FACTOID # 27: If you're itching to live in a trailer park, hitch up your home and head to South Carolina, where a whopping 18% of residences are mobile homes.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Henry IV, Part One

Henry IV, Part 1 is a history play by William Shakespeare, widely considered the greatest of the histories. It is set in a period beginning sometime in 1402 and ending in July, 1403. The play follows on from Richard II and is succeeded by Henry IV, Part 2 and Henry V. Traditionally, the works of William Shakespeare have been grouped into three categories: tragedies, comedies, and histories. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Richard II is a play by William Shakespeare, based on the life of King Richard II of England, written in 1595. ... Henry IV part 2 is a history play by William Shakespeare, first published as part of Shakespeares First Folio. ... Henry V is a play by William Shakespeare based on the life of King Henry V of England. ...

Contents


Plot

The main plot of Henry IV, Part 1 deals with a Scottish challenge to King Henry IV led by Henry Percy ("Hotspur"), the son of the Earl of Northumberland. But just as important to the play is the subplot, consisting of several comic scenes in the Boar's Head Tavern in Eastcheap in which Prince Hal, the 'heir to the thrown', carouses with his lowlife friends Poins, Jack Falstaff, Bardolph, and Francis the Page. Henry IV (April 3, 1367 – March 20, 1413) was born at Bolingbroke Castle in Lincolnshire, hence the other name by which he was known, Henry of Bolingbroke. His father, John of Gaunt was the third and oldest surviving son of King Edward III of England, and enjoyed a position of... A carving of Henry Hotspur Percy Sir Henry Percy, also called Harry Hotspur (May 20, 1364/1366 – July 23, 1403) was the eldest son of Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland, 4th Lord Percy of Alnwick. ... The title of Earl of Northumberland was created several times in the Peerages of England and Great Britain. ... Eastcheap is a road in the City of London. ...


Prince Hal connects the two plots; he is the son of Henry IV and the friend and comrade of Sir John Falstaff. He is widely criticized for theft, irresponsibility and over-association with commoners by the lords of his father's court (and especially by his father, himself) but eventually proves himself in battle by defeating Hotspur. Sir John Falstaff is a fictional character who appears in three plays by William Shakespeare. ...


Hal plays a number of tricks on the drowsy and pudgy Falstaff. At one point he and Poins dress themselves in green (like Robin Hood and his men) and attack Falstaff in disguise, then later encourage him to lie about the encounter. Later Hal picks the knight's pocket, taking a valuable ring and claiming it to be a copper imitation. Hal and Falstaff also stage a skit making fun of the English court for the amusement of their tavern buddies. Robin Hood is the archetypal English folk hero, an outlaw who, in modern versions of the legend, stole from the rich to give to the poor. ... General Name, Symbol, Number copper, Cu, 29 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 4, d Appearance copper, metallic Atomic mass 63. ...


The turning point in Hal's development comes in Act III, scene 2. His father, guilty over the sin of deposing and killing Richard II (the anointed ruler), sees God's punishment in all the disasters that hover over his realm, including Prince Hal's irresponsible conduct. (Incidentally, the crusade he is planning at the start of the play is part of an effort to redeem himself for this sin.) In this scene, the king has a private conversation (royal conference) with the prince, in which he says, "As thou art to this hour was Richard then/ When I from France set foot at Ravenspurgh;/ And even as I was then Percy is now." Hal gives an eloquent reply that may seem overdone and gore-obsessed to modern audiences, but to Elizabethans would have been a clear signal of his change of character: "I will redeem all this on Percy's head/ And, in the closing of some glorious day,/ Be bold to tell you that I am your son,/ When I will wear a garment all of blood,/ And stain my favors in a bloody mask,/ Which, washed away, shall scour my shame with it ... And I will die a hundred thousand deaths/ Ere break the smallest parcel of this vow."


