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Encyclopedia > Heinie Zimmerman
Heinie Zimmerman
Third Baseman
Born: February 9, 1887
Died: March 14, 1969 (Aged 82)
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 8, 1907
for the Chicago Cubs
Final game
September 10, 1919
for the New York Giants
Career statistics
Batting average     .295
Runs batted in     796
Runs scored     695
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Henry Zimmerman (February 9, 1887 - March 14, 1969), known as "Heinie" or "The Great Zim," was a Major League Baseball player in the early 20th century. Zimmerman played for the Chicago Cubs and New York Giants. He was born and died in New York, New York. The position of the third baseman Third base redirects here. ... February 9 is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... March 14 is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1889) (a. ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the Gregorian calendar (254th in leap years). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885-1957) New York Gothams (1883-1885) Ballpark AT&T Park (2000–present) a. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In baseball statistics, a run batted in (RBI) is given to a batter for each run scored as the result of a batters plate appearance. ... In baseball, a run is scored when a player advances safely around all three bases and returns safely to home plate. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1889) (a. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885-1957) New York Gothams (1883-1885) Ballpark AT&T Park (2000–present) a. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... The 1907 World Series featured the Chicago Cubs and the Detroit Tigers, with the Cubs winning the Series in 5 games (4 wins and 1 tie) for their first championship. ... The 1908 World Series matched the defending champion Chicago Cubs against the Detroit Tigers in a rematch of the 1907 Series. ... The 1910 World Series featured the Philadelphia Athletics and the Chicago Cubs, with the Athletics winning in 5 games to earn their first championship. ... The Chicago White Sox beat the New York Giants in 6 games. ... The batting championship is awarded to the Major League Baseball player in each the American League and National League who has the highest batting average in a particular season. ... The batting championship is awarded to the Major League Baseball player in each the American League and National League who has the most home runs in a particular season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes runs batted in champions in the American League and National League each season. ... In baseball, a double is the act of a batter safely reaching second base by striking the ball and getting to second before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... February 9 is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... March 14 is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1889) (a. ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Big Blue Wrecking Crew, Big Blue, G-Men, The Jints, The New York Football Giants Team colors Royal Blue, Red, Gray, and White Head Coach Tom Coughlin Owner John Mara (50%) and Steve Tisch (50%) General manager Jerry Reese League/Conference affiliations National... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ...


In 1912, Zimmerman led the National League in batting and in home runs, but failed to win the triple crown, as Honus Wagner led the league in RBI. He was also an important member of the 1908 Cubs, the last Cubs team to win the World Series. Zimmerman was #98 on the "Top 100 Cubs of All Time" list as compiled by the web site Bleed Cubbie Blue. [1] The following are the baseball events of the year 1912 throughout the world. ... The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs, or simply the National League, is the older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball in the United States and Canada and the worlds oldest extant professional team sports league. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... Mark McGwire swinging for the fences. ... In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ... Honus Wagner Johannes Peter Wagner (February 24, 1874 - December 6, 1955), nicknamed Honus and The Flying Dutchman, is considered one of the greatest players in the history of major league baseball. ... In baseball statistics, a run batted in (RBI) is given to a batter for each run scored as the result of a batters plate appearance. ... The 1908 World Series matched the defending champion Chicago Cubs against the Detroit Tigers in a rematch of the 1907 Series. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ...


