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Encyclopedia > Henry Boyle, 1st Baron Carleton
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Henry Boyle, 1st Baron Carleton (12 July 1669 - 31 March 1725) was a British politician of the early eighteenth century. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... July 12 is the 193rd day (194th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 172 days remaining. ... Events Samuel Pepys stopped writing his diary. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining, as the final day of March. ... Events February 8 - Catherine I became empress of Russia February 20 - The first reported case of white men scalping Native Americans takes place in New Hampshire colony. ...


A scion of the Boyle Earls of Cork, one of the leading Anglo-Irish families, Boyle was educated at Westminster School and entered the army under the auspices of his uncle, the Tory politician Lord Rochester. However, Boyle himself became a Whig, and in 1688 deserted the army of James II in favor of the Prince of Orange. The title Earl of Cork was created in 1620. ... The term Anglo-Irish means British-Irish and is used frequently to describe formal contacts, negotiations or treaties between both states. ... Motto: Dat Deus Incrementum Westminster School (in full, The Royal College of St. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... Laurence Hyde, 1st Earl of Rochester (March, 1641 - May 2, 1711), was an English statesman and writer. ... This article is about the British Whig party. ... Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. ... James II of England and VII of Scotland (14 October 1633–16 September 1701) became King of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 6 February 1685. ... William III and II (14 November 1650–8 March 1702; also known as William Henry and William of Orange) was a Dutch Prince of Orange from his birth, King of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scotland from 11 April 1689, in each case until his...


In 1689, he was elected to parliament for Tamworth, but was defeated the next year, and spent the next two years in Ireland managing the family estates. In 1692 he returned to parliament for Cambridge University, and became a prominent spokesman of the "country" opposition, but in 1697 he switched to the court party. Here he advanced quickly, becoming a Lord of the Treasury in 1699 and Chancellor of the Exchequer in 1701. Events Louis XIV of France passed the Code Noir, allowing the full use of slaves in the French colonies. ... Tamworth is a historic town and local government district in Staffordshire England, located 17 miles (25km) north-east from the city of Birmingham. ... Events February 13 - Massacre of Glencoe March 1 - The Salem witch trials begin in Salem Village, Massachusetts Bay Colony with the charging of three women with witchcraft. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world (after Oxford). ... Events September 20 - The Treaty of Ryswick December 2 – St Pauls Cathedral opened in London Peter the Great travels in Europe officially incognito as artilleryman Pjotr Mikhailov Use of palanquins increases in Europe Christopher Polhem starts Swedens first technical school. ... In the United Kingdom, there are at least six Lords of the Treasury who serve concurrently. ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ... The Right Honourable Gordon Brown, PC, MP, current Chancellor of the Exchequer The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the ancient title held by the British cabinet minister whose responsibilities are akin to the posts of Minister for Finance or Secretary of the Treasury in other jurisdictions. ... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ...


He picked up other offices as he went along, becoming Lord Lieutenant of the East Riding of Yorkshire and Lord Treasurer of Ireland in 1704, and was elected member for Westminster in 1705. With the departure of Harley and his followers from the government, Boyle became Secretary of State for the Northern Department and Lord Treasurer Godolphin's principal lieutenant in the Commons. His and Godolphin's dominance in the ministry was increasingly overshadowed by the power of the Junto of Whig aristocrats, however, and in 1710 he retired from office and withdrew from politics with the arrival of Harley's new Tory ministry. The title Lord-Lieutenant is given to the British monarchs personal representatives around the United Kingdom. ... The East Riding of Yorkshire is a local government district in the United Kingdom. ... Events Building of the Students Monument in Aiud, Romania. ... Westminster is the name of a city that covers much of central London, located to the west of the ancient City of London, and which has been the principal seat of government in England for more than nine hundred years. ... Events Construction begins on Blenheim Palace, in Oxfordshire, England. ... Robert Harley, 1st Earl of Oxford and Mortimer (5 December 1661 - 21 May 1724), was an English statesman of the Stuart and early Georgian periods. ... The Secretary of State for the Northern Department was a position in the Cabinet of the government of United Kingdom up to 1782. ... Sidney Godolphin, 1st Earl of Godolphin (c. ... Another editor has suggested that this article might be improved by more material on its significance. ... Events April 10 - The worlds first copyright legislation became effective, Britains Statute of Anne Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) War of the Spanish Succession (1702-1713) Births January 4 - Giovanni Battista Pergolesi, Italian composer (d. ...


With the Hanoverian succession in 1714, Boyle was raised to the peerage as Baron Carleton, and became Lord President in 1721, an office in which he continued until his death in 1721. Events August 1 - George, elector of Hanover becomes King George I of Great Britain. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as Presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... Events Pope Innocent XIII becomes pope Johann Sebastian Bach composes the Brandenburg Concertos April 4 - Robert Walpole becomes the first prime minister of Britain September 10 - Treaty of Nystad is signed, bringing an end to the Great Northern War November 2 - Peter I is proclaimed Emperor of All the Russias... Events Pope Innocent XIII becomes pope Johann Sebastian Bach composes the Brandenburg Concertos April 4 - Robert Walpole becomes the first prime minister of Britain September 10 - Treaty of Nystad is signed, bringing an end to the Great Northern War November 2 - Peter I is proclaimed Emperor of All the Russias...



Preceded by:
John Smith
Chancellor of the Exchequer
1701–1708
Succeeded by:
John Smith
Preceded by:
Robert Harley
Northern Secretary
1708–1710
Succeeded by:
Henry St John
Preceded by:
The Viscount Townshend
Lord President
1721–1725
Succeeded by:
The Duke of Devonshire


The Right Honourable Gordon Brown, PC, MP, current Chancellor of the Exchequer The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the ancient title held by the British cabinet minister whose responsibilities are akin to the posts of Minister for Finance or Secretary of the Treasury in other jurisdictions. ... Robert Harley, 1st Earl of Oxford and Mortimer (5 December 1661 - 21 May 1724), was an English statesman of the Stuart and early Georgian periods. ... The Secretary of State for the Northern Department was a position in the Cabinet of the government of United Kingdom up to 1782. ... Henry St John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke (1678 - December 12, 1751) was an English statesman and writer. ... Charles Townshend, 2nd Viscount Townshend (1674 - June 21, 1738), English statesman, was the eldest son of Sir Horatio Townshend, Bart. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as Presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... William Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Devonshire (ca. ...



Preceded by:
New Creation
Baron Carleton
Succeeded by:
Extinct


The title of Earl of Shannon was created in the Peerage of Ireland in 1756. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Henry Boyle, 1st Baron Carleton - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (337 words)
Henry Boyle, 1st Baron Carleton (12 July 1669 - 31 March 1725) was a British politician of the early eighteenth century.
A scion of the Boyle Earls of Cork, one of the leading Anglo-Irish families, Boyle was educated at Westminster School and entered the army under the auspices of his uncle, the Tory politician Lord Rochester.
However, Boyle himself became a Whig, and in 1688 deserted the army of James II in favor of the Prince of Orange.
Office-Holders: Custodes Rotulorum (3865 words)
In 1711 the 1st Duke of Kent was appointed lieutenant and custos.
In 1694 the 1st Duke of Newcastle was appointed lieutenant and custos.
In 1689 the 1st Earl of Abingdon was appointed lieutenant and custos.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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