FACTOID # 20: Statistically, Delaware bears more cost of the US Military than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Heinrich Rudolph Hertz
Heinrich Hertz
Heinrich Hertz

Heinrich Rudolf Hertz (February 22, 1857 - January 1, 1894), was the German physicist for whom the hertz, the SI unit of frequency, is named. In 1888, he was the first to demonstrate the existence of electromagnetic radiation by building apparatus to produce radio waves. Download high resolution version (700x906, 99 KB)This is Heinrich Rudolf Hertz, from Oliver Heaviside: Sage in Solitude (ISBN 0-87942-238-6), p. ... Download high resolution version (700x906, 99 KB)This is Heinrich Rudolf Hertz, from Oliver Heaviside: Sage in Solitude (ISBN 0-87942-238-6), p. ... February 22 is the 53rd day of every year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The hertz (symbol: Hz) is the SI unit of frequency. ... The International System of Units (abbreviated SI from the French language name Système International dUnités) is the modern form of the metric system. ... Sine waves of various frequencies; the lower waves have higher frequencies than those above. ... 1888 is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... Electromagnetic radiation can be conceptualized as a self propagating transverse oscillating wave of electric and magnetic fields. ...


Hertz was born in Hamburg, Germany, to a Jewish family that had converted to Christianity. His father was an advisor in Hamburg, his mother the daughter of a doctor. While going to school at the University of Berlin, he showed an aptitude for sciences as well as languages, learning Arabic and Sanskrit. He studied sciences and engineering in the German cities of Dresden, Munich and Berlin. He was a student of Gustav R. Kirchhoff and Hermann von Helmholtz. He obtained his PhD in 1880, and remained a pupil of Helmholtz until 1883 when he took a post as a lecturer in theoretical physics at the University of Kiel. In 1885 he became a full professor at the University of Karlsruhe where he discovered electromagnetic waves. Alster Lake at dusk Hamburg is the second largest city in Germany and with the Hamburg Harbour, its principal port. ... Jews (Hebrew: יהודים translit. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion centered on the life, teachings, and actions of Jesus as recounted in the New Testament. ... Alster Lake at dusk Hamburg is the second largest city in Germany and with the Hamburg Harbour, its principal port. ... Arabic (; , less formally, ) is the largest member of the Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family (classification: South Central Semitic) and is closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... Sanskrit ( संस्कृतम्) is an Indo-European classical language of India and a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. ... Dresden is the capital city of the German Federal State of Saxony and situated in a valley on the River Elbe. ... Munich and the Alps Munich (German: München (pronounced listen) is the largest city and capital of the German Federal State of Bavaria. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Gustav Robert Kirchhoff (March 12, 1824 - October 17, 1887), a German physicist who contributed to the fundamental understanding of electrical circuits, spectroscopy, and the emission of black-body radiation by heated objects. ... Hermann von Helmholtz Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz (August 31, 1821 – September 8, 1894) was a German physician and physicist. ... 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The University of Kiel, in full the Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel (in short: CAU), is a university in the city of Kiel, Germany. ... The Universität Karlsruhe (TH) is a mainly technical university in the city of Karlsruhe, Germany and is a leading research university: It is among the five universities in Germany with the strongest effort in research. ...

Hertz's autograph
Hertz's autograph

Following Michelson's 1881 experiment (precursor to the 1887 Michelson-Morley experiment) which disproved the existence of luminiferous aether, he reformulated Maxwell's equations to take the new discovery into account. Through experimentation, he proved that electric signals can travel through open air, as had been predicted by James Clerk Maxwell and Michael Faraday, and which is the basis for the invention of radio. He also discovered the photoelectric effect (which was later explained by Albert Einstein) when he noticed that a charged object loses its charge more readily when illuminated by ultraviolet light. Image File history File links This is Heinrich Rudolf Hertzs autograph, from Oliver Heaviside: Sage in Solitude (ISBN 0-87942-238-6), p. ... Image File history File links This is Heinrich Rudolf Hertzs autograph, from Oliver Heaviside: Sage in Solitude (ISBN 0-87942-238-6), p. ... Albert Abraham Michelson. ... 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). ... The Michelson-Morley experiment, one of the most important and famous experiments in the history of physics, was performed in 1887 by Albert Michelson and Edward Morley at what is now Case Western Reserve University, and is considered to be the first strong evidence against the theory of a luminiferous... The luminiferous aether: It was hypothesised that the Earth was immersed in, and moves through, a medium (the aether) which was also the base carrier of light In the late 19th century the term luminiferous aether (light-bearing aether), or ether, was commonly used to describe the medium that, at... Maxwells equations (sometimes called the Maxwell equations) are the set of four equations, attributed to James Clerk Maxwell, that describe the behavior of both the electric and magnetic fields, as well as their interactions with matter. ... James Clerk Maxwell (June 13, 1831–November 5, 1879) was a Scottish mathematical physicist, born in Edinburgh. ... Michael Faraday Michael Faraday, FRS (September 22, 1791 – August 25, 1867) was a British scientist (a physicist and chemist) who contributed significantly to the fields of electromagnetism and electrochemistry. ... The photoelectric effect is the emission of electrons from matter upon the absorption of electromagnetic radiation, such as ultraviolet radiation or x-rays. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... Electric charge is a fundamental conserved property of some subatomic particles, which determines their electromagnetic interactions. ...


