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Encyclopedia > Henry Wilmot, 1st Earl of Rochester

Lieutenant-General Henry Wilmot, 1st Earl of Rochester (26 October 161219 February 1658) was an English Cavalier who fought for the Royalist cause during the Wars of the Three Kingdoms. is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 20 - Mathias becomes Holy Roman Emperor. ... is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 13 - Edward Sexby, who had plotted against Oliver Cromwell, dies in Tower of London February 6 - Swedish troops of Charles X Gustav of Sweden cross The Great Belt (Storebælt) in Denmark over frozen sea May 1 - Publication of Hydriotaphia, Urn Burial and The Garden of Cyrus by... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the anthem of the United Kingdom is God Save the Queen. See also Proposed English National Anthems. ... Prince Rupert of the Rhine Cavaliers was the name used by Parliamentarians for the Royalist supporters of King Charles I during the English Civil War (1642–1651). ... Prince Rupert an archetypical cavalier For other uses, see Cavalier (disambiguation). ... The Wars of the Three Kingdoms were an intertwined series of conflicts that took place in Scotland, Ireland, and England between 1639 and 1651 at a time when these countries had come under the Personal Rule of the same monarch. ...


Life and times

Wilmot's family was descended from Edward Wilmot of Witney, Oxfordshire, whose son Charles Wilmot, 1st Viscount Wilmot of Athlone, (1570/71–1644) had served with distinction in Ireland during Tyrone's Rebellion at the beginning of the seventeenth century, and was president of Connaught from 1616 until his death. In 1621, Charles had been created an Irish peer as Viscount Wilmot of Athlone. Henry Wilmot was born in 1612 as the third son of Charles, but he was the only one still alive on his father's death so he succeeded to the title. High Street in Witney. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from the Latinised form Oxonia) is a county in the South East of England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, and Warwickshire. ... Combatants Alliance of Irish Chiefs under Hugh ONeill, centred in Ulster England and allied Irish lords Commanders Hugh ONeill Hugh Roe ODonnell Earl of Essex Lord Mountjoy Strength 8,000 men in Ulster at the start of the war. ... Statistics Area: 17,713. ... The title Earl of Rochester was created twice in the Peerage of England. ...


Henry Wilmot had five years experience in the Dutch army, and was badly wounded at the siege of Breda. He joined Charles I for the Bishops' Wars (1639-1640) and served as an officer in the cavalry, sitting in the Royal Council of War and fighting in the Battle of Newburn. Combatants United Provinces Spain Commanders Maurice of Nassau Ernst von Mansfeld Ambrosio Spinola Strength 14,000 Unknown Casualties 10,000 dead, wounded, or captured Unknown {{{notes}}} The Siege of Breda was a battle of the Eighty Years War and Thirty Years War. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... The Bishops’ Wars—Bellum Episcopale—refers to two armed encounters between Charles I and the Scottish Covenanters in 1639 and 1640, which helped to set the stage for the English Civil War and the subsequent Wars of the Three Kingdoms // The Scottish Reformation in 1560 was intended to settle the... The Battle of Newburn took place in 1640 during the Bishops Wars. ...


In 1640, he was elected to the Long Parliament to represent Tamworth and took an active part in the army plot of 1641 against Parliament. He was committed to the Tower of London and expelled from the House of Commons. The Long Parliament is the name of the English Parliament called by Charles I, in 1640, following the Bishops Wars. ... Tamworth town centre Tamworth is a historic town and local government district in Staffordshire, England, located 27 km (17 miles) north-east of Birmingham city centre and 198 km (123 miles) north-west of London. ... Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is a historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ... Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups...


He distinguished himself in the First English Civil War by defeating Sir William Waller at the Battle of Roundway Down in July 1643 and at the Battle of Cropredy Bridge in June 1644. He was appointed lieutenant-general of horse in the King’s army under Prince Rupert of the Rhine, and, in June 1643, was created Baron Wilmot of Adderbury. He drank hard and was amazingly popular but he was on bad terms with some of the King's friends and advisers, including Prince Rupert and Digby and the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Sir John Culpeper. The First English Civil War (1642–1646) was the first of three wars, known as the English Civil War (or Wars). The English Civil War refers to the series of armed conflicts and political machinations which took place between Parliamentarians and Royalists from 1642 until 1652, and includes the Second... For the former governor of Mississippi, see Bill Waller. ... English Civil War battle fought near Devizes, on 13th July, 1643 Following the Battle of Lansdowne on 5th July, 1643, the same two armies faced each again at Rounday Down. ... The Battle of Cropredy Bridge was the last battle won on English soil under the command of an English King. ... Anthonis Van Dyck Prince Rupert, Count Palatine of the Rhine Rupert, Count Palatine of the Rhine, Duke of Bavaria (German: Ruprecht Pfalzgraf bei Rhein, Herzog von Bayern), commonly called Prince Rupert of the Rhine, (17 December 1619 – 19 November 1682), soldier, inventor and amateur artist in mezzotint, was a younger...