Hal does not immediately abandon Falstaff and his commoner friends, and in fact uses Falstaff's recruiting skills to enlarge his army against the Scots, but does move rapidly into a more responsible role that culminates in the slaying of Hotspur (the rejection of Falstaff occurs at the end of Henry IV, Part 2 and Falstaff's death in Henry V). However, the prince's sense of humor and good-natured friendship with the cowardly knight are preserved even then, for when Falstaff invents a series of outrageous lies to claim credit for killing Hotspur, Hal says, "For my part, if a lie do thee grace,/ I'll gild it with the happiest terms I have."


Themes and interpretations

At its first publication in 1597 or 1598 the play was titled The History of Henrie the Fourth and its title page advertised only the presence of Harry Hotspur and the comic Sir John Falstaff; Prince Hal was not mentioned. Indeed, throughout most of the play's performance history, Hal was seen as a relatively uninteresting figure, and the stars of the stage typically preferred to play Hotspur. It was only in the twentieth century that readers and performers began to see the central interest as the coming-of-age of Hal, who is now seen as the starring role. Events 17 January - A court case in Guildford recorded evidence that a certain plot of land was used for playing “kreckett” (i. ... Events January 7 - Boris Godunov seizes the throne of Russia following the death of his brother-in-law, Tsar Feodor I April 13 - Edict of Nantes - Henry IV of France grants French Huguenots equal rights with Catholics. ... A carving of Henry Hotspur Percy Sir Henry Percy, also called Harry Hotspur (May 20, 1364/1366 – July 23, 1403) was the eldest son of Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland, 4th Lord Percy of Alnwick. ... Sir John Falstaff is a fictional character who appears in three plays by William Shakespeare. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s The 20th century lasted from 1901 to 2000 in the Gregorian calendar (often from (1900 to 1999 in common usage). ...


In the "coming-of-age" interpretation, Hal's acquaintance with Falstaff and the tavern lowlife humanizes him, as well as rounding out the view of Elizabethan life. At the outset, Prince Hal seems to pale in comparison with the fiery Henry "Hotspur" Percy, the young noble lord of the North (whom Shakespeare portrays about 23 years younger than he was in history in order to provide a foil for Hal). For many readers, Prince Hal grows up, evolving into King Henry V, perhaps the most heroic of all of Shakespeare's characters, in what is a tale of the prodigal son writ large against the backdrop of medieval England. A carving of Henry Hotspur Percy Sir Henry Percy, also called Harry Hotspur (May 20, 1364/1366 – July 23, 1403) was the eldest son of Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland, 4th Lord Percy of Alnwick. ... A lord is a male who has power and authority. ... A foil character is either one who is in most ways opposite to the main character or nearly the same as the main character. ... Henry V Henry V, (August 9 or September 16, 1387 – August 31, 1422), King of England, son of Henry IV by Mary de Bohun, was born at Monmouth, Wales, in September 1387. ... This article is about the type of character. ... The Return of the Prodigal Son (1773) by Pompeo Batoni The Prodigal Son is one of the best known parables of Jesus. ...


Other readers have, however, looked at Hal more critically; the play can be read as nostalgic for the old-fashioned honour and chivalry of Hotspur, and Hal can appear as a budding Machiavel. In this reading, there is no "ideal king": the gradual rejection of Falstaff is a rejection of Hal's humanity in favour of cold realpolitik. See also order of chivalry Woman under the Safeguard of Knighthood, allegorical Scene. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Realpolitik (German for realistic politics) is foreign politics based on practical concerns (political expediency) rather than theory or ethics. ...


Film adaptations

Orson Welles' Chimes at Midnight (1965) compiles the two Henry IV plays into a single, condensed storyline, while adding a handful of scenes from Henry V. The movie, also known as Falstaff, features Welles himself in the title role. Orson Welles, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) is generally considered one of Hollywoods greatest directors, as well as a fine actor, broadcaster and screenwriter. ... Orson Welles, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) is generally considered one of Hollywoods greatest directors, as well as a fine actor, broadcaster and screenwriter. ... See also: 1964 in film 1965 1966 in film 1960s in film years in film film // Events Top grossing films North America Mary Poppins The Sound of Music, starring Julie Andrews Goldfinger My Fair Lady Whats New Pussycat? Shenandoah The Sandpiper Father Goose Academy Awards Best Picture: The Sound...


