Hermann Göring Division, which fought on various fronts with mixed success. The Hermann Göring Division (Division Hermann Göring in German; sometimes spelled Goering in English publications, or abbreviated to HG) was a Luftwaffe combat formation. ...


Göring was also placed in charge of exploiting the vast industrial resources captured during the war, particularly in the Soviet Union. This proved to be an almost total disaster and little of the available potential was effectively harnessed for the service of the German military machine. However, Göring became notorious among the Nazi elite for pilfering art and other valuables from occupied Europe. Great Museums in the World (Louvre, Metropolitan Museum, MoMA, Picasso …) CGFA: A Virtual Art Museum Very large website with good reproduction quality scans of thousands of paintings Art-Atlas. ...


Göring was the highest figure in the Nazi Hierarchy who had authorized on paper the 'final solution of the Jewish Question', when he issued a memo to SS Obergruppenführer Reinhard Heydrich to organize the practical details (which culminated in the Wannsee Conference). It is almost certain however that Hitler issued a verbal order to Göring in the fall of 1941 to this effect. The Final Solution of the Jewish Question (German Endlösung der Judenfrage) refers to the German Nazis plan to address the Jewish problem through systematic relocation and later extermination through genocide during World War II. The term was coined by Adolf Eichmann, a top Nazi official who supervised the genocidal campaign. ... For other uses of the abbreviation SS, see SS (disambiguation) The Schutzstaffel (Protective Squadron), or SS, was a large paramilitary organization that belonged to the Nazi party. ... Reinhard Heydrich Reinhard Tristan Eugen Heydrich (sometimes incorrectly spelled as Reinhardt, March 7, 1904 – June 4, 1942) was an Obergruppenführer in the Nazi German paramilitary corps—the SS led by Heinrich Himmler. ... The Wannsee Conference was the discussion by a group of Nazi officials about the Final Solution of the Jewish Question (Endlösung der Judenfrage). ... 1941 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In his political testament just before his own suicide, Hitler expelled Göring and Heinrich Himmler from the party and from all offices of State for disloyalty to him, for negotiating with the enemy without his knowledge and against his wishes, and for illegally attempting to seize power in the State for themselves. This referred to a telegram which Göring sent from Berchtesgaden to Hitler in Berlin on April 23, 1945, in which he offered to take command of the Reich as Hitler's designated successor. Hitler accused Göring of high treason, stripped him of all his offices, and had him placed under arrest by the SS on April 25. The last will and testament of Adolf Hitler were dictated by Hitler to his secretary in his Berlin Führerbunker on April 29, 1945 the day he and Eva Braun married. ... Suicide (from Latin sui caedere, to kill oneself) is the act of intentionally ending ones own life; it is sometimes a noun for one who has committed, or attempted the act. ... Heinrich Himmler Heinrich Himmler (October 7, 1900 – May 23, 1945) was the commander of the German Schutzstaffel and one of the most powerful men in Nazi Germany. ... Telegraphy (from the Greek words tele = far away and grapho = write) is the long distance transmission of written messages without physical transport of letters, originally over wire. ... Berchtesgaden is a German municipality in the Bavarian Alps with a population of around 9,000. ...  Berlin? (pronounced: , German ) is the capital of Germany and its largest city, with 3,426,000 inhabitants (as of January 2005); down from 4. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (114th in leap years). ... 1945 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... In law, treason is the crime of disloyalty to ones nation. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (116th in leap years). ...