In 1644, he was reported to have said that Charles was afraid of peace and to have advised his supersession by his son, the Prince of Wales. Consequently, he was deprived of his command, and after a short imprisonment was allowed to cross over to France. Wilmot left the country and joined Queen Henrietta Maria in France. When Digby arrived in Paris in 1647, they fought a duel. Wilmot was defeated with a stab through the hand. Queen Henrietta Maria (November 25, 1609 – September 10, 1669) was Queen Consort of England, Scotland and Ireland (June 13, 1625 - January 30, 1649) through her marriage to Charles I. The U.S. state of Maryland (in Latin, Terra Mariae) was so named in her honour by Cæcilius Calvert, son...


After Charles I was executed in January 1649, Wilmot became a gentleman of the bedchamber of King Charles II. He was greatly trusted by Charles II, whose defeat at the Battle of Worcester and subsequent wanderings Wilmot shared. During this King's exile, he was one of his principal advisers, being created by him Earl of Rochester in 1652. In the interests of Charles, he visited the emperor Ferdinand III, Nicholas II, Duke of Lorraine, and Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg. In March 1655, he was in England, where he led a feeble attempt at a rising on Marston Moor, near York as part of the Sealed Knot Penruddock uprising. The York uprising was put down by Colonel Robert Lilburne Governor of York and on its failure Wilmot fled the country. Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... Combatants English Parlimentry forces loyal to Oliver Cromwell English and Scottish Royalists loyal to King Charles II Strength 31,000 less than 16,000 Casualties 200 3,000 killed, more than 10,000 prisoners The Battle of Worcester took place on 3 September 1651 at Worcester, England and was the... The title Earl of Rochester was created twice in the Peerage of England. ... Ferdinand III, Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand III, Holy Roman Emperor (July 13, 1608 – April 2, 1657), ruled February 15, 1637 – 1657. ... Nicholas II (December 12, 1612 – January 25, 1670), was Duke of Lorraine between 1634 and 1661, when he abdicated for his son. ... Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg. ... Marston Moor, in Harrogate, North Yorkshire was the site of the battle of Marston Moor, the last great battle of the English Civil War in 1644. ... York shown within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state Constituent country Region Yorkshire and the Humber Ceremonial county North Yorkshire Admin HQ York City Centre Founded 71 City Status 71 Government  - Type Unitary Authority, City  - Governing body City of York Council  - Leadership: Leader & Executive  - Executive: Liberal Democrat  - MPs: Hugh Bayley (L) John... The Sealed Knot is a British historical association dedicated to period costume reenactment of battles and events surrounding the English Civil War. ... The Penruddock uprising was one of a series of coordinated uprisings planned by the Sealed Knot for a Royalist insurrection to start in March 1655 during the Protectorate of the Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell. ... Colonel Robert Lilburne (1613–1665), was the older brother of John Lilburne, the well known Leveller, but unlike his brother who severed his relationship with Oliver Cromwell, Robert Lilburne remained in the army. ...


In 1656, Wilmot obtained command of a foot regiment of English in the royalist army in Bruges, thus becoming the first colonel of the Grenadier Guards. The unhealthy and overcrowded conditions of the regiment’s quarters in the winter of 1657-58 caused many in it to fall sick, including its commander. Wilmot died at Sluys on February 19 and was buried at Bruges. The Grenadier Guards is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division of the British Army, and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry. ... Sluis is a municipality and a town in the southwestern Netherlands in the west of Zeeuws-Vlaanderen. ... is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Geography Country Belgium Community Flemish Community Region Flemish Region Province West Flanders Arrondissement Bruges Coordinates , , Area 138. ...


After the Restoration, his body was transferred to the family vault at Spelsbury church, Oxfordshire. He was succeeded by son John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester, a noted poet and libertine at the Restoration court. King Charles II, the first monarch to rule after the English Restoration. ... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from the Latinised form Oxonia) is a county in the South East of England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, and Warwickshire. ... For other people of this name, see John Rochester. ... King Charles II, the first monarch to rule after the English Restoration. ...


References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
  • Biography of Wilmot British Civil Wars & Commonwealth website
  • Birth and death dates thepeerage.com
Preceded by
New creation
Earl of Rochester
1652–1658
Succeeded by
John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester

  Results from FactBites:
 
Henry Wilmot, 1st Earl of Rochester - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (686 words)
Wilmot's family was descended from Edward Wilmot of Witney, Oxfordshire, whose son Charles Wilmot, 1st Viscount Wilmot of Athlone, (1570/71–1644) had served with distinction in Ireland during Tyrone's Rebellion at the beginning of the 17th century, and was president of Connaught from 1616 until his death.
Henry Wilmot had five years experience in the Dutch army, and was badly wounded at the siege of Breda.
Wilmot died at Sluys on February 19 and was buried at Bruges.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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