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Encyclopedia > Henry Murdac

Henry Murdac, abbot of Fountains Abbey (1144-1147) and archbishop of York (1147-1153), was a native of Yorkshire, but descended from a wealthy family from Compton Murdac (now Compton Verney), in Warwickshire. He was friendly with Archbishop Thurstan of York, who gave him preferment in the Cathedral of York, however he resigned soon afterwards when St. Bernard invited him to become a Cistercian monk at Clairvaux. He was later appointed abbot of Vauclairs and in 1144 returned to Yorkshire to assume the abbacy at Fountains. Henry was a strict disciplinarian and a magnificent administrator, enforcing his rules by example, in living a life of great austerity and constantly wearing sackcloth next to his skin. Fountains Abbey in Yorkshire is a Cistercian monastery first founded A.D. 1132. ... Events Louis VII capitulates to Pope Celestine II and so earns the popes absolution Pope Celestine II is succeeded by Pope Lucius II December 24 - Edessa falls to Zengi Montauban, France, is founded First recorded example of an anti-Semitic blood libel in England Normandy comes under Angevin control... Events King Afonso I of Portugal and the Crusaders capture Lisbon from Muslims First written mention of Moscow. ... Arms of the Archbishop of York The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Events King Afonso I of Portugal and the Crusaders capture Lisbon from Muslims First written mention of Moscow. ... Events January 6 - Henry of Anjou arrives in England. ... Compton Verney is a small village 2km north-west of Kineton, in Warwickshire and was originally an extra parochial Liberty. The first record of a settlement at Compton Verney was the late Saxon village of Compton. ... Warwickshire (pronounced either /ˈwɔːɹɪkˌʃə/ or /ˈwɔːɹɪkˌʃɪə/) is a landlocked non-metropolitan county in central England. ... Thurstan, or Turstin (d. ... St. ... The Order of Cistercians (OCist) (Latin Cistercenses), otherwise Gimey or White Monks (from the colour of the habit, over which is worn a black scapular or apron) are a Catholic order of monks. ... Clairvaux abbey was founded in 1115 by St. ...


Henry was also at the forefront of opposition to the appointment of William Fitzherbert to the see of York, by King Stephen. William, who was the king’s nephew, was accused by some of simony and unchaste living; in a letter to Pope Innocent II, Bernard of Clairvaux maintained that Fitzherbert was ‘rotten from the soles of his feet to the crown of his head.’ Fitzherbert was at first suspended by the pope and in 1147 he was formally deposed by the Council of Rheims. Innocent II, né Gregory Papareschi (d. ... Bernard of Clairvaux, in a medieval illuminated manuscript Saint Bernard of Clairvaux (Fontaines, near Dijon, 1090 – August 21, 1153 in Clairvaux) was a French abbot and theologian who was the main voice of conservatism during the intellectual revival of Western Europe called the Renaissance of the 12th century. ... Events King Afonso I of Portugal and the Crusaders capture Lisbon from Muslims First written mention of Moscow. ...


Murdac was installed as the new archbishop of York, however, the chapter of York refused to acknowledge his appointment, so he retired to Beverley. King Stephen refused to recognise him, sequestered the stalls of York and imposed a fine on the town of Beverley for harbouring him. In retaliation, Murdac excommunicated Hugh De Puisnet, Treasurer of York, and his other enemies and laid the city under interdict. Puisnet, in return, excommunicated the Archbishop and ordered the services to be conducted as usual, in which he was supported by Prince Eustace, son of Stephen. Location within the British Isles Arms of Beverley Beverley is a market town in the East Riding of Yorkshire, north of Kingston-upon-Hull, east of Market Weighton and west of Hornsea. ... Stephen (1096 - October 25, 1154), the last Norman King of England, reigned from 1135 to 1154, when he was succeeded by his cousin (or, as the gossip of the time had it, his natural son) Henry II, the first of the Angevin or Plantagenet Kings. ... Eustace IV (c. ...


In 1153, Puisnet was elected Bishop of Durham, which greatly offended Murdac chiefly because he, as metropolitan of the province, had not been consulted. He excommunicated the Prior and Archdeacon of Durham, who came to York to implore mercy and absolution. The King and his son, Eustace, implored him to grant the rebels absolution, but he refused, until they came to Beverley, acknowledged their fault, and submitted to scourging at the entrance to the Minster when he did absolve them. Events January 6 - Henry of Anjou arrives in England. ... Arms of the Bishop of Durham The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ...


Murdac spent five of his six years as archbishop in Ripon. Despite everything, Henry retained his influence over Fountains and the three succeeding abbots, Maurice (1148), Thorald (1148-1150) and Richard (1150-1170), were suffragen abbots under him. Map sources for Ripon at grid reference SE3171 Ripon is a cathedral city in North Yorkshire, England, 214 miles NNW from London. ... Events Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Barcelona conquered Tortosa in posetion of the moors. ... Events Åhus, Sweden gains city privileges City of Airdrie, Scotland founded King Sverker I of Sweden is deposed and succeeded by Eric IX of Sweden. ... Events December 29: Assassination of Thomas Beckett, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury cathedral Eleanor of Aquitaine leaves the court of Henry II because of a string of infidelities. ...


Following Henry’s death in 1153 William was reinstalled as archbishop and made his peace with the community at Fountains.

Preceded by:
William FitzHerbert
Archbishop of York
1147–1153
Succeeded by:
William FitzHerbert
Saint William of York, (d. ... Arms of the Archbishop of York The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Saint William of York, (d. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
People (158 words)
The installation of Henry Murdac as bishop of York; Murdac is surrounded by Cistercian monks.
Henry Murdac, abbot of Fountains (1144-47) and archbishop of York (1147-53).
Henry was also at the forefront of opposition to the rather controversial appointment of William Fitzherbert to the see of York, by King Stephen.
Henry Murdac - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (395 words)
Henry Murdac, abbot of Fountains Abbey (1144-1147) and archbishop of York (1147-1153), was a native of Yorkshire, but descended from a wealthy family from Compton Murdac (now Compton Verney), in Warwickshire.
Henry was a strict disciplinarian and a magnificent administrator, enforcing his rules by example, in living a life of great austerity and constantly wearing sackcloth next to his skin.
Murdac was installed as the new archbishop of York, however, the chapter of York refused to acknowledge his appointment, so he retired to Beverley.
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