Capture, trial and death

Göring in his cell after committing suicide by cyanide

Göring surrendered to American troops on May 8/9, 1945 in Austria and was the highest ranking Nazi official brought before the Nuremberg Trials. Though he defended himself vigorously, he was sentenced to death; the judgement stated that "his guilt is unique in its enormity". One of his last acts was to ask his brother Albert Göring to look after his wife and daughter. Defying the sentence imposed by his captors, he committed suicide with a cyanide capsule the night before he was supposed to be hanged. Where Göring obtained the cyanide, and how he had managed to hide it during his entire imprisonment at Nuremberg, remains unknown. In the 1950s, Erich von dem Bach would claim that he had given Göring the cyanide shortly before Göring's death; however, this claim is most often dismissed. Modern day theories speculate that Göring had befriended a U.S. Army Lieutenant, stationed at the Nuremberg Trials, who had aided Göring in obtaining cyanide which had most likely been hidden in Göring's personal effects confiscated by the Army. In 2005, a retired Army private, Herbert Lee Stivers, claimed that he delivered "medicine" hidden inside a fountain pen to Göring from a German woman he had met and flirted with. Stivers served in the US 1st Infantry Division's 26th Regiment, who formed the honor guard for the Nuremberg Trials. Stivers claims to have been unaware of what the "medicine" he delivered actually was until after Göring's death. After his suicide, Hermann Göring was cremated and his ashes were scattered into the Isar river. nuernberg war tribunal photo pub domain File links The following pages link to this file: Hermann Göring ... nuernberg war tribunal photo pub domain File links The following pages link to this file: Hermann Göring ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (129th in leap years). ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (130th in leap years). ... 1945 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Nuremberg Trials is the general name for two sets of trials of Nazis involved in World War II and the Holocaust. ... Albert Göring Albert Göring was born in 1900 to Heinrich Ernst Göring and his wife Franziska. ... Suicide (from Latin sui caedere, to kill oneself) is the act of intentionally ending ones own life; it is sometimes a noun for one who has committed, or attempted the act. ... A cyanide is any chemical compound that contains the group C≡N, with the carbon atom triple bonded to the nitrogen atom. ... Hanging to Music. ... Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Events and trends The 1950s in Western society was marked with a sharp rise in the economy for the first time in almost 30 years and return to the 1920s-type consumer society built on credit and boom-times, as well as the... Erich von dem Bach, born Erich von Zelewski and also known as Erich von dem Bach-Zelewski (March 1, 1899 - March 8, 1972) was a Nazi official and member of the SS with a rank of SS-Obergruppenführer. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Patch of the United States Army 1st Infantry Division. ... Cremation is the practice of disposing of a corpse by burning. ... The Isar is a river in Bavaria, Germany. ...


Göring's last days

Göring's last days were spent with Gustave Gilbert, a German-speaking intelligence officer and psychologist who was granted free access by the Allies to all the prisoners held in the Nuremberg jail. Gilbert kept a journal of his observations of the proceedings and his conversations with the prisoners, which he later published in the book Nuremberg Diary. The following quotation was a part of a conversation Gilbert held with a dejected Göring in his cell on the evening of 18 April 1946, as the trials were halted for a three-day Easter recess. A psychologist is a researcher and/or a practitioner of psychology. ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... 1946 was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Easter is the most important holiday of the Christian year, observed in March, April, or May each year to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus from the dead after his death by crucifixion (see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year around AD 30-33. ...


Sweating in his cell in the evening, Göring was defensive and deflated and not very happy over the turn the trial was taking. He said that he had no control over the actions or the defense of the others, and that he had never been anti-Semitic himself, had not believed these atrocities, and that several Jews had offered to testify in his behalf. Later in the conversation, Gilbert recorded Göring's observations that the common people can always be manipulated into supporting and fighting wars by their political leaders: Anti-Semitism (alternatively spelled antisemitism) is hostility towards Jews (not: Semites - see the Misnomer section further on). ...

Göring: Why, of course, the people don't want war. Why would some poor slob on a farm want to risk his life in a war when the best that he can get out of it is to come back to his farm in one piece?
Naturally, the common people don't want war; neither in Russia, nor in England, nor in America, nor for that matter in Germany. That is understood. But, after all, it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy, or a fascist dictatorship, or a parliament, or a communist dictatorship.
Gilbert: There is one difference. In a democracy the people have some say in the matter through their elected representatives, and in the United States only Congress can declare wars.
Göring: Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country.

Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... A congress is a gathering of people, especially a gathering for a political purpose. ... Pacifism is opposition to the practice of war. ... Patriotism is a feeling of love and devotion to ones own homeland (patria, the land of ones fathers). ...

In fiction

In Philip José Farmer's Riverworld, a reincarnated Göring becomes a missionary for the Church of the Second Chance, a pacifist religion. Philip José Farmer (born January 26, 1918) is an American author, principally known for his science fiction and fantasy novels and short stories. ... Riverworld is a fictional universe and the setting for a series of science fiction books written by Philip José Farmer. ... Reincarnation, also called transmigration of souls, is the rebirth in another body (after physical death), of some critical part of a persons personality or spirit. ... A missionary is a propagator of religion, often an evangelist or other representative of a religious community who works among those outside of that community. ...