Zimmerman was suspended from the New York Giants in 1919, along with his friend Hal Chase for allegedly attempting to convince other players to fix games. Based on testimony by Giants managerJohn McGraw during the Black Sox Scandal hearings, Zimmerman and Chase were both indicted for bribery. Zimmerman denied McGraw's accusations, and neither he nor Chase was ever proven to be directly connected to the Black Sox, but based on a long-term pattern of corruption both were permanently banned from baseball by Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis, Commissioner of Baseball. According to some historians, he had been informally banned after the Giants released him. Baseball statistician Bill James has suggested that the Giants' loss to the Chicago White Sox in the 1917 World Series may have been partial motivation for Zimmerman's suspension. Zimmerman batted .120 in the Series. City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Big Blue Wrecking Crew, Big Blue, G-Men, The Jints, The New York Football Giants Team colors Royal Blue, Red, Gray, and White Head Coach Tom Coughlin Owner John Mara (50%) and Steve Tisch (50%) General manager Jerry Reese League/Conference affiliations National... The following are the baseball events of the year 1919 throughout the world. ... Hal Chase, of the Chicago White Sox, at Comiskey Park. ... John Joseph McGraw (April 7, 1873–February 25, 1934), nicknamed Little Napoleon and Muggsy, was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... 1919 Chicago White Sox team photo The Black Sox Scandal refers to a number of events that took place around and during the play of the 1919 World Series. ... Kenesaw Mountain Landis Kenesaw Mountain Landis (November 20, 1866 – November 25, 1944) was an American jurist who served as a federal judge from 1905 to 1922, and subsequently as the first commissioner of Major League Baseball. ... In 1920, the owners of Major League Baseball, in order to reestablish confidence of fans in the sport following the Black Sox Scandal, established the office of Commissioner of Baseball. ... Statistics are very important to baseball, perhaps more than any other sport. ... George William “Bill” James (born October 5, 1949 in Holton, Kansas) is a baseball writer, historian and statistician whose work has been widely influential. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Chicago White Sox beat the New York Giants in 6 games. ...


However, he is best-known for an infamous rundown in the decisive game. In the fourth inning, the game was scoreless when Chicago's Eddie Collins was caught between third base and home plate. Catcher Bill Rariden ran up the line to start the rundown, expecting pitcher Rube Benton or first baseman Walter Holke to cover the plate. However, neither of them budged, and Collins blew past Rariden to score what turned out to be the Series-winning run (the White Sox won 4-2). Third baseman Zimmerman ran behind him pawing helplessly in the air with the ball. As pointed out by researcher Richard A. Smiley in SABR's 2006 edition of The National Pastime, Zimmerman was long blamed for losing the game, although McGraw blamed Benton and Holke for failing to cover the plate--a serious fundamental error in baseball. The play was actually quite close, as action photos show Zimmerman leaping over the sliding Collins. A quote often attributed to Zim, but actually invented by writer Ring Lardner some years later, was that when asked about the incident Zim replied, "Who the hell was I supposed to throw to, Klem (umpire Bill Klem, who was working the plate)?" Edward Trowbridge Collins Sr. ... The position of the third baseman A third baseman, abbreviated 3B, is the player in the sport of baseball whose responsibility is to defend the area nearest to third base, the third of four bases a baserunner must touch in a counterclockwise succession in order to score a run. ... Home plate is the final base in baseball and related games that a player must touch to score. ... The position of the catcher Catcher is also a general term for a fielder who catches the ball in cricket. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... John Cleave Benton (June 27, 1890 - December 12, 1937) was a Pitcher, born in Clinton, North Carolina, for Major League Baseballs Cincinnati Reds (1910-15 and 1923-25) and New York Giants (1915-21). ... The position of the first baseman First base redirects here. ... Walter Henry Holke (December 25, 1892 in St. ... The position of the third baseman Third base redirects here. ... The XM29 Objective Individual Combat Weapon (OICW), also referred to as the Selectable Assault Battle Rifle, is a highly advanced new assault rifle / grenade launcher system slated to replace certain M-16 assault rifles with M203 underslung grenade launcher. ... Ringgold Wilmer Lardner (March 6, 1885 - September 25, 1933) was an American sports columnist and short story writer best known for his satirical takes on the sports world, marriage, and the theatre. ... Home plate umpire Gary Darling signals that the last pitch was a strike In baseball, the umpire is the person charged with officiating the game, including beginning and ending the game, enforcing the rules of the game and the grounds, making judgment calls on plays, and meting out discipline. ... Bill Klem, the father of baseball umpires, in 1914 William Joseph Klem, born William Joseph Klimm (February 22, 1874 – September 16, 1951), known as the father of baseball umpires, was a National League umpire in Major League Baseball from 1905 to 1941. ...


Source

James, Bill. The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract. New York: The Free Press, 2001.


External links

Preceded by
Honus Wagner
National League Batting Champion
1912
Succeeded by
Jake Daubert
Preceded by
Frank Schulte
National League Home Run Champion
1912
Succeeded by
Gavvy Cravath
Preceded by
Gavvy Cravath
National League RBI Champion
1916-1917
Succeeded by
Sherry Magee

 
 

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