He died of blood poisoning at the age of 37 in Bonn, Germany. Bonn is a city in Germany (19th largest), in the Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia, located about 20 kilometres south of Cologne on the river Rhine in the north of the Siebengebirge. ...


His nephew Gustav Ludwig Hertz was a Nobel Prize winner, and Gustav's son Carl Hellmuth Hertz invented medical ultrasonography. Gustav Ludwig Hertz (July 22, 1887, Hamburg – October 30, 1975, Berlin) was a German physicist, and a nephew of Heinrich Rudolf Hertz. ... Sir Edward Appletons medal Photographs of Nobel Prize Medals. ... Carl Hellmuth Hertz (1920-1990) was the son of Gustav Ludwig Hertz. ... Medical ultrasonography (sonography) is an ultrasound-based diagnostic imaging technique used to visualize internal organs, their size, structure and any pathological lesions. ...


See also

People

Lists and histories Hans Christian Ørsted (August 14, 1777 – March 9, 1851) was a Danish physicist and chemist, influenced by the thinking of Immanuel Kant. ... Guglielmo Marconi Guglielmo Marconi, GCVO (25 April 1874 – 20 July 1937) was an Italian electrical engineer and Nobel laureate, known for the development of a practical wireless telegraphy system commonly known as the radio. Marconi was President of the Accademia dItalia and a member of the Fascist Grand Council... Gustav Ludwig Hertz (July 22, 1887, Hamburg – October 30, 1975, Berlin) was a German physicist, and a nephew of Heinrich Rudolf Hertz. ... Hermann von Helmholtz Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz (August 31, 1821 – September 8, 1894) was a German physician and physicist. ... James Clerk Maxwell (June 13, 1831–November 5, 1879) was a Scottish mathematical physicist, born in Edinburgh. ... Nikola Tesla (July 10, 1856 – c. ... Wilhelm Röntgen Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen (March 27, 1845 – February 10, 1923) was a German physicist, of the University of Würzburg, who, on November 8, 1895, produced wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation that are now known as x-rays or Röntgen Rays. ...


Electromagnetic radiation Timeline of electromagnetism and classical optics 130 — Claudius Ptolemy tabulates angles of refraction for several media, 1269 — Pélerin de Maricourt describes magnetic poles and remarks on the nonexistence of isolated magnetic poles, 1305 — Dietrich von Freiberg uses crystalline spheres and flasks filled with water to study the reflection and refraction... Timeline of quantum mechanics, molecular physics, atomic physics, nuclear physics, and particle physics 585 BC Buddha stated that there were indivisible particles of mind and matter which vibrated 3 trillion times in the blink of an eye which he called kalapas 440 BC Democritus speculates about fundamental indivisible particles---calls... Many famous physicists of the 20th and 21st century are found on the list of recipients of the Nobel Prize in physics. ... The pre- and early history of radio is the history of its technology. ... Wireless telegraphy is the practice of remote writing (see telegraphy) without the wires normally involved in an electrical telegraph. ... This is a list of people on postage stamps of Germany. ... This page aims to list all Wikipedia articles that are related to physics. ... Electromagnetic radiation can be conceptualized as a self propagating transverse oscillating wave of electric and magnetic fields. ...

Other Sine waves of various frequencies; the lower waves have higher frequencies than those above. ... The hertz (symbol: Hz) is the SI unit of frequency. ... This page is about the radiation; for the appliance, see microwave oven. ... In the NATO phonetic alphabet, X-ray represents the letter X. An X-ray picture (radiograph) taken by Röntgen An X-ray is a form of electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength approximately in the range of 5 pm to 10 nanometers (corresponding to frequencies in the range 30 PHz... The photoelectric effect is the emission of electrons from matter upon the absorption of electromagnetic radiation, such as ultraviolet radiation or x-rays. ... This long range radar antenna (approximately 40m (130ft) in diameter) rotates on a track to observe activities near the horizon. ... The luminiferous aether: It was hypothesised that the Earth was immersed in, and moves through, a medium (the aether) which was also the base carrier of light In the late 19th century the term luminiferous aether (light-bearing aether), or ether, was commonly used to describe the medium that, at...

The main building, viewed from the Hofgarten. ... The Universität Karlsruhe (TH) is a mainly technical university in the city of Karlsruhe, Germany and is a leading research university: It is among the five universities in Germany with the strongest effort in research. ... A simple half-wave dipole Antenna a shortwave listener might build A dipole antenna, invented by Heinrich Rudolph Hertz around 1886, is an antenna with a center-fed driven element for transmitting or receiving Radio frequency energy. ...

External link

  • Short biography

  Results from FactBites:
 
VIAS Encyclopedia: Heinrich Rudolf Hertz (438 words)
Heinrich Hertz was born in Hamburg, on February 22, 1857, the first child of a wealthy family.
Hertz showed particular interest in one of laboratories, which Helmholtz (1870 professor for physics) was leading.
After two projects, concentrating on the inertia of the mass of electricity, and the relationship between electromagnetic forces and the dielectric polarization of insulators, he achieved his doctorate with magna cum laude, at the age of 22.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m