Gus van Sant's My Own Private Idaho (1991) has a story similar to Henry IV, Part 1, but presented in a modern setting. Gus Van Sant Gus Van Sant Jr. ... DVD cover My Own Private Idaho (1991) is a film written and directed by Gus Van Sant, loosely based on Shakespeares Henry IV, part 1. ... This is a list of film-related events in 1991. ...


External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about:
Henry IV, Part 1
  • The First Part of Henry the Fourth, from eBooks@Adelaide
  • Henry the Fourth part 1 - plain vanilla text from Project Gutenberg
  • The First Part of Henry the Fourth - HTML version of this title.

Image File history File links i would like to see some quotations by or about goebbels. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... Project Gutenberg (PG) was launched by Michael Hart in 1971 in order to provide a library, on what would later become the Internet, of free electronic versions (sometimes called e-texts) of physically existing books. ...

References

  • Wright, Louis B, LaMar, Virginia A. (eds.) The Folger Library General Reader's Shakespeare: Henry IV, Part I.
  • Greenblatt, Stephen. "Invisible Bullets: Renaissance Authority and Its Subversion in Henry IV and Henry V." In Jonathan Dollimore and Alan Sinfield (eds.), Political Shakespeare (1985), pp. 18–47.
  • Barker, Roberta. "Tragical-Comical-Historical Hotspur." Shakespeare Quarterly 54.3 (2003): 288–307.


Stephen Jay Greenblatt (b. ... Jonathan Dollimore (b. ...

The works of William Shakespeare

Tragedies: Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, King Lear, Hamlet, Othello, Titus Andronicus, Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, Coriolanus, Troilus and Cressida, Timon of Athens Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... A Shakespearean tragedy usually involves the following: A seemingly admirable protagonist who falls from grace and into doom due to a fatal flaw in his/her character. ... Romeo and Juliet is a famous play by William Shakespeare concerning the fate of two young lovers. ... Scene from Macbeth, depicting the witches conjuring of an apparition in Act IV, Scene I Macbeth is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, based loosely on historical events, such as the King Macbeth of Scotland, and including characteristic features of a morality play. ... King Lear and the Fool in the Storm by William Dyce (1806-1864) King Lear is generally regarded as one of William Shakespeares greatest tragedies. ... The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark is a tragedy by William Shakespeare and one of his most well-known and oft-quoted plays. ... This page is about the Shakespeare play. ... Titus Andronicus may be Shakespeares earliest tragedy. ... Julius Caesar is a tragedy by William Shakespeare probably written in 1599. ... Antony and Cleopatra is a historical tragedy by William Shakespeare, first performed in 1607 or 1608 and printed in the First Folio, 1623. ... Coriolanus is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, based on the life of the legendary Roman leader. ... The History of Troilus and Cressida is a play by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written around 1602, shortly after the completion of Hamlet. ... Timon of Athens is a play by William Shakespeare written around 1607. ...

Comedies: A Midsummer Night's Dream, All's Well That Ends Well, As You Like It, Cardenio (lost), Cymbeline, Love's Labour's Lost, Love's Labour's Won (lost), Measure for Measure, The Merchant of Venice, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Much Ado About Nothing, Pericles, Prince of Tyre, Taming of the Shrew, The Comedy of Errors, The Tempest, Twelfth Night, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, The Two Noble Kinsmen, The Winter's Tale Shakespearean comedies are one of the three (sometimes four) genres of plays by William Shakespeare. ... A Midsummer Nights Dream is a romantic comedy by William Shakespeare written in the mid-1590s. ... Alls Well That Ends Well is a comedy by William Shakespeare, which is also considered one of his problem plays. ... Scene from As you like it, Francis Hayman, c. ... Cardenio is a lost play, known to have been performed by the Kings Men, a London theatre company, in 1613. ... The Mythical British King Cymbeline is identified with Cunobelinus Cymbeline is a play by William Shakespeare. ... Loves Labours Lost is one of William Shakespeares early comedies; it is believed to have been written around 1595-1596 and is probably contemporaneous with Romeo and Juliet and A Midsummer Nights Dream. ... Loves Labours Won (or Loues Labours Wonne) is an unknown play written by William Shakespeare before 1598. ... Measure for Measure is a play written by William Shakespeare in 1604 or 1605. ... Shylock and Jessica by Maurycy Gottlieb (1856-1879) The Merchant of Venice is one of the most famous plays by William Shakespeare, written at an uncertain date between 1594 and 1597. ... The Merry Wives of Windsor is a comedy by William Shakespeare featuring the fat knight Falstaff. ... Much Ado About Nothing is a comedy by William Shakespeare. ... Pericles, Prince of Tyre is a play written partly by William Shakespeare and included in modern editions of his collected plays. ... The Taming of the Shrew is a comedy by William Shakespeare. ... The Comedy of Errors is an early play by William Shakespeare. ... Miranda and Ferdinand, Angelica Kauffmann, 1782. ... Twelfth Night, or What You Will is a comedy by William Shakespeare. ... The Two Gentlemen of Verona is a comedy by Shakespeare from early in his career. ... The Two Noble Kinsmen is a play written in 1613 by John Fletcher and William Shakespeare in collaboration. ... The Winters Tale is a comedy by William Shakespeare. ...