He was portrayed by Brian Cox in the 2000 TV movie Nuremberg, also starring Alec Baldwin and Jill Hennessy. Brian Cox as Henry II in The Devils Crown. ... 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A television movie (also TV movie, TV-movie, made-for-TV movie, etc. ... Alec Baldwin Alexander Rae Baldwin III (born April 3, 1958, in Massapequa, Long Island, New York, USA) is an American actor who is the oldest and best known of the Baldwin brothers, with brothers Daniel, Stephen and William. ... Jillian Noel Hennessy (born November 25, 1968 in Edmonton, Alberta) is a Canadian actress, best known for her television roles on Law & Order (1993-1996) and Crossing Jordan (2001-present). ...


Books about Göring

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about:
Wikimedia Commons has more media related to:
Hermann Wilhelm Göring
  • Frischauer, Willi: The Rise and Fall of Hermann Goering (Ballantine Books 1951)
  • Overy, Richard J.: Goering: The Iron Man (Routledge 1984)
  • Maser, Werner: Hitlers janusköpfiger Paladin:die politische Biographie, (German) (Berlin 2000) ISBN 38-6124-509-4
  • excerpt from Hermann Göring book "Germany Reborn" (http://www.third-reich-books.com/x-567-hermann-goering-germany-reborn.htm)


Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

Preceded by:
Hans Ulrich Klintzsche
Leader of the SA
1923
Succeeded by:
Post vacant from 1923-1925
Preceded by:
Franz von Papen
Prime Minister of Prussia
1933–1945
Succeeded by:
Prussia abolished



Hermann Göring as the SA Commander in 1923 Oberste SA-Führer was a title used by the Sturmabteilung from 1920 to 1945. ... Franz von Papen (October 29, 1879–May 2, 1969) was a German politician and diplomat associated with the Centre Party. ... The Prime Minister (Ministerpräsident) of Prussia existed in one form or another from 1792 until the dissolution of Prussia in 1947. ...