Histories: King John, Edward III (attributed), Richard II, Henry IV, part 1, Henry IV, part 2, Henry V, Henry VI, part 1, Henry VI, part 2, Henry VI, part 3, Richard III, Henry VIII Traditionally, the works of William Shakespeare have been grouped into three categories: tragedies, comedies, and histories. ... King John is one of the so-called Shakespearean histories, plays written by William Shakespeare and based on the history of England. ... The Reign of King Edward III is a play attributed to William Shakespeare. ... Richard II is a play by William Shakespeare, based on the life of King Richard II of England, written in 1595. ... Henry IV, Part 1 is a history play by William Shakespeare, widely considered the greatest of the histories. ... Henry IV part 2 is a history play by William Shakespeare, first published as part of Shakespeares First Folio. ... Henry V is a play by William Shakespeare based on the life of King Henry V of England. ... King Henry VI Part 1 is one of the history plays of William Shakespeare. ... The play we know as King Henry VI Part II was originally known as The First Part of the Contention betwixt the Two Famous Houses of York and Lancaster. ... Henry VI Part III is the third of William Shakespeares plays set during the lifetime of King Henry VI of England, and prepares the ground for one of his best-known and most controversial plays: the tragedy of King Richard III (Richard III of England). ... The Tragedy of Richard III is a play by William Shakespeare, in which the monarch Richard III of England is unflatteringly depicted. ... Henry VIII was one of William Shakespeares last plays. ...

Other works: Sonnets, Venus and Adonis, The Rape of Lucrece, The Passionate Pilgrim, The Phoenix and the Turtle Shakespeares sonnets comprise a collection of 154 poems in sonnet form that deal with such themes as love, beauty, politics, and mortality. ... Venus and Adonis is one of Shakespeares longer poems. ... The narrative poem The Rape of Lucrece is the graver work promised by English dramatist-poet William Shakespeare in his dedication to his patron, Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton, in Venus and Adonis. ... The Passionate Pilgrim is a collection of poems, first published in 1599, attributed on the title-page to William Shakespeare. ... The Phoenix and the Turtle is a poem by William Shakespeare. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Henry IV, Part 1 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1461 words)
Henry IV, Part 1 is a history play by William Shakespeare, widely considered the greatest of the histories.
As Henry Bolingbroke is mishandling the affairs of state, his son Hal is joking, drinking, and whoring.
Henry is pleased with the outcome, not least because it gives him a chance to execute Thomas Percy, the Earl of Worcester, one of his chief enemies (though previ ously one of his chief friends).
Henry IV, Part 2 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (657 words)
Henry IV, Part 2 is a history play by William Shakespeare.
It is the third part of a tetralogy; it is preceded by Richard II and Henry IV, Part 1 and succeeded by Henry V.
Another rebellion is launched against Henry IV, but this time it is defeated, not by a battle, but by the duplicitous political machinations of Hal's brother, Prince John.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m