 
German Field Marshals (Generalfeldmarschall) of World War II

Werner von Blomberg | Hermann Göring | Walther von Brauchitsch | Albert Kesselring | Wilhelm Keitel | Günther von Kluge | Wilhelm Ritter von Leeb | Fedor von Bock | Wilhelm List | Erwin von Witzleben | Walther von Reichenau | Erhard Milch | Hugo Sperrle | Gerd von Rundstedt | Erwin Rommel | Georg von Küchler | Erich von Manstein | Friedrich Paulus | Ewald von Kleist | Maximilian von Weichs | Ernst Busch | Wolfram von Richthofen | Walther Model | Ferdinand Schörner | Robert Ritter von Greim Note: This article is about the military usage of the word marshal. For other usages, see the end of this article. ... Generalfeldmarschall (General Field Marshal, usually translated simply as Field Marshal, and sometimes written only as Feldmarschall) was a rank in the armies of several German states and also of the Holy Roman Empire and Austrian Empire which could be granted to active officers only in wartime. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (over 11 miles) into the air. ... Werner von Blomberg Werner Eduard Fritz von Blomberg (September 2, 1878-March 22, 1946) was a leading member of the German Army prior to World War II. Born in Stargard, Pomerania, Germany, Werner von Blomberg joined the army at a young age and attended Germanys War College in 1904. ... Walther von Brauchitsch (October 4, 1881, Berlin - October 18, 1948, Hamburg) was commander-in-chief of the Wehrmacht in the early years of World War II. Brauchitsch was commissioned in the Prussian Guard in 1900. ... Albert Kesselring (August 8, 1881 _ July 16, 1960) was a German Generalfeldmarschall who commanded Army Group C during World War II. He was nicknamed Smiling Albert or smiling Kesselring. He was born in Marktsteft, Germany, in 1881 . ... Generalfeldmarschall Wilhelm Keitel Wilhelm Bodewin Johann Gustav Keitel (September 22, 1882 - October 16, 1946) was a German Field Marshal (Generalfeldmarschall) and a senior military leader during World War II. Early life and career He was born in Helmscherode near Hanover, Germany, the son of Carl Keitel, a middle-class landowner. ... Günther von Kluge Günther von Kluge (nicknamed Hans) (October 30, 1882 - August 19, 1944), was a German military leader. ... Field Marshal Wilhelm Ritter von Leeb Wilhelm Ritter von Leeb (September 5, 1876 - April 29, 1956) commanded Germanys Seventh Military District as a lieutenant general before the rise of Hitler and the Nazi Party. ... Generalfeldmarschall Fedor von Bock Fedor von Bock (December 3, 1880 - May 4, 1945) was a German field marshal during World War II. He was born in Küstrin, Germany. ... Wilhelm List (Siegmund Wilhelm von List) (May 14, 1880 - August 17, 1971), was a German Field Marshal during World War II. During 1939 he was General Officer Commanding the German 14th Army in Poland. ... Erwin von Witzleben (December 4, 1881 - August 8, 1944) was a German Generalfeldmarschall. ... Field-Marshal Walther von Reichenau Walther von Reichenau (August 16, 1884 - January 17, 1942), German military commander, was the son of a Prussian general and joined the German Army in 1902. ... Air Marshall Erhard Milch Erhard Milch (March 30, 1892 – January 25, 1972) was an official of the Nazi government who oversaw the development of the Luftwaffe as part of the re-armament of Germany following World War I. Milch was born in Wilhelmshaven. ... Hugo Sperrle Hugo Sperrle (February 7, 1885 - April 2, 1953), was a German field marshal of the airforce Luftwaffe during World War II. He joined the German Army in 1903 and transferred to the Luftstreitkräfte (German Army Air Service) at the start of World War I, serving as an... Generalfeldmarschall Gerd von Rundstedt Karl Rudolf Gerd von Rundstedt (December 12, 1875 - February 24, 1953) was a Field Marshal of the German Army during World War II. He remains known as one of Germanys best generals, as well as for being apolitical throughout his career. ... Erwin Rommel Erwin Johannes Eugen Rommel (November 15, 1891 – October 14, 1944) was one of the most distinguished German Field Marshals and commander of the Deutsches Afrika Korps in World War II. He is also known by his nickname The Desert Fox (Wüstenfuchs). ... Field Marshal Georg von Küchler Georg Karl Friedrich Wilhelm von Küchler (May 30, 1881 _ May 25, 1968) was a German field marshal during World War II. Born in Philippsruhe castle near Hanau, Küchler led the German 18th Army in 1940 in the invasion of neutral Holland... Generalfeldmarschall Erich von Manstein Erich von Manstein (November 24, 1887–June 10, 1973) was one of the most prominent commanders of Nazi Germanys Armed Forces (Wehrmacht) during World War II. He attained the rank of Field Marshal (Generalfeldmarschall). ... Field Marshal Friedrich Paulus Friedrich Wilhelm Ernst Paulus (September 23, 1890, Breitenau –February 1, 1957, Dresden) was a German general, later promoted to field marshal, during World War II. Paulus was the son of a schoolteacher. ... Paul Ludwig Ewald von Kleist (August 8, 1881 - November 13 or 16 1954) was a leading German Field Marshal during World War II. Born into an aristocratic family in Braunfels an der Lahn, von Kleist was educated in a German military school and served as a lieutenant of hussars and... Maximilian von Weichs Maximilian Maria Joseph Karl Gabriel Lamoral Reichsfreiherr von Weichs zu Glon (12 November 1881 - 27 September 1954) was a German Generalfeldmarschall and a military leader in World War II. He was born into a noble family at Dessau, a son of an army Colonel. ... Ernst Busch (6 July 1885 - 17 July 1945) was a German field marshall during World War II. He was born in Essen-Steele, Germany, and died in a prisoner of war camp in Aldershot, England. ... Wolfram Freiherr von Richthofen (10 October 1895 - 12 July 1945) He was born in Barzdorf. ... Walther Model (pronounced modal) (January 24, 1891–April 21, 1945) was a German general, and later a Field Marshal, during World War II. He was noted for his defensive skills, and was nicknamed Hitlers fireman. Model served as an infantry officer in World War I. During the Polish and... Field Marshal Ferdinand Schörner Ferdinand Schörner (December 5, 1892 - February 7, 1973) was a German general and later field marshal during World War II. He was born in Munich, Bavaria. ... Robert Ritter von Greim Robert Ritter von Greim or Robert Greim (June 22, 1892 - May 24, 1945) was a German pilot and army officer. ...

Honorary: Eduard von Böhm-Ermolli Eduard Freiherr von Böhm-Ermolli (1856 - 1941) was an Italian-born Austrian officer during World War I who rose to the rank of Field Marshal in the Austro-Hungarian Army. ...

 
German Grand Admirals (Großadmiral) of World War II

Erich Raeder | Karl Dönitz Alternate meaning: Grand Admiral (Star Wars). ... German Grand Admiral Sleeve Insignia Grand Admiral Shoulder Insignia In the German Navy the rank of Grand Admiral (Großadmiral) was considered the highest Naval rank. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (over 11 miles) into the air. ... Erich Raeder. ... Grand Admiral Karl Dönitz. ...


 
 

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